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volume 131, number 87

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

$1 million pepper spray settlement calls for collaborative university reform Chancellor to issue personal apologies to plaintiffs By ROHIT RAVIKUMAR Aggie News Writer

Shazib Haq / Aggie

On Sept. 26, local attorney Mark Merin spoke to the press on the UC Davis Quad regarding the pepper spray settlement. The settlement between the University of California includes a $1,000,000 payout, a personal apology to the students pepper sprayed and policy changes regarding free speech.

ASUCD and CALPIRG hold voter registration drive on campus AggiesVote promotes new online voter registration tools for students

Brian Nguyen / Aggie

ASUCD senator Bradley Bottoms helps fourth-year mechanical engineering student Hannah Zhu register to vote for the first time.

By STEPHANIE B. NGUYEN Aggie News Writer

Registering to vote is now easier than ever with the launch of online voter registration in California that began Sept. 19. With the national presidential elections in November quickly approaching, ASUCD and California Public Interest Group (CALPIRG) have joined forces to promote and facilitate voter registration among UC Davis undergraduates with AggiesVote. The students behind AggiesVote hope to register

Today’s weather Sunny High 99 Low 55

as many students as possible, and in recent weeks AggiesVote has been a widespread force around campus, tabling at the dining commons, on the Quad and at various welcome week events. The coalition also hopes to expand their reach by partnering with student groups and Greek organizations in the coming weeks. “College students are some of the most politically active and well-informed participants in our democracy, but they're also very busy and occasionally let things like registration slip through the cracks,” said ASUCD senator and fifth-year

See VOTE, page 2

Students, alumni and American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) attorneys gathered on the UC Davis Quad Sept. 26 to discuss a recent settlement between the University and the plaintiffs of last November’s pepper spray incident. The settlement, approved by the UC Board of Regents in a mid-September meeting, would distribute $1 million: $630,000 to the 21 plaintiffs, $250,000 to be split between their attorneys, $100,000 to be put aside for individuals who were pepper sprayed but have yet to come forward and $20,000 to the ACLU in exchange for collaborative work on university reform. UC Davis Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi will also issue personal apologies to each person who was pepper sprayed. At the conference, plaintiffs gathered to share their experiences from last November. “Nightmares, waking up screaming, anxiety [and] panic attacks all came, and it just wasn’t with me,” said UC Davis alumna Fatima Sbeih, who was a student last November. In addition, the settlement will bring collaboration between UC Davis and the ACLU on a series of reforms. “I know the $1 million figure got a lot of attention, but we think it’s important that the community see that our reforms and policies will have the benefit of a very respected organization, the ACLU,” said Barry Shiller, executive director of strategic communications at UC Davis. The first reform is a complete internal reorganization of the police department, a process which began with Police Chief Annette Spicuzza’s resignation on April 18 and her re-

See PEPPER, page 2

Absurd Publications pushes full steam ahead Unexpected success buoys company

By ANDREW POH Aggie News Writer

In May, the new student-run press Absurd Publications had yet to print a book. Four months later, it’s sitting on a monthly reading series at The Avid Reader, a self-printed anthology titled “All the Vegetarians in Texas Have Been Shot,” two prints of a small creative journal titled “The Oddity” and radio airtime on Capital Public Radio’s “Insight.” “When we first began, we had grand plans: a final printed book to be sold in bookstores, a place in which to host our own readings, a connection enough with the community to publish a monthly journal — a sort of ‘mini-anthology,’” said Evan White, co-founder of Absurd Publications. “And, in every case, we've been successful. I don't pretend to know how any of it happened.” Other co-founder of Absurd Publications Corey La Rue said the press was conceived at UC Davis. “It was a community project really — born in the hot halls of Voorhies last year in a poetry class taught by Dr. [Andy] Jones,” La Rue said. “That class really changed everything, and we took away a lot with us. One day I approached Evan after class at a Starbucks and was like, ‘Hey you wanna start a

courtesy

press?’ and the rest is history.” The entire process has not been an easy one, according to White and La Rue. They realized early on that making the books would be taxing, both mentally and financially. In fact, after all the equipment had been bought, the company only had $20 left of their seed money. Absurd Publications is currently run entirely in the apartment that La Rue and White share together, with a steady stream of friends

helping to smooth out any bumps they may encounter along the way. Though White and La Rue had come into the business imagining that they wouldn’t turn any profit, time has shown that there may just be a little gold in it after all. “In the beginning we told ourselves, ‘We're making a book of short fiction, which there's almost no money in. We're also going to include poetry too, which there is

See ABSURD, page 3

News iN Brief

ASUCD to host congressional candidate forum On Oct. 8, Rep. John Garamendi will join the Associated Students, University of California, Davis (ASUCD) in a congressional candidate

Forecast I guess global warming is real, right? Written by Amanda Nguyen Weather report courtesy of www.weather.com

forum from 7 to 8 p.m. at the Student Community Center. Students are encouraged to attend and ask questions at the forum as the City of Davis read-

Wednesday

Thursday

Sunny

Sunny

High 90 Low 55

High 84 Low 52

ies itself to vote for a new representative in November. — Claire Tan

Alpha Kappa Psi, a co-ed professional business fraternity at UC Davis, encourages you to start now in investing in your future, in investing in yourself. Join our Fall Rush 2012 on Facebook and check out www.davisakpsi.org for more info! Valerie Francisco


page two

2 tuesday, october 2, 2012

daily calendar dailycal@theaggie.org

TUESDAY Interview Basics 12:10 to 1 p.m. 229 South Go to this seminar put on by the Internship and Career Center to learn about different types of interviews and strategies to respond to questions so that you can effectively demonstrate your knowledge and qualifications for the position you want.

Lack of Hope and Persistence of Poverty Seminar 5 to 6:30 p.m. Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center, AGR Room Listen to this free Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics lecture given by Esther Duflo, the Abdul Latif Jameel Professor of Poverty Alleviation and Development Economics in the Department of Economics at MIT and a founder and director of the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL).

1003 Kemper Hall Join Dr. Ajay Kumar Dalai, associate dean and professor at the University of Saskatchewan and Fulbright Scholar, UC Davis (2012-2013), as he discusses Development of Novel Carbon Nanotubes Supported Catalysts for Fischer–Tropsch and Higher Alcohol Syntheses. There is no cost and all are welcome to attend.

‘Get Some Jerky,’ because Aggies do business too UC Davis students create jerky business

Biomedical Engineering Seminar Series 4:10 to 5 p.m. 1005 GBSF Listen to Dr. Crystal Ripplinger discuss the sympathetic nervous system and cardiac arrhythmias as part of this seminar series.

Young Cattlemen’s Association Club Meeting 6:30 to 7 p.m. ASTF 500 Attend the first Young Cattlemen’s Association Club meeting of the year. Pizza and beverages will be provided.

UC Davis Rowing Informational Meeting

THURSDAY Big Bang Business Plan Competition Kick-Off and Welcome 7 to 9 p.m. Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center, AGR room Find out about this year’s competition and how you can get involved. Big Bang is the annual UC Davis Business Plan Competition organized by MBA students of the Graduate School of Management. The goal of the contest is to promote entrepreneurship at UC Davis and the region supported by the University. The event is free and sponsored by the Child Family Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Graduate School of Management. For more information, go to eventbrite.com/event/4029554506.

Shinkoskey Noon Concert 12:05 to 1 p.m. Yocha Dehe Grand Lobby, Mondavi Center Attend this free performance with guitarist Michael Goldberg and more.

UC Davis Energy Institute Fall 2012 Seminar Series 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.

7 to 8 p.m. 1100 Social Sciences Attend this informational meeting about the UC Davis men’s and women’s rowing teams. No experience is necessary to join and there will be free pizza.

Opening Night: Readings by the Creative Writing Faculty 7 to 8 p.m. Wyatt Deck (rain location: 126 Voorhies Hall) Listen to readings by award-winning fiction writers and poets from the UC Davis Creative Writing Program. This program features Joshua Clover, Greg Glazner, Pam Houston, Yiyun Li, Joe Wenderoth and Alan Williamson. This free event is co-sponsored by the UC Davis English department and the Arboretum. For more information, call (530) 752-4880 or visit arboretum.ucdavis.edu. To receive placement in the AGGIE DAILY CALENDAR, e-mail dailycal@theaggie. org or stop by 25 Lower Freeborn by noon the day prior to your event. Due to space constraints, all event descriptions are subject to editing and priority will be given to events that are free of charge and geared toward the campus community.

police briefs THURSDAY

Cowell Boulevard.

Wedding crashers

No Nudz Plz

Someone had friends and family stay over after their wedding at their residence on Clemson Drive, only to discover that once their guests had left, much of their belongings were gone.

Someone was seen walking naked toward Safeway on Cowell Boulevard.

Totally fried Somebody was passed out in the drivethru at In-N-Out on Olive Drive.

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Not-so-silent treatment A male and female were heard having a loud verbal disagreement in a treatment room on West Covell Boulevard.

Office party Someone drank two bottles of champagne in the bathroom at OfficeMax and then was suspected of taking a few items on

Fowl play A suspicious person was spotted sitting in the middle of a plot with a shopping cart full of junk and two very expensive birds on Research Park Drive. Police briefs are compiled from the City of Davis daily crime bulletins. Contact EINAT GILBOA at city@theaggie.org.

courtesy

By DANIEL RIESGO Aggies Features Writer

When one hears about UC Davis, one thinks about its world-class agriculture program or the extensive research facilities and faculty that have made it one of the greatest public universities in the nation. However, one recent grad and two seniors have committed themselves to create a new reason to be proud to be called an Aggie. Founded and spearheaded by senior political science major Alex Lane, Get Some Jerky is “what freedom tastes like”: an all-American, high-quality beef jerky company located in Davis. Lane, as an unsatisfied jerky lover, decided to create a company that would offer a meat lover-worthy, preservativefree jerky because he said people deserve better. With only two and a half months since the company launched, Lane and his fellow founders, 2011 graduate Sarah Hellesen and senior history major James Panabaker, have artfully crafted their way to produce four distinct flavors of jerky – hot beef, sweet and spicy, homestyle pepper and a sweet teriyaki turkey jerky – and interest three investors. But Lane said these achievements have not come easy to Get Some Jerky. Lane tells of the sacrifices the company has demanded from him and his co-founders in order to grow as entrepreneurs, including the almost complete eradication of their social lives, stress and extra time invested in learning small business management due to working 100-hour weeks. “To sum it up in one sentence: The

PEPPER

accuracy The California Aggie strives to ensure that all of its facts and details are accurate. Please bring any corrections to our attention by calling (530) 752-0208.

Cont. from front page placement by Matthew Carmichael. The university’s aims are to make the police, specifically bicycle police, appear more approachable and part of the community, while also improving training that teaches how to handle student protest. The second is a clarification and adjustment of the roles of students, faculty and staff in managing incidents on campus and moving the three groups to the fore while minimizing the role of police for nonvolatile incidents. The third in the series

Janelle Bitker Editor in Chief

Matthew Yuen Sports Editor

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Caelum Shove Advertising Manager

Stephanie Chon Opinion Editor Joey Chen Copy Chief Brian Nguyen Photography Editor

Muna Sadek Campus Editor

Janice Pang Design Director

Claire Tan City Editor

Amanda Nguyen Night Editor

Elizabeth Orpina Arts Editor

Irisa Tam Art Director

Devon Bohart Features Editor

David Ou New Media Director

One Shields Ave. 25 Lower Freeborn, UCD Davis, CA 95616 Editorial (530) 752-0208 Advertising (530) 752-0365 Fax (530) 752-0355

The California Aggie is entered as first-class mail with the United States Post Office, Davis, Calif., 95616. Printed Monday through Thursday during the academic year and once a week during Summer Session II at The Davis Enterprise, Davis, Calif., 95616. Accounting services are provided by ASUCD. The Aggie is distributed free on the UC Davis campus and in the Davis community. Mail subscriptions are $100 per academic year, $35 per quarter and $25 for the summer. Views or opinions expressed in The Aggie by editors or columnists regarding legislation or candidates for political office or other matters are those of the editors or columnist alone. They are not those of the University of California or any department of UC. Advertisements appearing in The Aggie reflect the views of advertisers only; they are not an expression of editorial opinion by The Aggie. The Aggie shall not be liable for any error in published advertising unless an advertising proof is clearly marked for corrections by the advertiser. If the error is not corrected by The Aggie, its liability, if any, shall not exceed the value of the space occupied by the error. Further, The Aggie shall not be liable for any omission of an advertisement ordered published. All claims for adjustment must be made within 30 days of the date of publication. In no case shall The Aggie be liable for any general, special or consequential damages. © 2009 by The California Aggie. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form whatsoever is forbidden without the expressed written permission of the copyright owner.

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company is my life,” Lane said. UC Davis prestige is not particularly associated with business and entrepreneurship; a company like Get Some Jerky, however, proves that Aggies can do business as well. It is vital to notice that Get Some Jerky is not the first company to arise from innovative students from this university. Companies such as Aseptia, a food processing technology company, and Solera, a company created to develop small electricity-generating systems, were founded by Aggie impresarios with a true spirit of innovation. Evidently, the entrepreneurial interest of UC Davis students is increasing. Lane has been attending meetings of a Davis startup club focused on mentoring and helping new entrepreneurs in the city. Davis in general has been truly helpful for Get Some Jerky’s success. “We’ve been receiving much support from local Davis citizens; our investors are actually local as well,” Panabaker said. Panabaker said that Davis locals encourage and care for students’ business ambitions. Appealing to Davisites is one of Get Some Jerky’s primary goals; thus, what better way to attract locals’ attention than by having a bear meander around the town’s biggest events? Get Some Jerky’s mascot is, indeed, a bear by the name of Jerk. Co-founder and handyman Panabaker wears the bear costume to the farmers market, on-campus activities and occasionally to downtown Davis to take pictures with locals. But Get Some Jerky has other priorities as well. The three founders, a

of reforms is a complete reexamination of the UC Davis guidelines for freedom of expression, a process led by the Academic Senate. This step is ongoing, and there has been much talk of the final outcome of the discussion. Finally, the University plans to address aftereffects from the pepper spray incident, making efforts to keep the community involved in police policy. This process has just begun and will move forward more quickly starting in October, according to Shiller. “We’re not just doing this alone,” Shiller said. “In addition to what we’re doing, there is a UC system-wide review of cam-

VOTe

Jonathan Wester Business Manager

The california Aggie

Cont. from front page political science and philosophy double major Justin Goss. “We’re ensuring this doesn’t happen by making registration as convenient as possible for them so we can usher these savvy political voices into the voting booth where they belong.” In order for the drive to have a campus-wide effect, ASUCD has formed a coalition with CALPIRG, whose lead campaign this year is the New Voters Project, a continuous effort to register undergraduate students to vote. In addition, AggiesVote will hold a forum where students can learn about Rep. John Garamendi’s platforms on Oct. 8, as well as co-sponsor a screening of the presidential debate. Students can register to vote before, during and after any of

CPA, a lawyer and informal support by Chase bank in Davis are the only influences and minds in the corporation. Although Lane is the “mastermind” behind Get Some Jerky, Hellesen said she realizes that an addition of other professionals into the business will increase the efficiency and growth of the company. “As we grow, we’re planning to bring in somebody from marketing, because while it’s something we can do by ourselves, it could be much better done by a professional,” Panabaker said. However, a low budget and the relative freshness of the company have not made this possible just yet, exposing Lane, Panabaker and Hellesen to more responsibilities and situations they said they are not entirely savvy and well-versed for. Lane plans to start selling the jerky at the Coffee House in the Memorial Union soon. After that, he plans to expand to other campuses like UC Berkeley, where he expects that Get Some Jerky’s mascot bear will become popular and widely accepted by the locals. Ultimately, Get Some Jerky – and in essence Aggie pride – should be available in store counters throughout the nation. As of now, Lane must continue to exploit his intellect, innovative talent and unique charisma to attract new investors to the company and thus slowly grow as an entrepreneur. “Starting the company is like having a baby,” Lane said. “You’re always stressed, broke [and] too busy, but it’s worth it.” DANIEL RIESGO can be reached at features@theaggie.org.

pus police guidelines and practices.” The University Office of the President (UCOP) will coordinate and run the reform recommendations for all 10 UC police departments. The ACLU, contacted by individuals who were pepper sprayed, now plans to work closely with UC Davis officials to ensure that the events of last November do not happen again. “This happened because Davis simply did not have the types of policies to ensure that when there are demonstrations, the administration and police act in a certain way,” said Michael Risher, an ACLU staff attorney who attended the

these events. “The goal is to not only get students involved in democracy, but also to have them be informed and educated voters,” said New Voters Project campaign coordinator Donna Farvard, a third-year neurobiology, physiology and behavioral studies major. ASUCD senators Bradley Bottoms and Kabir Kapur, who have played a key role in organizing the drive, agreed. “Recently, there have been many bills and propositions going through the state government that directly affect students — most notably Proposition 30,” said Bottoms, a thirdyear political science and sociology double major. Kapur also discussed the possibility of Proposition 30 not passing in the November elections. “Proposition 30 is an important issue on this November’s ballot for stu-

Sept. 26 press conference. “We want to make sure free speech is not just tolerated, but encouraged.” The importance of the reforms is not lost on some of the plaintiffs, such as Ian Lee, a secondyear environmental policy analysis and planning major, who was pepper sprayed and in attendance at the press conference. “I think the settlement is a step in the right direction, but we need to do more,” he said. “If campus police are to exist, they must be accountable to the students.” The settlement is still awaiting court approval. ROHIT RAVIKUMAR can be reached at campus@theaggie.org.

dents because if it fails tuition will go up 20 percent in January,” said Kapur, a third-year political science and philosophy double major. Goss continued to address the big picture. “The state of California education is still in decline,” Goss said. “Increasing undergraduate participation in the voting process allows the student voice to more overtly dominate the political sphere and forces legislators to cater to the preferences of students if they want to get reelected. Therefore, we believe registering more students to vote could facilitate better treatment for California education by the legislature.” AggiesVote will continue until the voter registration deadline on Monday, Oct. 22. STEPHANIE B. NGUYEN can be reached at campus@ theaggie.org.


OPINION

The california aggie

tuesday, october 2, 2012 3

Letter to the editor

editorials

Pepper spray settlement

Let’s move forward Settlement plans between the University of California and the students pepper sprayed on November 18 were submitted for court approval last week, where the university is to pay $1 million to the plaintiffs, attorneys and the American Civil Liberties Union. We are happy that a settlement has been reached, but we feel that the focus should be put on new policies to avoid the possibility of repeat incidents. One million dollars is a lot of money, but people should keep in mind that the money used in this case was set aside for the University’s self-insured General Liability Risk Program, and it would have been used in another university lawsuit anyway. On April 30, the University of California published the Robinson-Edley Report, which contained 50 recommendations to ensure that protests will be handled in a manner that does not result in undue violence and injury.

However, these recommendations mean nothing if they are not enacted and enforced. Lack of communication was a primary factor that led to the incident in the first place, and it will be good communication that ensures the future safety of students and the accountability of those in charge. It should be the responsibility of students and faculty to hold the administration to their policies, and it should be the responsibility of the administration to provide adequate lines of communication, making sure that the student body is informed of the rules regarding protests. While students receiving compensation is a good thing, it is even more promising that Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi is issuing personal apologies to each student. We hope that within these apologies, Katehi will take responsibility for her actions, as well as the university’s.

Athletic director

Keep your eye on the ball On July 5, Terrance J. Tumey was appointed the UC Davis Director of Athletics in succession of Greg Warzecka. Tumey is starting with a base salary of $210,000 that will increase in $5,000 increments every year until it reaches $230,000 in the fifth year. As the Athletic Director, Tumey will oversee the operations of coaches and staff of the intercollegiate athletic programs at UC Davis. But that doesn’t concern the rest of you non-studentathletes right? Wrong. As much as you would like to treat athletics and academics as separate entities, they are directly intertwined at our university, which students should realize. The change in athletic directors could have a direct effect on every student on campus. Some sports – such as football, baseball and basketball – have the potential to generate revenue for the school through mediums like ticket sales. UC Davis athletic programs are already struggling to stay afloat, and the abysmal attendance doesn’t help. It’s difficult to pinpoint where this chicken-or-the-egg cycle began. There is a problem when there were higher attendance numbers when UC Davis was a Division II school than there are now in Division I. Where did all the fans go? Tumey is taking it upon himself to figure out why UC Davis isn’t pulling in the fans that it has the potential to. In a time when every bit of revenue can help a university strapped for money, athletics and academics can team up in generating revenues; they don’t have to be fighting for funds. More ticket sales means more people in the stands, which creates a bigger pull for athletes, which means better athletes will want to come to Davis. When strong athletes come to Davis, they put more W’s in the win column. When we win, we sell more tickets, and so on. Now, this isn’t to say that our athletes aren’t world-class athletes. They’re here because they’ve already figured out that UC Davis is a special place to go and develop skills. They just need the financial support from a school, and the knowledge that they have fans and a student base around them that supports and cares about them. And judging by our attendance records – let’s be honest – are we doing that for them? Tumey’s actions will affect the athletic programs here at UC Davis, which in turn have the potential to foster the University even further along in its growth as both an athletic and academic powerhouse. Good luck, Mr. Tumey. And students: keep watching.

feeling strongly about something? submit a letter to the editor to have your opinion printed in

The California Aggie.

editor@theaggie.org

Yes on Prop 34 The inflated budget of the California Department of Corrections is at least indirectly related to the lack of funds available to higher education. The exorbitantly expensive death penalty is one of the reasons why there isn’t more taxpayer money for the University of California. Students and their parents end up paying for higher tuitions because funds are not allocated to the university yet it is to programs such as the death penalty. By voting YES on Proposition

34 UC students, faculty and staff will have the opportunity to replace the death penalty with life without the possibility of parole. The California death penalty has cost more than $4 billion since 1978 and there have been only 13 executions. Just the expense of death row housing is $100,000 more per year per death row inmate than for those serving life sentences. And just in case you think that the death penalty makes us safer, please know that 46% of murders and 56% of rapes go unsolved

each year in California. Wouldn’t it make you feel safer if we spent our hard-earned money on crime detection and prevention as well as on education? Please register to vote if you are not registered. And when you vote, vote as if your education or job depends upon it, because it just might. Please start by voting YES on Proposition 34. Carol Crabill UC Davis Alumna Business Officer of UC Davis Mathematics

guest opinion

UC should do better By KATHRYN LYBARGER

President, American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees, Local 3299

As the people who cook, clean and care for you and your campus, the work we do is essential to UC’s ability to provide you with a worldclass education. Our work isn’t glamorous, but the purpose of our work is to support you – our future – and we take real pride in that. Today, we are engaged in a struggle with the UC administration over issues that affect us and our families deeply: retirement with dignity, wages and jobs that sustain us, and the ability to advocate for ourselves and the people we serve — like all of you. At age 60, after 20-plus years of hard work, we will retire with permanent injuries, unafford-

able healthcare and an average retirement income of $18,000/year. By contrast, UC President Mark Yudof can retire after just seven years of service to UC on more than $350,000/year, with decreased health insurance costs. We pay for our retirement benefit each month of our working lives so that we can afford to stop working when we are old, and we have foregone hefty raises for the promise of healthcare when our bodies are too broken to work. The UC Regents, however, have proposed changes to these benefits that will leave us impoverished: We would retire at age 65, well past the point of physical ability, and for some of us, the increased cost of our health insurance would exceed our monthly retirement income. Yet our risk of work-related injury is only increasing. UC now hires fewer

custodians, maintenance workers and gardeners to clean your restrooms, fix the lights in your classrooms and make your campus clean and safe. Increasingly, this work is being done by people who work for outside contractors, make poverty wages with no benefits and have no rights at work. This creates unsafe working conditions for us, and poor conditions for your education. For this, you are paying higher fees, yet the training and research you do while at UC is the foundation for what is a highly profitable university system. We think that UC can and should do better. The UC system is the third-largest employer in the state, impacts one out of 46 jobs in the state and reported an increase of $414 million in net assets last year. The University of California is an economic engine

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

GUEST OPINIONS

The California Aggie welcomes letters from its readers. Letters must be typed and no longer than 200 words. As The Aggie attempts to represent a diversity of viewpoints on its letters page, we reserve the right to edit letters for length and clarity. Publication is not guaranteed, and letters become the property of The California Aggie. All correspondence must be signed with the author’s name and telephone number. Unsigned letters will not be considered for publication, although names may be withheld upon request.

ABSURD Cont. from front page no money in,’” White said. Much of the money is going toward continuing the publication. “[We] haven’t made enough to pay rent,” La Rue said. “Rather, we’re using all resources to re-invest and to continue to publish and cause some chaos.” La Rue and White haven’t been doing it alone, however. In terms of staffing, Absurd Publications also has Valerie Palomo as secretary and CFO, Joe Nijmeh as an official photographer and Eric Crowl as outreach. Another source that has been helping them every step of the way has been Dr. Andy Jones, whom White calls his mentor and

that can either help drive the state’s economy forward our help drag it down, but the administration is making further and deeper cuts to your education and our livelihoods. How will workers be able to retire if the UC continues to cut our pensions? How will you be able to earn your degree if the UC continues to raise fees and cut classes? How will California recover and grow if UC’s workers and graduates are living in debt? As you see us on the picket line this month, please understand that we are putting our greatest effort into reaching a fair agreement with the UC administration — one that honors our dignity, safety and livelihoods, and that can help to restore the excellence that you deserve and should expect from the University of California.

The California Aggie welcomes guest opinions from its readers. Guest opinions must be typed with an approximate word count of 600 to 800, or character count around 3,000 to 4,000. The same standards of letters to the editor apply to guest opinions. Guest opinions may reflect a variety of viewpoints. Any member of the campus community is eligible and encouraged to highlight issues regarding UC Davis, regional or national issues. Address letters or guest opinions to the Opinion Editor, The California Aggie, 25 Lower Freeborn, UC Davis, CA 95616. Letters may also be faxed to (530) 752-0355 or sent via e-mail to opinion@theaggie.org.

La Rue looks to as his therapist. “Obviously, as a doting uncle, I’m really proud of them and impressed with how much that they’ve done,” Jones said. “And they may call me a source of mentorship or therapy or whatever the case may be, but largely it comes out of the drive of these two folks.” Jones goes on to credit Davis’ unique climate in which student’s are endowed with a greater degree of autonomy to pursue their own goals. “There’s an important sort of selfreliance that we really expect from our students at UC Davis,” Jones said. The final surprise is how well the books are doing themselves. The anthology “All the Vegetarians in Texas Have Been Shot” has sold 40 prints in less than a month. There

are currently 10 prints left. In the future, Absurd Publications is looking toward expansion. Their book is available at The Avid Reader and has recently been added to permanent stock. White and La Rue are also looking into selling it at broader outlets like Amazon, iTunes and Barnes & Noble. The third edition of their creative journal, “The Oddity,” has been printed and is available free of charge on their website www.absurdword.com. “In the case of ‘The Oddity,’ we didn’t want to put a price tag on it,” La Rue said. “It limits the audience because some people may not be willing to fork over a dollar and others may not even have a dollar.” ANDREW POH can be reached at city@theaggie.org.


4 TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012

INSIDE the game with... Terrance Tumey Terrance Tumey is a busi- through the conduit of athness man. That much is letics. Athletics is just a mirclear. He’ll ask calculated ror image of the institution. questions to further his un- Davis is a strong academderstanding of any situa- ic entity and a strong athletic tion. Tumey seems to com- entity that needs to grow in prehend relational dynam- concert and move forward. ics and is the sort of person Understanding what founthat will spend the time do- dation that is and how to get ing his research to get things that working is what I need right in the long run. But the to do in my first year. model he will be working on is that of UC Davis athletics, At your last position as a task that will require all of the Athletic Director for his years of experience. Dominican University, He has spent consider- you headed their transiable time getting to know tion from NAIA to NCAA Division II. How the Davis commuwill that experinity since he asence help you here sumed his post in at UC Davis, which August, attending recently comUC Davis sportpleted the switch ing events and takfrom Division II to ing the extra steps Division I? to understand the Every position I’ve ecosystem here in been in has been Davis. He has a hisin a transition-type tory in academics role and every instiand athletics in the Terrance Tumey tution has benefited UC system, as well Athletic Director from it. Even when I as coaching and was with the 49ers, managing football. Tumey has been asking they went through a developa lot of questions, as he is ment curve when they were still adjusting and getting to on a non-salary capped enviknow the unique environ- ronment; then it dipped bement we have here at UC cause of the salary cap issue. Davis. He played a little role Dominican was mostly reversal and took the time to known for its nuns and the answer questions from Aggie penguins but they wanted to Sports Editor Matthew Yuen, move past that and become to let the Davis communi- a select institution of choice ty familiarize itself with the in that region. Athletics was new head of Aggie Athletics. going to help them do that, and it wasn’t just an NCAA What attracted you to UC transition, but it was a tranDavis when you first heard sition of the institution. of the Athletic Director job There are a lot of elements opening and what has been on this campus that are doing your first impression of the that and I’m going to be lookschool and community thus ing out to learn from them as far? I’m hoping they’ll be learning Anybody who looks at from me as we try to move Davis can say it’s a “Sleeping this institution forward. Giant.” It could be great but why has it been a sleeping One thing you’ve stressed is giant for so long? What are that athletes and coaches the issues, the obstacles, the must fit into the framework things that are stopping it we have here at UC Davis. As from growing as an athlet- for yourself, how do you fit ic entity? That 2005 year was into the UC Davis mold? a tremendous year, but after One of the greatest comthat there hasn’t been [a] lot pliments I received in this of press coverage. process is when people said, Academically, UC Davis “Terry, even though you did has never wavered but it isn’t not go to UC Davis, you feel really recognized for that like an Aggie already.” and we need to push that. That meant to me that the It led me to look at Davis as principles and the things I an institution and not just as hold dear in terms of academan athletic entity. And that ic integrity, striving for athletmade me look at how it all ic excellence and putting the relates to athletics. business and academic principles into place to make us Did the incidents that took flourish, all those aspects lead place in November, amidst into what people see as the all the budget cuts, etc. af- Aggie athletic experience. fect your desire to pursue I think it is from being a this position? student-athlete in the UC I felt as though it was typi- System, playing football cal of an institution that has down at UCLA and going to very progressive people that school there. Then I struggled understand rights and want through business school, but having the opportunity to be to express them. Everyone here is so stu- around that surrounded me dent-athlete-oriented, that with excellence. when you do things that affect student-athletes every- What does Aggie Pride mean one gets concerned. It did to you? not dissuade me one bit. Constantly moving for I was happy to see peo- ward is what we want to see ple were so passionate about in Aggie Athletics. And that’s athletics. In an elimination what people talk about when situation, nobody wins. One they’re saying Aggie Pride, of my goals here is to never they mean moving forward, have to experience the elim- which is what always happened at the Division II level. ination of sports. We need to do that in What are some goals you Division I. Just like you do it have for the near future for on the academic side, that’s UC Davis athletics? what we need to do on the In terms of athletics and athletic side. And we’re all the community my first goal going to get it done; we have is to listen and embrace what great people here. the mission of this institution — Matthew Yuen is, and how we can support it

The california Aggie

UC Davis ties Big West Conference record at 1-1 MEN’s SOCCER UC Davis men’s soccer (3-4-4 and 1-1 in conference play) opened their run in the Big West Conference with a shaky start against Cal State Northridge, but immediately bounced back against UC Irvine. Junior Alex Aguiar led the UC Davis offense with four shots while junior Omar Zeenni made five saves, but CSU Northridge scored twice in the opening 15 minutes and held on for a 2-0 win on Friday at Matador Soccer Field in Northridge, Calif. The first half featured four of Zeenni's five saves, but the Matadors struck early, scoring in the sixth minute of play. David Turcios, the CSU Northridge forward, drove

into the box and fired a shot, which Zeenni deflected, but Turcios collected the rebound and put it away into the lower left corner. Later in the half, junior Alex Henry’s corner kick found junior Pat Reese but Reese's header in the middle of the box was blocked out for a second Aggie corner kick. Freshman Eric Budniewski took the corner, but it was cleared out by the CSU Northridge defense. Despite the setback, the Aggie defense held strong, allowing just three second-half shots, preventing the Matadors from scoring again. The Aggies faced UC Irvine on Sunday and put them away 3-1. Aguiar and Reese scored goals in the first half to put the game out of reach, snapping the team’s threegame losing streak.

Reese then scored his second goal of the year in the 28th minute with an impressive show of offense. His first shot was deflected by UC Irvine goalkeeper Michael Breslin, but Reese collected his own rebound and shot past Breslin to give UC Davis a 2-0 lead. Junior Kevin Schulte also knocked in a goal two minutes into the second half to put the Aggies up by three. With the 3-0 lead, the UC Davis defense held on, thanks to a strong performance by Zeenni in the goal. Zeenni made two more saves in the closing minutes of the second half to help preserve the win. Next, the Aggies will face Cal State Fullerton and UC Santa Barbara at Davis. — Veena Bansal

Aggies split weekend UC Davis trumps UC Santa Barbara, falls to Cal Poly

Brian Nguyen / Aggie

Ashley Kelly scored the first goal against UC Santa Barbara on Sept. 28. UC Davis went on to win the game 2-1 in overtime.

women’s SOCCER By KIM CARR

Aggie Sports Writer

The UC Davis women’s soccer team kicked off Big West conference play with two games on the road this weekend. The Aggies took down UC Santa Barbara in overtime, but could not pull out a victory over Cal Poly and split the weekend matchups. Friday — UC Davis 2, UC Santa Barbara 1 (OT) The Aggies headed down to Santa Barbara on Friday and managed to earn a 2-1 OT victory against the Gauchos. The first half was scoreless but it was certainly not due to a lack of action. UC Davis tallied 13 attempts on the goal during the first half but the offense was unable to find the back of the net until the 76th minute when senior Allison Kelly booted one in for a goal. UC Santa Barbara struck back 10 minutes later when sophomore goal-

keeper Taylor Jern was unable to block a header shot by Gaucho sophomore Madison Beckley. Junior Hannah Hicks took another shot on the goal during regulation but was unable to get past UCSB’s goalkeeper. The Aggie offense continued to attack during the extra frame and eventually freshman Sienna Drizin was able to send one past the Gaucho goalie for the game winner at the 98-minute mark. Head coach MaryClaire Robinson was happy with her team’s performance during Friday’s game. She praised their youth and their continued determination to improve the offensive attack. “We’re young and we’ve got a lot of spunk,” Robinson said. “We’ve also got a lot of fresh faces in new roles this year which is something refreshing.” Sunday — UC Davis 0, Cal Poly 1 The win over UCSB moved UC Davis to 6-4-1 overall with a 1-0 conference record. They traveled to Cal Poly on Sunday to face their conference rival Mustangs. Cal Poly’s offense struck first

when the Mustang’s lead scorer, Elise Krieghoff, managed to put one past Jern during the 12th minute. Jern and the Aggie defense managed to prevent Cal Poly from earning more goals but UC Davis’ offense was unable to even the score. The Mustangs held a 14-7 shot advantage during the match and Cal Poly’s defense managed to hold off UC Davis’ late offensive rally to give the Aggies their first conference loss of the season. Despite the loss, Robinson remains encouraged about the trajectory of her team. “Our legs were a little heavy from Friday night but we rallied late … we’re on the right path.” The Aggies have one more road match to complete before they can return to Aggie Soccer Field to enjoy home field advantage. UC Davis holds a 6-5-1 overall record and is 1-1 in the Big West. The Aggies will head down to Stockton on Friday to face off against another conference rival, Pacific. KIM CARR can be reached at sports@theaggie.org.

Women’s volleyball 2-1 in conference Aggies getting back into the swing of things By VEENA BANSAL Aggie Sports Writer

The UC Davis women’s volleyball team has opened their run at the Big West championship on a strong note. Although the Aggies endured a rocky start at the beginning of the season, they have come away with strong wins against powerful teams, yielding a boost of confidence and energy in the team’s dynamic performance. UC Davis (8-8) opened its season with three matches at the Blue Raider Bash tournament in Tennessee, losing two against Furman and Alabama-Birmingham and winning one against Middle Tennessee State. Subsequently, in the next four games, the Aggies went 2-2 in matchups with Utah, Middle Tennessee State, UAB and Furman. “During non-conference, we played with a lot of different lineups,” said coach Jamie Holmes. “We tried a lot of different personalities to figure out the best group for the Big West conference play.”

The results of the variance and experimentation in lineups shone through in the Aggies’ first Big West Conference match against fierce competitor Pacific. Junior outside hitter Devon Damelio tallied 15 kills while sophomore middle blocker Victoria Lee posted a career-high 10 blocks, resulting in a four-set upset. As the progression toward the optimal lineup for Big West competition continues, the women have focused their attention on core elements of their game. One of the Aggies’ focuses is to improve their serve and receive and first-ball contact. An improvement in the reception line and being able to receive serves would boost the women’s overall performance and allow the top players to take control of the plays. Last week, the women focused on the defensive side of the game, the results of which were displayed in the strong defensive success against Pacific on Saturday night with five blocks. Although the Aggies’ overall record currently stands at 8-8, the

team showed no signs of weakness against Pacific. Damelio tallied 15 kills while sophomore middle blocker Victoria Lee hit 0.500 and posted a career-high 10 blocks to lead UC Davis to a four-set upset over Pacific in a match at the Pavilion last Saturday night. Subsequently, the Aggies improved their conference record to 2-0 in a thriller against UC Riverside. Damelio tallied a team-leading 18 kills while senior Allison Whitson added 15 kills and a career-high 23 digs to help UC Davis hold onto a five-set win over the Highlanders on Friday night. Unfortunately, the women fell to Cal State Fullerton in yet another gripping five-setter. Although they maintained a 2-1 match lead, the Aggies struggled in the fourth set with a 0.062 average. Whitson and sophomores Valerie Rain and Victoria Lee each tied or set career highs in kills. Next, the Aggies will embark on a two-game road trip against Long Beach State and UC Irvine this

See VOLLEYBALL, page 5


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ence that we will be able to take lightly. It’s really going to be about us continuing to improve and find our perCont. from page 4 sonality on the court,” Holmes said. weekend. UC Davis faces off with the One of Holmes’ primary goals for 49ers on Friday and then the Anteaters the season is very simple and fundaon Saturday. Both games are at 7 p.m. mental to her idea of success of the “There are no teams in the confer- women’s volleyball

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team. “My goal for this season is for us to play to our potential,” she said. “If we play a tremendous game and leave with a loss, that’s still a victory in my book.” VEENA BANSAL can be reached at sports@theaggie.org.

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle tuesday, october 2, 2012 5 Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis ACROSS 1 Hurts with a horn 6 Trudge 10 Where E.T. came from? 14 As vertical as possible, as an embedded anchor 15 Anchor attachment 16 Charm 17 Bassist for the Sex Pistols 19 Run off at the mouth 20 Made the trip 21 Uncommonly big 23 Had a bite 24 Distress letters 25 Most irritated 28 Friend you probably never met 30 Spread with cocktails 32 Fish eggs 33 Leopardlike critter 35 Skye of film 36 Muttley’s evil master in HannaBarbera cartoons 40 Like many a 45-Across 41 Hitchcock classic 42 Swing voter: Abbr. 43 Singer Feliciano 45 Underground room 49 ’50s Kenyan revolutionary 51 PBS funder 52 Mimic 53 Cancún coins 56 Hebrew prophet 57 Fast fliers 59 “The Wonder Years” star 61 War god 62 “Law & Order: SVU” actor 63 Sloping edge of a chisel 64 Author Zane 65 Big name in lawn equipment 66 Fish basket DOWN 1 It’s replaced after a fill-up 2 Sedative 3 St. John’s athletes, until 1994

By Robert E. Lee Morris

4 Gutter site 5 Go downhill fast? 6 Toyota hybrid 7 Pirate’s haul 8 Music with a number 9 Stop 10 The color of honey 11 Nonsense 12 Steely Dan album pronounced like a continent 13 Stick up 18 Air-conditioned 22 Ballet-dancing Muppet 24 Pass rusher’s success 26 VAIO computer maker 27 Golfer’s gismo 29 Childhood disease mark 30 Rapper’s entourage 31 Mem. of the bar 34 Indy 500’s 200 35 Golden calf, e.g. 36 Agent Scully of “The X-Files” 37 Hall of Fame guest of honor 38 Permission to use

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39 Perlman of “Cheers” 40 Faint 43 Pres. inauguration month 44 Uniform 46 Childbirth education pioneer 47 Orbital high point 48 Transfer for a price, as a used car

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50 Not well-kept 51 Acknowledge with a head movement 54 Sacramento’s __ Arena 55 Change direction 56 Say assuredly 57 Binge 58 Make a mistake 60 “Desperate Housewives” network

Sudoku

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Enter digits from 1 to 9 into the blank spaces. Every row must contain one of each digit. So must every column, as must every 3x3 square. Each Sudoku has a unique solution that can be reached logically without guessing.

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The california Aggie

October 2, 2012  

The California Aggie

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