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The 10 Year Anniversary Issue 10 Artists Shaping the Arts in Charleston page 12


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LITERARY The Dawn of the Charleston Artists Charleston to Charleston Literary Festival

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V I S UA L 10 Artists Shaping the Arts in Charleston: Fletcher Williams III Hirona Matsuda Jill Hooper John Duckworth Jonathan Green Mary Whyte Robert Lange Shepard Fairey West Fraser Tim Hussey British Invasion When Disaster Strikes

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PERFORMING

WEARABLE A Guide for This Season’s Wearable Art: Harper Poe, Proud Mary Susan Walker, Ibu Hart Haggerty, HART Danielle Hosker, Mason Hosker Maria Pucci, Gramercy Atelier Mini Mariana Hay, Goldbug Collection IN EVERY ISSUE: Your Guide to Art-Gawking & Gallery-Hopping—63

Ranky Tanky

ON THE COVER:

Still Life with Green Parakeet by Jill Hooper, from Ann Long Fine Art 10 Artists Shaping the Arts in Charleston, pg. 19 10 | thear tmag.com

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Events—69 Maps—74


The British Print Invasion: British Linocuts 1914–1939

Sybil Andrews Speedway, 1934

November - January Scarecrow Event Gallery 23 Ann Street Downtown Charleston 843.306.0101


The 10 Year ANNIVERSARY ISSUE Over the past decade, Charleston has become a hot spot for contemporary culture. The growth of our city continues to foster new ideas and attract creatives who bring a fresh perspective to a charming city rich in history. In celebration of our 10th year, we take a look at 10 artists from the past decade who have helped shape Charleston into the art destination it is today. by Sarah Miller 12 | thear tmag.com


01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 IN CHARLESTON

THE ARTS

SHAPING

ARTISTS


01

Fletcher

W IL LI A M S III Williams conceived an astounding exhibit, Souvenir, in 2015 after the tragic events at Mother Emanuel AME. Conceptual and raw, Williams’ work has brought Charleston into to the 21st century and out of our safe zone. “Fletcher has a diverse palate,” explains Greg Colleton of Redux Contemporary Art Center. “He creates in various directions, whether it being sculpture, found objects, oil paints, candy paint, pen & ink, or swing sets. Yet he still balances and delivers his exceptional quality. He tackles the issues that are uncomfortable to approach in everyday situations. He isn’t afraid to take a stance on what he believes or worry about the status quo.”

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Jonathon Stout

TOP: Brace, discarded wood, plywood, shingle, 77 x 52 x 21” ABOVE: Fresh Linen and Royalty, discarded wood, automotive paint, metal flake, steel lath, 30 x 30 x 4”, 2017 RIGHT: Oak, palmetto roses, chicken wire, steel fencing, 5 x 4 x 4’, 2015


RIGHT: Bathhouse VII BELOW: Scaffold FAR RIGHT: Down the Well


02

Hirona

M ATSUDA Matsuda is a petite powerhouse. She manages the art supply store Artist & Craftsman by day and constructs her intricate works of art by night. A cross between sculpture and assemblage, Matsuda’s oeuvre brings complex sophistication to the gallery scene. For the past 10 years she has been an active catalyst for local artists, and just mentioning her name forges connections in Charleston’s creative web. “This ever-changing group [of artists living in Charleston] propels me and each other to try more, make more, show more,” Matsuda explains. Being a visionary and an advocate, Matsuda also pushes for a better tomorrow. “In my dreams, I envision a more united, creative Charleston. One that is in sync with each other, supports each other, and collaborates to bring the highest level of artistic ideas to our community.”

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03

Jill

HOOPER As the youngest living artist collected by the Gibbes Museum of Art, Hooper gives classical realism new life. In order to round out Charleston’s art scene, it’s important that exterior influences are celebrated. “Taking influence from the old masters, [Hooper’s] paintings are technically perfect and hauntingly beautiful,” says Meyer Vogl Gallery director Katie Geer. “Jill’s work reminds us how thrilling it is to view art created by an extraordinary talent.” Pam Wall, the Gibbes’ curator of exhibitions, agrees. “Her very presence in Charleston pushes other artists to take their work to the next level. And beyond that, Jill is a generous soul who is deeply involved with a number of organizations in the Charleston community, including the young patrons group of the Gibbes, Society 1858.”

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TOP: Mary Whyte, 1999, oil on canvas; 51 5/8 x 33 5/8”, Donated from the Collection of Mary Whyte, Image courtesy of the Gibbes Museum of Art/Carolina Art Association ABOVE: Remains of a Meal, 2000, oil on linen, 7 x 17”, Museum Purchase with funds provided by a gift of the Charleston Fine Art Dealers Association, Image courtesy of the Gibbes Museum of Art/Carolina Art Association RIGHT: Still Life with Green Parakeet, oil on linen over panel, 15.5 x 11.75”


04

John

DUCK WORT H LEFT: New Highs and Lows, 2013, work on canvas, 43 x 63” TOP: 81559 Stono River, photograph on canvas ABOVE: 79558 Spring Island, photograph on canvas

Duckworth is a dynamic artist who’s best known for his iconic, abstracted landscape photography. His artistry includes work in video, sound, light, and installation. Bringing experiential art to the masses, Duckworth’s 2014 AWAKE exhibition at the City Gallery at Waterfront Park turned heads at a time when technology had begun altering the way we look at art. His position on environmental and social change has given way to education being a main component of his exhibitions. Duckworth continues to surprise and delight through his multi-layered productions and unique ideas.

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05

Jonathan

GR EEN Green’s ability to bring our past and present together, gracefully, is a gift. Spoleto Festival USA director Nigel Redden explains, “His artistic influence has not only enriched [the festival]—as a poster artist in 2004 and 2016 and visual designer for our 2016 production of Porgy and Bess—but his passion and commitment to preserving and sharing Gullah history is an invaluable contribution to the city. The optimism and joy of his landscapes and portraits convey a profoundly beautiful vision of the Lowcountry.” Green took his talents to the streets during a 2016 public art project, applying West African motifs to historical buildings throughout the city.

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Corene, 1995, oil on canvas, 50 x 62”, Museum purchase, Image courtesy of the Gibbes Museum of Art/Carolina Art Association


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LEFT: Iron Man, 2000, watercolor on paper; 39 x 28”, Museum purchase with funds provided by Dr. and Mrs. Louis D. Wright, Jr. and Mrs. Norman Olsen, Jr. and a partial gift of Coleman Fine Art, Image courtesy of the Gibbes Museum of Art/Carolina Art Association RIGHT: Artist, 2007, watercolor on paper, 36 x 48”, Museum purchase with funds provided by Dr. and Mrs. (Caroline) Anton Vreede, Image courtesy of the Gibbes Museum of Art/Carolina Art Association  

06

Mary

WHYTE Whyte manages to turn an everyday scene into a moment that will take your breath away. Celebrating the ties that bind humanity, Whyte brings the colors of life to watercolor paper. We know her as a local treasure with international acclaim, but what’s most important to Whyte is the reach of her profession. “Mary Whyte’s multi-faceted vision has profoundly impacted the arts community through ardent advocacy for the healing arts, bringing visiting art collectors to Charleston, and her passion in support of South Carolina Public School art education,” says art agent Sharon Crawford. And the best part, “Whyte continues to evolve as an artist and a teacher.”

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07

Robert

L A NGE By opening Robert Lange Studios over a decade ago, Lange brought serious contemporary realism to the Lowcountry on a large scale. He cultivates an inviting environment within his gallery, making RLS a home to a rotating artist residency program where patrons are able to watch masterful pieces of art come to life. When The Vendue reopened its doors as Charleston’s Art Hotel, Lange and his wife Megan were recruited to curate the space within, giving international and emerging artists the opportunity to exhibit together. As a connector and advocate, he brings inspiration to a new generation of art entrepreneurs.

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TOP: In Harmony, oil on panel, 24 x 24” ABOVE: Reflecting Views, oil on panel, 36 x 48” RIGHT: Baby Blue, oil on panel, 8 x 8”


Endless Power

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08

Shepard

FA IR E Y Fairey didn’t forget his roots when he left Charleston. Thanks to the good people at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, Fairey brought his iconic street art back to us in a way no other artist has. “I consider myself a populist artist,” Fairey says. “I want to reach people through as many different platforms as possible. Street art is a bureaucracy-free way of reaching people, but T-shirts, stickers, commercial jobs, the Internet – there are so many

Scale Tipping

different ways that I use to put my work in front of people.” (2009 John Rogers’ for Colorado Daily). Bringing change to our city’s landscape is not something the Board of Architectural review regularly allows. Fortunately for street art lovers, the city also recognized the important role Fairey has played in international culture. The gravity of Fairey’s installations has brought welcome juxtaposition to Charleston’s facade.

Oil and Gas Building

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LEFT: Gossip, oil on linen, 36 x 30” RIGHT: Island Texaco, oil on linen, 18 x 24”

09

West

FR A SER A true son of the Lowcountry, Fraser’s place in the Charleston art community spans back further than the past decade. But, it’s important to recognize the significant mark he continues to make. “West Fraser has supported the Charleston art community for decades,” explains Corrigan Gallery owner and artist Lese Corrigan. “He’s encouraged artists and galleries, supported arts’ organizations, served on the South Carolina Arts Commission, worked on international recognition for local artists, plein air painters, and local arts committees – all while applying his talents to his painting career.” “Nobody captures the beauty of the Lowcountry landscape quite like West,” says Pam Wells of the Gibbes Museum of Art. “He is also a committed conservationist who advocates stewardship of our coastal land and waters, actively supporting local farmers and fishermen.”

Fall 2017 | 31


10

Tim

HUSSE Y “Tim Hussey has proven to be a timeless creative force in the city. From his ever-questing innovation in messaging, to his hip-boho style, Tim has set a lofty standard for other painters to emulate,” says Charleston Arts Festival co-founder Terry Fox. He is vocal and unconventional. After a stint in California, Hussey returned with a fresh perspective and expanded view of his already mindful approach to contemporary painting, and we look to Hussey as one of the pioneers of Charleston’s new wave of abstract artists.

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Badeschiff 10, oil, acrylic, ink on paper, 30 x 44”


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South Carolina Aquarium

Charleston Gothic, 2017 scaquarium.org/about-goodcatch


VISUAL

ABOVE: Otter Hunt by Sybil Andrews RIGHT: Speedway by Sybil Andrews

THE BRITISH PRINT INVASION: BRITISH LINOCUTS 1914-1939 November - January Scarecrow Event Gallery 23 Ann St, Charleston 36 | thear tmag.com


British Invasion A P R I VAT E C O L L E C T I O N O F MODERN ICONIC BRITISH PRINTS M A K E S I T S WAY TO C H A R L E S TO N

by Michele Seekings

A

rguably one of the greatest achievements in twentieth-century British art was the linocut prints produced by artists from the Grosvenor School of Modern Art in London. Founded in 1925, the goal of the school was for students to explore contemporary themes while working in new and progressive media. Students had the freedom and flexibility to study what they wanted and when they wanted under no strict syllabus. (Where do I sign up?) Linocuts are images cut into pieces of linoleum, inked, and then applied to paper. These new linocut prints resulted in clean-cut blocks of vibrant color with a sense of dynamic movement. This was such a radical change in look and feel from the traditional etchings and more established printing process of the time that the prints possessed a completely modern look. Common themes included urbanism, transportation, technology, speed, and sports, which also added to their futuristic flair. Fall 2017 | 37


LEFT: Tube Station by Cyril E. Power BELOW: Waiters by Lill Tschudi

From 1925 to 1930, Claude Flight taught linocutting at the school. He envisioned linocuts as an affordable way for ordinary people to decorate their homes with modern art “at a price which is equivalent to that paid by the average man for his daily beer or his cinema ticket.” (reference:  Linocuts of the Machine Age by Stephen Coppel, 1995) Among his students were Sybil Andrews, Cyril Power, and Lill Tschudi, who are considered to be three of the most acclaimed linocut artists. Though the popularity of linocuts was short-lived and decreased after 1939, interest in the prints was revived in the 1970s and today the Grosvenor School prints are highly collectible.  ON THE HUNT A private collection of these linocuts has made its way to Charleston, and the 16 piece collection will be on public display this fall. The collector – who prefers to remain anonymous so the focus remains on the collection rather than the collector – began collecting these linocut prints in 1996 while living in 38 | thear tmag.com

NYC. His apartment on Greene Street was furnished with Art Deco furnishings, and he was on the hunt to find art to coordinate. A mentor and friend with a shared passion for art brought the collector to the International Fine Art Dealers Association Print Fair at Park Avenue Armory where he saw his first linocut. His friend, who already collected twentieth-century British linocuts, encouraged him to buy his first piece or he would “lose it.” We’ve all been with a friend who introduces us to one of their passions by bringing us along to something, and after his first linocut purchase of Waiters by Lill Tschudi, he was hooked. He found it incredible that these linocuts were created primarily by women, considering it was not easy for women to be artists in the early 1930s. To him, they “possessed a unique, energetic quality not seen in other art forms,” he says. The collection was originally driven by a need for art to fit in a period interior.


SETH A. TANE solo exhibition:

“In A New York Minute” November 3~10, 2017 “15 Seconds”

Oil on Board

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24" x 36"

L.L.C.

106A Church Street, Charleston, South Carolina, 29401 843.723.0073 • helenafoxfineart.com • info@helenafoxfineart.com HFFA half_pg(h)_ad_09.26.17_3.indd 1

“The linocuts fit the style, feel, and vibe of the apartment’s interior,” explains the collector, but his passion for acquiring British linocuts grew. His earlier collection focused primarily on collecting urban scene linocuts but shifted to include rustic and landscape themes as he began furnishing a 1929 historic lodge in upstate New York. Again, in need of period interior furnishings, the rustic themed linocuts were a perfect fit. The “holy grail” of this collection is Speedway by Sybil Andrews, which is one of the most iconic of the linocuts of this period. Created in 1934, the piece depicts not only movement but also speed. This quintessential piece caught the collector’s eye on a trip to London and became a “must have” for his collection. He still remembers the

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excitement he felt as he unpacked it after it arrived at his NYC apartment. While many of these pieces were part of the Modern Life: British Prints 1914 to 1939 exhibition in 2008 at both The Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC and at The Museum of Fine Art in Boston, this will be the first time these pieces and styles of this impressive private collection of linocuts will be exhibited and showcased together. The collector is excited to share his collection in Charleston and is an advocate of sharing art in public spaces, “with the hopes that it may spark a platform for channeling creative whims and aspects,” he says. ♦ Fall 2017 | 39


VISUAL

by Michele Seekings of SPIRE Ar t Services

My neighbor’s house recently caught on fire and filled my home with thick smoke.

STEP 1

The unexpected smoke damage required a complete overhaul and cleaning of everything inside, art collection included. I learned firsthand how important it was to have a plan in place to protect my art collection before a disaster strikes.

Are you really prepared?

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So many elements and moving parts are involved in rebuilding your life after a disaster that your full attention can’t possibly be placed on your art, which makes it all the more essential to have a plan before anything happens. With the impending hurricane season upon us, it’s important to consider protecting your art by creating a disaster plan. While you never know when these things can happen, there are steps you can take to protect your valued collection and minimize any subsequent damage.

To be prepared for emergency situations, make sure you have an inventory of your art collection with detailed documentation. Familiarize yourself with the details for your insurance coverage for art. Your insurance professional can guide you to the best option for you.


Zinnia Willits is an expert in disaster preparedness. As the Director of Collections and Operations at Gibbes Museum of Art and Consulting Partner of SPIRE Art Services, she is a wealth of knowledge when it comes to all things related to the condition and care of art. “I always encourage collectors to create a disaster plan for their personal art collection,” she says.   “A plan can be as simple as wrapping artwork in plastic to protect it from possible water damage or identifying secure, windowless spaces in your home to store art during a weather event,” Willits explains. “It can also be as complex as establishing a relationship with a fine art storage provider in another location," she adds. 

STEP 3

STEP 2

Do you have a plan? Part of your plan should also include a contact list. Include your insurance agents/ brokers, insurance company (note your policy number), art handlers, shippers, and storage, along with a contact for a disaster recovery professional. “It’s so important to know who the experts are in your area before a disaster strikes,” Willits says. Another part of your plan should include a priority list, which identifies your most important items to protect. List the pieces you find the most value in; this includes pieces high in monetary value as well as pieces high in emotional value.

What if it happens to you?

Contact your insurance agent immediately! Take multiple pictures to document any damage and also describe it in writing. Begin to call the experts from your contact list to start the process of dealing with the consequences of a disaster situation. If the inside of your house becomes exposed to the elements, make sure to properly store anything of value. “Sudden, rapid, or prolonged changes in temperature and relative humidity can be detrimental to all types of artwork,” explains Willits. “It’s important to remove artwork from non-climate controlled environments after a disaster as soon as possible.” If you have no climate control, at the very least keep air circulating with fans in areas with artwork. On a personal note, I had to implement my own disaster plan from the recent smoke damage in my home. Fortunately, since I had steps one and two well in place, it made step three way less stressful and much more efficient. You never know when disaster will strike, but being prepared will save you time, money, and emotional toll. Fall 2017 | 41


performing


Ranky Tanky T H E N E X T E VO L U T I O N O F J A Z Z I N C H A R L E S TO N

by Matt Dobie / photos by Reese Moore

T he Charleston jazz community is

As for Singleton, not only is he a trumpeter, he is also the bandleader and musical director of the Charleston Jazz Orchestra, which since its inception in 2008, has only grown in stature and reputation. “The orchestra has really picked up due to some hard work by a lot of people in the community,” says Singleton. “Great shows, great reviews, and we’re starting to get a lot of international stars that are coming through and wanting to perform with the orchestra.”

Singleton and his frequent collaborator Quentin Baxter have both—in no small part—contributed to the growing jazz scene in Charleston. Among other projects, Baxter, a highly respected drummer and percussionist, was musical director of The Mezz—a listening room for live jazz—a few years back. And though The Mezz has since closed, it remains a template for a concept this city is missing. “We still need a few spots that are totally devoted to listening to jazz,” says Singleton. “So that’s something that we’ve got to work on.”

GROWING UP GULLAH Suffice to say, Singleton’s career has changed a lot in the last decade. “I’ve really been very fortunate,” he says. “I’ve gone from just starting out as a full time musician to leading this tremendous orchestra, releasing my own recordings, and as of late there’s the new band, Ranky Tanky.”

growing. More players are moving to town, aware that a living can be made here strictly as a jazz musician. And then there’s the College of Charleston as well as Charleston Southern pumping out topnotch talent at a healthy clip. And of those college grads, “A lot of them have opted to stay in town,” says trumpeter Charlton Singleton. “There are a lot of versatile musicians coming from those schools that are making some really good music in the community.”

Fall 2017 | 43


Singleton and Baxter are both members of the quintet Ranky Tanky, along with vocalist Quiana Parler, guitarist and vocalist Clay Ross, and bassist Kevin Hamilton. Ross developed the concept for the band, essentially to celebrate and honor the music of the Lowcountry, specifically the Gullah culture. Gullah refers to descendants of enslaved African Americans that developed their own distinct culture in the southeastern sea islands of the United States, and in Ranky Tanky, they borrow a wide range of elements from that culture, including Gullah church songs, kids’ games, and poetry, then reinterpret the material and “put a little spin on [it] as only we can,” says Singleton. Both Baxter and Singleton grew up in the Lowcountry, so they were well aware of the source material. “Quentin and I grew up playing it in church quite a bit,” says Singleton. “We know these songs and kids’ games and poems and sayings and the language and all that.” 44 | thear tmag.com

How they add their own personal touch is a collaborative effort between everyone in the group and differs from song to song. They may compose a melody and harmonies for a spoken word kids’ game or combine two, maybe even three songs into a single cohesive piece of music. And of course, there is always room for improvisation and soaring solos over top of that driving Gullah rhythm, able to move even the biggest wallflower to the dance floor. Ranky Tanky has already performed throughout the United States and Europe at some of the most prestigious jazz festivals. But Charleston is still their home base. And when they’re not on the road, you can count on them contributing to the local scene. “The jazz scene in Charleston has continued to grow,” says Singleton. “And I don’t see that changing. I think it’s on really solid footing right now.” ♦


DAMN. GOOD. THEATRE.


by Trey Jameson Image: Charleston Love by Danielle Cather Cohen

T he way we view art is changing. A

new economically-based platform is creating a generation with different wants and needs, allowing the creative arts economy to become a driving force in the near-future. At its simplest form, the creative arts economy is founded in the arts and technology and the revenue streams attached to them. 46 | thear tmag.com


WHY A CREATIVE ARTS ECONOMY As automation and artificial intelligence continue to permeate our daily lives, they alter how we interact with the world – from how we ship packages to how we communicate. No part of our lives is untouched, including our jobs. The job market and economic environment will only continue to shift to adjust to dramatically increasing technological advancements. Partially as a reaction to these changes, the creative arts economy is predicted to become a larger component of our GDP. For a country known for the Industrial Revolution and the leader of the Information Age, it may be hard to believe that creative arts could be in the driver seat, but let’s consider this: If most components of our lives are automated or controlled by AI, what is left? What will people want? And who will create these automated services and devices? Creatives. Creatives will drive this economy through design and innovation. Technology can create, but not without human intervention. Architects, designers, and artists will be needed in even greater numbers to supply the ideas for design. These changes will create an opportunity for artists. More people will want original humanmade products in this overly automated

life. A modicum of originality will be desired in our lives, and the effect created will trickle down to creatives at all levels. At its base, artists will create, and companies will want to use and incorporate their work into products and services. Design will drive all aspects of this economy.

RISE OF LOCAL CREATIVES As individuals, a life of simplicity from automation and AI may be appreciated, but it will have dire consequences for the job market. However, with every lost job comes a new opportunity for creatives, allowing artists to enter the marketplace and succeed at an unprecedented rate. Currently, Charleston is steadily transforming into the epicenter of art and culture for the South. Culinary and tech already drive the creative arts economy, with fine arts and marketing not far behind. With such a daily influx of people into our community, originality is wanted from Charleston, whatever that may be. We are fortunate that we may not have to wait for increases in automation and AI in the workplace for our economy to be heavily influenced by the creative arts industries, and if you’re a creative, now may be the time to start your own business and become a part of this marketplace.

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LITERARY

H O W O N E O F T H E O L D E S T L I B R A RY S O C I E T I E S I N T H E C O U N T RY I S L E A D I N G O U R L I T E R A RY F U T U R E

by Matt Dobie

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doors and welcome any and all people who care about books, stimulating conversation, and creative ideas. And it has taken on a life of its own.” Same could be said for the inaugural Charleston to Charleston Literary Festival happening this November. “It had a quirky sort of explosion of creativity,” explains Cleveland. “We were going to start very small with just some sessions on Saturday and then a half day Sunday.” But as interest grew, so too did the programming. Now the festival will run from Thursday, November 2 through Sunday the 5th.

L

isten up you lovers of all things literary, if you haven’t heard of the Charleston Library Society, do yourself a favor and check it out. Not only is it the oldest cultural institution in the American South and the second oldest circulating library in the United States, but since executive director Anne Cleveland took over the reins in 2009, it has blossomed into a creative hub, hosting concerts, lectures by renowned authors, and offering events to scratch all your literary itches. Cleveland is a lifelong student of history and was a teacher for many years before taking over as executive director of the Library Society, which at the time was underutilized and suffering from significantly declining membership. “Once I got in, I discovered the treasures there were just extraordinary,” says Cleveland. “All that needed to happen to revitalize this gem was to open the

The Charleston to Charleston Festival is a partnership between the Library Society and the Charleston Festival in Sussex, England, which for almost three decades has been one of the premier literary festivals in all of Europe. A handful of Library Society members had the opportunity to attend the most recent Sussex festival in May. “Every single one of those people came back just avid, in fact, rabid fans of the Charleston Sussex Festival and plan to go many more years,” says Cleveland. She hopes the local festival can inspire a similar reaction. And there’s no reason it shouldn’t, with its compelling collection of speakers from the States and the UK alike, including author and screenwriter William Nicholson. You may not know his name, but you know his work. Nicholson has been nominated for two Academy Awards for his screenplays for Shadowlands and the blockbuster Gladiator (which Fall 2017 | 49


he co-wrote). His new film, Breathe, starring Claire Foy and Andrew Garfield, is already generating Oscar buzz, and, as luck would have it, is opening in Charleston a week after the festival. So as part of the Charleston to Charleston Festival on Thursday night, “They’re going to do a sort of red carpet premiere at the Music Hall,” says Cleveland. “[Nicholson] is going to introduce it and then do a Q & A after the screening.” But that’s just the beginning of the eclectic programming the Charleston to Charleston Festival is offering. Among other topics, there will be lectures on women’s rights, Shakespeare-based historical fiction, Virginia Woolf, the preservation of artistic and literary legacies, and even an intriguing look

at how a couple from Sussex has completely separate and somewhat sensational connections to Charleston, South Carolina. And of course, there will be libations and hors d’oeuvres of plenty. The Charleston to Charleston Festival is just the latest example of the Holy City’s growing literary presence. YALLFest brings thousands of young readers to the streets of Charleston every year, and Anne Cleveland and the Library Society continually attract vaunted authors from around the globe. And hopefully this is just the beginning. “It’s been exciting to see such vibrant growth in the literary world,” says Cleveland. “And I think it’s only going to continue to expand in a healthy and exciting way.” ♦


ATRIUM ART GALLERY 61 QUEEN STREET

Charleston’s Most Exciting Art Space www.AtriumArtGallery.com 843.973.3300 CONTEMPORARY w ABSTRACT w PHOTOGRAPHY w LOWCOUNTRY


A Guide for this Season’s Wearable Art C H A R L E S TO N D E S I G N E R S S H A R E T H E I R C R E AT I O N S , I N S P I R AT I O N S , A N D I N F L U E N C E S BEHIND THEIR NEW COLLECTIONS by Emily Reyna


WEARABLE

HARPER POE of PROUD MARY 125 1/2 Spring St proudmary.org

What’s new for this season?

We’re launching our first knitwear collection that will be available exclusively through our online store. We are also coming out with a small capsule collection of handcrafted leather shoes from Morocco.

What are you inspired by?

I’m constantly inspired by indigenous clothing and always, always by the colors of Morocco. Those colors inspired our SS18 collection. Our AW17 knitwear collection was inspired by comfort and ease, it consists of pieces you can mix and match – chic but super cozy.

What inspires your personal style?

Comfort. The world is so crazy right now I want to feel 100% comfortable in my daily life. Fall 2017 | 53


SUSAN WALKER of IBU 183 King St ibumovement.com

What’s new for this season?

We’re excited to present a new fall/winter collection: Charlotte Moss for Ibu. A year ago, I asked Charlotte to design a clothing collection because of her own personal panache and great style, to which she gave an enthusiastic Yes! Over the past year, we have collaborated with Charlotte to design a full and integrated fall/winter collection in a palette of deep tomato red, chartreuse, charcoal, and indigo blue.

What influences your designs?

Charlotte Moss has inspired and influenced my work, of course! She dresses with bold jewelry and accents, but always a classic style. As a New York resident of 30 years or more, a friend and patron of fashion designers, and a textile designer herself, Charlotte knows the essence of style. And detail! She is all about the details, which make a garment sing.

What inspires your personal style?

My summers in Santa Fe – the absolute freedom to experiment with dress and layer in unexpected ways. I’m always inspired by vintage and antique textiles. Mexican silver jewelry, Afghan mirrored dresses, Indian caftans, simple Japanese indigo farm jackets. I love the rich visuals of walking into a party here – or even down the street – and seeing the artfulness of each person’s dress. 54 | thear tmag.com


HART HAGERTY of HART

Holiday Trunk Show Wed, Dec 6 Zero George 0 George St, Charleston

harthagerty.com

What’s new for this season?

I just launched my fall collection of earrings, which is full of earthy colors and rich, neutral tones that are versatile and chic. They’re the ultimate ‘understated statement earrings’ and I’m in love with all of the colors. For holiday, I was inspired by ‘70s Ibiza glam and created an over-the-top collection of bold earrings with a lot of wow-factor. They are shimmery, fun, and unapologetically cool. I’m also offering a new service where people can customize their own Hart army jacket. They can pick their own

embroideries from my collection of textiles, and we’ll design the jacket together with embellishments – fur collar, buttons, lining, etc.

What influences your designs?

I recently went to the Balearic islands off the coast of Spain and was inspired by the landscape and lifestyle of the Mediterranean. I can’t stop reading about the bohemians who settled into Ibiza into the ‘70s, turning the island into their wild oasis. Very free spirited and glamorous. The book Ibiza Bohemia inspired a lot of my holiday collection. Fall 2017 | 55


DANIELLE HOSKER of MASON HOSKER 17 State St, Charleston masonhosker.com

What’s new for this season?

I’m having a visual love affair with Mia Farrow, so our Mia dress was born. We’re launching our “How do you Mia?” campaign to roll out our newest dress, the “Mia”, in a limited edition collection inspired by 1960s icon, Mia Farrow. It’s the perfect shift dress to take you from “carpool to cocktails” and everything in between. Comfortable and chic – I’m MIA-ing myself right now as a working mom running between meetings, school, and work events.

Mia Shift Dress & 79 Ashley Pop-up Sat, Oct 14, 2–6pm

Meet designer Danielle Hosker in collaboration with fashion veteran George Ackerman and his amazing line of handmade Vachetta leather goods, 79 Ashley. Skinny Dip Charleston, 345 King St


Our Tiki Lounge is showcasing the South’s largest ceramic tiki collection Located next to the Scarecrow Event Gallery’s “British Print Invasion” Exhibit 23 Ann Street / Downtown Charleston


ANDY JAHDE of JAHDE LEATHER ATELIER 68 Queen Street 843.212.7329 jahdemade.com

What’s new for this season?

We’re launching our debut Fall Collection of handmade leather jewelry and small accessories, all crafted here in Charleston with American-sourced materials.

What are you inspired by?

Currently, I’m inspired by succulents. The clean lines, the different tones of green, and the bright pop of colors when they bloom was an inspiration for fall. Succulents are resilient and strong, similar to leather.

What inspires your personal style?

My style inspiration right now is a mix between the bohemian silhouettes of the ‘70s and the colors of the ‘90s. I’m loving colors like poppy red, a dark merlot, and forest green mixed with a soft peach nude or lavender. When in doubt, I wear purple – any shade of purple. Fall 2017 | 59


MINI MARIANA HAY of GOLDBUG COLLECTION Croghan’s Jewel Box 308 King St croghansjewelbox.com

What’s new for this season?

We’re introducing the Shining Star Collection, named after the Eath, Wind, and Fire song. The bugs are a little more ‘cockroach’ like, with longer, skinnier legs, and the whole body is set with crystals. The crystals are set in a ‘star’ setting, inspired by an antique gold band I fell in love with at Croghan’s. This is the third rendition of the bugs. I wanted this collection to have some element of bug designs from previous years so the collection can be interchangeable. For example, we’re doing a leather cord that comes with this season’s star bug, but the idea is to add your bug pieces from past collections or any other charms or lockets you already own. Seeing the mix of what people have is the most fun and really allows you to create something that is truly your own.

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What are you currently inspired by?

I always find inspiration in antique jewelry and a lot of my grandmother’s jewelry. She really shaped Croghan’s into the treasure chest it is now. A lot of my ideas stem from old pictures of her and the jewelry she wore – then altering it to be relevant and on-trend for today.

What influences your designs?

I feel so fortunate to be able to do what I love and have people support me and appreciate the line, so I always try to find a way to give back to our community. Last year’s ‘Lovebug” Heart Pendant gave back to a great local program called heART, an artist guild and theatre company that promotes creative expression, independence, dignity, and community integration for differently abled adults. This year I designed a bug pin with pink stones that will benefit the Roper St. Francis Breast Cancer Program.


MARIA PUCCI of GRAMERCY ATELIER 188 King St, No. 2 gramercy-atelier.com

What’s new for this season?

This season I’m focusing on collaborations with artists to create original fabric designs. We’ve been invited to participate at Cube Art Fair: The American Art Fair of Brussels from October 11-15. As a part of the event, we are bringing an abstract hand-painted silk piece, which we created with Eduardo Wilder, who is well-known for his costume design work on Broadway. We’re also working with Charleston-based designer Susan Carson from Carson & Company whose work combines different antique botanical prints in whimsical patterns.


CALLING ALL

SOUTHEASTERN ARTISTS WE'VE PUT OVER $120,000 ON THE LINE. NOW IT'S YOUR TURN TO SUBMIT YOUR BEST WORK TO ARTFIELDS 2018! NOW ACCEPTING SUBMISSIONS

DEADLINE NOVEMBER 9TH ARTFIELDSSC.ORG


Visual Arts YO U R G U I D E TO A RT- G AW K I N G & G A L L E RY- H O P P I N G

Gallery Openings

by Katie Kerns Geer BELOW: Plantation Tree of Life by Colin Quashie, oil on canvas, 53 x 54�, 2017, at The Southern

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6

$ NEW PAINTING The Southern, 2 Carlson Ct (thru Nov. 12)

PAN AMERICAN MODERNISM: AVANT-GARDE ART IN LATIN AMERICA & THE UNITED STATES Gibbes Museum of Art, 135 Meeting St (thru Jan. 7)

This group show features contemporary painters Adam Eddy, Susan Klein, and Sophie Treppendahl, among others, and their exploration of painting techniques, both old and new.

Showcasing more than 70 important works of art, the exhibition examines Modernism as an international phenomenon, embracing the contributions of Latin American artists.


CHARLESTON GALLERY ASSOCIATION ART WALK, 5-8pm

Make a night of it. The following art openings take place during the CGA Art Walk:

OUR CITY Anglin Smith Fine Art | 9 Queen St (thru Oct. 20)

Charleston plays muse to the artists in this group show, including the Smith family — mother, Betty Anglin Smith, and triplets, Shannon Smith Hughes, Jennifer Smith Rogers, and Tripp Smith.

NEW SOUTHERN LANDSCAPES Linda Fantuzzo | Ann Long Fine Art

CAST Nancy Langston | Corrigan Gallery THE RIKHOFF SPORTING ART COLLECTION Dog & Horse Fine Art, 102 Church St (thru Nov. 4)

View the sporting art collection — from foxhunting paintings and prints to whimsical collectibles — of avid hunter and writer Jim Rikhoff.

AFTERGLOW Stephanie Marzella | Edward Dare Gallery

JESSICA PISANO SOLO SHOW " Atrium Gallery, 61 Queen St (thru Oct. 31)

NEW BETWEEN Lori Glavin | The George Gallery, 50 Bogard St (thru Oct. 27)

THE COLORS I SEE Ann Watcher | Cecil Byrne Gallery

WHAT’S IN A NAME? Mary Ann Cope & Mary Hoffman Hagan Fine Art

LAND ESCAPES Susan Gilmore | Charleston Artist Guild

PASTURES AND POULTRY Rana Jordahl | Lowcountry Artists Gallery

Birds, trees, the sea — contemporary artist Pisano is perpetually intrigued by nature and explores its mystiques in this solo exhibition.

The abstract painter, printmaker, and collage artist debuts dynamic new work.


Aria by Jessica Pisano, oil on wood panel, 40 x 40”, at Atrium Art Gallery

LAND’S EDGE Sheryl Stalnaker | Martin Gallery THE INS AND OUTS OF CHARLESTON Brandon Newton | Mary Martin Gallery SECOND NATURE Marissa Vogl | Meyer Vogl Gallery, 122 Meeting St (thru Oct. 27)

Vogl often paints in two different styles simultaneously. Landscapes inspire abstract paintings, while abstracts influence the landscapes; this exhibition presents both and pairs them together.

BIRDS OF A FEATHER Miles Purvis | Miller Gallery, 149 ½ E. Bay St (thru Oct. 27)

Purvis unveils her newest series of resin and mixed-media collage work. The inspiration? The artist’s best friends and their favorite cocktails.

REACH Sara Pittman | Mitchell Hill, 438 King St (thru Oct. 31)

Working with oils and acrylics, Pittman explores unusual combinations of both bright and muted colors, shapes and marks.

JEFF ERICKSON Principle Gallery

Play by Susan Gregory, encaustic, at Fabulon

THE CALLING Michelle Jader and Robert Lange Robert Lange Studios, 2 Queen St (thru Oct. 31)

Figures leap, float, and dive their way towards positive directions in these action-based paintings by Jader and Lange.

INTERIOR MOODS Katriel Srebnik | Srebnik Gallery

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14 # WOMEN WHO GO THERE Fabulon, 1017 Wappoo Rd

This interactive traveling post card show makes a stop at Fabulon — its only visit to the South — before heading to China.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19 CATS VS. DOGS The Vendue Charleston’s Art Hotel, 19 Vendue Range (thru April)

Are you a cat person or a dog person? Forty artists from around the world answer this question in a group show that donates a portion of all sales to the Charleston Animal Society. Opening Reception, 6-8pm

Fall 2017 | 65


Times Square Noon by Seth Tane, oil on board, 6.75 x 10”, at Helena Fox Fine Art

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 SEA CHANGE Aurora Robson & Chris Jordan | Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, 161 Calhoun St (thru Dec. 9)

A series of breathtaking imagery and programs, in collaboration with the South Carolina Aquarium, to raise awareness of our plastic waste problem and the detrimental effects on our planet.

NEW WORKS BY COLIN PAGE Anglin Smith Fine Art NEW WORKS BY JILL HOOPER Ann Long Fine Art EXAGGERATED NATURE Art Mecca

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21

SAND, SEA & SKY Cecilia Murray & Jeanne Rosier Smith Cecil Byrne Gallery

TRIBUTE and WAX POETICA Fabulon, 1017 Wappoo Rd

COLOR NOTES Ginny Versteegen | Charleston Artist Guild

One night, two art openings. Tribute features artwork inspired by song lyrics, while Wax Poetica delves into hot wax, exhibiting work of encaustic artists from across the nation. Opening Reception, 5-8pm

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3 FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK, 5-8PM

The following art openings coincide with the First Friday Art Walk:

66 | thear tmag.com

REMEMBERING THE PAST Elizabeth O’Neill Verner | Corrigan Gallery AN AMERICAN IMPRESSIONIST John C. Traynor | Ella Walton Richardson Fine Art FIELD DAY Vicki Sher | The George Gallery (thru Nov. 30)

Gallery owner Anne Seigfried says Sher has a “personal language of shapes and colors.” Indeed, the artist’s pieces feel conversational, energetic, and a little bit playful.


! NEW YORK MINUTE Seth Tane | Helena Fox Fine Art (thru Nov. 10)

Tane’s highly realistic paintings are a love song to New York City — unique views of the subway, colorful abandoned railroad tracks and trains, and urban landscapes.

RURAL ARCHETYPES Allen Wynn | Martin Gallery SOUTHBOUND Anne Blair Brown | Meyer Vogl Gallery (thru Nov. 30)

The renowned plein-air artist travels the world to paint, but this show features work that is quintessentially southern.

NEW WORKS BY KATE HOORAY OSMOND Miller Gallery, 149 ½ E. Bay St (thru Nov. 30)

The oil and gold leaf artist goes big for this solo exhibition, featuring some of her largest aerial paintings to date.

[UN]FAMILIAR GROUND Joshua Flint | Robert Lange Studios, 2 Queen St (thru Nov. 30)

Vintage shops, digitized museum archives, old churches in states of decay — the artist is fascinated with out-of-date materials and finds much of his inspiration there.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9 THE GIBBES DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES PRESENTS OLIVIER PICASSO Sottile Theatre, 44 George St

Olivier Widmaier Picasso is an authority on Pablo Picasso with a unique perspective: He is grandson to the legendary artist. Tickets $50 for members, $60 for non-members, 6-7pm; gibbesmuseum.org

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10 HONORING THE STRUGGLE E.B. Lewis | Wells Gallery

The artist presents his latest watercolors of African American Freedom Fighters and scenes of brave escapes from slavery.

Fall 2017 | 67


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 15 15TH ANNUAL ART AUCTION Redux Contemporary Art Center

Redux turns 15! Come celebrate the center’s incredible commitment to keeping contemporary arts alive in the Lowcountry with cocktails, food, live music, and a silent and live auction of original art. Purchase tickets at reduxstudios.org

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1 CHARLESTON GALLERY ASSOCIATION ART WALK, 5-8pm

The following art openings coincide with the CGA Art Walk:

OUR INTERIORS Anglin Smith Fine Art, 9 Queen St (thru Dec. 15)

Forget landscapes. This group show focuses on light-filled interiors, cozy café corners, and energetic restaurants.

68 | thear tmag.com

GALLERY WALL‘APALOOZA Meyer Vogl Gallery, 122 Meeting St (thru Dec. 24)

The small works in this group show are perfect for filling gallery walls, small nooks, and Christmas wish lists.

NEW WORKS Jared Owens + Phil Durst | Mitchell Hill, 438 King St (thru Dec. 24)

Martin began painting after working as an art consultant for many years; Owens, after spending years in a prison cell. Both create expressive, color-centric abstracts.

JANE CHAPIN & GENE COSTANZA Principle Gallery OLGA KRIMON Reinert Fine Art ISLANDS I MAKE BELIEVE Nathan Durfee | Robert Lange Studios HOLIDAY SHOW Katriel Srebnik | Srebnik Gallery


EVENTS CHARLESTON FARMERS MARKET AT MARION SQUARE Offering local produce, plants, flowers, and crafts to support Lowcountry farmers and artisans. Saturdays, 8am – 2pm | charlestonfarmersmartket.com

COLOUR OF MUSIC The fifth annual Black Classical Musicians Festival, showcasing the impact and historical significance of black classical composers and performers on American and world culture. Oct 18 – 22 | colourofmusic.org

REQUIEM FOR RICE A tribute to the Africans enslaved on Lowcountry rice plantations and their contributions to the economy of the South through concerts, readings, lectures, dinners, and ballet to reclaim the shared cultural inheritance of the Lowcountry rice industry. Oct 20 – 22 | requiemforrice.com

J.K.CRUM THE BOOK OF MINIS K. CRUM MINI S by JOHN THE BOO K OF

J.K .CR UM MIN IS THE BO OK OF

CHARLESTON ARTS FESTIVAL FINALE AT THE ROYAL AMERICAN An extension of the JAIL BREAK series, this all encompassing arts extravaganza will feature live dance, comedy, and musical performances by Brave Baby, Beach Tiger, Benjamin Starr, DJ Sista Misses, and Matadero. Sat, Oct 28, 4pm – 11pm | Tickets: $25

FREE VERSE POETRY FESTIVAL Charleston’s first poetry festival, presenting poetry through workshops, at events, and as public art. Until Oct 31 | freeversefestival.com

CHARLESTON TO CHARLESTON LITERARY FESTIVAL The inaugural international literary festival hosted by Charleston, SC and Charleston, Sussex, UK. Nov 2 – 5 | charlestontocharleston.com

YALLFEST Charleston’s Young Adult Book Festival Nov 10-11 | yallfest.org

7½" square - 112 pages

John is known for his whimsical and gentle surrealism. This book showcases 54 select miniature 4"x 4" paintings in a glossy, limited edition book. Each book is signed and all painting are shown in color and actual size! $ 35 includes free shipping - Available online: Fall 2017 | 69


performing Arts

KEEP UP WITH THE L AT E S T A RT S E V E N T S AT T H E A RT M AG . C O M / E V E N T S OR BY SIGNING UP FOR T H E A RT M AG N E W S L E T T E R

BALLET EVOLUTION balletevolution.org

NOV 7: Schubertiade!, Dock Street Theatre

OCT 28-29: Notes Between the Shadows, Sottile Theatre

NOV 10: Bartók, Higdon & Koumendakis, Simmons Center Recital Hall

DEC 22-23: The Snow Queen, Sottile Theatre

NOV 17-18: Cathedral Sounds, Gaillard Center

CHARLESTON JAZZ ORCHESTRA

DEC 7-10: Holy City Messiah, Cathedral of St. John the Baptist

charlestonjazz.com

OCT 21: Jazz Elements: The Music of Earth, Wind & Fire, Charleston Music Hall DEC 2: Holiday Swing: A Charleston Jazz Tradition, Charleston Music Hall

CHARLESTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

DEC 13: Holiday Strings, Charleston Library Society DEC 16: Holiday Pops, Gaillard Center DEC 17: Family Holiday Pops Concert, Lightsey Chapel at Charleston Southern University

charlestonsymphony.org

DEC 20: Canadian Brass, Gaillard Center

OCT 13-14: Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Gaillard Center

CHAMBER MUSIC CHARLESTON

OCT 26: Happy Birthday, John Williams, Gaillard Center OCT 28: Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone in Concert, North Charleston Performing Arts Center

70 | thear tmag.com

chambermusiccharleston.com

OCT 12: Rock & Rondo Redux IV, Charleston Library Society NOV 12: Music for Piano and Strings, Dock Street Theatre


charleston theatRE

CHARLESTON STAGE AT DOCK STREET THEATRE 135 Church St | 843.577.7183 charlestonstage.com OCT 18 – NOV 5: To Kill A Mockingbird

34 WEST

200 Meeting St | 843.901.9343 34west.org UNTIL NOV 11: Love Potion No. 9 by Stephen Wayne NOV 21 – DEC 31: Holiday Road by Stephen Wayne and Jeff Querin DEC 10: Live screening of Stephen Sondheim’s legendary musical Follies

NOV 29 – DEC 20: A Christmas Carol DEC 9 – 16: Junie B. In Jingle Bells, Batman Smells!

FOOTLIGHT PLAYERS

20 Queen St | 843.722.4487 footlightplayers.net OCT 20 – NOV 5: The Addams Family DEC 1 – DEC 17: Annie


To add to this Victorian nightmare, Woolfe Street Playhouse has partnered with HOM to serve a Meat Pie and Mash plate before each performance of Sweeney Todd. (thru Nov 18)

PURE THEATRE

477 King St | 843.723.4444 puretheatre.org OCT 27 – NOV 18: The Royale by Marco Ramirez

THRESHOLD REPERTORY THEATRE

84 ½ Society St | 843.277.2172 thresholdrep.org

The best of British theatre is broadcast live from the London stage and shown at 34 West Theater Co. Next up is Follies Dec 10.

VILLAGE REP AT WOOLFE STREET PLAYHOUSE

34 Woolfe St, Charleston | 843.856.1579 woolfestreetplayhouse.com OCT 27 – NOV 18: Sweeney Todd DEC 9 & 10: Village Kids Troupe presents Elf Jr. directed by Lara Allred

UNTIL OCT 15: Ripcord: A Comedy by David Lindsay-Abaire

MIDTOWN PRODUCTIONS

NOV 2 – 19: The Elephant Man by Bernard Pomerance

OCT 13 – 29: It’s Only a Play by Terrence McNally

WHAT IF? PRODUCTIONS 84 ½ Society St | 843.737.6059 whatifproductions.org DEC 8 – 17: Feathers & Teeth

2816 Azalea Dr, North Charleston 843.557.1163 | midtownproductions.org

DEC 1 – 17: Plaid Tidings

SOUTH OF BROADWAY THEATRE COMPANY

1080 E. Montague Ave, North Charleston | 843.745.0317 southofbroadway.com OCT 19 – NOV 29: What the Butler Saw by Joe Orton

72 | thear tmag.com


5TH WALL PRODUCTIONS

DEC 1 – 16: A Christmas Story

2070 Sam Rittenberg Blvd, West Ashley 5thwallproductions.org

CHARLESTON PERFORMING ARTS CENTER JAMES ISLAND 873 Folly Rd, James Island 843.991.5582 charlestonperformingarts.org

OCT 20 – 28: Ghost Walks Into a Bar by Mora Harris DEC 1 – 16: The Pillowman by Martin McDonagh

UNTIL OCT 22: Sweet Charity

FLOWERTOWN PLAYERS Summerville’s Community Theatre 133 S. Main St, Summerville 843.875.9251 flowertownplayers.org

DEC 1 – 22: Holiday Cabaret

OCT 20 – 28: Accomplice by Rupert Holmes

A Center for Art and Education

843.566.3383 1017 Wappoo Road Charleston, SC 29407

Original Live Theater

FabulonArt.com Susan@FabulonArt.com

www.34west.org

in the heart of Charleston 200 MEETING ST


DOWNTOWN

Visual Arts

Gallery Guide

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DOWNTOWN 1. Carolina Antique Maps and Prints

91 Church St | 843.722.4773 carolinaantiqueprints.com

2. Dog & Horse

Fine Art & Portraiture

102 Church St. | 843.577.5500 dogandhorsefineart.com

3. Charleston Renaissance Gallery

103 Church St | 843.723.0025 charlestonrenaissancegallery.com

4. Helena Fox Fine Art 106-A Church St 843.723.0073 helenafoxfineart.com

5. DiNello Art Gallery

111 E Bay St | 843.764.9941 lauradinello.com

6. Corrigan Gallery

7 Broad St | 843.722.9868 corrigangallery.com

7. Ellis-Nicholson Gallery

1 1/2 Broad St | 843.722.5353 ellis-nicholsongallery.com

8. Edward Dare Gallery

31 Broad St | 843.853.5002 edwarddare.com

9. Martin Gallery

18 Broad St | 843.723.7378 martingallerycharleston.com

10. Ann Long Fine Art

54 Broad St | 843.577.0447 annlongfineart.com

11. Ella Walton Richardson Fine Art

58 Broad St | 843.722.3660 ellarichardson.com

12. Cecil Bryne Gallery

60 Broad St | 843.312.1891 cecilbyrnegallery.com

13. Mary Martin Gallery of Fine Art

103 Broad St | 843.723.0303 marymartinart.com

25. Lowcountry Artists Gallery

148 E Bay St | 843.577.9295 lowcountryartists.com

14. Horton Hayes Fine Art

26. Atrium Art Gallery

15. Revealed Art Gallery

27. Alkyon Arts and Antiques

30 State St | 843.958.0014 hortonhayes.com 119-A Church St 843.872.5606 revealedgallery.com

16. Gaye Sanders

Fisher Gallery

124 Church St | 843.958.0010 gayesandersfisher.com

17. John Carroll Doyle Art Gallery

125 Church St | 843.577.7344 johncdoyle.com

18. Miller Gallery

149 1/2 East Bay St 843.764.9281 millergallerychs.com

61 Queen St | 843.973.3300 atriumartgallery.com 120 Meeting St | 843.276.5899 alkyon.us

28. Meyer Vogl Gallery

122 Meeting St. | 843.805.7144 meyervogl.com

29. Principle Gallery

125 Meeting St | 843.727.4500 principlegallery.com

30. Atelier Gallery

153 King St | 843.722.5668 theateliergalleries.com

31. Sportsman’s Gallery

165 King St | 843.727.1224 sportsmansgallery.com

19. Charleston Artist Guild

32. Hagan Fine Art

20. Graffito

33. Reinert Fine Art

21. Anglin Smith Fine Art

34. John Pope Antiques

22. The Vendue

35. LePrince Fine Art

23. Robert Lange Studios

36. Julia Santen Gallery

24. Gordon Wheeler Gallery

37. Audubon Gallery

160 East Bay St | 843.722.2425 charlestonartistguild.com 151 E Bay St | 843.727.1155 graffitocharleston.com 9 Queen St | 843.853.0708 anglinsmith.com 19 Vendue Rg | 843.577.7970 thevendue.com 2 Queen St | 843.805.8052 robertlangestudios.com 180 E Bay St | 843.722.2546 gordonwheelergallery.com

177 King Street | 843.901.8124 haganfineart.com 179 King St. | 843.345.1785 reinertfineart.com 180 King St | 843.793.4277 johnpopeantiques.com 184 King St | 843.442.1664 leprince.com 188 King St | 843.534.0758 juliasantengallery.com 190 King St | 843.853.1100 audubonart.com

Fall 2017 | 75


38. Charleston Craft Co-op

161 Church St | 843.723.2938 charlestoncrafts.org

39. Real Estate Studio

214 King St | 843.722.5618 dunesproperties.com/the-realestate-studio/

40. Chuma Gullah Gallery

17 188 Meeting St | 843.722.1702 gallerychuma.com ER 41. HOne UG of A Kind Art and

Fine Craft

43. Tate Nation

257 King St. | 843.568.9911 tatenation.com

44. Jennifer Black

74 N Market St | 843.534.1774 oneofakindgallery.com M O RR 42. Studio 151 IS N O O N 175HChurch St | 843.579.9725 NS O Jstudio151finearts.com

265 King St | 843.763.0861 lowcountrystudio.com/Jennifer.htm

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45. Grand Bohemian Gallery

55 Wentworth St 843.724.4130 grandbohemiangallery.com

46. Alterman Studios

36 George St | 843.577.0647 altermanstudios.com

MIDTOWN 47. Art Mecca

427 King St | 843.577.0603 artmeccaofcharleston.com

48. Ben Ham Images

416 King St | 843.410.1495 benhamimages.com

Improve your online presence

49. Mitchell Hill

438 King St | 843.564.0034 mitchellhillinc.com

Increase your client base

50. King Street Studios

Strengthen your brand loyalty

51. Sanavandi Gallery

511 King St | 843.628.5515 thecharlestonphotographer.com 66 Spring St. | 843.937.0107 sanavandiart.com

52. Molly B. Right

68 Spring St | 843.568.3219 mollybright.com

academy.themodernconnection.com

Enroll Today!

53. The George Gallery

50 Bogard St | 843.579.7328 georgegalleryart.com

54. The Southern Your hostess: Ashley T Caldwell CEO of The Modern Connection

2 Carlson Ct | 843.642.8020 thesouthern.gallery

Fall 2017 | 77


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DOWNTOWN 1. Oak Steakhouse

2. Fast & French 98 Broad St | 843.577.0647 fastandfrenchcharleston.com

3. Bull Street Gourmet 120 King St | 843.722.6464 bullstreetgourmetandmarket.com

4. Queen Street Grocery 133 Queen St | 843.723.4121 queenstreetgrocerycafe.com

5. Bin 152 152 King St | 843.577.7359 bin152.com

6. 82 Queen 82 Queen St | 843.723.7591 82queen.com 78 | thear tmag.com

7. Poogan’s Porch 72 Queen St | 843.577.2337 poogansporch.com

8. Husk

KING

17 Broad St | 843.722.4220 oaksteakhouserestaurant.com

2

76 Queen St | 843.577.2500 huskrestaurant.com

9. McCrady’s 2 Unity Alley | 843.577.0025 mccradysrestaurant.com

S. BATTERY

10. Minero MURERA 153B Bay Y St | 843.789.2241 minerorestaurant.com

11. Drawing Room 19 Vendue Range 843.414.2334 drawingroomrestaurant.com

12. Cypress 167 E Bay St | 843.727.0111 cypresscharleston.com

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13. Blossom 171 E Bay St | 843.722.9200 blossomcharleston.com

14. The Gin Joint 182 E Bay St | 843.577.6111 theginjoint.com

15. Magnolia’s 185 E Bay St. | 843.577.7771 magnoliascharleston.com

16. Poogan’s Smokehouse 188 E Bay St. | 843.577.2337 poogansporch.com

17. Slightly North of Broad 192 E Bay St | 843.723.3424 snobcharleston.com

18. High Cotton 199 E Bay St | 843.724.3815 highcottoncharleston.com


19. Craftsmen Kitchen 12 Cumberland St 843.577.9699 craftsmentaphouse.com

20. Fulton Five 5 Fulton St | 843.853.5555 fultonfive.com

21. Kitchen 208 208 King St | 843.725.7208 kitchen208.com

22. Bar at The Spectator 67 State St | 843.724.4326

23. Grill 225 225 E Bay St | 843.266.4222 marketpavilion.com

24. 5 Church 32B N Market St | 843.937.8666 5churchcharleston.com

25. Burwell’s Stone Fire Grill 14 N Market St | 843.737.8700 burwellscharleston.com

26. Peninsula Grill 112 N Market St 843.723.0700 peninsulagrill.com

27. Charleston Grill 224 King St | 843.577.4522 charlestongrill.com

28. Circa 1886 149 Wentworth St 843.853.7828 | circa1886.com

29. Hank’s Seafood 10 Hayne St | 843.723.3474 hansseafoodrestaurant.com

30. Cru Café 18 Pinckney St | 843.534.2434 crucafe.com

31. FIG 232 Meeting St 843.805.5900 | eatatfig.com

32. Élevé at the Grand Bohemian

55 Wentworth St 843.724.4144 grandbohemiancharleston.com

33. Sermet’s Downtown 276 King St | 843.853.7775 sermetsdowntown.com

34. Cristophe Chocolatier 90 Society St | 843.297.8674 christophechocolatier.com/

35. Muse 82 Society St | 843.577.1102 charlestonmuse.com

36. Co 340 King St | 843.720.3631 eatatco.com

37. Ted’s Butcherblock 334 E Bay St | 843.577.0094 tedsbutcherblock.com

MIDTOWN 38. Virginia’s on King 412 King St | 843.735.5800 holycityhospitality.com

39. Stella’s 114 St Philip St | 843.400.0026 stellascharleston.com

40. Pane e Vino 17 Warren St | 843.853.5955 panevinocharleston.com

41. 39 Rue de Jean 39 John St | 843.722.8881 holycityhospitality.com

42. Coast 39 John St | 843.722.8838 holycityhospitality.com

43. Michael’s on the Alley 39 John St | 843.722.8838 holycityhospitality.com

44. Vincent Chicco’s 39 John St | 843.722.8838 holycityhospitality.com

45. The Victor Social Club 39 John St | 843.722.8838 holycityhospitality.com

46. Halls Chophouse 434 King St | 843.727.0090 hallschophouse.com

47. Monza 451 King St | 843.720.8787 monzapizza.com

48. Closed For Business 453 King St | 843.853.8466 closed4business.com

49. Fish 442 King St | 843.722.3474 fishrestaurantcharleston.com

50. O-Ku 463 King St | 843.737.0112 o-kusushi.com

51. Basil 460 King St | 843.724.3490 eatatbasil.com

52. Cocktail Club 479 King St | 843.724.9411 locu.com

53. The Macintosh 479 King St | 843.789.4299 themacintoshcharleston.com

54. Rarebit 474 King St | 843.974.5483 therarebit.com

55. Belmont 511 King St locu.com

56. 492 492 King St | 843.203.6338 492king.com

57. Bay Street Biergarten 549 E Bay St | 843.266.2437 baystreetbiergarten.com

58. Hominy Grill 207 Rutledge Ave 843.937.0930 | hominygrill.com Fall 2017 | 79


67. The Grocery

MIDTOWN

4 Cannon St | 843.302.8825 thegrocerycharleston.com

17

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68. Brown’s Court Bakery

75

199 St Philip St 843.724.0833 brownscourt.com

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69. WildFlour Pastry

N

73 Spring St. | 843.327.2621 wildflourpastry.com

I N T E R S TA T E

26

52

70. Warehouse 45 ½ Spring St | 843.202.0712 wearewarehouse.com

PER

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74

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SS NA

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71. Trattoria Lucca 41 Bogard St | 843.973.3323 luccacharleston.com

E

LIN

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CO

73

72. Elliotborough Mini Bar

.P ST

18 Percy St | 843.577.0028 elliotboroughminibar.com

LIP

HI

E

71

70 68

61

NG

60

57

65

MI

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64 63 CO

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630 King St | 843.577.5393 barsacharleston.com

66

67

69

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73. Barsa

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72

701 E Bay St | 843.793.2636 mercandmash.com

75. Taco Boy 217 Huger St | 843.789.3333 tacoboy.net

HI

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56 55 54 53 52 51 50 49 48 46 47 41-45

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40 39

38

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210 Rutledge Ave N

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60. Sugar Bakeshop 59 Cannon St | 843.579.2891 sugarbake.com

61. Five Loaves Café 43 Cannon St | 843.937.4303 fiveloavescafe.com

62. Xiao Bao Biscuit 224 Rutledge Ave xiaobaobiscuit.com 80 | thear tmag.com

N

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CA

59. Goulette

74. Mercantile and Mash

63. Stars 495 King St | 843.577.0100 starsrestaurant.com

64. Prohibition 547 King St | 843.793.2964 prohibtioncharleston.com

65. Indaco 526 King St | 843.727.1228 indacocharleston.com

66. The Ordinary 544 King St | 843.414.7060 eattheordinary.com

UPTOWN 76. Luke‘s Craft Pizza 271 Ashley Ave. lukescraftpizza.com

77. Dell‘z Uptown 511 Rutledge Ave 843.641.0352

78. The Daily 652 King St | 843.619.0151 shopthedaily.com

79. Harold’s Cabin 247 Congress St | 843.793.4440 haroldscabin.com


52

MT. PLEASANT

UPTOWN

89

88

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80. Leon’s Oyster Shack 698 King St | 843.531.6500 LO leonsoystershop.com CK

W O

O

D 81. The Park Cafe

730 Rutledge Ave 843.410.1070 theparkcafechs.com

82. Royal American 17

970 Morrison Dr 843.817.6925 theroyalamerican.com

83. Revelry Brewing Co 10 Conroy St | 843.203.6194 revelrybrewingco.com

84. Lewis Barbecue I N T E R S TA T E

26Nassau St | 843.805.9500 464 N lewisbarbeque.com

85. Fiery Ron‘s Home Team BBQ

126 William St | 843.225.7427 hometeambbq.com

88. Tattooed Moose 1137 Morrison Dr | 843.277.2990 tattooedmoose.com

89. Rutledge Cab Co. 1300 Ritledge Ave 843.720.1440 rutledgecabco.com

86. Edmund’s Oast 1081 Morrison Dr | 843.727.1145 edmundsoast.com

87. Butcher & Bee 1085 Morrison Dr | 843.619.0202 butcherandbee.com

Fall 2017 | 81


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Art Mag: Fall 2017, The 10 Year Anniversary Issue  
Art Mag: Fall 2017, The 10 Year Anniversary Issue