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SPECIAL EDITION • WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 7, 2011

THE ALL STATE.ORG STATE Student Newspaper of Austin Peay State University Since 1930 • First copy free, additional copies 50 cents each

WE REMEMBER Sept. 11, 2001 - Sept. 11, 2011


2 SEPT. 11, 2001

0

survivors from the World Trade Center North Tower above the point of impact.

WE REMEMBER SPECIAL EDITION • WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 7, 2011

New Yorkers see ‘phoenix’ rise from the ashes of 9/11

1.5

million tons of debris removed from the World Trade Center.

2

years old is the age of the youngest passenger on the hijacked jets.

10

bystanders were killed by falling debris from the World Trade Center.

16

survivors from World Trade Center South Tower above the point of impact.

19

hijackers carried out the attacks.

20

miles was how far the World Trade Towers could be seen burning.

THE MORNING OF

ON THE COVER: ‘Tribute in Light’ illuminates the sky over Manhattan on Sept. 11, 2006, in New York, marking the fifth anniversary of the Sept. 11 terror attacks. ABOVE: Firefighters walk through the rubble in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks. PHOTOS BY ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEPTEMBER 11, 2001

American Airlines Flight 11 Boston to Los Angeles Boeing 767 87 passengers

American Airlines

Flight 77 Washington to Los Angeles Boeing 757 59 passengers

United Airlines

Flight 93 Newark to San Francisco Boeing 757 40 passengers * times in CDT

7:30 a.m.

7 a.m.

8 a.m. 

BOSTON Departs 6:59 a.m.

WORLD TRADE CENTER NORTH TOWER Impact 7:45 a.m.

United Airlines

Flight 175 Boston to Los Angeles Boeing 767 60 passengers

mourned — then mourned again when soldiers died in the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. And mourned yet again when the housing market went bust and when the Great Recession began. “Maybe in New York, they can see a phoenix rising out of the ashes,” said Tony Brunello, a political science professor at Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Fla. “But to people around here, it’s a world of fear, with no evidence of the recovery.” New Yorkers weren’t spared the hardship of the recession and wars. But their morale might be higher a decade after 9/11 because they see evidence of progress and accomplishment at ground zero, Brunello and Baick said, while folks in places like Florida, Arizona and Nevada felt an ever-worsening string of events over the past decade, with no end in sight. “The rest of the country is still trying to grasp the meaning of these things, trying to make sense of them,” said Baick. “The rest of the country, which was not as affected by 9/11, is still coming to grips with this.” TAS

 By ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOSTON Departs 7:15 a.m.

9:30 a.m.

10 a.m. ●

● SARASOTA, FL. President Bush notified of attack 7:50 a.m.

WORLD TRADE CENTER SOUTH TOWER Impact 8:03 a.m.

MAYOR RUDOLPH GIULIANI ORDERS EVACUATION SOUTH OF CANAL STREET 10 a.m.

NORTH TOWER Collapses 9:28 a.m.

 ●

BUSH CONDEMNS TERRORIST ATTACKS 8:15 a.m.

9 a.m.

8:30 a.m.

SOUTH TOWER Collapses 9:05 a.m.

BUSH LEAVES SARASOTA, WHITE HOUSE IS EVACUATED 9:15 a.m.

WASHINGTON Departs 7:10 a.m.

NEWARK Departs 7:05 a.m.

In the days after Sept. 11, 2001, lower Manhattan was covered in grey ash from the demolished twin towers while stunned people posted flyers of missing loved ones throughout the city. Massive blood drives were organized around the country, and folks lined up to donate. Yet few people had been pulled out alive from the World Trade Center debris, so no blood was needed. A decade later, New Yorkers are no longer stunned, said John Baick, a professor of history at Western New England University in Springfield, Mass. “New York got over 9/11 much faster than anyone expected,” said Baick, who is also a New York City historian. “New Yorkers are better at compartmentalizing. Nowhere else in the world is there this kind of diversity, tension and strangeness. New Yorkers adapt and adjust remarkably quickly.” While the city of New York picked itself up, the rest of the country also

PENTAGON EAST WALL Impact 8:45 a.m.

● F.A.A. GROUNDS ALL DOMESTIC FLIGHTS, MANHATTAN BRIDGES AND TUNNELS CLOSED 8:20-8:40 a.m.

ALL INCOMING FLIGHTS U.N. DIVERTED TO CANADA HEADQUARTERS 9:30 a.m. EVACUATED 10 a.m.

EAST WALL Portion collapses 9:10 a.m.

 PENNSYLVANIA Crashes 9:20 a.m

● NEW YORK CITY PRIMARY ELECTIONS CANCELED 9:30 a.m.


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WE REMEMBER SPECIAL EDITION • WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 7, 2011

‘She became a hero’

Alumna, former All State photographer shares the story of her cousin’s death on United Flight 93

SEPT. 11, 2001

20

percent of Americans knew someone hurt or killed in the attacks.

23

N.Y.P.D. police officers died at the World Trade Center.

24

people are still classified missing from the World Trade Center.

26

days later, the U.S. began bombing Afghanistan.

The 9/11 Memorial Guide app lets users explore the memorial that will open on Sept. 11 and search for victims names. SCREEN SHOTS FROM 9/11 MEMORIAL GUIDE APP

37

Port Authority police officers died at the World Trade Center.

50

percent increase in CIA applications from 2001 to 2002.

69

» By LOIS JONES Former All State Senior Photographer

September 11, 2001, started like any other fall day. I got up and got the kids off to school, grabbed my cup of coffee and watched “The Today Show.” The day seemed like it would progress like any other. Before long the show announced breaking news that a plane had crashed into one of the Twin Towers in New York. Speculations were bandied back and forth from engine failure to pilot error and finally a terrorist attack. The discussion about the cause of the crash went on for some time as “The Today Show” showed a burning tower. The newscasters got louder on the show and you heard, “Oh my God, another plane flew into the second tower.” I was watching in disbelief as I saw planes flying into towers, people screaming and running and flames and smoke pouring from

the twin towers in New York City. My phone rang and it was my mother. We watched the broadcast together in disbelief and prayed for the people in the towers, and those who must have perished on the planes. We hung up and I continued to watch, transfixed by what was happening in real life that looked like special effects in a movie. They now thought it was a terrorist attack. My phone rang again. It was my mother. Her voice had changed and there was an urgency to it. “Linda is flying today,” she said. I asked if she was on one of those flights and my mother said no. She said she was trying to get my aunt on the phone and see where Linda was flying out of and her destination. She said she would call me back and hung up. I continued watching. The phone rang again and my mother said Linda was flying out of Newark where neither of these planes departed from. We

stayed on the phone and watched together. The media was frantic. You could hear in the newscasters voices the disbelief, fright, concern and struggle, to pay attention to what was happening in the United States, yet report the news in an accurate, informative way. “Oh my God, another plane has flown into the Pentagon,” reported “The Today Show” newscasters. My mother hung up to try and find out what flight Linda was on and if she was in the air at that time. This part of the day is a blur to me. I am not sure what happened in what order, but we found out Linda was on an United Airlines flight out of Newark heading to San Francisco. She thought Linda was flying first class with her boyfriend Joe. It was two days before Linda’s birthday and they were flying there for a short vacation mixed with a little work. We found out the flight number, United Flight 93. I am not

sure when we knew Linda was on the fourth plane, but it was either right before they announced a fourth plane or immediately after they announced it. My mother had hung up and called her sister, Linda’s mother to confirm if Linda was indeed on that plane, the plane we were now hearing about as the fourth hijacked plane. Linda was on Flight 93: that Flight 93. The calls from the plane started so we knew that the passengers knew what was happening. Linda had called too. She got her sisters answering machine. “Hi Elsa, it’s Lin. We know that the plane has been hijacked. We know about the others. I don’t know what is going to happen, but I love you. Tell mom and dad I love them too. My safe is in the closet, here is the combination.” She went on in the conversation to give instructions

CONTINUED ON PAGE 8

days was how long fires continued to burn at the World Trade Center after the attacks.

82

years old was the age of the oldest passenger on the hijacked jets.

98

F.D.N.Y. vehicles destroyed at the World Trade Center.

102

minutes elapsed from impact to collapse of the World Trade Center towers.

115

nationalities were represented by people who died in the attacks.

125

people died at the Pentagon.


WE REMEMBER

Display in your window in remembrance of those lost in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.


THE ALL STATE Student Newspaper of Austin Peay State University Since 1930


6 SEPT. 11, 2001

144

rings found in the World Trade Center rubble.

200

funerals attended by New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani.

246

people died on the four planes involved in the attacks.

289

WE REMEMBER SPECIAL EDITION • WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 7, 2011

Reflections from President Emeritus Sherry Hoppe

bodies were found intact at the World Trade Center.

351

firefighters and paramedics died at the World Trade Center.

437

wristwatches found in the World Trade Center rubble.

500

miles per hour was how fast the two Boeing 767 jets hit the World Trade Center towers.

614

workers died in the World Trade Center South Tower.

684

points drop in the Dow Jones Industrial Average when the N.Y.S.E. reopened after the attacks.

$970

million spent on the emergency by FEMA.

1,402

workers died in the World Trade Center North Tower.

1,609

people lost a spouse or partner in the attacks.

» By SHERRY HOPPE APSU President Emeritus

September 11, 2001, began like any other day at APSU: students and faculty in class and staff members in offices. The executive staff and I had gathered in the President’s Conference Room for our weekly meeting and were deep into discussions about academic opportunities, student issues and budget problems as we planned for the future of the university. With a small tap on the door and a quick whisper from my executive secretary, instantly we were propelled from the microcosm of our world to a macro event that would forever change the lives of Americans. I immediately shared what Martha Woodall had told me — a plane had crashed into one of the World Trade Towers — and almost as one, the executive staff and I rose and rushed to my office, where Martha had a television tuned to the news. We watched in horror as another plane crashed into the second tower and then stayed pinned to the television as more tragic events unfolded. By 9:30 a.m., we knew the worst — President Bush announced the attacks

Students, faculty and staff gather around the flag pole in front of Browning in the days following the Sept. 11 attacks. FILE PHOTO

were apparently carried out by terrorists. With a sad heart, I sent a university-wide email to inform faculty, staff and students, and we began making plans for how the university should respond. Jennifer Meningall, vice president for Student Affairs, tried in vain to reach her brother, who was in New York. Despite the fear in her own heart, she turned her attention to APSU students. In collaboration with the registrar’s office, she identified students who might have family in NYC and made direct contact. Student Affairs also held meetings in housing to respond to questions, and we had an open meeting that any student or faculty/staff could attend. Counseling offered special sessions for anyone

needing assistance. In a few days, the university held a memorial service near the flag pole in front of Browning. I recall protests from a few faculty because a prayer was part of the service, but I in no way regretted the decision to include prayer. Never had we needed to cling more to “In God We Trust.” Like most Americans, APSU faculty and staff reacted with shock and revulsion that terrorists had attacked innocent Americans on our own soil. With so many of our university family affiliated with Fort Campbell, the impact on our community would last more than ten long years, taking lives of soldiers who were our friends and our students and affecting colleagues whose families have

been separated multiple times through extended and repeated deployments over the past decade. In Dickens’ words, it was the worst of times and the best of times. As I reflect on 9/11 and the subsequent years, I am extremely proud to have been a part of a university and community that responded to a national tragedy with patriotism and dedication. TAS

» SEPT. 17, 2001

Sept. 17: Sherry Hoppe was inaugurated as the eighth president of APSU. Sept. 17: The Sundquist Science Complex was officially dedicated.


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WE REMEMBER SPECIAL EDITION • WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 7, 2011

SEPT. 11, 2001

1,714

hate crimes reported to the Council on American-Islamic Relations nationwide since 9/11.

1,717

families receive no remains of loved ones lost.

1,776

feet is the height of the new Freedom Tower under construction at the World Trade Center site.

1,800

degrees Fahrenheit was the temperature of the fires ignited by jet fuel in the World Trade Center site.

2,974

people died in the attacks.

3,000

children lost a parent in the attacks.

19,858

Smoke billows from one of the towers of the World Trade Center and flames and debris explode from the second tower on Sept. 11, 2001. ASSOCIATED PRESS

WTC collapse reaches local streets » By CHARLES BOOTH Public Relations and Marketing Writer

Two men stood on the sidewalk in front of The Leaf-Chronicle building. One wore khaki pants and a polo shirt. The other had on worn jeans, a T-shirt and muddy work boots. They didn’t know each other, but they both had similar bashful expressions on their faces. I wondered for a moment what they were doing there. They simply stood on the sidewalk, not wanting to go inside the building, but in no hurry to walk away. I’d come outside for some fresh air. I was the newspaper’s education reporter at the time, and

we’d just rushed to put out a special afternoon edition with the headline “America Attacked.” My eyes were red, and I didn’t want to talk to anyone. The two men looked at me, and then they looked up at the sky. It was a beautiful September day. “I’m from New York,” the man in the worn jeans said. “Your family still there?” I asked. He nodded. “Have you heard from them?” “No,” he said. “My brother works at the World Trade Center.” He laughed when he said this. The Twin Towers had already fallen. If he was telling the

truth, his brother had probably just died. But his laughter didn’t seem strange to me at all. It was part of the unreality of that day. “Do you know anything else?” the man in the khaki pants asked me. That’s when I realized they’d come for news, the same way people crowded around newspaper offices on Dec. 7, 1941, eager for information. But on that September afternoon, at the beginning of the 21st century, only those two strangers carried on this tradition. I told them everything I’d heard from CNN that morning. Then, the three of us lingered on the sidewalk, laughing nervously and looking up at the strange, clear blue sky. TAS

body parts found at the World Trade Center site.

22,000

bombs dropped on Afghanistan in the six months after the attacks.

116,000

American flags were sold by Walmart on Sept. 11, 2001.

146,000

jobs were lost in New York City due to the attacks.

422,000

New Yorkers suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of 9/11. Information from the 9/11 Numbers app.


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WE REMEMBER SPECIAL EDITION • WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 7, 2011

Hero

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3

to her sister, Elsa, regarding her affairs. She knew she would probably die. We, my mother, sister, aunt and myself, all in separate houses, as well as millions of people, watched as my cousin Linda Gronlund died that day — with 39 others — in a field in Shanksville, Penn. She was a hero. It was assumed the White House was the intended target for the fourth plane, and the passengers took charge and crashed the plane before it could hit another building. Linda was in first class, seat 2A the hijacker was in 1A. She had been right behind him. It has been 10 years since that horrible morning we watched our world change and my cousin Linda die. I miss her. Linda was an attorney and worked as an environmentalist for BMW, Corp. She was smart, funny, witty and sometimes caustic. I think of her often and talk to her regularly. I think she would have been proud of me. She too loved education, the law, and communication, things I came to love after she had passed. Linda Gronlund died a hero. She didn’t know when she boarded that plane that her boyfriend had a ring in his pocket and was going to propose. She didn’t know that there was a hijacker sitting in front of her. She didn’t know that she would die that day when she got on that plane. She did know her family all loved her. I have this fantasy during the hell on that plane, Joe proposed to Linda and for a brief few moments she was really happy, before she became a hero. Please take a moment to pause and think about all the family members of those affected by the loss of their loved ones, those in the planes and those who gave their lives trying to save others. TAS

In this Sept. 13, 2001, file photo, an American flag flies over the rubble of the collapsed World Trade Center buildings in New York. ASSOCIATED PRESS

American pride rings in children’s voices day after 9/11 attacks on America  By CONNIE SANDERS Child Learning Center Director

On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, I was teaching a wonderful group of 4-yearolds. We were sitting under the loft and enjoying the welcome to the classroom song when a mother rushed in and said the United States was under attack. I continued to sing songs and dance with the children. The director of the Child Learning Center — Blanche Wilson — turned on the radio and went online to get more information. It was sadly confirmed the United States had been attacked. The teachers

in the center tried to keep things on the normal schedule, as parents came to pick up their children and head back to post. We all spent our lunch hour in front of the computer getting any information we could. After nap time we finally took the children outside and as we stood there in the quiet. We knew it was a day we would never forget. One of the children always counted the airplanes or the white lines airplanes left and we would write the number on the chalkboard. After a few moments outside he said, “where are the airplanes? There’s no jet smoke.” Because we were not ready to

give the children the news we talked instead how there were no white lines in the sky for the first time in my life. The next morning was a significant day for me also. As we prepared for circle time, the children began to sit under the loft, I was helping another child put away toys when I heard a soft voice begin to sing “America, America, my home sweet home.” On this morning all the children learned to sing that line. It is hard for me to grasp that it has been 10 years and the children from the 2001 class are now 14 and 15 years old. I hope they remember how we came together and sang “America” that sad week in our lives. TAS

9/11 SPECIAL EDITION  

The voice of Austin Peay State University students since 1930.

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