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A full-service graphic design agency. We create corporate identities, printed collateral, websites and first class newspaper and magazine ad campaigns. 

Established in Chesterfield, Missouri 25 years ago, The Design Company continues to build a reputation for providing superior client service, innovative creative solutions, and market focused results that meet the tightest of deadlines at affordable rates. The wheels are always turning here. We “hit the ground running” and have the technique and talent in marketing and extraordinary graphic design work. Whether you’re launching a new business, refreshing a bland website or strengthening an established brand, we’re ready to take your marketing and graphic design project to the next level. We make you look your best. Setting your company apart from your competitors is crucial in today’s business environment. A professional and appealing design, whether it’s for a website, a logo, a brochure, business stationery, restaurant menu, magazine or newspaper ad, we can do wonders in creating a positive impression of your company. The Design Company thrives on creating rich, unique high-end graphic design work for our clients. 
 Industry Experience We have cross-industry experience with many clients over the years. If your company is not represented in our portfolio, we welcome the challenge. See the highlights of our portfolio at www.sfdesignco.com.

(636) 530-9140 Email: sandy@sfdesignco.com Website: www.sfdesignco.com


The Arts Live Advisory Board Ron Thomas

Graduated from The Art Institute of Chicago {BFA]; Indiana University [MS]; SIU-E [MFA]. Began the Sculpture and Painting Department at St. Louis Community College @ Meramec and also taught 2D @ 3D Design, Drawing and Figure Drawing and Advanced Special Problems courses. Retired after 40 years. Solo exhibitions at St. Louis Art Museum, Laumeier Sculpture Gallery, The Art Foundry in St Charles and other galleries. Winner of The National Endowment for the Arts for “Excellence in Drawing”. Currently expmenting with oils on wood and traveling with artist-wife Harriet to museums and art galleries through U.S. and Canada. Email: Ronwthomas@aol.com

Bryan Haynes

The commercial work of the artist has graced the pages of national magazines, international advertising campaigns, CD covers, posters, and book covers from Agatha Christie to the cover of “Scarlett” the sequel to “Gone With the Wind”. Since graduating of the Art Center College of Design in 1983 his artwork has been represented by Bernstein & Andriulli in New York, Ron Sweet in San Francisco, and Foster Represents in St. Louis. Recent corporate and institutional commissions include murals and large scale paintings for; The Kauffman Foundation in Kansas City, The Missouri Botanical Garden’s permanent collection, The Westward Expansion Memorial Museum at the Arch, Novus International Inc., and the Danforth Plant Science Center. Additional patrons include Disney, Estee Lauder, Warner Bros., Toblerone –Switzerland, Universal Studios, IBM, Nike, Sony Music Corp., and Anhueser Busch. www.artbybryanhaynes.com artbybry@aol.com

Vic Barr

I design and work with the North American and exotic hardwoods of the world. I create contemporary jewelry chests and towers. I hand turn a lot of writing instruments, pens and pencils. I’ve begun to do some contemporary table-top sculptural pieces. I design custom pieces to meet the needs of individual clients. Email: VicBarr@sbcglobal.net

Sandy Kolde

After retiring from a long professional career in health care I now devote my life to art, which has always been a vital interest of mine. I have taken many classes at the Craft Alliance, as well as workshops at Penland School of Fine Craft and Arrowmont. Contemporary ceramic figurative sculpture is my focus and these sculptures have recently beenshown in exhibits at William Woods University, and the St. Charles Arts Council. I have served on Boards of Directors of several arts organizations and believe strongly that art contributes to the quality of life for all who are interested in either viewing art as a patron or producing art themselves. Email: sandykolde@charter.net

Adam Long

Adam Long is a nationally known sculptor in St. Charles, Missouri. Educated in the St. Louis region he has an MFA in Sculpture from Fontbonne University. He has been an art educator for over fifteen years, working in public middle and high schools and the university level. Locally, his work has been featured in articles in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Street Scape Magazine, Suburban Journals Weekend, At Home: St. Louis Magazine, the St. Charles County Post, and LifeScape Magazine and shown on the FOX, CBS, and PBS network affiliates. He has exhibited across the region, including shows at the Arts Incubator of Kansas City, the Schmidt Art Center at Southwestern Illinois College, the Baker Arts Center in Kansas, the Foundry Art Center in St. Charles, the O’Fallon Cultural Arts Center, and the St. Louis Artists’ Guild. His sculptures have received prizes and cash awards in numerous juried exhibitions. His work is in many private, national collections. His work can be viewed at www.AdamLongSculpture.com

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EDITORSLETTER

On-Line Publication Publisher and Editor Joyce Rosen Design The Design Company Sandy Ferrario Editorial Assistants Sandra Kolde Advertising Sales

Welcome!

Digital-Media Direct Sandra Kolde Photography Marion Noll

Goingoutguide Newsletter sign up to receive

To the 2012 Winter Edition of “The Arts Live” magazine.

In a relatively short period of time, The Arts Live has become a reliable resource for discovery, enlightenment, and fellowship. Presenting interviews with artist studio visits, emerging artist, gallery/museum interviews. We are Investigating, the creative process, and the parameters of aesthetic expression, we find we are constantly expanding our own horizons. We hope that all curious people enjoy these same challenges. As we move into the next year, we remain solidly committed to our mission. We believe art can change lives and we thank all who work with us to inspire, educate, entertain, and enlighten. It is a worthy endeavor. We are constantly growing and changing to better serve its increasing number of visitors. Arts and culture are part of a broader creative economy and to make an important contribution of economic growth and cultural tourism. For more information, please contact us at 314.910.0764.

Joyce Rosen, Founder of “The Arts Live” jrosen@theartslive.com www.theartslive.com Click Here to subscribe: www.theartslive.com/magazine

The Art of Giving

Your contribution will be acknowledged on our web site sponsor page and listing page on the Arts Live magazine. Your contribution will vastly enable The Arts Live to continue and expand our coverage of artists, galleries, performance arts and art organizations in the State of Missouri. Click here Advertise Rates PDF Click here-Connect with Contact page other ways to support The Arts Live

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Calendar

Submit your event See www.theartslive.com and click submit event. Web Site: Digital Ninja Published 4 times per year, Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter

The Arts Live

200 South Brentwood, Ste. 5B, St. Louis, Mo. 63105 Phone: (314).910.0764 e-mail: jrosen@theartslive.com www.theartslive.com


Winter2012

Contents

FEATURES

IN EVERY ISSUE

Studio Visits Encouraging the public to meet artist, see new work, make purchases and nurture potential new collectors. Increase access for the public to see work and meet artists, Interviews with Contemporary Artists’ working across the United States in a variety of media, painting, sculpture, fiber, ceramics and photography.

Dialog with Us An open forum on contemporary art and culture.

Performing Arts

Lanny Bergner 6 Amy Firestone Rosen Alice Calhoun

Emerging Artist Katie Aichholz

Gallery/Museum Interview Crystal Bridges

Art Focus Preferred Health

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Art Festivals Art Organizations

26 32 30

Art on View

Sharp Shooter’s: Kaleidoscope: Photographic Perceptions 29

Travel Missouri - Visit Galleries & Museums 34 Advisory Board

Is made up of artists, persons of knowledge experience and judgment who have an interest in the arts. Ron Thomas, Bryan Haynes, Vic Barr, Adam Long and Sandy Kolde Cover Lanny Bergner

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STUDIOVISITS

Lanny Bergner Q. When did you first realize you were an artist A. I knew that I wanted to be an artist in 1971, which was my senior year of high school. It took many more years before I thought I actually was an artist. That probably didn’t happen until right after graduate school in 1984 when I began exhibiting my work on a regular basis Q. Description of your art? A. I always find it difficult to describe my art or to even characterize its place in the art world. I mainly work with metal, yet I exhibit mostly in the fiber world. I make metal mesh basketry works, but I also create site-specific installations and do public art. I think like a sculptor when it comes to working with concepts, form and space, but I also create well-crafted handmade objects that lend themselves to the world of fine-craft. My work’s imagery is naAbove: Lanny Bergner Left: Silent Reflection, 52” x 50” oil and collage on canvas

ture based, but sometimes the work contains a bit of human objectification along with a dash of spirituality. I also do other work that is almost exclusively about pattern and design. It is all serious work, but nothing should be taken to seriously. Q. Current Medium. A. My primary medium for the past year has been stainless steel mesh, which I draw upon using a propane or butane torch. I also use glass frit, silicone and wire and in some cases I combine all these materials in the making of a piece. Q. Previous Medium. A. I have worked with many materials over the span of my career, but metal mesh (stainless steel, aluminum, brass and bronze mesh) has been the dominant material

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over all those years. I gravitate toward common materials that I can use in an uncommon way. Some of the other materials I have worked with have been broken auto glass, sand, coal, slag, carpet tacks, straight pins, safety pins, hydrocal, sandblasting grit, monofilament, fishhooks and even traditional sculpture materials such as wood and stone. Q. Do you have a favorite Subject Matter? A. The natural world is my favorite subject matter, especially the patterns and structures found in nature. I have an interest in microbial life and a growing fascination in geologic formations. I also have an interest in cosmology, vessel forms, architecture and pattern design. I like to abstractly suggest the human form in my work, and in my current studio projects I am using the vessel shape as a substitute for the human figure. Q. Have you been Influenced by what artist and how? A. I have to go back a long ways to answer that question. Back when I was in high school I had an English teacher, Anne McCracken, whose husband was a sculptor. I wasn’t a good English student, but she recognized my artistic talent and introduced me to her husband. His name was Philip McCracken and in 1976 I worked as his assistant for five months before going on to college. He taught me a lot about the craft of making sculpture and exposed me to the spiritual side of art making (finding the spirit within an object). He also gave me insight into the workings of a professional artist. To this day he is still the artist who has influenced me the most.

Q. What inspires and motivates you? A. Inspiration: My primary sources of outside inspiration come from the natural world. In particular, I am finding the book “Art Forms from the Ocean” the monographs of 19th century naturalist, by Ernst Haeckel very inspiring. His book has been a jumping off point for my latest body of work called “Primordial Muse”. In this series I am drawing on stainless steel mesh using a propane/butane torch and the imagery is derived from the Haeckel monographs. I am also turning my attention to tafoni rock formations; these are eroded rock cavities prominent in shoreline regions of the Gulf Island of British Columbia. I hope to develop a new body of work using observations gleamed from visiting tafoni sites to inspire torch burn drawings on stainless steel vessel forms. A lot of my work is just inspired by the series of works that I am working on, with one piece leading to the next. Motivation: I am a compulsive maker who has to be working with my hands. That is the way I explore the mysteries of the world, the way I function in it and the way I find equilibrium with it. I am not a religious person, but for me art making is a meditative activity and in that sense it gives me a certain spiritual base. Q. How has your work changed as you developed as an artist? A. My knowledge about materials and my technical expertise has increased over the years. I also have a much better understanding about the strengths and limitations of the materials that I use. I basically use the same method of joining mesh that I developed during my final year of graduate school in 1983. The difference is the craftsmanship, which took me many years to refine. I am now using more imagery in my work with the torch drawing on mesh. This a relatively new phase in my artistic development. Q. What interests do you have besides? A. I like to garden. I own a garden property that my parents used to garden back in the early 70s. I have been growing veggies and fruit there since 1994. Running and music are other interests that I have. Q. Studio Space where is it and describe your studio what is it like A. I have two studio. One is the small studio, which is the size of a one-car garage. It is connected to the house. I go out my front door, turn left and enter the studio. This is where I do most of my work, especially during the fall and winter months. My other studio is a 20 x 30’ out building about 100 feet from the house, which I

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Left: Flora Grid Right: Spce Botanical 5


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had constructed about three years ago. The building isn’t heated so it is mostly used for storage, photography, crate building, cutting mesh and doing torch burning on mesh. Both of the studios are very utilitarian and they are not really set up as inspirational spaces. They are cluttered and not very well organized. When I am in my studio I am interested in the piece I am doing and not the space that I am doing it in. That said, I cannot think of a place I would rather be. Q. Do you work in your studio every day? A. Weekdays yes, and I sometimes work on the weekends. I also like to have something I can work on in the evenings while relaxing (much like my mother did). This activity would be something repetitive and easy to do while watching TV. Q. What do you do for fun? A. Hummm, maybe I should try to find more time for that. I like to run, but I don’t know if that exactly counts as a fun thing to do. I used to like to play guitar and maybe I should get back to that one. Q. What kind of music do you listen to while creating? A. I usually listen to jazz while working. Q. Did your family have an influence on your decision to become an artist’s? A. I’m sure they did, but not directly. I have a brother who did

some painting while I was growing up, so that introduced me to the concept of making art. My mother was an avid crafter who always crocheted in the evening, and during the day, when she wasn’t doing household chores she was working on some other craft project. I do credit my mother with giving me the genes for compulsive behavior, which is why I like to work very directly with a material and employ repetitive construction techniques. My parents were always supportive of my art. I only remember one conversation I had with my dad warning me that it was hard to be an artist. He never brought it up again and was supportive from that time on. Q. Why does the world need art? A. For me, art is a positive force that makes life worth living. It is the way we explore our relationship to the world around us. Without art the world would be a pretty bleak place. Making art is my greatest joy and I like to think that by sharing my art I can make the world just a tiny bit better. In the very least it keeps me sane. Birthplace: Anacortes, WA Current Home: Anacortes, WA Price Range of your work $450 - $26,000 Gallery Representatives: Duane Reed Gallery, Snyderman – Works Galleries, Mobilia Galleryhttp://home.wavecable.com/~lbergner/ Phone: 360.299.0514

Clockwise from top left: Nebulae Squared, Amoeba Gathering and Mesh 3

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STUDIOVISITS

AMY FIRESTONE ROSEN

Q. When did you first realize you were an artist A. When I was little I used to create my own paper dolls and their outfits. I have always loved creating, coloring, painting and designing. Q. Description of art? A. My work is process driven. I have created a vocabulary of patterns and images of which I equate to spices in a pantry. I use these to build my work. My best work happens when I use my unconscious mind. There are times when I don’t realize what the work is about until a matter of time. Nothing is ever thrown away. Q. Current medium? A. Monoprints based on items of clothing. Q. Previous medium? A. Mixed Media abstract. Q. Favorite subject matter? A. I am fascinated by textile patterns in clothing and the marks that are made by using the items as relief plates. Good-

will, The Scholarshop, Veterans Village or any vintage shop can become my hunting ground for pieces of clothing to become my muse. I often seek the most outlandish items and wonder who was the original owner, where they planned to wear the outfit and what was the occasion? A. Have you been influenced by an artist and how? Q. Matisse for the wonderful patterns and fantastic colors, Jim Dine for his iconic prints A. What inspires and motivates you? Q. That seems to change from one body of work to another. I’m sure it depends on what is going on with my life.

A. How has your work changed as you developed as an artist? Q. The more I make art, the braver I have become. I enjoy reacting to the unplanned marks that occur while printing and creating my own rules as I go along.

Left: Slip Set Two


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Clockwise from left top: Three Maidens,Slip Tops, Dress Slips

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Q. What interests do you have besides? A. Cooking, movies Q. Studio space A. My work is created on a press and I have taken classes and rented space in order to use one. Q. Do you work in your studio everyday? A. I try to work four to five days a week. Q. What do you do for fun? A. Hang out with family and friends. Q. What type of music do you listen to while creating? A. I listen to NPR. You can’t sing along but I feel like I learn while working. The interviews keep me company Q. Did your family have an influence on your decision to become an artist? A. Yes, they have always been every supportive. Q. Why does the world need art? A. Well, I don’t really know why the world needs art but I can say that I am a better, happier person when I can create.

Amy Firestone Rosen —Artist Statement I have worked as a designer since 1980. When I design for clients I am both translator and interpreter. When I began creating for myself I found the freedom to let go of any internal visual rules intriguing. The problem solving process of each work demanded and pushed me out of my comfort zone and forced me to create my own rules and vocabulary. In 2003 I began taking painting and print making classes. The independence I discovered in utilizing these techniques inspired me to delve into a dialog process of finding connections and conversations between the human touch versus machine touch. The result is a sense of surprise and spontaneity. Born in St. Louis, Missouri I currently live in St. Louis $85.00 to $1200.00 Represented by PHD Gallery Web site: Amy Firestone Rosen.com

Above: Santo Found Right: Locomotion

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STUDIOVISITS

Alice Calhoun Q. When did you first realize you were an artist? A. I guess I have always been an artist. When I was 5, I drew a picture from one of those old matchbook covers, put it in an envelope, and sent it off (with the help of my kindergarten teacher). I got a letter back saying I had been accepted into a professional art school program. My mother said I had to go to finish kindergarten first. As a child, I built magical worlds on table tops, in closets, and under great big trees and told stories to my friends about the faerie creatures who lived there. I won numerous awards for my artwork in school. Although I went to graduate school in literature and taught for many years, I wrote my dissertation on the struggle of the artist in a world filled with multiple, changeable sources of meaning. It was titled Suspended Projections: Religious Roles and Adaptable Myths in the Fictions of John Hawkes, the Films of Ingmar Bergman, and the Paintings of Francis Bacon. J Quite a mouthful. Above: Enchantress & 7 Faeries Big No WireLeft with Alice Calhoun inset photo Left: Flutterbye

Q. Description of your art? Elegant and yet joyful copper garden sculpture designed for home and garden. Many of my pieces have stories. Current Medium Since I have become a professional artist, it has always been copper sculpture Previous Medium In college, I minored in Art and took Painting and Drawing classes. Q. Do you have a Favorite Subject Matter? A. Dance informs the movement in my artwork; myth informs the meaning. I sometimes do pieces inspired by paintings: Midsummer’s Eve by Robert Hughes, Primavera by Botticelli, Dance at Bougival by Renoir, The Four Seasons (separate paintings of each) by Alphonse Mucha are examples. I am working on a new series inspired by Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. This is especially pleasing for 19


Q. When did you first realize you were an artist? A. I guess I have always been an artist. When I was 5, I drew a picture from one of those old matchbook covers, put it in an envelope, and sent it off (with the help of my kindergarten teacher). I got a letter back saying I had been accepted into a professional art school program. My mother said I had to go to finish kindergarten first. As a child, I built magical worlds on table tops, in closets, and under great big trees and told stories to my friends about the faerie creatures who lived there. I won numerous awards for my artwork in school. Although I went to graduate school in literature and taught for many years, I wrote my dissertation on the struggle of the artist in a world filled with multiple, changeable sources of meaning. It was titled Suspended Projections: Religious Roles and Adaptable Myths in the Fictions of John Hawkes, the Films of Ingmar Bergman, and the Paintings of Francis Bacon. J Quite a mouthful. Q. Description of your art? A. Elegant and yet joyful copper garden sculpture designed for home and garden. Many of my pieces have stories. Current Medium Since I have become a professional artist, it has always been copper sculpturePrevious Medium In college, I minored in Art and took Painting and Drawing classes. Q. Do you have a Favorite Subject Matter? A. Dance informs the movement in my artwork; myth informs the meaning. I sometimes do pieces inspired by paintings: Midsummer’s Eve by Robert Hughes, Primavera by Botticelli, Dance at Bougival by Renoir, The Four Seasons (separate paintings of each) by Alphonse Mucha are examples. I am working on a new series inspired by Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. This is especially pleasing for for me since I studied at the Shakespeare Institute in Stratford-upon-Avon, England, and had a scholarship to the American Shakespeare Institute. That work was many years ago, so it’s nice to reread Shakespeare. Q. Have you been Influenced by what artist and how? A. No direct influence except that I do the occasional “homage” mentioned above. On the other hand, I think I am influenced in some way by every museum, cathedral, or castle I visit and every play, dance/ musical performance, literary reading I attend. Q. What inspires and motivates you? A. The whirling movement of dance, the glow and colorability of 20

copper, the take-your-breath-away beauty of color-filled gardens, the deep mysteries of ancient myths – all these inspire me. I grew up in the South where landscape is legendary and storytelling is a way of life. I love to travel and am lucky enough to have traveled widely to ancient places in Europe and the US; I always find new energy and new inspiration in these ancient landscapes. Q. How has your work changed as you developed as an artist? A. I began telling simple stories through my artwork, and the designs had afolk art simplicity. The stories were often new versions of old children’s tales. I early on re-discovered my love of dance and for several years made both the folk art garden creatures and dancers. Before too long, however, the stories became more complex, and I began to people my artistic world with characters that came straight from my imagination. Dance remained a source of inspiration, but the sculpture was no longer just a dancer; it was a character in the imaginary world I had created. For example, I did a gesture drawing of a contemporary dancer at the dance performance. As I was working on making the figure from copper, I knew she was much more than just a dancer. She is the Enchantress: every night she sings and dances and weaves the magic spell that makes the world beautiful. Q. What interests do you have besides art? A. I read a lot, mostly fictionalized history. Luncheon of the Boating Party, a novel about the summer when Renoir painted his masterpiece, is a recent favorite; I was mad to see a Renoir after reading this. I also did a walking tour on the Impressionists and visited Maison Fournaise this past spring. (I had been to Giverny several years ago). My husband and I love to travel. and I find it a great source of inspiration. In the past four years, we have been to Alaska, to Provence, to Bordeaux, to Burgundy, to Paris twice, to England and Ireland four times. The trips to England and Ireland are for business since I exhibit periodically at the Chelsea Flower Show in London and each year at Bloom in Dublin, but we usually do some traveling as well. I especially find the hidden places in Ireland a great source of inspiration; all of the landscape photos in my book are photos I took in Ireland. My husband and I are also interested in regional wines and foods, so when we travel, especially abroad, we usually seek these out, believing that these along with the art and history and music, define the culture. Just about everything I love, I in some way incorporate into my art. My life is my art; my art is my life. One leads to and inspires the other. What I do now I will do forever. When I can no longer make my copper Above: Highhand Dancers Right clockwise from top: Eve & Dawnphilly, Mermaid and Ascending Faerie Philly


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sculpture (and I’m not sure if that day will ever come), I will write more stories peopled with the characters I have created over the years. Q. Studio Space where is it and describe your studio what is it like A. My husband and I own two historic houses in Hermann, Missouri. We live in one house, and my studio is in the other. It is not open to the public since I have/use dangerous/hazardous tools and chemicals. Q. Do you work in your studio every day? A. My studio is where I have the tools to cut and clean the copper, my acetylene torch, the acids and paint that color my work. I am in and out of the studio nearly every day when I am at home. But I do my design work/drawing in my kitchen where the light is great and, of course, I do all the paperwork that goes with running a small business in both my home and studio “offices.” Q. What do you do for fun? A. In addition to the dance performances, reading and travel mentioned above and all the learning associated with that, I love theatre, gardening, myth, and history. I do love PBS Masterpiece as well. Q. What kind of music do you listen to while creating? A. I don’t; I concentrate better in a quiet space. I like music that tells a story and large romantic piano concertos and do listen to these when I’m driving. I also try to get music that is characteristic of the various places I travel to. Above: Sunbathing Mermaid Philly

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Q. Did your family have an influence on your decision to become an artist? A. My grandmother had been a painter and also designed and made beautiful clothes – but not as a professinal. My parents encouraged intellectual pursuits more, seeing artwork as a pastime more than a profession. So I was a college literature professor and a corporate executive before coming to the art as a profession. Q. Why does the world need art? A. To remind us of what gives joy and meaning to life. Birthplace – Jacksonville, Florida. Grew up in Cheraw, South Carolina Current Home – Hermann, Missouri Price Range of your work $45 $750 for single pieces. Websites: www.CopperCurls.com (for sculpture orders) www.CopperCurls.net and www.facebook.com/CopperCurlsSculpture (for new designs - no orders) www.MagicOfMany.com for book orders through PayPal Email is dancers@coppercurls.com Business Name: Ace of Spades Garden Art, 112 East First Street, Hermann, MO 65041 ( no store although I do have some of my faeries in my garden for people to see and purchase if I am home). I am almost always in my garden on the 3rd weekend in April and 3rd weekend in October when we have small Art Walks in Hermann. Business Telephone: (573) 486-3060 Registered Trademark for artwork: Copper Curls®Sculpture Gallery


OUR VISIT TO BENTONVILLE, ARKANSAS...

from us to you the architecture and natural setting will take your breath away!

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By Joyce Rosen and Sandy Kolde

arly in November, 2012 with three of my arty friends we traveled to Bentonville, Arkansas…to visit the magnificent Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. Crystal Bridges sits on 120 acres of lush forest and the Museum gets its name from a nearby natural spring and from the unique bridge construction incorporated into the building design. Moshe Safdie has designed an unusual museum for Alice Walton, who had the vision and was the driving force behind Crystal Bridges Museum. Alice Walton, is the daughter of Sam Walton, founder of Walmart, which is headquartered nearby. The Galleries contain American history art. The nineteenth and early twentieth centuries are splendidly represented, although the late twentieth-century works in the collection are less impressive, I would like to see contemporary American Artist for some impact. The galleries are box like spaces, spanned by curved wooden beams. The original design specified skylights in all of the galleries, but a year before the opening, while construction was under way, a new museum director was appointed. There were different views, and the skylights were removed.” Modern Curators are highly sensitive to gallery light levels natural light is notoriously difficult to control. http://crystalbridges.org Eleven the Museum’s restaurant was excellent, we had dinner there, the food presentation was excellent and the servers were friendly and accommodating. The Museum Store was a particular success with us and what was a pleasure and they carry original works by regional artists. I wasn’t sure what to expect when anticipating the trip to the Crystal Bridges Museum in Bentonville, Arkansas. Upon approach I was struck by the beauty of the surroundings; the wooded areas, the trails, and the

layout of the museum is spectacular. So much so, it almost eclipses the art collection. Another surprise, the museum is free to the public! The Walton clan have done a really good job. The art was enjoyable and varied. You can take yourself from the Renaissance to the Contemporary. The restaurant was very good, and the gift shop was impressive…I had to work hard to get out of there with out purchasing anything. All in all, a worthwhile trip, especially when you make it with good friends.

On View

October 13- January 28, 2013 – See the Light, The Illuminist Tradition, Mark Rothko, recently added to the permanent Collection October 13 – January 28, 2013 The Path to Crystal Bridges Showcasing the work of world-renowned Architect Moshe Safdie an urban planner, educator, theorist and author who embraces a comprehensive and humane design philosophy. http://www.msafdie.com • Moshe Safdie has created iconic buildings in countries around the world. Habitat 67, the groundbreaking multi-family dwelling that brought Safdie international attention at the Montreal World Exposition. • Yad Vashem Holocaust Museum in Jerusalem features a sky-lit concrete tunnel that cuts through one of the site’s hills. • The National Gallery of Canada features an innovative use of glass, including a glazed colonnade and an elaborately sky-lit hall. • The Kauffman Center for the performing Arts, in Kansas City, Missouri • The Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles closely resembles Crystal bridges in its use of architectural concrete banded in cedar. 23


STUDIOVISIT E M E R G I N G

A R T I S T

Katie Aicholz

Q. When did you first realize you were an artist A. Just recently. I’d always considered myself a designer, but not a true artist. In the last two years I’ve been focusing on developing my own style and incorporating the techniques that I love rather than producing collections for sale. Since that point I think that my work has become much more of an expression of myself. Q. Description of your art? A. Hand-dyed silks using a variety of shibori techniques. A. Current Medium- Silk fabric dyed using synthetic and local natural dyes B. Previous Medium-I’ve always worked in fabric. I started stitching quilt blocks with my grandma, then reconstructing used clothing to create ‘new’ garments, and finally developing full garments from conception to completion. Q. Do you have a Favorite Subject Matter: A. My primary technique is arashi shibori. I also enjoy Turkish marbling ‘Ebru”. Q. Have you been Influenced by what artist and how? A. Yes, I love the vast open spaces in traditional Japanese land24

Katie Aicholz

scapes. I try to make my pieces as simplistic as possible. Editing out all of the unnecessary frills until I have a design that is both beautiful and functional. I am a huge fan of Elsa Schiapparelli also which is a great contradiction to the Japanese style. Her fashions were so theatrical, but I think that it’s really her innovative use of patterns, embellishment, and balance that interests me.

Q. What inspires and motivates you? A. Nature. I spend a lot of time outdoors with my dog collecting plants to use for dyeing. This evening I was collecting persimmons to use for cooking- rather than dyeing- and I noticed the extraordinarily rough surface of the older persimmon trees. I’m planning to use one of the Japanese Shibori techniques to recreate the look of the rough persimmon bark in my spring collection. My spring collection is also to be dyed using only local plants that I have either foraged for or grown myself. Q. How has your work changed as you developed as an artist? A. I’ve become more in tune to my individual design aesthetic. When I was starting out I tried to follow trends and make sure that I was producing just what my ideal customer would want. Now, I design for myself.


Q. What interests do you have: A. I’ve an avid gardener, cyclist, and have recently taken up pottery. I’ve tried to take up hobbies that allow me to quiet my mind. Studio Space where is it and describe your studio what is it like. I have a beautiful historic home in New Haven, MO and have transformed two of the bedrooms into studio space. One bedroom serves as the office and the other as the design studio. The design studio is a small, but very efficient area packed with a cutting table, design rack, sewing table, and shelves for fabric storage. I have only what I need to create and nothing more. Q. Do you work in your studio every day? A . It’s pretty close. I’m either doing paperwork, updating my website, or working in the design studio every day. However, wish I could just stay in the design studio. Q. What do you do for fun? A. I love to cook. I think that works well with the foraging for dyes. A couple months ago I set out to gather lichens to use for dyeing and ended up finding two large clumps of Hen of the Woods (wild mushroom). My fiance and I had mushroom everything that week from creamy soup, to pasta, to a mushroom pate’. I never really know what I’ll find when I’m in the woods. Q. What kind of music do you listen to while creating. A. Most recently I’ve been listening to The Talking Heads, Queens of the Stone Age, and Ali Farka Toure’. I think that the music I’m listening to shines through in the final collection. I’m not exactly sure how these artists will mix with this Spring’s collection. Q. Did your family have an influence on your decision to become an artist’s? I am one of the youngest of many cousins and an older sister and my family believes whole-heartedly in hand-me-downs. However, I never wanted to wear my sister’s old clothes,so I would reconstruct them and mix them with other garments. When I was in middle school I started making full garments. I would take my mom’s sheets, tablecloths, and curtains (sometimes off of the windows, if I felt so compelled) and lock myself in my bedroom with my sewing supplies. A few hours later I would emerge with a “new” outfit and though my mom wasn’t always happy that I had ruined her linens she was always supportive of my designs. Whether I wanted to be creative or not it was a necessity if I wanted to have clothes that were individual to my style. Q. Why does the world need art? A. People must have an outlet to express themselves. Katie Alcholz New Haven, MO 63068 www.kantley.com 573-680-0785

Above: Fashion show with Katie Aicholz designs Left: Katie Alcholz with one of her designs

25


Maryville University

ART VIEW ON

A photography exhibition, presented by the Sharp Shooters and Maryville University, will features works by Nancy 650 Maryville University Dr. St. Louis, Mo 63141 Morton J. May Foundation Gallery located in University Library The medium of photography, over its relatively short lifespan, has assumed a myriad of roles and appearance. From its creation, the camera’s specific ability to capture light and preserve a moment has been put to use in nearly every field of this exhibition. Sharp Shooter’s Presents Kaleidoscope: Photographic Perceptions On display from November 1, to November 30, 2012

L. Bridges, Jo McCredie, Anna Harris, Marianne Pepper, Joan Proffer, Marion Noll, Naomi Runtz, Barbie Steps, Kay Wood and Barbara Zucker. Morton J. May Foundation Gallery

26

The late St. Louis businessman and philanthropist, Morton D. May, once exhibited his photographs at Maryville. He later established the Morton J. May Foundation Gallery on campus, in his father’s name. Recently relocated to the first floor of the University Library, the Gallery comprises two contemporary rooms of open floor and wall space. Two regional or national artists are typi-

cally shown each month, through exhibits that may include painting, drawing, prints, sculpture, metalwork, photography, illustration and more. Each spring, seniors graduating with a BFA in studio art have their own one-person exhibit in one of the gallery rooms. In summer months, the Gallery often features selected artwork of other talented Maryville students.

Gallery Photographs by Marion Noll


SUPPORTING HEALTHY LIFESTYLES THOUGH THE

P

referred Family Healthcare Inc. is a Behavioral Health Organization with administrative offices in Kirksville and St. Louis Missouri, established in 1979. Continually striving to assist others in achieving their potential, PFH is the largest provider of Substance Abuse Treatment Services in Missouri with close to 50 offices as well as significant expansion of programming in Kansas. Through our Achieving Recovery, Resiliency & Responsibility Through Creativity (A.R.T.C.) programs, we provide a wide range of creative opportunities and experiences which allow program participants, young and old to use their talents, strengths and interests as tools for personal growth and recovery. Originally developed within our adolescent substance abuse treatment programs we have expanded A.R.T.C. to provide adults with substance use disorders and those struggling with persistent mental illness as well as youth experiencing a broad range of risks with innovative opportunities in both the prevention and treatment arenas. With strong visual and performing arts components, A.R.T.C. strives to use the language of creativity to ensure individuals with a wide variety of learning styles are given impactful opportunities to learn and change. Focused on the provision of both strengths and interest based prevention activities and interventions, A.R.T.C. takes both education and intervention to a new level, providing engaging and powerful vehicles within which to deliver messages of hope and crucial information that will allow for sustained personal change. Whatever their strengths, their talents, their abilities, their weaknesses and their concerns we must celebrate,cherish and encourage all human beings to be the best they can be, to put their best foot forward, to show the world how amazing they are! ~Kasey Harlin A.R.T.C. Program Director The following showcased artists provide a small window into the world of A.R.T.C. and it’s impact. Their talents are notable, their in-

sight and use of creativity to find their voices is even more remarkable. To see a wider variety of our work visit www. pfh.org/artc, http://pinterest.com/preferredfamily/, http://www.facebook.com/pfh.org

Age 15 Wentzville, MO Adolescent A.R.T.C. Q. When did you first realize you were an artist A. I first realized I was good at art during second grade art class. This is when I first was exposed to painting and drawing. Initially I traced a lot and then I started using my imagination to freehand. It just kind of progressed as I got older. Q. Description of your art A. I’m really not sure how to explain it, really. Q. Current Medium: A. I mainly work with painting using acrylics and experimenting with surrealism. Q. Have you been Influenced by what artist and how? A. I think my biggest influence would be my uncle. He’s a really good cartoonist and painter. My mom and dad draw and I feel they are influential as well. Q. What inspires and motivates you? A. I like to get on the Internet and look at art. When something inspires me I will take pieces of it and make it into my own. Q. How has your work changed as you developed as an artist

A. Yes, my skills have really progressed. I used to just draw stick figures but now I’m more confident and able to draw things with more detail. I have also been getting into surrealism lately. I’m also more comfortable adding texture to my paintings which is taking me away from just basic dots and into more of a discipline. Q. What interests do you have besides A. I love animals. We raise great Danes and I also have a turtle, cat, and three dogs. Q. Studio Space where is it and describe your studio what is it like A. My studio is actually my bedroom. I have easels and tons of paints. Q. Do you work in your studio every day? A. Yes Q. What do you do for fun? A. Hang out with my family and friends. Play with my animals and do art. Q. What kind of music do you listen to while creating A. Pop radio Q. Did your family have an influence on your decision to become an artist’s? A. My uncle has really encouraged me to pursue art. My family also encouraged to to pick up art again after I dropped it for cheerleading in 8th grade. My life got so much better after I started painting again. A. Why does the world need art? A. The world needs art so people can express themselves Age 15 Kirksville, MO Adolescent A.R.T.C. Q. When did you first realize you were an artist A. I felt like I was an artist since I could

pick up a pen or pencil. When I was a kid I was always good with coloring and other art projects.

27


SUPPORTING HEALTHY LIFESTYLES THOUGH THE ARTS Q. Studio Space where is it and describe your studio what is it like A. I don’t really have a designated studio space. I usually set up in our living room. Q. Do you work in your studio every day? A. I work on my art every day. Q. What do you do for fun? A. I also enjoy spending time with my friends. Q. What kind of music do you listen to while creating Q. I love listening to R&B and Soul music while I create! Q. Description of your art A. My art is flamboyant and unique Q. Current Medium : The current medium I use most frequently is graphite A. Previous Medium : I have also really enjoyed working with watercolors in the past. Q. Do you have a Favorite Subject Matter A. My favorite subject matter is the face, and portraying its beauty.

Q. Did your family have an influence on your decision to become an artist’s? A. My dad was one of my strongest influences in becoming an artist. He was always encouraging my brothers and sisters and I to make art. When my older sister stopped creating, I felt I had to keep up even more, and I began pushing myself even harder. Q. Why does the world need art? A. I think the world needs art just like it needs music. Without art, the world would be dead.

Q. Have you been Influenced by what artist and how? A. I was strongly influenced by my father’s art. He would always criticize and critique my hart to help me make it better. If it wasn’t as good as he thought it could be, he would make me do it over, and that’s how I continue to challenge myself today. Q. What inspires and motivates you? A. People who say they can’t draw really inspire and motivate me. I like to teach them that they can, and show them how to practice and train themselves to improve their skills. Q. How has your work changed as you developed as an artist A. I used to focus on landscaping in my art. As I grew in my artwork, I gradually moved into areas I wasn’t really good at or comfortable with, like bodies and faces. Now that’s my favorite thing to draw! Q. What interests do you have besides A. I also like to run, make bracelets, and I have a really good relationship with my mother and I love talking with her. 28

Q. Previous Medium: A. Previously I worked with water colors, decoupage, and collage Q. What is your favorite subject matter? A. My favorite subject matter is comedy. Q. Have you been Influenced by what artist and how? A. I have been influenced by the cartooning of Peter Max. Q. What inspires and motivates you? A. People around me inspire my art every day. Q. How has your work changed as you developed as an artist A. As I grew as an artist, I went from stiffer lines to more of a flowing line. Q. Studio Space where is it and describe your studio what is it like A. I currently do not have a studio space Q. Do you work in your studio every day? A. N/A Q. What do you do for fun? A. For fun I like to relax and watch T.V. Q. What kind of music do you listen to while creating A. While creating art I like to listen to classic rock. Q. Did your family have an influence on your decision to become an artist’s? A. My family did influence my decision to make art. They gave me a lot of art materials and supplies for my art. Q. Why does the world need art? A. I think the world needs art for world peace

D. Age 52 Kirksville CPRC A.R.T.C. Q. When did you first realize you were an artist A. I was about three when I first realized I was an artist. I was good at coloring books and outlining coloring pages. Q. Description of your art A. I really like drawing cartoons because they are characteristic of people, and because every part of the body is different. Q. Current Medium: A. My current medium I like to work with is fin tip magic marker

L. age 18 West St. Louis County A.R.T.C. Q. When did you first realize you were an artist A. In Kindergarten


SUPPORTING HEALTHY LIFESTYLES THOUGH THE ARTS A. In Kindergarten Q. Description of your art A. Current Medium: Acrylic Painting Q. What is your favorite subject matter? A. Nature Q. Have you been Influenced by what artist and how? A. Pablo Picasso and Andy Warhol

A. When I first started drawing. I enjoyed drawing flowers, horses and other animals when I was younger. Q. Description of you art A. My aunt has described my painting style as Romantic. I like to try and keep things looking realistic, especially in my paintings but I also like to do cartoon people some-

Q. Where is your studio space and describe what your studio is like? A. I work in my aunt’s studio in Washington, MO. The studio has a kind of exciting atmosphere, to me. The room has a lot of light and I’m more comfortable there than I even am at home. Q. Do you work in your studio every day? A. No. I go to my aunt’s house once a week.

Q. What inspires and motivates you? A. God Q. How has your work changed as you developed as an artist A. I used to be afraid to take chances, now I follow my gut.

Q. What do you do for fun? A. I like to hang out with my boyfriend, play with animals, paint, draw, ride horses. Q. What kind of music do you listen to while creating? A. I depends on my mood but, I might listen to anything from Metal to Pop music or soft rock. One of my favorite bands to listen to, though, is Maroon 5.

Q. What interests do you have besides A. Hula Hooping Q. Studio Space where is it and describe your studio what is it like A. Anywhere with good lighting, lots of table space and lots of materials Q. Do you work in your studio every day? A. No, a few times a week though

times too.

Q. What do you do for fun? A. Go to A.A. meetings

Q. Current Medium A. Oil pastels and colored pencils

Q. What kind of music do you listen to while creating A. Trance, house, disco, dubstep

Q. Previous medium A. Acrylic paint

Q. Why does the world need art? A. To remind people that there is hope and life is beautiful

being outdoors, being with my pets and seeing my boyfriend.

Q. Did you family have an influence on your decision to become an artist? A. I decided on my own but my aunt helped me out too. Q. Why does the world need art? A. Because the world would be boring without art.

Q. Do you have a favorite subject matter? A. People Q. Have you been influenced by what artist and how? A. I don’t really know many famous artists but I have been influenced by my aunt and she works with several mediums. Q. What inspires and motivates you? A. Love.

M. age 17 Franklin County ARTC Q. When did you first realize you were an artist

Q. How has your work changed as you developed as an artist? Q. With practice, pieces have become more and more realistic and I have learned some new skills and techniques as I have continued to learn. Q. What interests do you have besides A. I enjoy watching tv, riding my horse, 29


SUPPORTING HEALTHY LIFESTYLES THOUGH THE ARTS Q. Why does the world need art? A. To remind people that there is hope and life is beautiful

Q. What interests do you have besides artA. Astrology, psychology, math, chemistry, world history

M. Age 16 Kansas City A.R.T.C Q. When did you first realize you were an artist A. Honestly, when I came here [to treatment at Preferred Family Healthcare]

Q. Studio Space where is it and describe your studio what is it like A. Kansas City ARTC Program

Q. Description of your art A. I like to draw things with wings, I draw usually statues or tattoos. Things with shading. I usually don’t use color.

L. age 18 West St. Louis County A.R.T.C. Q. When did you first realize you were an artist A. In Kindergarten Q. Description of your art A. Current Medium: Acrylic Painting Q. What is your favorite subject matter? A. Nature Q. Have you been Influenced by what artist and how? A. Pablo Picasso and Andy Warhol Q. What inspires and motivates you? A. God

Q. Current Medium A. Pencil and paper Q. Previous Medium A. same Q. Do you have a Favorite Subject Matter Q. Angels, Birds, things with meaning Q. Have you been Influenced by what artist and how? A. Not really, I look at other people’s graffiti work and sometimes that does, but I like to draw things as I am looking at them. I like looking at people who can draw images from their mind because I want to try to do that.

Q. How has your work changed as you developed as an artist A. I used to be afraid to take chances, now I follow my gut. Q. What interests do you have besides A. Hula Hooping Q. Studio Space where is it and describe your studio what is it like A. Anywhere with good lighting, lots of table space and lots of materials Q. Do you work in your studio every day? A. No, a few times a week though Q. What do you do for fun? A. Go to A.A. meetings Q. What kind of music do you listen to while creating A. Trance, house, disco, dubstep 30

Q. What inspires and motivates you? A. People. Things I am going through in life that I am learning, certain types of music. Driving through a rough neighborhood where I can sketch out something. Q. How has your work changed as you developed as an artist A. My family told me that I was a good artist before, but when I came here sat and drew pictures that were simple at first, but now I can tackle harder things. I learned skills in about a week’s time. I can take time and apply myself.

Q. Do you work in your studio every day? A. On the weekends and about 3 times in the week Q. What do you do for fun? A. I like to write, journal and read. I like to play basketball and volleyball for fun. Q. What kind of music do you listen to while creating A. Various artists that are more conscious. I like some rap, country, and classical. Q. Did your family have an influence on your decision to become an artist’s? A. Yes, I feel like they want me to get back into something positive. They want me to get back into something that I am good at and I can keep applying myself and get better in. Q. Why does the world need art? A. I think the world needs art because its expressing emotion through lines. Anyone in the world can look at it and see what you are going through. It adds flavor to the world. Without art, things would be so boring. There are so many varieties, there is something out there for everybody to express themselves. There is no one way to do art. —Artist Statement When I sit down and start writing or drawing, especially when I am having a bad day, it gives me a mental get away. I can just pull out a piece of paper and do anything. I was really bored at my house and that was one of the main reasons I did drugs. It has showed me that there is something I can do besides using. It helps the time go by. I also think a lot. I can think about almost anything and think through my problems. It’s kind of like meditation. I can draw or write something and it can show what I am going through. Others can look at what I am doing and tell what I am going through without even asking. That is nice because I don’t like talking all the time, especially when I am mad. web site: www.pfh.org


Y

our support enables The Arts Live to share its magazine, goingoutguide of exhibitions, and educational programs with thousands of visitors each year, helping the widest possible audience understand and enjoy contemporary art. We hope that when you think about the Arts Live, you share our feelings of pride and admiration. We welcome your involvement and hope you support this project with a donation. So we can build on our success bringing quality art opportunities to the community.

Our Thanks to our current supporters Sponsors - Current

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You will receive the Arts Live goingoutguide, enhancing your experience in the arts; gallery openings, happenings, art festivals, on-going exhibitions and performances. Spring, Summer, Fall, and Winter, The Arts Live Magazine, Web Site, Artist Database, Gallery, Festivals, and a membership listing. Use our PayPal on contact page- www.theartslive.com/contact or send check to Rosen & Associates, LLC “The Arts Live”, 200 South Brentwood, Ste.5B, St. Louis, Missouri 63105 Email: jrosen@theartslive.com web site: www.theartslive.com T: 314-910-0764- F: 314-721-7880 Name________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Corporate Name________________________________________________________________________________________________ Address_______________________________________________________________________________________________________ City_____________________________________________State____________________________Zip__________________________ Phone #______________________________________________Email____________________________________________________ Amount $_____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 31


MISSOURI Galleries & Museums

Cape Girardeau

Gallery 501 at Art Glass Array

Kansas City

501 N. Kingshighway, St. Charles, 63301 Edward Bernard Gallery

Museum at Corinthian Hall

636.724.0288

107 West Drive, Cape Girardeau,

3218 Gladstone Blvd., Kansas

http://www.artglassarray.com

Missouri 63703 Tel 573.332.7733

City Mo 64123

St. Louis

www.edwardbernardgallery.com

http://www.kansascitymuseum.org

816.483.8300

Art St. Louis Mozaic Art Studio

Kirksville

Mo 63101 Tel 314.241.4810

#5 North Main, Cape Girardeau, Missouri Tel 573.339.9510

Kirksville Arts Association

http://mozaicartstudio.com

117 S. Franklin Street, Kirksville,

Columbia

955 Washington Ave. St. L. www.artstlouis.org

Missouri 63501 660.665.0500

Art Trends Gallery

www.kirksvillearts.com

703 Long Road Crossing Drive, Chesterfield, Mo 63101

Columbia Art League

Parkville

Tel 636.536.3266 www.arttrendsgallery.net

207 S. 9th St., Columbia, Missouri 65201 Tel 573.443.2131

Northland

Email:info@columbiaartleague.org

Exposure Artists’ Gallery

Atrium Gallery

110 Main Street, Parkville,

4728 McPherson Avenue,

PS Gallery

Mo 64152 816.746.6300

St. Louis, Mo 63108 • Tel 314.367.1076

1025 E. Walnut, Columbia,

www.northlandartists.com

www.artriumgallery.net

Saint Joseph

Bonsack Gallery at

Mo 65201 Tel 573.442.4831 Email: info@perlow-stevensgallery.com

John Burroughs School

Hannibal

The Albrecht-Kemper

755 South Price Road,

Museum of Art

St. Louis Mo 63124 Tel 34.993.4040

Hannibal Arts Council

2818 Grderick Avenue,

www.jburroughs.org

105 S. Main Street, Hannibal,

Saint Joseph, Missouri 64506

Mo 63401 573.221.6545

Tel 816.233.7003

Bruno David Gallery

www.hannibalarts.com

http://albrecht-kemper.org

3721 Washington Blvd., St. Louis, Mo 63108 Tel 314.531.3030

Saint Charles

www.brunodavidgallery.com

Mo 63401 573.221.2275

Foundry Art Centre

Coca

www.hanibalallianceartgallery.com

520 North Main Center St.

524 Trinity Ave. St. Louis, Mo 63130

Charles 63301 636.255.0270

http://www.cocastl.org

Hannibal Alliance Art Gallery 112 N Main St., Hannibal,

Kansas City

www.foundryartcentre.org Chesterfield Arts

Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art

Framations Art Gallery

444 Chesterfield Center Chesterfield,

4525 Oak Street, Kansas City,

218 N. Main Street ,

Mo 63017 Tel 636.242.1236

Mo 64111

St. Charles, 63301 636.724.8313

www.chesterfieldarts.org

816.751.1278

http://www.nelson-atkins.org 32

http://www.framations.com


MISSOURI Galleries & Museums

Contemporary Art Museum

Maryville Morton

Saint Louis University

3750 Washington Ave.,

May Gallery

Museum of Art

St. Louis, Mo 63108

650 Maryville Library Drive, Creve

3663 Lindell, St. Louis Mo 63108

Tel 314.535.4660

Coeur Mo 63141 314,529.9381

314.977.3399

www.contemporarystl.org

www.maryville.edu

www.slum.slu.edu

Componere Gallery

May Gallery

Saint Louis Art Museum

6509 Delmar Blvd. St. Louis,

Webster University, Severdrup Building

One Fine Arts Drive, Forest Park, St.

Mo 63130 Tel 314.721.1181

8300 Big Bend Blvd. Webster Groves

Louis Mo. 63110 314.721.0072

www.componere.co

Mo 63199 Tel 314.246.7673

www.slam.org

www.webster.edu/maygallery Craft Alliance - Delmar

Sedallia

6640 Delmar Blvd.

Mildred Lane Kemper

University City, Mo

Art Museum Washington University

63103 314.535.7528

One Brooking Drive, St. Louis, Mo

Daum Museum

www.craftalliance.org

63130 Tel 314.935.4523

3201 West 16th Street, Sedalia, Mo 65301 Tel 660 530.5888

Craft Alliance- Grand Center

Laumeier Sculpture Park

501 North Grand Blvd.

312580 Rott Road, St. Louis

63103 314.535.7528

Mo 63127 314.615.5278

Art Impressions

www.craftalliance.org

www.laumeier.org

Gallery and Framing

http://www.daummuseum.org

412 S. Ohio, Sedalia, Mo 65301 Duane Reed Gallery

Mocra

660.826.4343

4729 McPherson Ave. St. Louis

3700 West Pine Mall Blvd. St.

Liberty Center Association for the Arts

Mo 63108 314.361.4100

Louis Mo 63103 314.997.7170

111 W 5th Street, Sedalia, Mo 65301

www.duanereedgallery.com

http://www.mocra@slu.edu

660.827.3228

Gateway Gallery

Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts

Springfield

21 North Bemiston, Clay-

3716 Washington Blvd. St. Louis, Mo

ton, Mo 63105 Tel 314.

63108 314.754.1850

www.gatewaygallery.com

Springfield Art Museum 1111 East Brookside Drive Spring-

Saint Louis Artist Guild

field, Mo 65807 417.837.5700

Greenberg Van Doren Gallery

Two Oak Knoll, Clayton, Mo 63105

http://www.springfieldmo.gov/art

3540 Washington Avenue St. Louis

314.727.6266

63103

www.stlouisartistsguild.com

St. Louis Mercantile

Regional Arts Commission

Thomas Jefferson Library Building,

6128 Delmar Blvd, University City

One University Blvd. St. Louis, Mo

63112

63121 314.561.7240

314. 863.6811

www.umsl.edu/mercantile/about/contact.html

www.art-stl.com

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The Arts Live - Winter 2012  

"The Arts Live" is the pre-eminent showcase for the arts to be an important part of the local, regional and national art scene. The Arts Liv...