Page 1

26.01.12

AJ Small Projects Part 2 of the shortlist, plus the Sustainability Award on the cover Elips Design

£4.95   THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL   THEAJ.CO.UK


Proud sponsors of the Small Projects Award 2011

See

at Ecobuild

Stand number N1030 Event date: 20th - 22nd March 2012

Let lighten your load. At times roofing and cladding specification can be complex and heavy going. That’s why we’re on hand to offer practical, experienced support in a host of useful ways. From creating bespoke NBS, BIM or CAD details to answering questions on any aspect of your roofing or cladding project. We will deliver urgent samples where and when they’re needed and provide products that help you achieve an A+ rating. We’re always happy to take the weight , it’s all off your shoulders. Because with about you.

Call today on 01283 722588 or visit marleyeternit.co.uk/me


Contents

26.01.12

AJ Small Projects Part 2 of the shortlist, plus the Sustainability Award on the cover Mitchell Taylor Workshop

26.01.12

AJ Small Projects Part 2 of the shortlist, plus the Sustainability Award on the cover Denizen Works and friends

£4.95   THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL   THEAJ.CO.UK

26.01.12

26.01.12

AJ Small Projects

AJ Small Projects

Part 2 of the shortlist, plus the Sustainability Award on the cover Office for Subversive Architecture

£4.95   THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL   THEAJ.CO.UK

26.01.12

AJ Small Projects Part 2 of the shortlist, plus the Sustainability Award on the cover Theis + Khan Architects

£4.95   THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL   THEAJ.CO.UK

Part 2 of the shortlist, plus the Sustainability Award on the cover Hudson Architects

£4.95   THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL   THEAJ.CO.UK

£4.95   THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL   THEAJ.CO.UK

26.01.12

Artists Workshop

26.01.12

AJ Small Projects

AJ Small Projects

£4.95   THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL   THEAJ.CO.UK

£4.95   THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL   THEAJ.CO.UK

Part 2 of the shortlist, plus the Sustainability Award on the cover CAT Professional Diploma students

Part 2 of the shortlist, plus the Sustainability Award on the cover Jonathan Tuckey Design

26.01.12

AJ Small Projects Part 2 of the shortlist, plus the Sustainability Award on the cover NEX

£4.95   THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL   THEAJ.CO.UK

26.01.12

26.01.12

26.01.12

AJ Small Projects

AJ Small Projects

AJ Small Projects

£4.95   THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL   THEAJ.CO.UK

£4.95   THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL   THEAJ.CO.UK

£4.95   THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL   THEAJ.CO.UK

Part 2 of the shortlist, plus the Sustainability Award on the cover Sheffield School of Architecture

Part 2 of the shortlist, plus the Sustainability Award on the cover Elips Design

News 05 ARB should ‘strike off ’ firms that don’t pay staff 06 UNStudio set for UK debut 08 The week: KPF’s Pinnacle on hold, Hadid wins Iraqi parliament, Rogers on cities 12 Interview: Sherin Aminossehe on architects in government 14 Holyrood plan ‘ups security risk’ aj 26.01.12

Part 2 of the shortlist, plus the Sustainability Award on the cover Tim Bayman Architecture

Artists Workshop

COVER phOtOgRaphy: tOp ROw, fROm lEft: tina tERVO, jOhannEs maRbuRg, mitChEll taylOR wORkshOp, matt gRiggs. miDDlE ROw: niCk kanE, CathERinE wattOm, DiRk linDnER, maRCus pEEl. bOttOm ROw: tOm haRDEn, CaRlO CaROssiO, DaVE mORRis, DaViD butlER

Artists Workshop

ORDER ADDITIONAL COPIES OF You can order additional copies of this week’s and last week’s AJ Small Projects issues with the cover of your choice. Please contact Ashley Powell on 020 7728 4518.

26.01.12

AJ Small Projects Part 2 of the shortlist, plus the Sustainability Award on the cover Mole Architects

£4.95   THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL   THEAJ.CO.UK

This week

26.01.12

20 L eader & Letters The gap between UK cities is widening – and not along the north-south divide, writes Christine Murray 25 AJ Small Projects The second half of the 2012 shortlist, plus contenders for the sustainability award 59 The Critics A study of post-war reconstruction in Picardy offers both a historical narrative and regional perspective on Modernism 65 Top jobs PRP Architects, Byrom Clark Roberts This week online Search by cost, practice or location to choose your favourite entry to this year’s AJ Small Projects awards at AJBuildingsLibrary.co.uk 03


Start with a challenge, end with the perfect finish. We understand how difficult your job can be and how it can sometimes feel like you’re swimming against the tide. That’s why we want you to involve us right from the start; we’ll help you ride out your challenges and sail through to the perfect finish. With more than 30 years experience in the construction industry we know the ropes pretty well by now and can advise on potential cost savings, provide guidance on how to reduce fire risks and recommend the best way to achieve the most suitable acoustic performance for a buildings use. We run a tight ship; offering the promise of integrity, products of high quality, performance that is tested and accredited, and all of that with prices that are competitive. Our promise is epitomised in the ElitePlus 25 year system guarantee. The products that we manufacture and every other component of the system is supplied from a single source and guaranteed for 25 years. Wentloog Corporate Park Cardiff CF3 2ER T: 029 2079 0722 E: sales@euroclad.com I: www.euroclad.com You can literally make waves with Elite System 4 using the standing seam outer sheet, just like the stunning roof of the RNLI Headquarters in Poole.

Colorcoat HPS200 Ultra, Colorcoat Prisma and Confidex Sustain are registered trademarks of Tata Steel UK Limited

And we can also help you achieve a building solution that is CarbonNeutral®. Elite Systems is an approved cladding system for Confidex Sustain®, exclusively from Tata Steel, using Colorcoat HPS200 Ultra® or Colorcoat Prisma®. Don’t be afraid to take a new tack. Give us a call, send us an email or just browse our website to find out more and put the wind back in your sails.


News

john pawson / design museum

New home for the Design Museum John Pawson has revealed his proposals to convert the Grade-II* listed Commonwealth Institute building, west London, into the new home for the Design Museum. The museum is set to move from its current base in Shad Thames, east London, to RMJM’s ‘dormant’ 1962 tent-like landmark in 2014. See TheAJ.co.uk for more images

employment

ARB should ‘strike off’ firms that don’t pay After top practices leave staff unpaid, past presidents urge the RIBA and ARB to step in A group of past RIBA presidents has urged the institute and the ARB to ‘take a strong line’ with practices that repeatedly fail to pay their staff. The call came in the wake of a raft of recent stories on unpaid wages. In the last few months, the workforce at Austin-Smith:Lord was at one point owed more than £850,000, and staff at YRM were denied two months’ salary prior to its demise and subsequent purchase by RMJM last month. RMJM also failed to pay its UK and US staff on time in January. Past president George Ferguson (2003–5) said: ‘The RIBA and ARB should be taking a strong aj 26.01.12

line on this with the practices and principals concerned. [The ARB] should consider striking off the worst offenders.’ Ferguson added: ‘Some of the recent cases where staff have not been paid for a considerable time on the promise of pay to come, when the means to do so could not be guaranteed, are inexcusable and a disgrace to the profession.’ Ex-president Paul Hyett (2001–3) said: ‘Both the RIBA and ARB have the teeth to investigate any serious misappropriation of monies or breaches of staff contracts among their members. ‘They have, respectively, a moral

and statutory duty to use such powers effectively.’ Former president Owen Luder (1981–3 and 1995-7) agreed: ‘The RIBA should come out in public criticism that this is not the way to run a professional practice.’ Current RIBA president Angela Brady attacked the behaviour of some practices as ‘absolutely disgraceful’. Speaking about YRM, she said: ‘This situation seems very harsh on staff and their families, but [there is] also the loss of talent to the profession and economy.’ Last week RMJM lost its leading Scottish designer, Paul Stallan, who cited the non-

payment of his and his staff ’s wages as his reason for leaving. ‘It is possibly the worst it’s been for staff [at the moment]. The hardship that it creates has a debilitating effect on the studio,’ he said, revealing that December pay remains outstanding. Stallan plans to establish a new practice with former RMJM principal Alistair Brand, who was sacked last week. Past RIBA president Jack Pringle (2005–7) said: ‘Practices should pay their staff as a priority over all creditors and not unilaterally use the salary roll as a buffer against the bank.’ Merlin Fulcher 05


News

Welsh architects are invited to submit designs for a pavilion for this year’s Eisteddfod arts festival in the Vale of Glamorgan, South Wales. Reflecting a ‘vision of Welsh architecture for 2012’, the pavilion (below) has a budget of £20,000 and should be built in 10 days. [Expressions of interest must be received by 30 January]

Brighton & Hove City Council is on the hunt for public realm schemes for Ann Street and Providence Place Gardens. The contract is open to architects, designers and artists and seeks plans that ‘transform and enhance people’s experience’ of the site. The most ‘inspirational’ scheme will bag the £40,000 commission. [PQQs should be returned by 29 February] The Velindre NHS Trust and Aneurin Bevan Health Board are searching for architects, quantity surveyors, CDM coordinators and engineers to take part in a four-year consultants’ framework in Wales. Individual contracts for works up to £1 million are available, as well as separate lots for projects worth more. [Requests to participate must be received by 13 February] Sean Kitchen The AJ does not organise, endorse, or take responsibility for these competitions unless stated 06

UNStudio in (Bennetts out)

Dutch practice set for UK debut with 29-storey City Road skyscraper Dutch-based UNStudio finally looks set to make its UK debut with this 29-storey apartment tower on City Road in Islington, north London. Submitted for planning in December, the project for new landowner Orion Capital Managers UK has been drawn up with PLP Architecture and includes 190 flats, a ground floor shop and a restaurant. The tower replaces a previously consented scheme on the plot designed by Bennetts Associates in 2005 (below). The practice first worked on a masterplan for the canal basin, which included large-scale improvements to the public realm and a neighbouring tower, almost a decade ago. Last year, the design team behind this larger skyscraper also switched hands – from Squire and Partners to SOM. Rab Bennetts told the AJ he has concerns about the the tower and ‘ad-hoc changes’ to the masterplan, made without extensive consultation with local residents. He said: ‘Much of this is happening without the same degree of public information as before, so local people may be surprised by what is finally constructed.’ Richard Waite

BeNNettS aSSociateS

THE PICK OF THE BEST UK, EUROPEAN & INTERNATIONAL DESIGN CONTESTS

UNStUdio

COMPETITIONS FILE

london

aj 26.01.12


11017 TATA 265x210 Architects Journal SupaDurablePoloriod Ad

WHATEVER ELSE CHANGES, YOUR BUILDING WON’T. GUARANTEED.

Colorcoat HPS200 Ultra® built to last. Many things will change during the life of a business (not least cars, suits and haircuts), but the condition of your Colorcoat HPS200 Ultra® building envelope won’t be one of them.

Today’s super durable, Colorcoat HPS200 Ultra® has been proven to provide the best possible performance of any pre-finished steel product. It’s been independently certified by the BBA, it’s guaranteed for up to 40 years and certified to BES 6001.

PROVEN PERFORMANCE. BUILT TO LAST.

For a building envelope that will still be working long after you retire, specify Colorcoat HPS200 Ultra®. Colorcoat Connection® helpline: T: +44 (0) 1244 892434 www.colorcoat-online.com/ultra

BES 6001 Colorcoat, Colorcoat Connection, Colorcoat HPS200 Ultra and Confidex are registered trademarks of Tata Steel UK Limited.


News

the week in architecture

AHMM wins retendered Willesden Green contest

Rogers, Stirk RIBA launches Harbour: discuss student job tools

london Allford Hall Monaghan Morris and Architecture 519 have won the retendered contest to design the Willesden Green Cultural Centre redevelopment in Brent, north London. The team, part of a bid led by Galliford Try Regeneration with Gillespies Landscape and URS-Scott Wilson, will replace the existing 1980s library with a ‘community landmark’ and 90 flats. Brent Council originally selected a bid from a consortium led by First:Base with Arup Associates. However, according to council documents, the tender process had to be reopened in November 2011 due to ‘material changes to the structure of [First:Base’s] offer’, which was ‘reliant upon obtaining a significant level of funding from an external source’. Hal Currey, director at Arup Associates said: ‘We’re naturally disappointed that despite having developed a design that was really positively received we cannot take this scheme forward. We wish the council and AHMM well.’ A planning application for the AHMM scheme will be submitted in the spring with completion set for 2014.

riba Richard Rogers will be joined by Graham Stirk and Ivan Harbour on stage next Tuesday evening 31 January at RIBA’s Portland Place headquarters to discuss cities in the 21st century and how design affects the way we live. The sold-out talk will focus on projects in Asia, Europe and London to ‘describe the process, narrative and language’ inherent to the practice’s work, past and present. Tweet questions to @ArchitectsJrnal (#RogersStirkHarbour). The most interesting will be put to the architects by event chair, AJ deputy editor Rory Olcayto.

diversity The Stephen Lawrence Trust has called on architects to sponsor its diversity programmes amid fears that funding shortfalls could force it to close. The trust may have to halt programmes that give disadvantaged young people access to the profession, inspired by murdered teenager and aspiring architect Stephen Lawrence, by the end of 2012. The cash-strapped organisation, which is based in a David Adjaye-designed building in Deptford, south London, currently has annual operating costs of around £150,000. Chief executive Paul Anderson-Walsh said money was needed to create a ‘living legacy’ that helped black and ethnic minority youngsters become architects. He said: ‘If we were able to generate £50,000 from the architecture and built environment professions, we could effectively guarantee the capacity to deliver on all of our aspirations for the built environment.’ 08

1. Listen to AJ editor Christine Murray discuss the results of the AJ’s Women in Architecture survey on BBC Radio 4 Woman’s Hour 10am 30 January 2. Take part in the AJ100 survey of UK practices at AJ100awards.com before the 11 February deadline 3. Book now for the Architectural Review’s ar+d Emerging Architecture spring lectures, starting on Tuesday 7 February at the RIBA with Boonserm Premthada of Bangkok and Canadian practice Molo Design. Architectural-Review.com/emerging 4. Watch a video of Oona Hassim painting at the Occupy London camp. Her solo show opens this week at the Woolf Gallery on Charlotte Street, London. TheAJ.co.uk/Occupy 5. Browse images, drawings and data for all 156 Small Projects entries in the AJ Buildings Library AJBuildingsLibrary.co.uk

KPF’s Pinnacle put on hold

london KPF’s £800 million Pinnacle skyscraper in London has been put on hold due to finance and cost concerns. The main contractor, Brookfield, shut down the City of London site on the orders of the client, Arab Investments. The building was originally scheduled to complete in 2008.

Hadid designs Iraqi parliament

baghdad Zaha Hadid Architects has been shortlisted to design a £650 million parliament complex in Baghdad, Iraq. The practice is bidding against other companies on a yet to be confirmed shortlist for the high profile post-war reconstruction job. Londonbased studio Assemblage is also shortlisted. A winner is expected to be announced later in the year. aj 26.01.12

ALL STORIES By THE AJ nEWS DESK

Stephen Lawrence Trust makes £50k funding plea

five THiNGS TO DO

riba The RIBA has unwrapped an armoury of ‘essential’ new tools aimed at boosting young architects’ chances of finding work in the profession. The online suite for associate members includes video interviews with architects including Ken Shuttleworth, Barbara Weiss, Lee Polisano and Joanna van Heyningen. It also features advice from brand guru Bryan Edmondson and the Chartered Institute of Marketing’s Mark Blayney Stuart on finding jobs and selling ideas. RIBA vice president for membership Stephen Hodder said: ‘The job market for young architects remains tough and unpredictable.’


News

Housing begins to grow Private housing project starts are predicted to grow by 15 per cent this year, but the net figure will remain 38 per cent below the 2007 peak for the sector *forecasted

Private housing starts – £million Source: Glenigan

£11,064m

2006

£11,386m

2007 £8,254m

2008 £5,489m

2009

£6,095m

2011

15%

£7,355m

2,000

4,000

RIAI pushes for NAMA scheme

ireland Newly inaugurated RIAI president Michelle Fagan has said architects could help in reactivating stalled development sites held by state-owned Irish bank NAMA. Fagan called on the public to work with architects to identify new uses for NAMA’s moribund development plots in the ‘short, medium, even long-term’. In an interview with the Irish Times, she said: ‘There are derelict sites in nearly every town and village [linked to NAMA], and it’s a very good idea to get an architect in – not just leave it to estate agents and landowners’. NAMA was set up by the Irish government following the country’s 2009 financial crisis to manage €72.3 billion worth of property debt.

Number of architecture companies going into administration in England (PwC)

143 131

06

2010

2011

glenigan

19%

knight frank / markit survey

4%

8,000

6,000

Year-on-year fall in the number of construction project starts for the three months to December

Percentage of people believing their home has fallen in value since December 2011

-7%

2013*

aj 26.01.12

20%

£7,040m

2012*

0

-27%

-33% £6,562m

2010

3%

6%

10,000

12,000

Number of firms going under falls

economy The number of architectural companies going into administration fell slightly last year, according to Price Waterhouse Coopers (PwC). Since 2010, a total of 274 architecture companies in England have collapsed. The highest number of insolvencies was in London, where 67 outfits have folded. In that period, more than 5,000 UK construction companies went under. PwC head of engineering and construction Jonathan Hook said: ‘2011 was another tough year for the sector. Over the last two years we have lost more than 5,000 companies. Cuts to the government’s capital programme and uncertainty around the economy means there is little chance that 2012 will see this trend reverse.’

32%

Percentage of US construction firms expecting to recruit new staff this year

associated general contractors of america

2:1

Male to female ratio of young people (aged 16-24) claiming Jobseeker’s Allowance in UK cities cities outlook 2012

09


News

the week in architecture

News in pictures

04

01 Landolt + Brown’s new West Hampstead Thameslink Station in north London has opened 02 Further redevelopment plans for developer Ask’s First Street scheme in Manchester have been submitted. Ian Simpson Architects has designed a four-star Innside hotel; Mecanoo, a new home for the Cornerhouse cinema and the Library Theatre Company 03 Metropolitan Workshop has completed its masterplan for Dún Laoghaire harbour in Ireland, including cruise liner facilities, an urban beach and homes. Heneghan Peng had been lined up to oversee the project but had its bid dropped 04 MJP Architects has completed a 60-metre steam bridge for the University of Birmingham. Part of a combined heat and power network, the structure is clad in laser-cut stainless steel 05 Maurice Shapero has revealed plans to build the tallest building in the north of England. The 67-storey skyscraper is the latest high-rise scheme mooted for Liverpool’s King Edward site 01

02

03

10

aj 26.01.12


PICTURE CREDITS: 01 LANDOLT + BROWN 02 ASK 03 METROPOLITAN WORKSHOP 04 MJP ARCHITECTS 05 MAURICE SHAPERO

News

05

aj 26.01.12

11


News

interview

‘This government believes in good design’ In her first interview since leaving HOK to lead the UK’s regional property strategy, Sherin Aminossehe reveals the challenges of being one of the few architects in central government just a different emphasis. In keeping with the spirit of straightened times, there is a great chance to think differently about retrofits, re-using office buildings as housing or schools and, of course, new ways of working. There is a lot of room innovation and creativity, to look at buildings in a different way.

What does your new role entail? I’m responsible for creating and delivering the property strategy for the mandated civil estate in the English regions and outer London, alongside all the departments. This will be done by consolidating or exiting short-term leases and making better use of long leases, PFIs and freeholds, and through workplace transformations that will see a number of departments all working under one roof. The government is one of the largest freeholders, as well as the largest tenant, in the country, so there’s room to make the estate more efficient and sustainable, while also delivering savings. We talk about joined-up government and this is its physical embodiment.

planning and the economics of development, so when I heard about the job I knew I had to apply. To me, it’s one of the most interesting jobs in property, combined with the chance to decrease the national deficit by billions over the next decade – it can’t get more exciting than that!

It’s quite a change. What tempted you to leave HOK? It’s not often that you get the opportunity to influence the property strategy for thousands of buildings and I’ve always had a wider interest in policy,

What roles are there for architects in developing the regional property portfolio? There will continue to be a greater number of refurbishments than new builds, but that doesn’t mean there are no opportunities,

12

Why is it so rare for architects to work in central government? There are not that many ‘traditional’ architecture roles within central government, as there is not a need for an inhouse architectural department. Saying that, I have never been a traditional architect. I didn’t leave the Bartlett thinking that I wanted to design bespoke houses or museums: I’ve always loved the bigger picture.

How do practices get involved and will there be opportunities for smaller firms? We currently use existing frameworks such as the Homes and Communities Agency’s, which has a wide range of firms. However, we are committed to creating opportunities for smaller firms and will be looking at that in more detail over the next year. How will your selection of sites tie-in with the Localism agenda? Our initial focus is on the Central Civil Estate, and in particular on the two property pilots in Central London and Bristol. The journey throughout 2012 for these pilots will be about trialling solutions, delivering quick wins, demonstrating success, and ensuring we begin to tackle inherent inefficiencies. Lessons from these pilots can then be used to drive efficiencies across a range of locations, while ensuring solutions are bespoke enough to meet local needs. There is also potential to connect this with departmental land holdings and local government estates, creating a direct link with the Localism

agenda through regeneration and growth opportunities in partnership with local authorities and stakeholders. Is design important to the Cabinet Office, and if so, how? Yes of course it is; good design is essential in many ways. Perhaps in times of austerity there is even greater need to focus on it, particularly in terms of function. We believe that property, and thereby good architecture and design, is an enabler of change. For example, if you had a very attractive yet difficult building, the only way to get the most out of it is through good design, allowing it to become an efficient, modern office space that creates new ways of working. It’s also worth remembering that the Cabinet Office co-sponsors the Prime Minister’s Better Public Building Award. Are there new ‘private’ models, such as the white collar factory, that can be used by government for workplace strategies? The white collar factory can mean different things to different people. The model that we would aspire to would be David Rosen’s Tea Building by AHMM in Shoreditch, with its efficient and great workplace design, rather than the battery farming, call centre version. As part of the national property controls, we are advising departments to work to an average of eight square metres per person and eight desks for every 10 employees. aj 26.01.12


Duravit brings the bathroom to life.

Sanitaryware, bathroom furniture, bathtubs, shower trays, wellness products and accessories: Duravit has everything you need to make life in the bathroom a little more beautiful. More info at Duravit UK, Milton Keynes, Phone 0845 500 7787, Fax 0845 500 7786, info@uk.duravit.com, www.duravit.co.uk

UK_ArchitectsJournal_S1004_210x265mm.indd 1

19.01.12 10:15:33 Uhr


News

scotland

news in brief

Holyrood plan ‘ups security risk’

Developer chooses Rogers Stirk Harbour for embankment site

New entrance falls short of Home Office guidance, says Parliament architect Edinburgh City Council has approved Lee Boyd’s controversial plans for a new entrance (right) to the Scottish Parliament, despite expert warnings it represented an ‘enhanced security risk’. The planned addition to Enric Miralles and RMJM’s 2005 Stirling Prize-winning building failed to meet Home Office security guidance, according to one of the architects in charge of security on the original scheme. John Ramsay, who was second in command of the project and responsible for coordinating design input from the police

and Home Office, criticised the proposed anti-terrorism screening facility in a letter commenting on the planning application. He said the scheme breached the building’s ‘security stand-off

distance’ by placing the public ‘too close’ to a public road. He added: ‘[All] parts of the building within this standoff are designed to withstand extraordinary blast forces from vehicle-carried explosive devices. The proposed design appears inadequate to meet this.’ Architects have branded Lee Boyd’s scheme ‘disrespectful’ and called for the original building to be listed (AJ 12.01.12). A Scottish Parliament spokesman said: ‘We do not comment on the detail of our security measures.’ Merlin Fulcher

Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners (RSHP) has been chosen to design a second scheme on the Albert Embankment, in south London. The practice has been selected by developer St James for the Eastbury House site just north of the Vauxhall Nine Elms Battersea Opportunity Area. Richard Rogers’ firm is already working on plans for a mixed-use tower for Foxtons founder Jon Hunt on the nearby Texaco garage site. Further south, RSHP is delivering another scheme for St James – Tideway Wharf next to Battersea Power Station. The developer also confirmed this week it had picked John Thompson & Partners to work on its redevelopment of the Royal Mail site at Twickenham.

New Practices #97 Luis Trevino Architects

Putney, London. December 2010

Main people Luis Treviño (above), Alfredo Albanes, Militza Ortiz Where have you come from? After a master’s in architecture at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, I worked with Rick Mather Architects for eight years before starting up. What work do you have and what projects are you looking for? We are currently working on an extension for a Grade-II listed vicarage in Northumberland (right) and we have almost finished an all-glass extension in Crouch End. Our work is all about capturing light, especially alongside period architecture.

14

What are your ambitions? We are a very small practice, which has lots of benefits in the current economic environment. It also allows you to be personal – we tackle each project with a fresh approach, learning from the past, but optimistic about the future. The biggest risk is compromising on your principles and stagnating. Architecture is a passionate profession and you’ve either got it or you haven’t.

Design for the Old Vicarage in Northumberland

How you marketing yourselves? We open projects for Open House and were named one of the five top picks this year: we had almost 500 people over two days! I have been published in the New York Times, Homes and Gardens and the Evening Standard. It’s a cliché, but word of mouth is the best recommendation. Contact www.luistrevino.co.uk

aj 26.01.12


Innovate

Brick is beautiful and compelling. It’s contemporary and traditional. And it’s your desired colour, texture or period. Brick is local, sustainable and cost effective. Above all, it’s able to breathe life into innovative designs or finishing flourishes. Wienerberger. The strength behind your creativity.

What could you do with brick? Request our latest brochure. Phone 0845 303 2524 www.brick.co.uk

K5635_wienerberger_AJ_fullpage_innovate.indd 1

9/11/11 10:12:33


flow. Like built-in. But better.


Stylish stainless steel lock and lock-plates are available in either polished or satin finish.

Door thickness has been increased to a substantial 42mm.

With its substantial build quality, featuring 42mm thick flush fitting doors, available in either laminate or veneer and with matching 27mm dividers, flow gives every indication of being a fully built-in cubicle. But with none of the hassles. Discreet and elegant locks, cleverly concealed automatic

Flush fitting pivot hinges, fixed to aluminium frame and available in a choice of anodised finishes.

closing mechanisms and robust, inset pivoting hinges enhance safety and add weight to the overall impression of built-in strength.

thrislington cubicles Product : flow Scale :

nts

Contact : t +44 (0)1244 520 677

w www.thrislingtoncubicles.com e info@thrislingtoncubicles.com


Astragal The Hellman Files #56

A trawl through Hellman’s archives, in which we uncover gems that are as relevant now as they were then. ‘This cartoon is from AJ 01.06.06, when the Labour government attempted to de-list the empty Grade II Commonwealth Institute

so that it could be sold to property speculators who could then demolish it and replace it with a commercial development. Tessa Jowell is the secretary of state at the DCMS doing the dirty deed. Happily, she was foiled.’

Reaping the rewards The life of an RIBA president is not an easy one: long hours tending to presidential business, less time to give to your practice’s projects, the rubbish lift at Portland Place... However, Astragal hears rumours that could make the busy, busy role that little bit sweeter. As well as soaking up the prestige, future presidents may be given a small ‘stipend’ to keep them in red trousers/shocking pink dresses/ etc. Don’t all rush now.

www.louishellman.co.uk

The Invisible man

Livid Architecture He may seem gentle (big, sad eyes) and kind (the numerous trendy holiday homes he pays trendy architects to design for his Living Architecture programme). But Alain de Botton, despite inherited family fortunes and a successful career as a writer and broadcaster, is known also to be a rather angry, young(-ish) man. Famously, in 2009, in response to a poor review of his book The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work in the New York Times, he tracked down the reviewer’s blog and wrote: ‘I will hate you till the day I die and wish you nothing but ill will in every career move 18

you make. I will be watching with interest and Schadenfreude.’ You may sympathise with de Botton, an honorary RIBA fellow, if you’ve ever had work rudely dissected in public view, yet more trouble is brewing for him. His latest book, Religion for Atheists is drawing unfavourable reviews from heavyweights such as John Carey (‘fatally unimaginative’) and Terry Eagleton (‘strikingly unoriginal’). The book proposes a secular church – a restaurant called Agape, (the Greek word for love) where families and couples are seated apart so as to encourage engagement with strangers. Those flung together then choose topics to discuss from a menu,

such as ‘What is your greatest fear?’ and ‘Whom can you not forgive?’ Somehow, de Botton argues, this will make us better people and society will begin to heal. ‘Can he be serious?’ asks Carey in his Sunday Times review. And so does this column after hearing friends of Astragal were barred entry to their favourite restaurant because de Botton and friends were in town. ‘Oh, you look very nice, but this party is private,’ a guest said, seemingly unaware she was undermining the fundamental religious concept of the Agape restaurant that de Botton wants you to buy. Surely this time, he will only be angry with himself.

It’s heartening to hear of highprofile exits motivated more by yearning for a lightness of soul than alarm at the sound of a sinking ship. In a move not beaten since Will Alsop threw it all in to concentrate on his painting, Piers Taylor announced his departure from Mitchell Taylor Workshop with a heartfelt missive about sticking it to the man. More specifically, he would be forming an Invisible Studio, to ‘collaborate with mathematicians, magicians, writers, carpenters, digital fabricators, boat builders and bicycle framers’. He wrote: ‘My vision isn’t an office with flat-screen monitors and associates and directors and buzzy rhetoric about itself and timesheets and working hours and a logo and a corporate identity and a letterhead and chartered RIBA membership and a website with Practice Profile Projects’. Good on you Piers, for having the courage to do it. The 2012 Will Aslop Prize for Quitting Practice with Panache remains open for entries, but we suspect it’s safe with Piers. aj 26.01.12


LCYNENE_ADZ_FACT3.pdf

1

14/10/2011

12:11

FACT#3

50% quicker installation

we put our energy into perfecting the ultimate insulation systems...

THAT’S

DRAIN POWER The unique Duomat fixing tool cuts installation time by 50% through the simultaneous tightening of the stainless steel couplings. “I can state that installation time is halved when using the Harmer Duomat fixing tool” John Whybrow, PSI Ltd C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

...so you can put Zero Energy into your designs Icynene has been installed in over 300,000 residential and commercial projects. Our portfolio of high performance spray foam insulation solutions helps meet the new stringent requirements for energy efficiency in buildings - especially for designers seeking to meet CfSH levels 4 - 6. Already used to create Zero Carbon Homes, Icynene’s superb insulation delivers the ultimate thermal performance, improving airtightness, minimizing heat loss and enhancing acoustic performance. Free from HFC or HCFC’s, Icynene foams are “Water blown” and harmless to the environment. If your requirements are for the highest Code levels obtainable, you’ll need an insulation system which is easy to apply even in difficult to reach corners, won’t sag, soak up moisture or lose performance over time. To really reduce your footprint - put you foot down and insist on Icynene.

+ – × ÷ = Go online to download the NEW Rainwater & Drainage Calculator Software

To request a brochure please telephone:

0808 100 2008

www.harmerdrainage.co.uk

www.icynene.com CONTACT 0117 230 2477 - INFO@ICYNENE-UK.COM S M L S O I L & WA S T E

R A I N WAT E R S Y S T E M S


Leader The gap between UK cities is widening – and not along the north-south divide, writes Christine Murray such as customer service and machine operatives. Centres with a higher proportion of these jobs have fared worse since the recession. On the other hand, cities with universities, such as Aberdeen, Edinburgh and Cambridge, have higher rates of innovation, patents and start-up businesses. They have a strong private sector, and high employment in knowledge-intensive fields such as biotech, finance, media or business, with which emerging markets can’t compete. When the competition gets tough, it seems the solution is to work smarter, not just harder. The report also confirms what architects already know – that businesses benefit from the proximity that a dense and vibrant city centre brings, where suppliers take advantage of this ‘agglomeration’. The study also includes some troubling statistics: Birmingham has enough young people claiming Jobseeker’s Allowance to fill its

Milton Keynes, tipped for growth next year

MILTONKEYNES.COM

T

here’s a good reason why some UK cities have weathered the recession better than others, according to a new report from the Centre for Cities – and it has nothing to do with the north-south divide. Cities Outlook 2012 claims the five cities to watch for growth are Aberdeen, Cambridge, Edinburgh and Milton Keynes, as well as London, and you can’t get much more evenly dispersed than that. Summed up, the report – well worth a read for those engaged in city-making – says the secret to an economically vibrant city is a brainy population and a healthy private sector. The report proposes that emerging markets have proved too competitive on price when it comes to general manufacturing or low-specialist jobs,

Letters received Last issue AJ 19.01.12

Minorities report Letter of the week Each week, the AJ will choose its favourite letter. The lucky winner will receive a limited edition bone china AJ mug. Please address letters to: The Editor The Architects’ Journal Greater London House Hampstead Road London nw1 7ej Email letters@architectsjournal.co.uk

19.01.12

AJ Small Projects Presenting the 2012 shortlist for the awards: Part 1 on the cover Ewan Cameron Architects

£4.95  THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL THEAJ.CO.UK

20

Letters should be received by 10am on the Monday before publication. The AJ reserves the right to edit letters

Regarding the Women in Practice issue (AJ 12.01.12), I have to say I have found similar problems to those discussed. Being a young, obviously gay man certainly does not help when dealing with clients, current bosses, consultants or during interviews. I have been dismissed because of my sexuality more times than I can honestly remember, and I am aware of gay men in practice who go out of their way to fit in with the boys’ club image. I would like to point out that because of the dominance of white, middle-

LETTER OFK THE WEE

aged middle-class men, it can be hard for the gay community to make headway in the profession. I am also sure that other minorities feel the same with such a bias – perhaps a thought for a future survey. Name withheld, via email

Right to reply You say you ‘know how you would deal with fee agreements if you were president’ (Diary of an Anonymous Architect, TheAJ.co.uk 11.01.12) – you are invited now to participate. The RIBA is a membership organisation, so if you have good ideas, then come and make our profession better – like the

aj 26.01.12


The five cities tipped for growth are Aberdeen, Cambridge, Edinburgh, Milton keynes and London St Andrews Stadium – that’s 32,000 people aged 16 to 24. Also interesting is that at the national level, there are two young male Jobseeker’s Allowance claimants for every young female – perhaps confirming studies that young women are now better educated than young men. The report’s boost for cities proves that there is no need for a policy of ‘managed decline’, such as that proposed by the Tories for Liverpool in the 1980s. Cities, with their concentrated central population and businesses, are profitable things. They are effortlessly sustainable and efficient, neatly packing nearly 54 per cent of the UK’s population onto nine per cent of its landmass. They are also economic

powerhouses, with 70 per cent of the wealth of the greater South East, and 72 per cent of employment in the North West, based in their respective cities. But cities need to be managed closely and individually. Those with knowledge-poor jobs and no university risk a further brain drain of talent and innovators in the coming months as their residents leave for more prosperous centres. Just 0.7 per cent growth in GDP is expected in 2012 by the Office for Budget Responsibility, and with unemployment currently at its highest level since 1994, the regeneration of poorer cities will depend upon them taking reports such as this one to their heart.

hundreds of other members that do. The RIBA Agreements (standard appointment forms, no longer called SFAs) provide a balanced contractual position of the interests of the architect/consultant and the client. This means that clients (or their legal advisors) would prefer them to be more in favour of their interests, while some members would like them to be more protectionist of the architect’s interests. The view of the RIBA Board and Council has always been that neither extreme is helpful. The RIBA extols the virtues of standard contracts, convincing clients it’s not in their interests to pile all the risks on their consultant, because it forces the consultant to be ultra-

protectionist. It may not be insurable (PII cover voided) and if their consultant topples under the load of obligations, the client won’t be best served. However, there are many lawyers who make good money creating bespoke appointment contracts, and it’s in their interest to rubbish standard contracts. RIBA contracts are often much fairer than the bespoke ones. Angela Brady, RIBA president, via TheAJ.co.uk

aj 26.01.12

Correction The photos of The Jewel Box by Fraher Architects (AJ 19.01.12) should have been credited to Andy Matthews.

THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL GREATER LONDON HOUSE HAMPSTEAD ROAD LONDON NW1 7EJ THEAJ.CO.Uk Established 1895 Editorial enquiries/fax 020 7728 4574 / 020 7728 4601 E firstname.surname@emap.com T 020 7728 plus extension below Editor Christine Murray (4573) Deputy editor Rory Olcayto (4571) Acting administrator Rakesh Ramchurn (4574) Digital editor Simon Hogg (4572) News editor Richard Waite (07918 650875) Reporter Merlin Fulcher (4564) Editorial intern Heenali Patel Technical editor Felix Mara (4568) Senior editor James Pallister (4570) Sustainability editor Hattie Hartman (4569) Sustainability intern Ruth Dreyer AJ Buildings Library editor Tom Ravenscroft (4644) Art editor Brad Yendle (4578) Designer Ella Mackinnon (4567) Production editor Mary Douglas (4577) Sub-editor Abigail Gliddon (4579) Contributing editor Ian Martin Contributing photographer Edmund Sumner Editorial director Paul Finch Group chief executive Natasha Christie-Miller Director of architecture and media Conor Dignam (5545) Commercial director James MacLeod (4582) Business development managers Nick Roberts (4608), Ceri Evans (3595) Group advertising manager Amanda Pryde (4557) Account managers Hannah Buckley (3762), Simon Collingwood (4515), Steph Atha (4609) Classified and recruitment sales Ashley Powell (4518) AJ subscription UK £165 Overseas £210 Back issues and subscriptions 0844 848 8858

The Architects’ Journal is registered as a newspaper at the Post Office. © 2012. Published by Emap Inform, a part of Emap Ltd. Printed in the uk by Headley Brothers Ltd aj (issn 0003 8466) is published weekly except Christmas and August. Subscription price is $420. Periodicals postage paid at Rahway, nj and additional mailing offices. Postmaster send address corrections to: aj, c/o Mercury International Ltd, 365 Blair Road, Avenel, New Jersey 07001. Distributed in the us by Mercury International Ltd, 365 Blair Road, Avenel, nj 07001.

21


Column

Paul Finch’s letter from London Chipperfield’s quest for Common Ground at the Biennale is admirable; the British Council’s, perverse Chipperfield set out his position on this with a short but impassioned speech when he received the Gold Medal two years ago, and much of his own work has included propositions about the nature of architecture and architectural history. To what extent are those issues relevant to the entire spectrum of architectural production? Is there really a common language for architects of different regions, countries, races or religions? On the basis of our experience with the World Architecture Festival (now in its fifth year) I am sure the answer is yes, but to have the proposition made the basis for the Biennale will produce a marvellous testing ground. Given that national pavilions are invited to reflect on the curator’s theme and use it as a mainspring for their own offering, the British Council’s response seems extraordinarily perverse. Far from celebrating commonality and its potential benefits, the British pavilion will be filled with examples of how people overseas do certain things so much better than us. It will be another ‘Britain is useless’ moan, rather like the damp squib on housing in 2008. It doesn’t have the wit and engagement that characterised Muf ’s pavilion design in 2010. Given the unbelievably mean budget, perhaps the British Council could have explored the theme of ‘getting something for nothing’ that has certainly taken hold in British architecture in recent years. Thinking about it, the idea for the British pavilion is so weird that it may turn out to be interesting, though I am not holding my breath. Happily, the great thing about Venice is that there are always plenty of really good national pavilions – and of course the main curated spaces, which look certain to be showstoppers thanks to the intelligent choice of theme. I hope Jonathan Meades is invited to give a lecture to mark the opening.

The first of Jonathan Meades’ three-part series On France, broadcast on BBC4 last week, was a reminder of just how brilliant a cultural commentator he is, at the very top of his game, deploying devastating wit in almost surreptitious asides, and as ever larding his narrative with architectural example and allusion. Impossible to categorise, I can only recommend you get access to the programme if you missed it. Programmes like this make the licence fee look trifling. As might be expected, Meades took a couple of sideswipes at ‘Modernism’, (in a broadcast you never know if the ‘m’ is capitalised). But in its defence he noted the way that its universal nature was/is something we should admire for being an alternative to frozen architectural styles that reinforce notions of identity based on race, region, religion or nation. Modernism represents that which makes us individuals as opposed to groups, and an environment we can respond to in our individual ways.

By coincidence, the theme for David Chipperfield’s Venice Biennale was announced in the same week. Common Ground is a truly powerful starting point for an event that is universal but, given the many national pavilions in the Giardini and outside it, is inevitably about difference too. That tension will provide, I am sure, an inspirational event – perhaps the best for a decade. The Italian government must be congratulated for staying serious after some nonsense from Silvio Berlusconi about who was going to be in charge. Berlusconi, I am told, was baffled when the distinguished academic Kurt Forster curated the Biennale in 2004. The comic-opera president was under the impression he had given his approval to Norman Foster . . . Reflecting on what architects and architecture have in common, as opposed to what divides them, will provide an opportunity to examine architectural culture and explore the qualitative as a social good, rather than the precursor of satisfactory ‘return on investment’ statistics.

22

David Chipperfield’s theme for the 2012 Venice Biennale could prove to be the most inspirational for a decade

Merlin FulCher

Far from celebrating commonality, the British pavilion will be filled with examples of how people overseas do things better than us

aj 26.01.12


Sunsquare:Layout 1

15/3/10

12:00

Page 1

THE EXPERTS IN COMMERCIAL SHOWERING & WASHROOM CONTROLS

THE NEW RANGE OF RADA TIMED FLOW CONTROLS WASHROOM PERFECTION & SHOWERING PRECISION • Choice of contemporary designs • High performance and durability • Adjustable flow rate for water/energy savings • Engineered for high-use environments • WRAS approved Designed to provide a choice of durable and stylish timed flow controls for the most demanding environments. A selection of designs and features that will complement the aesthetics of any setting whilst maximising sustainability through water and energy savings.

For more information visit www.radatimedflowcontrols.com Or telephone 0844 879 3733 quoting reference RADA AJ13


Knowledge you can build on.

Subscribe today Visit: subscription.co.uk/aj/alia Call: 0844 848 885 quoting ALIA

AJ107 FP Subs ad 1.indd 1

AJ107FP1

Stay informed and remain competitive with insider access to detailed building studies and technical advice you can apply in your own practice - helping you to save time and money.

12/04/2011 17:08


AJ Small Projects 2012

O

n the following pages, we present the remaining projects in the 24-strong shortlist for the AJ Small Projects Awards, supported by Marley Eternit. We also feature the three projects up for our Small Projects Sustainability Award. This is my third year scouring the AJ Small Projects entries for the most inspiring exemplars of sustainable design. In selecting the shortlist, the emphasis is on the quality of the design and finish achieved on a tight budget. For the sustainability award, we were also looking for great design underpinned, but not undermined, by green thinking. My predilection has always been that the Small Projects submissions should include a seed-bed of >>

Hattie Hartman introduces the second part of the shortlist, including those vying for the sustainability award

AJ SMALL PROJECTS

2

dan hopkinson

arboreal architecture

1

Paul Reed, sales and marketing director at Marley Eternit, comments: ‘We are proud to be sponsoring this prestigious award for a second year. Marley Eternit is fully committed to helping highlight some of the creative and original work that architecture practices produce, regardless of budget constraints and size of project; this competition helps us to reward and cast a spotlight on such excellence.’ aj 26.01.12

paul richardson

3

25


exemplar sustainable projects which would lead me to emerging practitioners at the forefront of green design. Until this year, such expectation had been met with disappointment. Two years ago, it was slim pickings, but there’s good news to report this year – sustainability shines through on numerous projects. The three projects selected for this year’s sustainability award shortlist have one point in common: singlemindedness: Whimsy pervades Denizen Works’ ‘sledge’ sauna (pages 38-40), from the placement of a mirror to the shape of a door handle. Designed so that it can be hauled out on the frozen lake in winter, the sauna incorporates many reclaimed materials and touches the earth

lightly. Also shortlisted is NEX’s pavilion of translucent ‘capillaries’ at Kew Gardens (pages 54-56), which transforms plants’ cellular structure into a poetic, contemporary interpretation of a garden folly. And finally, Jonathan Tuckey’s lean approach to design stretches a modest budget to create a spacious, light-fi lled after-school club, replacing a Portakabin on a tight schoolyard site in Kilburn, north-west London (pages 30-32). It was difficult whittling down the list to those three. This year’s entries represent a quantum leap in affordable, sustainable design. Other contenders included an artist’s studio in Deptford, a bat house in Wales, a bird hide also in Wales and several clever retrofits,

The number of unique recycled polypropylene ‘cells’ in NEX’s Kew pavilion

586

5

TIM CROCKER

4

of which there were many. You can view the ‘best of the rest’ at AJFootprint.com and in greater detail on AJBuildingsLibrary.co.uk, where images and drawings of all 156 entries to Small Projects are available to view. The jury will choose the overall winner of AJ Small Projects 2012, as well as the winner of the sustainability award, after the live crit with me and the judging panel: Moira Gemmill of the V&A, Keith Bradley of Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios, Rider Levett Bucknall’s Lance Taylor, Paul Reed of Marley Eternit, and AJ editor Christine Murray. An exhibition of the shortlist will take place at the NLA from 9 February to 10 March. Hattie Hartman is the AJ’s sustainability editor

ARTUR SALITZ

Sustainable Small Projects: the best of the rest

Images. Drawings. Data. Search for ‘small projects’ on AJBuildingsLibrary.co.uk

26

1. B&Q Terrace, Foster Lomas, Bolton, 2010 2. Casa Miedi Larch Hut, Arboreal Architecture, Umbria, 2011 3. Hoo House, Jerry Tate Architects, Suffolk, 2010 4. The Bat House, Walk Barn Farm, Charles Barclay Architects, Suffolk, 2011 5. Magnificent Container, Hackney City Farm, Carl Turner Architects, London, 2011 (For 1-3, see the previous page)

aj 26.01.12


6079_Prf1 AJ_Gartec110x186

11/11/11

14:44

Page 1

Scandinavian beauty.

Designed and manufactured in Sweden, a Prime Series Platform Lift is the most aesthetically and technically advanced available today. Call 01296 397100 or visit www.gartec.com

Leading the Platform Lift Industry

Quality isn’t always on view

PermaQuik

®

Westfield Centre, West London

PermaQuik® hot melt roofing and podium membrane is certified by the BBA to last the lifetime of your building and comes with a 35 year guarantee – so you can be confident that it will be working as hard in 2047 as it was in 2012. Call us or visit our website to find out more.

www.radmat.com 2012_PQ HP 110 x 186.indd 1

tel: 01858 410372 24/01/2012 10:38


AJ Small Projects 2012

Elips Design

Dri Dri at Saint Martins Lane Hotel, London, Cost ÂŁ12,500 28

The Dri Dri pop-up Italian ice-cream stall aims to transport customers to the Mediterranean from the heart of London’s bustling centre. The front room of St Martins Lane Hotel, which has housed various creative collaborations including a fashion boutique, photography exhibition and video installation, was converted by Elips Design into an idyllic Italian

beach, complete with traditional decking, coloured beach cabins, sun umbrellas, chairs and tables. Gelato is served from a timber ice-cream cart placed in front of beach cabins that divide the space and create a back-of-house area for storage. The sun umbrellas are wall stickers to create more perspective in a bi-dimensional space. aj 26.01.12


5

1

6

2 4 3

7

4

2 1

0

1m

N

Carlo CarossIo

Plan

credits

legend

client Dri Dri Gelato contractor Imrich Fekete floor area 45m2

1. Flowers/plants 2. Chairs and tables 3. Decking 4. Ice cream 5. Cash table 6. Desk inside the cabin 7. Fake cabin with porch

aj 26.01.12

29


AJ Small Projects 2012

Jonathan Tuckey Design Wilberforce Primary School, London Cost ÂŁ135,000 30

This modest crèche and after-school centre makes the most of a limited budget. Replacing a Portakabin (which was sold on for re-use to contribute to the build costs) on a constrained site, a new standalone structure was designed so that it could be built by a local builder and joiner with minimal use of heavy machinery.

In lieu of a rectangular plan, two oblique walls open up towards the school and create more usable outdoor space. Similarly, a large folding double-glazed door links the interior space to the schoolyard, while a pitched roof extends the space vertically. Three operable rooflights can be used to vertically ventilate the classroom by opening aj 26.01.12


ground floor plan

2

1

2

3

4

6

DirK liNDNEr

5

the windows below. They also provide good access to natural light during daytime hours, reducing reliance on artificial lighting. Simple materials, such as profiled fibre cement sheeting outside and sustainably-sourced birch plywood inside, with a Marmoleum floor, combine to create a robust and flexible space. aj 26.01.12

credits

legend

client Wilberforce Primary School main contractor Edgar Design & Build structural engineer Built Engineers floor area 55m2 procurement JCT Minor Building Works

1. Entrance area 2. WC 3. Quiet area 4. Kitchen area 5. Main space 6. Concrete landscaping

Ground floor plan

0 500mm

N

31


AJ Small Projects 2012

shortlistED AJ Small Projects Sustainability Award

‘This simple, light-filled structure is an exemplar of economical lean design, both the building itself and its construction process. Thoughtful design and careful detailing make for an elegant contemporary insertion into the schoolyard which does not patronise its youthful clientele.’ Hattie Hartman, AJ sustainability editor 32

all images dirk lindner

judge’s comment

aj 26.01.12


If you dreamed a beautiful space If your desire is to be unique Choose Staron® Solid Surfaces and Radianz™ Quartz Surfaces for a sense of space with opulence

Staron® Solid Surfaces

Radianz™ Quartz Surfaces

Blackheath Products Birmingham T. 0121 561 3939

Gerald Culliford London T. 020 8390 4656

Staron UK Teesside T. 01642 616 880

Thomas Group Manchester T. 0161 748 2146 www.staron.com


AJ Small Projects 2012

Theis  +  Khan  architects Jay Mews, London Cost £245,000 34

This residential refurbishment sought to extend and modernise an existing first-floor flat in a mews in west London. It is located above an earlier office fit-out for Innovation RCA, which provides business support to students and graduates at the Royal College of Art. The project has opened up the existing confined spaces and exposed the roof trusses

to provide a generous, bright living area and open kitchen that has a feeling of space and character. A controlled palette of timber floors and joinery with white walls provides a refined backdrop to a contemporary home. The twobedroom apartment was also extended to the rear, with a new terrace established. aj 26.01.12


First floor plan

2 1

1

4

3

4

5 8 6

7

0

1m

N

NICK KaNE

Section

credits

legend

client Private structural engineer Elliot Wood contractor MDH quantity surveyor Stephen Cuddy floor area 94m2 procurement JCT Intermediate Contract 05

1. Bedroom 2. Storage 3. Entrance 4. Bathroom/WC 5. Living 6. Kitchen 7. Dining 8. Terrace

aj 26.01.12

35


dave morris

AJ Small Projects 2012

Tim Bayman Architecture House and office, Edinburgh, Cost £73,559 36

By reverting the front elevation to a ‘shopfront’, adding a new pitched roof and utilising the neglected space over a dropped ceiling, natural light has been restored to a building which had remained in the shadows since its conversion to residential use in 1984. The house’s staircase has been moved from the middle of the plan to a void created at the front of the building,

under the glazed facade, to allow light into the basement and free up the centre of the plan. On the ground floor a single table serves as both dining table and meeting table. The previously dark and airless storage space at basement level is now the living room. The narrow site allowed a pre-finished steel deck to be used as a single spanning structure. aj 26.01.12


0

1m

N

8

1 5 2

6

7

3 4

4

Ground floor plan

mezzanine level plan

credits

legend

client Tim Bayman Architecture structural engineer Create Engineering contractor Inscape Joinery floor area 93m2 procurement Negotiated contract and self-build

1. Living room 2. Wood-burning stove 3. Bedroom 4. Bathroom/WC 5. Dining table/ meeting table 6. Kitchen 7. Storage 8. Office

aj 26.01.12

DAvE mOrrIS

DAvE mOrrIS

Basement plan

3

37


AJ Small Projects 2012

Denizen Works and friends Denizen Sauna, Ă…land, Finland, Cost ÂŁ3,465 38

Located on a summer holiday island in the archipelago between Finland and Sweden, this self-build sauna was designed entirely in a small Moleskin notebook and built in nine days. The client had tried unsuccessfully for 12 years to obtain planning permission for a sauna within her disused boat shed. Denizen was

commissioned to find a solution that would circumnavigate the planning issues. Upon finding out that the planners allow the creation of mobile structures, and inspired by stories from the family’s past, they proposed building the sauna in the form of a large-scale sledge that could be hauled onto the frozen waters surrounding the house during the aj 26.01.12


tiina tervo

winter months. The sauna was constructed from locally sourced timber and recycled windows, and was lined in pine cladding that the client had stored in her shed 12 years ago, when she submitted her initial planning application. It sits on a raised foundation so that it can be towed onto the ice by a tractor or horses. aj 26.01.12

credits client Private completed July 2011 floor area 8m2 procurement Self-build

Detail drawings in architect’s sketchbook

39


AJ Small Projects 2012

shortlistED AJ Small Projects Sustainability Award

‘An ingenious and whimsical solution to a light footprint building in keeping with its surroundings.’ Hattie Hartman, AJ sustainability editor 40

all images tiina tervo

judge’s comment

aj 26.01.12


Acoustics 265x210_STO TESTING FACILITY 16/01/2012 10:52 Page 1

WE’VE PUT OUR ACOUSTIC SYSTEMS THROUGH THE ULTIMATE TESTS

As innovators and market leaders and with over 170 building product patents, we test everything to the very limit and beyond. Hear why our StoSilent acoustic systems help to provide the best ambience for your working environment – sounds good?

Scan this QR code with your smartphone

WATCH THE ACOUSTIC VIDEO www.stotestingfacility.co.uk


AJ Small Projects 2012

Office for Subversive Architecture OSA/Merzen at CUBE Gallery, Manchester. Cost £21,000 42

Based on artist Kurt Schwitters’ ‘Merz’ collage technique, in which he rearranged collected objects such as paper, timber and wire, OSA developed an accessible and tangible installation in Manchester’s CUBE Gallery. OSA transformed the gallery space by using old or used materials provided by the city of Manchester. After the materials had been placed

into the courtyard, they were thoroughly selected, divided and then ordered. The installation grew over a period of two months, using the materials as they were provided. Visitors were encouraged to become part of the development process by bringing their own collected materials of the built environment into the gallery. aj 26.01.12


Ground floor plan

0

1m

N

1

3

2

4

Lower ground floor plan

credits

legend

client Jane Anderson / CUBE Gallery / University of Salford structural engineer Kurt Schwitters services engineer Kurt Schwitters contractor OSA floor area 250m2 procurement Traditional

1. Material store 2. Original Kurt Schwitters 3. Workshop 4. Merzen

aj 26.01.12

JOhANNES MArBUrG

JOhANNES MArBUrG

4

43


AJ Small Projects 2012

Mole Architects

The Lanes, Cambridgeshire, Cost ÂŁ114,000 44

A larch-clad extension has transformed an unprepossessing two-bedroom 1960s bungalow in the village of Over, Cambridgeshire, for clients Patricia and Michael Sumpter. The front facade has been completely remodelled into a saw-tooth elevation composed of four pitches clad in vertical Siberian larch boarding.

Internally the three garden rooms, at the rear of the bungalow, have been combined to form an open-plan living space focused around an existing magnolia tree. The separate garage building has been incorporated into the main house, and converted along with the attic space. aj 26.01.12


2

3 1

2

N 3

5

6

0

1m

N

dAvid BUTLer

Ground floor plan

4

credits

legend

client Patricia and Michael Sumpter structural engineer Andrew Firebrace Partnership contractor Andy Knott Construction floor area 180m2 procurement JCT Homeowner contract

1. Garage 2. Bedroom 3. Bathroom 4. Kitchen 5. Utility room 6. Living/dining

aj 26.01.12

45


AJ Small Projects 2012

cat Professional Diploma Students Coed Gwern Bird Hide, Machynlleth, Cost ÂŁ1,500 46

The students on the Professional Diploma course at the Centre for Alternative Technology designed this temporary timber structure as a summer bird hide in the Coed Gwern woodland. The walls, roof and seating are integrated into one structure that is visually permeable and provides sufficient shelter without feeling separated from the environment. The

demounted structure was constructed over five days from Welsh organically grown untreated timber that was sawn and processed within 500 metres of the site. The lengths of timber were designed to achieve minimal waste of sawn pieces and the off-cuts were used to form spacers in between the timber. No mains electricity was consumed; battery and hand tools were used. aj 26.01.12


East elevation

North-east elevation

0

500mm

CAThERiNE wATTom

Section

credits client Centre for Alternative Technology project coordinator Duncan Roberts construction coordinator Geoff Stowe construction adviser Trish Andrews floor area 6m2

aj 26.01.12

47


AJ Small Projects 2012

mitchell taylor workshop Blundells Avenue Housing, Devon, Cost £180,000 48

The client, who wanted ‘more of the same’ housing that existed on the adjacent estate of nondescript ‘noddy boxes’, was persuaded by Mitchell Taylor Workshop that for the same money and with the same materials, three houses that were far better and more valuable could be built. The houses are grouped to achieve density and free up large external play and

garden areas, breaking the typology of the estate, but also responding to the urban grain of the adjacent historic road. The three houses’ build cost was £60,000 each, and they are constructed entirely from standard materials and components available from a local builders merchant. The intention was to show that there is an alternative to developer estate housing. aj 26.01.12


p y

0

2m

N

1

6

1 7 2 2

5

6

2

5

6

2

1

3

1

4

2

2

1

3

First floor plan

CourteSy MitCheLL tayLor WorKShoP

Ground floor plan

1

4

credits

legend

client Private structural engineer Structures 1 contractor John Smith floor area 210m2 co2 emissions 15kg/m2/year

1. Bedroom 2. Bathroom/WC 3. Store 4. Living 5. Dining 6. Kitchen 7. Living/dining

aj 26.01.12

49


AJ Small Projects 2012

Sheffield School of Architecture Live Project Ecclesall Woods Container Retreat, Sheffield, Cost ÂŁ1,150 50

One of Sheffield School of Architecture’s Live Project groups was asked to create a design language that could improve the appearance of the shipping containers used for storing tools and educational materials at the Ecclesall Woods Sawmill site. One container is near an outdoor classroom used by scout and school groups. The client wished to

create a space on top of this container for teaching children about the ancient woodland, close to the tree canopy. The retreat has been designed to help promote the innovative and sustainable use of timber. The structure was designed and built by the Live Project team from locally sourced timber, much of it from the woods themselves. aj 26.01.12


Exterior cladding detail

tom hArdEn

Axonometric drawing

credits client Sheffield City Council, Parks and Countryside floor area 14m2

aj 26.01.12

51


AJ Small Projects 2012

Hudson Architects

Lammas, Cley-next-the-Sea, Norfolk, Cost ÂŁ185,000 52

This extension to a 1960s two-storey house reads as an extrusion of the original house in terms of form, scale and materiality. The addition is positioned at a slight angle from the original house to establish a distinct identity for the new guest accommodation. A glazed link, which joins the extension to the original house, sits just below the eaves to

emphasise a break in the roofline that allows the old and new to be read as separate elements. Inside the link, oak stairs lead to guest accommodation via a landing spanning the house and the extension. A large corner window exploits the structural properties of the timber frame. External materials are used inside the link, providing a sense of going from inside to out. aj 26.01.12


0

2m

N

5 1

3

4 3

2

3

1 5

First floor plan

6 11

9

7

10 3

2 8 12

1

1

12

mAtt GRiGGS

Ground floor plan

credits

legend

client Private structural engineer Alcock Lees Partnership contractor RJ Bacon Builders floor area 50m2

1. Bathroom 2. Store 3. Bedroom 4. Walkway 5. Void 6. Kitchen 7. Dining 8. Study 9. Sitting room 10. Glazed lobby 11. Pergola 12. Garage

aj 26.01.12

53


AJ Small Projects 2012

NEX The Times Eureka Pavilion Richmond, Surrey Cost £70,000 54

Part of a small garden whose theme is ‘human dependency on plants’, this temporary pavilion is the latest in a string of quality architectural commissions by the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. Using principles of biomimicry, the architect NEX and landscape designer Marcus Barnett proposed a translucent pavilion based on the cellular structure of plants.

The design was developed using algorithms which replicate leaf capillaries. Sitting on a raft of sustainably sourced spruce beams, primary timber ‘capillaries’ form the structure which is infilled with 136 unique timber cassettes and 586 unique plastic ‘cells’ made of recycled translucent polypropylene. Rainwater from the aj 26.01.12


MaRcus pEEl

Elevation

roof runs through the capillaries inside the walls to the ground. The geometry of all the cassettes and cells radiates from two central vanishing points to create a dramatic and changing visual experience of the garden as visitors move through the structure. The pavilion can be dismantled and is entirely recyclable. aj 26.01.12

credits client Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, The Times landscape designer Marcus Barnett structural engineer Built Engineers contractor Outdoor Room dates May – June 2011 floor area 26m2

55


AJ Small Projects 2012

shortlistED AJ Small Projects Sustainability Award

‘A delicate reinterpretation of a garden pavilion with a creative use of materials.’ Hattie Hartman, AJ sustainability editor 56

all images marcus peel

judge’s comment

aj 26.01.12


London Sydney Melbourne Hong Kong

10 of the 12 Stirling Prize winners use us Architecture Interiors Graphics Creative Admin

0207 24 24 909 bespokecareers.com

AWSUB4135_bespoke_StirlingPrize_Ad.indd 1

21/09/2011 14:44


6-7-8-9

march

2 01 2

Cannes

Palais des Festivals

RegisteR by febRuaRy 21 and save €140! 4 days to attend the leading Real Estate exhibition & conference 18,600 unique participants 4,000 investors 1,800 exhibiting companies 90 countries 1 Country of Honour: Germany 2012

Find the most promising projects and powerful partners, gain critical industry insight, meet the world’s most influential real estate players at mIPIm 2012.

Building gloBal opportunities MIPIM® is a registered trademark of Reed MIDEM. All rights reserved.

210-265 EB ANG.indd 1

05/01/12 18:03


all photographs by nigel green

The Critics

exhibition

trĂˆs moderne A new study of post-war reconstruction in Picardy, France offers both a historical narrative and regional perspective on Modernism, writes Robin Wilson aj 26.01.12

59


The Critics

Between 2007 and 2009, photographer and artist Nigel Green conducted a series of documentary forays into the Picardy region of northern France. Commissioned by Picardy’s regional photography organisation Diaphane, Green made a comprehensive photographic record of the architecture of post-war reconstruction, the heritage of French Modernism built in the wake of the First and Second World Wars. A book of the project was published in 2010 and, following major exhibitions in France, it is currently on show for the first time in the UK at the Herbert Read Gallery, Canterbury. Green has long been fascinated with the remains of Modernism, and Reconstruction follows an earlier book, Transmodernity, on the post-Second World War reconstruction in Calais (2001). What this new project offers is an immersion into a regionally specific history

exhibition Reconstruction, the Herbert Read Gallery, UCA Canterbury 20 January – 14 February, free book Reconstruction, Nigel Green, text by Martin Kew Meade, Diaphane Éditions, 2010, €25

There are buildings of uncompromising severity and peculiarity of Modernism. Green portrays a modern architecture of hybridity. On the one hand, this is the result of a more historically cautious, local inflection of modern principles, such as the combining of a new tectonic and aesthetic use of concrete with more traditional stone and brick facing. However, there are also buildings of uncompromising severity and peculiarity, the expressions of a kind of a primitive, Modernist-Art Brut. The main text of the book is written by Martin Kew Meade, a Paris-based historian who is one of the few specialists on the period. Meade’s contribution lends the publication a strong historical narrative and contextualisation of the architecture, in terms of the evolution of construction technology and French urban policy. Thus, while many of the photographs stand alone as distinctive images within the pictorial tradition of ‘new objectivity’ photography, the project is also grounded by its aim to provide a detailed and systematic record. Green writes of how he responded to ‘archival necessity’. He comments on how an unmodified and authentic confrontation with this earlier, modern material culture can still be discovered in the backwater towns and B-road destinations of Picardy, such as Ham, Moreuil and Soissons. He says, ‘To find an environment that consistently exhibits this condition enables a contact with the past that is unique and genuine. This is not a representation of history reconstructed in the present, rather a revelation of the past that is unadulterated and actual’. For Green, these are radical environments, not 60

Previous page The town of Albert, Picardy This page, top The rotunde at Hirson/Buire Bottom The church at EstréesDeniecourt Overleaf Tour Perret, Amiens (1955)

just historical curiosities. But they are also often left unprotected from the forces of change. Green notes that two silos he photographed had been destroyed by the time of the book’s publication, and further buildings have been razed since then. The book organises the architecture into 11 categories that separate distinct building typologies, such as ‘churches’, ‘hotels and cafés’, ‘sport, services and utility structures’. The last category of the book is ‘street views and corners’, which functions as a thoughtful postscript and reveals much about Green’s photographic approach in general. In this more spatially defined category, he highlights how his attention encompasses the wider built environment, not just individual buildings. He portrays the continuity of surfaces and spaces that define not simply isolated architectural forms, but more complete pockets of this indigenous, modern urbanism. One of the most complex images of this type occurs in the ‘agricultural buildings’ section from the town of Villers-Cotterêts. Green has photographed a 1920s stone townhouse, bordered by industrial, agricultural buildings to either side and behind. Its original features look impeccably in order. The shutters of the house all closed, its iron gates shut and rusted. It is unclear whether the house is permanently abandoned or temporarily vacated, while the industrial infrastructure looks more definitively derelict. Moreover, this ensemble seems to comprise the entire extent of the town’s depth beyond the road. Through architecture, the image portrays the atrophying of a community, and a powerful disjunction between the resilience of built matter and the transience of the social and economic conditions that brought it into being. Green’s study spans the mundane to the most monumental and bespoke structures. One section is dedicated to ‘rotondes’, the turntable infrastructure of the Northern Railways network. The example at HirsonBuire could plausibly be the stripped remains of a fascist parade arena. Hirson/Buire also boasts the ruins of what Meade identifies as the ‘Florentine tower’, an ornate control tower by Gustave Umbdenstock (1920). Indeed, towers could have made for another category in Green’s documentation. From a four-storey stadium entrance tower in Albert, to Auguste Perret’s vast housing and office tower, part of his redevelopment of the train station of Amiens (1947-52), the tower is a ubiquitous typography on Green’s itinerary. Perhaps more than any other structure they represent the distance Green’s project has calibrated between the civic and social ideology behind this Modernism and its current status as an architecture of uncertainty and estrangement. Robin Wilson is a writer on architecture, art and landscape aj 26.01.12


The Critics

aj 26.01.12

61


The Critics

this week

The Modernist casts its eye far beyond its Manchester home, writes James Pallister

Neat, snappy and still in its oversized A5 format, quarterly magazine The Modernist (see AJ 20.07.11) is now in its third issue. This issue includes the usual missives from its normal Lancashire stomping ground – Eddy Rhead recalls Granada TV, which was broadcasting from Manchester while Salford Quays was still a working dock, while Aidan Turner Bishop recalls the tragically short-lived Hornsea Pottery – but it also looks to more exotic climes. There are tales from towerblocks in Leningrad, a Modernist guide to Essex, reports from Canadian oil city Edmonton, and the story of the Lingotto factory by naval architect Matté Trucco that famously features the fantastic racetrack atop. Showing great magnanimity in overcoming the traditional local rivalry, they’ve even gone as far as Liverpool. In ‘Bust to Bust’, Dan Russell reflects on the legacy of the 1984 Garden Festival, presenting it as a forerunner to the style of cultural and commercial regeneration that caught up with the city in 2008, the year of the European Capital of Culture and the development of Liverpool One. For Russell, the challenge for Liverpool now is to ensure that the ‘what next’ for the city avoids the neglect that the Garden Festival site suffered. Keeping up the rollicking pace set by Jonathan Meades in the magazine’s first issue, Owen Hatherley’s foreword outlines a Modernist state of mind characterised not by neophilia or nostalgia, but by a commitment ‘to socially useful things – education, public housing, the NHS’. This Modernism of ‘tween-times, between the harsh liberalism of the 19th-century Manchester Mills and the property speculation of today, is ‘something worth fighting for’.

read The Modernist, issue three ‘Boom and Bust’, the-modernist-mag.co.uk, £3.75

62

aj 26.01.12


Back Page

Ian Martin a list of most righteous grievances, and an artful remodelling of hearts and minds monday. This government has betrayed everything

It has taken seven lunches with senior Westminster contacts – one of those lunches, I might add, conducted in a luxury hot-air balloon – but I have done it. This farsighted, intelligent government has finally appointed me to remodel the national Psyche. I will leave the blog/e-petition for now.

I hold dear. It has betrayed the British people. more seriously, it has betrayed architectural metaphor. It promised to take us up in that glass lift to the top of Lloyd’s. you remember, we were going to have a packed lunch and oversee the City. Instead, this government has taken us up the oxo Tower.

Thursday. I applaud this new-look, benefit-

Tuesday. I despair, I really do. ‘Whither the built

capped London the critics are all raving about. apparently it’s going ‘sherlock’. Central London will shortly be entirely owned by russian, Chinese and Indian billionaires and then rented out to attractive eccentrics who don’t cook or clean and travel everywhere by black cab. It proves that we Can use welfare dependency to effect social engineering. oh, the power of deduction.

environment?’ as we used to say during the last recession, and the one before that. I’ve a good mind to commit some thoughts to paper on this matter. When I say ‘commit to paper’ I mean upload to my controversial new blog, Painted air. and when I say ‘some thoughts’ I mean a series of fat, shrill paragraphs in a variety of fonts. I am already huffily drawing up a list of charges against The so-Called Coalition. It’s already being talked about as a professional class action, in my head at least. I will not be silenced. Time to campaign on behalf of what I’m grandly calling The 3d Community: designers, dreamers and dudes. our serious and most righteous grievances include: • majesty of architecture overlooked in favour of financial services • Pastiche now displaced by random bits of historicism all just jumbled up and in it together • notion of ‘truth in beauty’ contracted out to spanish hedge fund • VaT exemption for conceptual thinking to be phased out • Withdrawal of funding from ‘gritty, urban’ architecture, support for ‘mainstream, fictional’ architecture only, e.g. downton abbey • marxist beard and situationist trousers no longer acceptable qualifications to teach Visual arts at a further education college • Introducing paywall for all hardcore public architecture • Prince of Wales’ letters being answered for the first time in 14 years • Prime minister declined invitation to this year’s ancient anoynting & Crowneing of ye Chief architectt at stonehenge • deliberately confusing ‘homeless’ and ‘non-doms’ in the minds of the electorate I am so incensed by this stupid government I might even start an e-petition.

66

Psyche. The brief from the department of entertainment calls for an inclusive psyche ‘that everyone likes, or at least thinks they like’. I propose a strong, independent aesthetic. no modernism and as few european influences as possible. Its form will be ‘classy classic Classical’, although I’m playing down the whole Greek thing for now by giving it Jacobethan cladding. There will be columns though. These will be plain, to resonate with our age of austerity, and topped with moral capitalism. all aspects of the national Psyche will be open to commercial sponsorship. Indeed, an appropriately generous donation could embed a sponsor’s name at the very heart of the sense of who we are as a nation. discreet negotiations are underway at the moment. I cannot comment on any frontrunners. Let’s just say that a certain mr murdoch, keen to make amends for any offence he may have caused the British people, has suggested rebadging it the national sKyche and I for one can see no harm in that. I am planning a stately landscape setting for the remodelled version, with surrounding woodland insulating our collective imagination. and a vast ornamental lake in front, to make the whole thing reflective and self-regarding.

.

Hanna Melin

.

Wednesday Thank God for the entrepreneurial spirit of people like me. People whose selfless, ceaseless hunger for money enables the enrichment of us all.

frIday. sketch out my redesign for the national

saTurday switch off cognitive functions, go on internet, discover the government’s now saying there’s no such thing as a national Psyche and that they’ve appointed andrew Lloyd Webber to score a new national narrative instead. sunday. suspended agitation in the recliner. aj 26.01.12


Beautiful skin.

Proud sponsors of the Small Projects Award 2011

See

at Ecobuild

Stand number N1030 Event date: 20th - 22nd March 2012

The beauty of fibre cement cladding is more than skin deep. Take a fresh look at Marley Eternit’s good-looking, hardwearing fibre cement cladding. With a palette of 86 subtle and inspiring colours in a variety of textures and finishes, it’s worthy of the most high-profile projects. It boasts life expectancy of at least 50 years and has robust resistance to impact, weather, frost and mould, too. So it will keep those good looks long into the future. And as one of the most sustainable cladding solutions there is with an A+ rating*, it’s hard not to see the attraction. For more information, technical advice or to request product samples, visit marleyeternit.co.uk/cladding call 01283 722588 or email us at info@marleyeternit.co.uk

*Based on generic BRE Green Guide to Specification rating for autoclaved fibre cement single sheet - (Element Ref: 80623042, 806230422, 806230447, 806230450) and autoclaved fibre cement (calcium silicate) cladding (Element Ref: 806220701, 806220675, 806220676).

MEL_M031_AJ_SmallProjects_SponserAds.indd 1

20/01/2012 12:43


Crittall retro V5pm 11/8/11 Crittall retro V5 11/8/11 1:44 Page 2 1:44 pm

Page 2

original artwork for Crittall poster and advertising Picture shows original Picture artworkshows for Crittall poster and advertising material circa 1930 material circa 1930

T i m e l Te si m s e l e s s

O u r

hO e ru ir t ah ge er i i t sa go eu ri s s to r ue rn gs t hr e n g t h Crittall Windows Ltd, FrancisRoad, House, Freebournes Road,3UN Witham, Essex CM8 3UN Crittall Windows Ltd, Francis House, Freebournes Witham, Essex CM8 Tel: Fax: +44 +44 (0)1376 530800 Fax: +44 (0)1376 530801 Email: hq@crittall-windows.co.uk Tel: +44 (0)1376 530800 (0)1376 530801 Email: hq@crittall-windows.co.uk

www. crittall-windows.com www. crittall-windows.com

Newavailable Brochure now available New Brochure now


26.01.12

AJ Small Projects Part 2 of the shortlist, plus the Sustainability Award on the cover Tim Bayman Architecture

£4.95   THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL   THEAJ.CO.UK


£4.95   THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL   THEAJ.CO.UK

Part 2 of the shortlist, plus the Sustainability Award on the cover CAT Professional Diploma students

AJ Small Projects

26.01.12


£4.95   THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL   THEAJ.CO.UK

Part 2 of the shortlist, plus the Sustainability Award on the cover Denizen Works and friends

AJ Small Projects

26.01.12


26.01.12

AJ Small Projects Part 2 of the shortlist, plus the Sustainability Award on the cover Hudson Architects

£4.95   THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL   THEAJ.CO.UK


26.01.12

AJ Small Projects Part 2 of the shortlist, plus the Sustainability Award on the cover Office for Subversive Architecture

£4.95   THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL   THEAJ.CO.UK


£4.95   THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL   THEAJ.CO.UK

Part 2 of the shortlist, plus the Sustainability Award on the cover Mitchell Taylor Workshop

AJ Small Projects

26.01.12


£4.95   THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL   THEAJ.CO.UK

Part 2 of the shortlist, plus the Sustainability Award on the cover Mole Architects

AJ Small Projects

26.01.12


26.01.12

AJ Small Projects Part 2 of the shortlist, plus the Sustainability Award on the cover NEX

£4.95   THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL   THEAJ.CO.UK


26.01.12

AJ Small Projects Part 2 of the shortlist, plus the Sustainability Award on the cover Sheffield School of Architecture

£4.95   THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL   THEAJ.CO.UK


26.01.12

AJ Small Projects Part 2 of the shortlist, plus the Sustainability Award on the cover Theis + Khan Architects

£4.95   THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL   THEAJ.CO.UK


£4.95   THE ARCHITECTS’ JOURNAL   THEAJ.CO.UK

Part 2 of the shortlist, plus the Sustainability Award on the cover Jonathan Tuckey Design

AJ Small Projects

26.01.12

Small Projects 2012 - Part 2 (AJ26.01.2012)  

Design on a budget - the Architects' Journal's annual Small Projects awards, part 2 of the shortlist for 2012

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you