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ATLAS

THE EXPLORATION ISSUE VOLUME ONE | ISSUE ONE | AUTUMN 2012 THE EXPLORATION ISSUE | 1


PHOTOGRAPHED BY ADRIANA FUENTEVILLA

CONTENTS 004. THE ATLAS TEAM

116. RED PLANET

AN INTRODUCTION TO THE STAFF

WRITTEN BY STEVEN MAYOFF

006. FOREWORD

117. HORIZON

A NOTE FROM THE EDITOR

WRITTEN BY JOSHUA ROSE

008. SILENT DRIFTERS

128. COASTAL MINDS

PHOTOGRAPHED BY AILERA STONE

018. RUN, RUN AWAY AN ILLUSTRATION BY NATALIE FINKELSTEIN

020. THE LIFE OF A STYLIST AN INTERVIEW WITH THEA BAMBINA

032. SUCH GREAT HEIGHTS PHOTOGRAPHED BY MEGAN BREUKELMAN

PHOTOGRAPHED BY MARIE DUCKER

138. ARMINA MUSSA AN INTERVIEW WITH A FASHION DESIGNER

144. NONSENSE THOUGHTS CREATED BY CHRIS COLLINS

164. A THEATRE IN THE WILD WRITTEN BY DAVID NEWSON

166. THE JOURNEY

042. LAURA CAMARATA

PHOTOGRAPHED BY OLIVIA BOSSERT

AN INTERVIEW WITH A FASHION PHOTOGRAPHER

174. THE SERPENTINE GALLERY PAVILLION

050. WANDERING

WRITTEN BY ANNA BLACHUT

WRITTEN BY SARAH RATNER

176. THE HAUNTING

062. COREY ALLEN A SERIES OF IMAGES

068. STYLE WRITTEN BY C.S. RUQUA

PHOTOGRAPHED BY ABBYLL CHRONICLES

184. EXPLORATION PAINTED AND WRITTEN BY APRIL WARD

186. JULIA TROTTI AN INTERVIEW WITH A PHOTOGRAPHER

070. THE WORLD IN HIS HANDS PHOTOGRAPHED BY NICOLAS VO

088. FUTURE WRITTEN BY LAURENCE DE MAERE

202. TRAVELS CREATED BY SCOTT MASON

204. FORCE OF NATURE WRITTEN BY MICHELLE ATKINSON

088. CITY ANIMAL PHOTOGRAPHED BY RAE MARSHALL

098. GUIDANCE WRITTEN BY STACIE LEE

100. URBAN EXPLORERS CREATED BY ANNA BLACHUT

106. KATHERINE ELEYCE FEATURE ON A FASHION DESIGNER THE EXPLORATION ISSUE | 2

THE COVER THE EXPLORATION ISSUE COVER WAS SHOT BY JAMIE DE LEEUW, FEATURING Nicolien Janssens. FULL SERIES FEATURED ON PAGE 52.


PHOTOGRAPHED BY IVY NINE DESIGNS

FEATURES 028. SPONTANEOUS LIGHT instagram photography

052. ETernal energy PHOTOGRAPHED BY JAMIE DE LEEUW

082. NATHALIA SUELLEN INTERVIEW WITH A DIGITAL ARTIST

118. FRANCIE IDETTE A SERIES OF PAINTINGS

150. CLOUDED VISIONS PHOTOGRAPHED BY ANDREA FUNTEVILLA THE EXPLORATION ISSUE | 3


THE ATLAS TEAM MEGAN BREUKELMAN

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | NORTH AMERICA

Megan grew up in a small town in Ontario, Canada. She is currently studying her BFA in Photography and Digital Imaging in Florida, USA. Photographing since she was fourteen years old, she photographs fashion and portraiture primarily. She also writes, and states that her primary influence in art is music.

OLIVIA BOSSERT

ORGANIZATIONAL COORDINATOR | EUROPE

Olivia Bossert is a Swiss photographer, currently studying a bachelors degree in Fashion Photography at Univeristy College Falmouth in the UK. She has been photographing since she was 15 years old, and focuses primarily on fashion and portraiture. Her dream is to travel the world and photograph all the beautiful people in it.

RONNIELLE KARIFOL ARTS COORDINATOR | ASIA

Ronnielle was born and raised in Israel, where she also served an obligatory army service. Her passion for art began with drawing at a very tender age, and evolved into photography during her high school years. She is currently pursuing her dream by capturing the souls of both agency models and web icons on the streets of Tel Aviv, in hopes to create a visual language that will last.

KIARA ROSE

PHOTOGRAPHY COORDINATOR | AUSTRALIA

Kiara grew up in Queensland, Australia but moved to Sydney before she started school. She is currently in High School, teaching herself photography on the side. She's been holding a camera since the age of 11 but only recently fell in love with it. She specialises in fine art/conceptual portraiture and says that artists like Edgar Allan Poe and Tim Burton are her biggest inspirations for her art.

ALEXIS CATALDO

ARTICLE COORDINATOR | SOUTH AMERICA

Alexis was born and raised in Buenos Aires. Her greatest desire as a child was to find magic and keep it close to her heart. She completed her first novel by the age of 16, the same year her destiny put a camera in her hands. She wishes to explore and embrace the whole world as her home.

ELISA NYASSOM

WRITING COORDINATOR | AFRICA

Elisa took her first steps in a small town in Cameroon, Africa. After traveling the world with her mother, she moved to DC, USA to further her education. She currently lives all over the US while pursuing her love for fashion and portraiture photography; she is open to music, illustration, pottery, painting, though her true love lies in traveling the world, capturing it and writing.

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY THOMAS COLE SIMMONDS

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THE EXPLORATION ISSUE a note from the editor

Welcome to the very first issue of Atlas Magazine, a publication for the new gen-

eration. We are focused on delivering art from all ends of the earth, showcasing new and exciting work from a range of different talents. We chose Exploration as our first theme to be an open-ended opportunity for you to show us what exploration is to you; your environment, your travels, your home, your thoughts. This issue features a multitude of talents originating from all around the world, from fashion design to toy camera photography. Over the Summer months of 2012, six young artists came together with a dream to produce a magazine with an international span to show perspectives from all sides of Earth. Through hard work, persistence and a lot of dreaming, their vision has finally come together as our very own, Atlas Magazine. I have been so honored and lucky to be able to work with such an astonishing range of talents within the staff, and to have had our dreams come more wonderfully to fruition than we had ever imagined. The submissions we received for issue one were so beautiful, be it exploration through writing and the imagination, through pens, pencils, paints and colors or through physical exploration with a camera. Thank you for reading Atlas Magazine, and we hope you never stop exploring.

Megan Breukelman Editor-in-Chief

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY ELLY LUCAS

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Silent Drifters P

PHOTOGRAPHED BY AILERA STONE WARDROBE: Vaidile Vasiliauskaite Models: Monika @ Baltic Models, Ieva @ modelteam

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White dress: DeZavu boutique White top: DeZavu boutique Skirt: Topshop Grey coat and scarVEs stylist's own.

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White coat: DeZavu Boutique Lace dress: Zara Cardigan: stylist's own

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White dress: DeZavu boutique White top: DeZavu boutique Skirt: Topshop Grey coat and scarf stylist's own.

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Burgundy cardigan: Primark Dark brown skirt: Topshop Bow belt: Zara Dark blue dress: Zara Grey coat stylist's own


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White coat: DeZavu Boutique Lace dress: Zara Cardigan: stylist's own

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White coat: DeZavu Boutique Lace dress: Zara Cardigan: stylist's own

White coat: DeZavu Boutique Lace dress: Zara THE EXPLORATION ISSUE | 14 Cardigan: stylist's own


Lace dress: Zara Burgundy cardigan: Primark Hat stylist's own

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Burgundy cardigan: Primark Dark brown skirt: Topshop Bow belt: Zara Dark blue dress: Zara Grey coat stylist's own


Floral dress: Mango Cardigan: DeZavu Boutique Lace top: DeZavu Boutique

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BY NATALIE FINKELSTEIN www.natfink.com

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THE LIFE OF A

STYLIST Canadian fashion stylist, Thea B. gives Atlas an exclusive insight into the world of fashion styling. INTERVIEW BY MEGAN BREUKELMAN

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY caileigh kyle

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Q. WHAT GOT YOU INTO STYLING? A. I have worked in retail for several years and along the way I developed great relationships with customers who trusted me to outfit them. That was all it took for me to take an interest in visual merchandising. The wonderful feedback I was getting from management and my customers was what made me realize that this could be a career for me. When I started in a fashion program, I was introduced to the world of internships. Interning can be hit or miss if you don’t have a clue what direction you want to go in but I finally landed one that got me started on the right path.

Q. HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN STYLING FOR? A. I have been styling for a little under a year now - I’m pretty fresh and still have a lot to learn!

Q. WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE THING ABOUT YOUR JOB? A. Being on set is so much fun! I go completely fangirly sometimes and I love to make up random captions as the models go to loosen everyone up. It’s just great to be able to meet so many interesting people and make something beautiful with our collective talents!

Q. AND YOUR LEAST FAVORITE? A. Scheduling and corresponding. I spend a lot of time at the computer before and after a shoot.

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY DANIELA MAJIC


PHOTOGRAPHED BY DANIELA MAJIC

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Q. WHAT IS YOUR DREAM OR GOAL IN STYLING? Right now I’m focusing on graduated goals, starting smaller and working my way up. I’ve been really lucky to have been able to work with talented photographers and amazing agency represented models from day one. I hope to get into an agency in the next year or so, but not until after I do some more interning. It would be great to eventually land an ad campaign with an established Canadian company and see my work in some well known Canadian fashion mags too. After that, we’ll just see what opportunities come my way!

Q. IF YOU COULD WORK WITH ANY MODEL, WHO WOULD IT BE? My top choice right now would have to be Andrej Pejic. He would be just so amazing to watch.

Q. WHY IS A GOOD STYLIST ESSENTIAL TO A SHOOT? Well I guess with fashion editorials styling really is the whole point. It’s both a creative art and a puzzle. But it really makes a difference when the entire team is great at what they do, you can’t leave one stone unturned because it can damage the whole dynamic of the image.

Q. WHAT IS YOUR BIGGEST FEAR ON THE JOB? Other than the work not turning out how you wanted (as every creative person has probably felt at one point or another), a big thing for stylists is the fear of damaged clothing.

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY DANIELA MAJIC IN COLLABORATION WITH IMPERIAL STYLE GROUP

Q. WHAT DO YOUR STYLIST DAYS CONSIST OF? Collecting images for mood boards and inspiration; researching designers, collections, brands and stores that might fit a concept. Corresponding with an excessive amount of people. Scheduling pull dates, pickups, drop-offs, fittings (if needed). Then you plan the looks out as best you can before the shoot they’re almost never the exact same when you get on set! Prep garments - steaming, pressing, cataloging, bagging. Then finally when the date of the shoot arrives, I set up my garments and check if there’s any last minute steaming to to be done and lay out all of the accessories and shoes etc. When hair and makeup is done, I help the models get dressed. Often times stylists are jumping into the scene to adjust a strap, a ruffle, or what have you - the garment has to look perfect. Then it’s about being as efficient as possible and making quick changes at the most opportune moment. Packing up early is key so that as the last look comes off the model you’re pretty much ready to go - timing is everything! Of course after that everything goes back to where it came from with many thanks, and sharing final images with everyone you worked with!

Q. IS IT WORTH IT TO SEE THE END RESULT? Absolutely! No doubt. The anticipation kills me every time!

THANK YOU, THEA, FOR PARTICIPATING IN THIS INTERVIEW.

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SPONTANEOUS LIGHT A COLLECTION OF BEAUTIFUL IMAGES TAKEN WITH INSTAGRAM Featured Photographers: Jamie De Leeuw (jamiedeleeuw), Jessica Christie (jessicaaar), Stefanie Neves (stefanieneves), Amanda Jasnowski (hokaytokay), Brittany Juravich (brittjuravich), Taylor Evans (tevyyy), Marie D端cker (mariedetoiles), Mindy Nguyen (suppmindy), Cat Lane (catlanephoto), Daniel Phun (cheapanzee), Joel Ng (joooooooel)

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SUCH GREAT HEIGHTS

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photographed by megan breukelman WARDROBE: THEA B. HAIR: STEFANIE GRIGOROVSKY MAKEUP: ASHLEY BURKE-GAMMON MODEL: HILLARY LERCH


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LAURA CAMMARATA an interview with european fashion photographer, laura cammarata INTERVIEW BY OLIVIA BOSSERT

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Where are you from in the world? I’m from sunny beautiful Sicily, ITALY but I recently moved to London. When did you first start taking photos, and what got you started? I started when I was 16, in 2007. The question about the reason why I started taking pictures is always tricky to me. I really have no idea why, it just happened. One day, back in 2007, on a summer day I saw a guy taking pictures with his DSLR (I did not even know what that was!) and his gestures, his way of looking for the perfect composition and frame charmed me, really. I started talking to him, he told me he had an account on Flickr and the rest is history. Every day I would spend at least 7-8 hours browsing for more and more photographers on the Internet, starting to build my own personal image encyclopaedia, longing to create the same beauty. I literally discovered photography from scratch. What inspires you above all? Everything can be pure inspiration and obviously other photographers I admire have influence on me. But mainly beauty in general is inspirationaland everything that can be described as “beautiful” lets my mind flow. It could be a single frame of a movie or a drawing, I simply have a strong aesthetic vision. How would you describe your work? As I said, the concept of beauty and harmony are what fascinates me the most. I would say my work is a compendium of my endless research of aesthetic perfection and storytelling, all blended with fashion. But clothes are not the main character in my stories, it is an eye-catching tool to complete my vision. People, and faces in particular, are what I love the most. I could get lost in one’s facial features.

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Are you a big planner before your shoots? Or are you more spontaneous? My personality (rational, organized and quite anxious) forces me to be a big planner, I start writing down every single detail even a month before the shooting. From location to models, from clothes to light, I go deep into it. And I will get fooled every time. Photographers, as artist in general I guess, have to accept that there is no idea that will turn out the way they have planned and this is the most incredible and exciting (and sometimes scary, I have to admit) thing about photography. You never know how things can change while shooting: creative team’s mood, weather, police forcing you to leave that location because you aren’t allowed to shoot there (oh yes, that happens quite often to me!) or simply you change your mind about what’s in front of you. You never know and I think it’s quite therapeutic for over-planning personalities like mine: you can plan as much as you want, but you also have to handle the situation of that moment, letting your mind flow freely to find the best solution. What is your favorite part of a fashion shoot? I honestly enjoy every single part of it. I start doing a lot of research on that particular theme and this is the point when I discover new pieces of art and I broaden my horizons. I also get very excited thinking about the beauty I’m going to create, it’s the moment when I really feel a flame inside thinking about a new project. After that, shooting is amazing of course: you have to turn into reality what you’ve been thinking about for so long. It’s engaging and challenging at the same time. I really love the editing part as well. I know a lot of photographers who just don’t enjoy that part and prefer letting other people doing that for them. It’s not my case: I love sitting for hours at my desk looking for the perfect combination of colours and tones, it’s like the missing piece of a puzzle: I need it to complete the frame. So as you can see I really love pretty much everything, But I can tell you what I like the least: the organizational part is sometimes quite boring and tricky. Finding a day when everyone of my creative team is available is HARD!

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Do you usually work in small or large teams for your shoots? It’s usually stylist, make-up artist, hair-stylist, models, assistants and me. How long do you spend selecting and editing your images? I’m quite fast to be honest, I usually know already what I’m looking for so selection is not a big issue. Editing can be longer though, depending on what kind of effect I want to achieve. I would say I usually need about one week to go through selection and editing. You’re so young, and yet already so successful! What advice do you have for aspiring fashion photographers? I tend to get quite banal when I give advice but it’s all so simple: nourish your mind with culture, art and beauty, behave like sponges and absorb everything that surrounds you and turn it into your own mental encyclopaedia to pick ideas from when you need. Build your own style, this is something a photographer never stops doing: we all start like copycats to learn but there is a point when you need to let your voice be heard, yours, not others. And the biggest piece of advice I can give is: don’t let anything/ anyone let you down, there will always be photographers out there better than you, with better cameras, models, locations and blablabla. Don’t compare yourself to others too much, do it just until the point it’s useful for you to push your skills further. Oh wait! One more thing: DARE, PUSH YOUR BOUNDARIES. Do you have any big dreams? Where do you see yourself in the next 10 years? I wish I could do exactly what I’m doing now but full-time and on a bigger scale: shooting editorials and campaigns for high-end magazines and brands, travelling the world for work and visiting places I’ve always dreamed of. I want to have an interesting life where job is not a nightmare as for most of people but a chance of turning my dreams and my artistic vision into reality. And I’ve already started.

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY TASHA FAYE

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Wandering She walks the green path. Pondering. Her footsteps adding their own quiet soundtrack To the symphony that is the forest. She is tired of her small suburban town With its identical townhouses. Her daily routine Devoid of any excitement. She stops And looks up. The branches stretch upwards Reaching. Always reaching. She reaches too. She reaches for a new life, For new experiences, For new pain. She reaches for adventure.

Written by Sarah Ratner

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Photography: Jamie de Leeuw Model: Nicolien Janssens Mua/Hair: Chanel Hinterholzer Styling/Design: Manon Geven, Kill Pixi Dogs: Taro and Kazuo

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COREY ALLEN artist

I am typically inspired by minimalism and very graphic/flattened imagery, along with hazy dream-like fine art and photography. William Eggleston's photography has also had a huge influence on my work because of the beauty he found in seemingly insignificant places.

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STYLE For Tegan, Age 14

With each snip, years fall away to the first time she pulled those curls into a ponytail so severe she could barely blink. The ponytail became her trademark and, later, modified with hemming scissors, a center clump cropped short enough to stand straight above her forehead. That has grown again, parted in the middle to hang at her cheeks, the ponytail still intact. She sits in the chair, loosens the ponytail with fingers as fine as any woman’s. (Strange how I’ve noticed that only now.) Her eyes glitter as the stylist asks, To here? fingers drawing up to the bottom of the side pieces. She nods, growing: a young woman, scissors, and an idea to be different. By C.S. Fuqua

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The World in My Hands

Photographed by Nicolas Vo

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY IVY NINE DESIGNS

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listen trees are talking grass is growing animals scurrying can't you see you've got a whole life to find what you need

dry up those tears, dear you have your whole life don't cut it short don't worry too hard you'll make the best of it in time the clock is ticking the numbness there but remember 80 years you'll be wise by then experiences will have been made the places and times you have seen and created your mind is full of memories past exploration past times but they're still here. remember, now. t THE EXPLORATION ISSUE | 81

ERUTUF

a gust of wind messing up your hair you feel the breeze on your ears your lips being to crack

FUTURE

brightness behind your eyes wistful expression on your face


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NATHALIA SUELLEN DIGITAL

INTERVIEW

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BY

ARTIST

ALEXIS

CATALDO


ONE. What was it like, growing up in Rio de Janeiro, and do you think it has influenced your art in any way? Somehow yes - not just about Rio, but Brasil itself. I personally think its a pretty “artistic” country in my ways. My dark artworks end up being colorful and very influenced by some very Brazilian elements like carnival's extraodinary clothes and dresses, glittery costumes, folklore influences, strange animals - it's a good mix for me and naturally gave me some originallity. TWO. Do you remember the moment when you realized you wanted to be an artist? Art has been in my life since I was a child - not as a digital artist but as a traditional drawer. I didn't choose anything; it was destiny and God. THREE. How would you describe your career so far? I think I'm living an essential moment as digital artist, I'm living a big transition of what I could do and what I can do now. After a long year away of personal works, I feel much more capable to make the things I imagine come true. So yes, I'm currently taking a big break, but I'm not resting! I'm creating a brand new series which I think is going to be the best of my career so far. I'm challenging myself much more than I used to. I totally abandoned that “terrible begginer thought” of following art trends and being afraid to try new things.

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FOUR. What do you think has been your greatest achievement so far? To have people who enjoy my work is the greatest achievement for me. FIVE. What character traits do you think have made you succeed? Creativity and faith. SIX. What inspires you? Music, soundtracks, fashion, Tim Burton or any dark or surreal stuff. SEVEN. What would be your advice for a young, aspiring artist? I would say that the most important thing to be an artist is faith and lot of practice. I know it sounds obvious and things seem a bit harder when starting out, so the honest hint is: do lot of work, every day, every week. Stop comparing your works with other artists, be yourself! Don't be afraid to share your ideas, even though you may not think you're that good; skills develop! Last but not least, keep feeding your art with good influences, inspiration, photography or whatever your find related to your art. EIGHT. What do you want most in life? To keep growing as artist and human being. Thank you, Nathalia, for your thoughts.

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Vest: Smack Chest Piece: Fire Finch

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CITY ANIMAL

PHOTOGRAPHED AND STYLED BY RAE MARSHALL Mua-Hair: Charity Vance at MAC products Model: Chase Farley

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Chest Piece: Fire Finch

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Scarf: Two Old Hippies Shirt: Roar

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Shirt: Two Old Hippies Pants: Ring of Fire

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Vest: Smack Chest Piece: Fire Finch

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Shirt: Two Old Hippies Pants: Ring of Fire Shoes: Buckle

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guidance she found from a young age that her skin is a map, and each tremor, quake and shiver was detailed, outlines on the palms of her hands and scatter along her skin like a star map. after the death of her first cat, she found a cluster of dimples on the inside of her thigh, little hollows to fill with sadness on quiet nights that are a two shaded darker than she’s used to. after first heartbreak, the bridge of her nose exploded with freckles and the semi circles under her nails turned permanently blue, permanently cold. the summer after her he found love, her heart became heavier than ever and she couldn’t quite breathe, like her entire chest had filled with salt water and her lips were sealed shut with the spray from the crashing waves her heart beat created. but it soon emptied again once she had cried it all out, and mixed it with enough tea to drown any pain that any boy, cat or heartache could throw at her. written by stacie lee

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY RDV PHOTOGRAPHY THE EXPLORATION ISSUE | 99


URBAN EXPLORERS Illustrated by Anna Blachut

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KATHERINE ELEYCE FASHION DESIGNER PHOTOGRAPHED BY TYRONE DAVID

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“

Falling down a rabbit hole into a redefined wonderland, Heard at a Whisper is the embodiment of enchantment. It is through a tireless commitment to transcended beauty, that Heard at a Whisper endeavors to inspire women to indulge in a romanticised state of mind. Through a constant search for beauty and aiming to enhance history through cloth, these garments of exquisite fabrication, are created to achieve a dream like reality. The beauty is in the emotion, the fun, the freedom and the liberation.

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Katherine Eleyce is an up-and-coming fashion designer from Sydney, Australia. She is pursuing a Bachelor of Design, majoring in Fashion but has already jump-started her design career. She has already founded her own fashion label, “Heard at a Whisper� and worked as an intern for Willow, even going so far as to help prepare for New York's Fashion Week. Katherine's designs are powerful and memorable; a fresh face in the fashion industry we will not soon be forgetting. Her designs in both men's and women's fashions are light and airy with a distinguished beauty and intensity.

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY TASHA FAYE

RED PLANET The muddy bank’s rust-coloured curve: a crescent wound that won’t heal. A trail of brightly painted buoys (decapitated heads) sun themselves on the salty high tide. Gulls circle and swoop. Shrieking insults. Patches of red appear on the blue river’s surface. Submerged islets. Signs of an interior life. An archipelago of mosquito-bitten scabs encrust the back of a white leg. Every squelch in this rosy muck sucks an iron-rich pigment, seeping into pores. Blue-veined tributaries map pale skin. Dusk’s watery pink bleeds across a heavenly underbelly dissipating into charcoal strata, the carbon of space. Glittering pinholes hint at some kind of afterlife and one pinhole brighter than the rest. Beaming back at us. One red planet reflecting off the other. STEVEN MAYOFF THE EXPLORATION ISSUE | 116


HORIZON Imagine a world undivided by an ever present horizon. Where flocks of fish dart in and out of whisping clouds and schools of birds dive for eternities under your feet. At night, jellyfish light the sky like small moons and fireflies form painterly currents around them. Boys and girls play in directions that together we have no words for. They know nothing of fishing rods, or boats, or of any reason to hold your breath. Instead, they know the touch of clouds and of the serene sleep that comes with a dream of falling. A fear of heights is being afraid what is above the blue, for below is the comfort of the hot beating of their world’s heart. A world whose horizon is jagged and overlooked. A world that’s lost in those who are forgotten they’re want to find it. Written by Joshua Rose

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Francie Idette ARTIST

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY THOMAS COLE SIMMONDS

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COASTAL MINDS Photographed by Marie Dücker Model: Raúl de Cuadro

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ARMINA MUSSA D E S I G N E R

INTERVIEW BY ELISA NYASSOM PHOTOGRAPHED BY Danielle Bella

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ATLAS: Where are you from in the world? ARMINA: I am from the DC, Maryland area. My mother is African American, and father is Sudanese and Ethiopian. ATLAS: When did you first start making clothes? ARMINA: I started designing 4 years ago. Then, I was into a lot of reconstructing cultural traditional garments and Vintage. Eventually, that passion manifested into creating my own original pieces. ATLAS: What inspires you above all? ARMINA: I have a very keen eye, so my inspirations are everlasting. Currently I am extremely inspired by Iranianborn Visual Artist, Shirin Neshat. I am really into a film she directed in 2009 called “Women without Men� that explores gender issues in the Islamic world. The film is visually transfixing, powerful, and raw. For the most part, I find a picture with a cause extremely moving and inspiring. ATLAS: How would you describe your work? ARMINA: My work evolves so much that I sometimes have trouble explaining what it is at times. Nonetheless it remains timeless, modest, and cultural. ATLAS: What is your favorite part of a fashion photo shoot with your clothes? ARMINA: Seeing my vision come together is timeless.

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ATLAS: Are you a big planner/dreamer before you create clothes or are you more spontaneous? ARMINA: There was a time when everything I created was spontaneous. Now that patience is apart of my organic process, everything is well thought out and manipulated in my head so many ways before creating! ATLAS: You’re so young, and yet already so successful! What advice do you have for aspiring fashion designers? ARMINA: Patience, Patience, Patience! Quality work is rewarded tremendously in the end. ATLAS: Do you have any big dreams? Where do you see yourself in the next 5 years? ARMINA: Of course. Within the next 5 years I hope to be established with a small lifestyle shop in Brooklyn or Dc. This is after doing much traveling and exploring an array of traditions from all around the world for knowledge! ATLAS: Why call your clothing line Yanghi? ARMINA: It’s a word I created that defines a superior soul that is universally understood within his/her evolution. ”An artist evolving until Jannah”. ATLAS: Thank you, Armina, for your time and perspective!

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Nonsense Thoughts A series of inspiring thoughts, words, quotes, expressions to get your creative energy flowing. By Chris Collins

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“I try to present ideas, thoughts, and situations that hopefully make people laugh, think, or feel something new.”

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PHOTO BY ELIZA MILLS


Adriana Fuentevilla Clouded Visions

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY IVY NINE DESIGNS

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They know cities similar to those you’ve wandered, or, if you’ve never traipsed our streets, at least seen them in pictures or postcards, or in film or at least heard sounds, read of their absolute greyness. But, there, they manage a great pilgrimage every so many months—in lieu of holidays like ours, that seem to us dull hours conformed to only for rest and never the historical claims for instituting them—great marches in the clearings of forests, where once inside the vast concrete structures there, there’d be no one outside the walls, scant a sound outside that behemoth among the trees, ponderous among the packs of indifferent creatures, a building which, inside, contains a truly unthinkable number of rooms, the bulk of them employing stages, bright stages; as well as above that maze of theatres, itself spanning upwards of eight levels, hundreds of rooms dispersed throughout, mostly for the actors while they, from the same cities, make their home for weeks of plays, dances, songs, the plangent chants of tragedies and other forms you’d think of, all under the auspices of a benefactor, a builder, unique to each hidden building, who could choose at random which show they’d like to see and always hold a special seat behind mirrored glass, behind the rest of the people. This glass representing the only thing made up of a material other than cement—so known are the concrete steps that carry one between levels and those stair-like seats, the solid slabs like old coliseums, with what lacking in definition they make up for by condoning rigid posture, enforcing a straight and healthy spine. Within the multitudes, thronging along coarse halls of the aforementioned and somewhat menacing labyrinth—lit by sconces to each side—of rooms not even numbered, it is sometimes better to give up the desire to find the event you’d been searching for and just watch anything, just find a seat somewhere, albeit in a mood always pestered by thoughts of other levels and the performances you wanted, though in the crowd you’d hide your bitterness. In truth, most views might reach the proscenium and no further, for it matters not the subject of the play, or the lyrics of the song. Those are merely blandishments for drawing a crowd; and they treat this, it’s true, like a vacation from themselves, simply sifting into nothingness—a sustained communal image, effectively one person, all their senses flooded with the same; all having the same ears and eyes; and these mass viewings are meant to rid the world of their larger presence, for a little while, away from the fights and conversations where they know each other, the loves where they see in the other person another consciousness, those only times where one knows that others experience something inside of them, because they tell us. So they are lost among the labyrinth, hidden under its layers, and in their cities you’d find no one, and in each theatre in the heart of the wild you’d find a single person; and though the narrative has been used for centuries to tell cultures about themselves, it is here used, every so many months, to forget. THE EXPLORATION ISSUE | 164


a theatre in the wild WRITTEN BY DAVID NEWSON

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PHOTO BY ELIZA MILLS


The Journey

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The Serpentine Gallery Pavilion: Seduced by the Sky Written by Anna Blachut Annually architects are invited to design a temporary structure at the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion in London. Despite his arrest and detention in 2011, Ai Weiwei's Skype collaboration with the Swiss architects, Herzog & de Meuron yielded this year's instillation. “As an artist, I am always very interested to put art, design, architecture and social change together to make new possibilities. We focused on memory and the past,” commented the controversial Chinese artist, Ai Weiwei. His past collaboration in 2008 to create the Bird's Nest stadium with the Tate Modern designers for the Beijing Olympics won the RIBA Lubetkin Prize. The trio's latest design retains a similar aesthetic appeal that was present in the intricately webbed steel arena. Further enhanced by their reversal of interlaced detail from exterior to interior. However this time the 2012 Olympic games was an opportunity for the invention of an urban innovation and transformation rather than a focal point. Designed to shield one from the summer sun and showers. The slightly elevated, circular disk invites its public to explore and unearth a space where they can stand, sit and interact. “We didn't want to do another object, and so the idea is to go underground”
 explained Herzog & de Meuron. Almost like an auditorium, cutting one off from the busy bustle of London's urban landscape; creating a cool oasis of calm that nurtures the senses. THE EXPLORATION ISSUE | 174

Double vision: cork stools lay sprinkled beneath the underbelly of an opal cover eclipsing London's ever-changing sky. Floating a few feet from the grass, the roof resembles an archaeological site. Trees and clouds bounce off the water saturated mirrored disk. In addition, the water can be drained off for special occasions transforming the dry roof into a raised platform or dance floor. Its smooth surface is somewhat similar to the 2009 floating aluminium Pavilion structure designed by Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa. However, this current instillation is more constraint and functional than that of the two leading Japanese architects. The foundations of this mole hole retrace the physical fragments of the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion. Twelve in total, each column stands for one of the designs installed between 2000 and 2001; including the works of Jean Nouvel, Peter Zumthor and Frank Gehry. “Plus our own column that we placed at will, like a wild card,” said Jacques Herzog. Julia Peyton Jones, the Director of the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion explains how the digging down of 1.5m and the raising by 1.5m is an integral aspect of the design. It goes in tandem of with the two key themes of the piece: memory and archaeology. Moreover, “the lowness allows it to not be obstructed by the object in the park. Traces of the past are physically there in the form of refills;


RDV PHOTOGRAPHY

makes use of the historical fact and reconstructs it,” clarified Pierre de Meuron. Circles, crosses and curved structures cut by planks and filigreed by tiny rectangles reveal the hidden history of the Pavilions. Rows of stools line the layered levels. To create this quarry, the initial soil of the Pavilion, which was very greasy was removed and backfilled with cork. Below the lawn the muted toffee tones enrich the artists' chosen material of cork and translates Ai Weiwei's artistic “silence of peace”. The unique qualities of this sustainable material affect its acoustics, aroma and add a tactile quality to the space. “Warm, wonderful to touch- like earth it has a certain amount of mystery to it. It has something that adds to this archaeology and past because it is an old material. Like a ghost of what was there”, commented Jacques Herzog. Throughout the summer public talks and events will take place at the gallery as the Pavilion operates as a public space and venue for Park Nights. Culminating in October 2012 with the Serpentine Gallery Memory Marathon a series conceived by Hans Ulrich Obrist.

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THE HAUNTING PHOTOGRAPHED BY Abbyll Chronicles

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“exploration� painting and writing by april ward.

the luminescent moon perched above is a warming mothers touch guiding the wandering moth home. the moth, a nocturnal creature explores the unknown, reliant on the dangling compass in the sky. the moon instills renowned intuition and guides the moth from places of darkness. something dark suddenly imbued in light, a sudden consciousness, a wisdom arises. Close to its mother it must stay for the allure of the man made beauties will make it stray. but if it falls for the temptation of the flame it will burn away. close to the path it must stay.

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Julia trotti PHOTOGRAPHER INTERVIEW BY KIARA ROSE

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Where are you from in the world? I’m from the sunny suburbs of Sydney, Australia. When did you first start taking photos, and what got you started? I first became interested in photography in high school, after spending a couple of years playing around with Photoshop and stock photography on the Internet. I wanted to start creating images that were more personal to me, which is when I went out, started shooting and fell in love with it. Since then, I started creating photo manipulations less and photographing people and places more. What inspires you above all? I am honestly inspired by everything, I can’t pick just one single thing! I love listening to music to help me come up with shoot concepts, finding an amazing location inspires me, random conversations with strangers, a new pretty face to shoot that I may accidentally come across. All these things play a different part in inspiring my shoots!

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What is your favorite part of a fashion shoot? Spending time with amazing people. I love hearing stories of other creatives making their way through the industry and how they got started in their craft. Do you usually work in small or large teams for your shoots? When I first started out, my shoots only consisted of me and a model. Soon after I started including a makeup artist, then a hair stylist, then a wardrobe stylist. I’d still consider my teams for personal fashion shoots are considerably small compared to when I shoot with a large number of people on big-production lookbook and editorial shoots! How long do you spend selecting and editing your images? Over the years I’ve grown a knack for being able to select the images I like and will work best with each other, most of the time it doesn’t take me very long at all!

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Are you a big planner before your personal shoots? Or are you more spontaneous? I’m a little bit of both. While I like to be organsed and have a talented creative team on board, once we’re at the shoot I like things to play out depending on the mood of the day. Especially when I’m taking pictures nothing is planned, the model and I will climb everything, walk everywhere and shoot anything lovely we see! You’re so young, and yet already so successful! What advice do you have for aspiring fashion photographers? Thank you so much! My advice would be: It takes a lot of hard work and effort, but with the right amount of passion and talent you will be where you want to be in time. The trick is to keep at it, learn as much as possible and work with as many people as you can! You never know what or who could turn into an amazing opportunity. Do you have any big dreams? Where do you see yourself in the next 10 years? I have so many dreams it’s hard to keep track! I want to see every corner of the world, hold meetups with all my favourite photographers, teach aspiring photographers everything I know and spread inspiration everywhere I possibly can! If you could describe your photography in 3 words, what would they be? Fun, youthful and free. THANK YOU, JULIA, FOR YOUR TIME.

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BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S Model: Martyna Wiktoria Pietrewicz (Novo Models) Make-up and Hair: Danielle van de Beurcht Styling: Nance Peeters (Peeters Haute Couture) Photographer and text: Kim Sanders

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY RDV PHOTOGRAPHY

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Force of Nature I used to be content with Vast extensions of unremarkable grass Cookie cutter houses And parks that grew all hemmed in You used to tell me to see the world With your full belly laugh and scarred meaty hands And true to form, my feet began to burn and itch And thirsted loudly for so much (for so much more) And so one day I up and left To find thin air smelling of snow and pine Embracing walks and climbs and hikes Discovering lakes of perfect blue But the strangest thing I found was Not the mountains or valleys, lakes or hills Not the ice or the oceans, the rivers or trees Or even all the life that called those landmarks home The strangest thing about those places Was how much I felt myself inside them I felt so much stronger in my country’s bones Then in cities made by man It was how much I felt at home in places run wild How in exploring nature I could make myself free And I remember thinking how odd that was Because I thought the only force of nature that could do that was you. MICHELLE ATKINSON

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PHOTOGRAPH BY IVY NINE DESIGNS

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY ELLY LUCAS

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Atlas Magazine | Autumn 2012  

Volume 1 | Issue 1 | The Exploration Issue The premiere issue of Atlas Magazine for Autumn 2012. A seasonal online publication for the new g...

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