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MHCC custodian sells beats, produces music part-time

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Music p. 10

www.advocate-online.net

May 28, 2010

Volume 45, Issue 30

Softball wins NWAACCs

Story on pages 6-7 Photo by Brett Stanley/The Advocate

Senate disciplinary bill vetoed by Best due to 'vagueness' concerns Jen Ashenberner The Advocate

Associated Student Government President Bradley Best on Wednesday vetoed a disciplinary bill passed by the Student Senate last week, saying he wasn’t comfortable signing it as presented. In the Senate meeting, Best took the opportunity to explain further and complimented the bill’s author, Sen. Charles Cookman, for the work he did on the bill and said that he appreciates all of the time put into it and that he wants to pass the bill but cannot as it is written. Best said his concerns regarded the vagueness in certain areas of the bill including the timeline for the investigative committee. “It doesn’t say anything about how soon information can be addressed and brought forth. Meaning --- is that a week, what is the shortest amount of time that you can launch

an investigation,” said Best. He also proposed that Senate clarify what offense would be “deemed worthy” of the removal of a president or vice president as he said that portion of the bill is not clear. The primary concern Best voiced was regarding Senate only requiring two-thirds votes in order to remove an elected official. “I like the process, I like what you guys are doing, your hard work has been impeccable, but I have to veto this,” he said. “If anybody picks this back up and puts in a unanimous vote, I will sign it faster than you can write it. I want to work with you, I want to be a part of this.” In reponse, Cookman said, “Seeing as how Senate has had disagreements about even the smallest details, when it comes to the heavier subjects we don’t come to agree all the time. Especially with something as heated as removing a president.” Best acknowledged Cookman’s point of

view and said that he would hope in a situation such as removal of an elected official, the complaint would be serious enough that all senators would have no problem deciding to remove them from office unanimously. Sen. Verity Bishop addressed the issue of a unanimous vote by discussing the federal impeachment requirement for a two-thirds vote. According to Janet Campbell, MHCC political science instructor, the two processes are different because of the structure of the balance of power because of how few senators are on ASMHCC Senate compared to the U.S. Senate. Campbell said, “There are two bodies involved in a federal impeachment process: one focuses on the accusation (House of Representatives) and one focuses on the conviction (U.S. Senate). There are a lot of people involved in the initial accusation, and a lot of people involved in the conviction. In the bylaws the accusation and

Queer Straight Alliance's Pride Week highlighted by guest speakers

conviction are (handled) within the same body.” “It’s different because there are only nine people involved and there’s not really that balance of power between the people who are accusing and the people who are convicting,” said Campbell. During the meeting, Vice President Bethany Peterman took a moment to clarify the veto process with the senators. “Once a bill passes through its second reading, it is just one complete thing,” she said. “We can’t tear it back open. It doesn’t go back to author. It’s passed. When the president vetoes, he is vetoing it in its entirety. Once he submits his veto, this will come back onto the agenda next week and you all have the choice to overturn the veto, which puts it back into the law books and it’s all

Senate continued on page 4 Index

News p. 12

Opinion

KMHD launch party announces public availability A&E p. 9

ASG responds to allegations of dismissing democratic process

Track athletes win shotput and 400-meter dash at NWAACCs

News

Opinion p. 3

Sports p. 5

Music

Sports A&E

p. 2-3 p. 4, 11, 12 p. 5-8 p. 9 p. 10


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OPINION

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Sanne Godfrey Editor-in-Chief Ron J. Rambo Jr. Executive Editor, Design Jake Fray Sports Editor Advertising Manager Brett Stanley Photo Editor Chelsea Van Baalen A&E, Web Editor

Students begin to express displeasure toward ASG keeping them in the dark

Jen Ashenberner Music Editor

Editorials

Jordan Tichenor Opinion Editor Ollie Barker Reporter Devin Courtright Reporter Chealsey Fischer Reporter Jon Fuccillo Reporter David Gambill Reporter Chanel Hill Reporter L. John King Reporter Thelma M. Lucas Reporter M. Michael Rose Reporter Mario Rubio Reporter Bob Watkins Adviser Dan Ernst Assistant Adviser E-mail advocatt@mhcc.edu 503-491-7250 (Main) 503-491-7413 (Office) 503-591-6064 (Fax)

www.advocate-online.net Mt. Hood Community College 26000 SE Stark Street Gresham, Oregon 97030

Submissions The Advocate encourages readers to share their opinion by letters to the editor and guest columns for publication. All submissions must be typed and include the writer’s name and contact information. Contact information will not be printed unless requested. Original copies will not be returned to the author. The Advocate will not print any unsigned submission. Letters to the editor should not exceed 300 words and guest columns should not exceed 600. The decision to publish is at the discretion of the editorial board. The Advocate reserves the right to edit for style, punctuation, grammar and length. Please bring submissions to The Advocate in Room 1369, or e-mail them to advocatt@mhcc.edu. Submissions must be received by 5 p.m. Monday the week of publication to be considered for print. Opinions expressed in columns, letters to the editor or advertisements are the views of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of The Advocate or MHCC.

College officials to blame for stagnant information flow

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t. Hood Community College District board members, administrators and President John Sygielski all seem to be buddy-buddy these days with each other and willing to scratch each other’s back. Each walks hand-in-hand, step-by-step, with the others, like a uniform military unit strategically planning a strike on their enemies.  The problem?  They aren’t walking the same line as the students, who more and more are growing concerned about this — as they should be.  And that strategic strike?  In a matter of weeks, it will take place in the form of pick-pocketing the students they are supposed to cater to. Instead, they seem to be catering and pandering to one another.  During open forums about how the college might implement a $50 parking fee, college officials seemed disinterested in hearing student input on why the fee was being implemented in the first place.  Discussions were held as if the fee was a foregone conclusion — but it hadn’t even been officially voted on or approved yet.  The initial proposal meeting was troubling in how short it was and how little discussion there was between board members – acting as budget committee members in this

instance – and Sygielski. Clearly, the president had already buttered up the committee and all necessary discussions had taken place earlier and elsewhere.  This is highly inappropriate. It is equally troubling that the budget committee is comprised of board members.  They are one in the same.  In approving the 2010-2011budget as the budget committee, they have assured everyone that they will do the same June 23 when acting as the district board.  Listening to budget committee/board member Duke Shepard at the May 19 meeting, the board appears ready to do whatever Sygielski wants.  Shepard responded to an audience member’s plea to reconsider the steep parking fee by telling her that she shouldn’t speak to the board “at budget time and ask us to make all these changes.”  Shepard, when else would a person talk to the committee/district board about making changes?  The proposal had just been announced May 5; should she have traveled back in time upon seeing the budget proposal and coerced Sygielski and budget consultant Heidi Franklin into removing this from the proposal?  Apparently, as Franklin suggested, this is the only way, the absolute only way,

to fill the $2 million gap in needed revenue – unless anyone else has suggestions they wouldn’t consider anyway. Regardless of the fact that there is still nearly a month until the budget must be finalized, leaving plenty of room for discussion (despite Shepard’s comments), the district board and several administrators are only puppets doing as Sygielski says. He has control of the board and his cabinet, as well as all of the flow of information in and out of the Office of the President.  If this is what board members wanted when they hired Sygielski two years ago, they got everything they asked for.  With these actions in mind, the students should be ready and willing to write letters, confront Sygielski and administrators, vote for new board members who will not be yes-men, and do everything else short of harrassment to get the changes they deserve.  Faculty members have been invisible, saying nothing publicly to aid or at least comfort those who pay their bills.  But at the forefront of this should be the Associated Student Government, many of whom have been just as silent and willing to follow orders, despite claiming to be the voice of the students. 

MHCC spring sports perform well throughout the season

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ongratulations are in order for the Saints spring sports teams for the second straight year. Softball and track and field each put together extraordinary performances to come out on top. And even though baseball didn’t make it into the NWAACC tournament, they still put in one of the most impressive runs in the league this year to keep their playoff chances alive until the last day of the season. The softball team headed into the NWAACC tournament as a number two seed out of the Southern Region but for a second straight year took top honors. With the leadership of the sophomore class, along with exceptional play from the freshmen, the Saints deserved to be NWAACC champions again. NWAACC tournament MVP Ariel Fulkerson provided the Saints with timely hits and managed her pitchers well in all four games as the Saints surged to the title. The track and field teams proved that after having a year under their belt, the sophomores knew they could go into the NWAACC Championship meets and do well and come out as champions in their respective events. Chris Zeller and Jr. Velasquez won NWAACC gold while Anaiah Rhodes came in second in the 100 meters and third in the 200 meters, Micah Strong also finished

second in the 100 meters and third in the 200 meters. The teams also broke two school records this season, the 4x100 meters record was broken during the NWAACC Championship and the shot put record was broken earlier in the season. The 4x100 meters record stemmed from 1978 while the previous shot put record was set in 1970. All in all, it was a great year for the MHCC track and field teams. The baseball didn’t get to make another trip to Longview to compete in the NWAACC Tournament, but in the face of the adversity the team encountered this season, they truly showed how much heart MHCC sports truly have. The men lost the former NWAACC player of the year Taylor Ard after only three preseason games when he broke his hand while hitting in practice. The Saints had to win their last six games but would have needed some luck with a top team losing one game to even have a shot at the tournament. Ultimately, the Saints came up short losing, their last game to end the season. All the Mt. Hood spring sports teams have a lot of heart and loyalty to their team and school, and congratulations go out for how hard they all worked this season. You have truly earned the respect from other teams in the NWAACCs.


OPINION

may 28, 2010

The Advocate 3

Illegal immigration activists should be more angry at fat people Ron J. Rambo Jr. The Advocate

Illegal immigration is once again a huge issue across America, but an even bigger issue (literally) is being totally ignored. Immigration questions and issues seem to have plagued the United States for the last 10 years, occasionally flaring up with racists/phony patriots screaming about the costs that illegal immigration supposedly imposes on the American economy by way of medical costs, welfare and job-stealing. What people should really be concerning themselves with, rather than the race of a person, is the weight of a person and those costs on American society. No one can control what they were born as, but they can control how fat they are. Therefore, yours truly is introducing (or at least supporting) the Fatist Movement, coming soon to a town near you! Arizona’s recently-passed controversial law, allowing cops to pull over anyone suspicious and demand to see their immigration papers, has been burning up a lot of people recently, especially Los Angelenos, whose City Council recently passed a boycott of contracts with Arizona companies, as well as most forms of travel to the state. Apparently, Californians have a short memory: As recently as 1998, California’s Highway Patrol (CHP) ran a program called Operation Pipeline, which was being used to search and detain Hispanic drivers to determine if they were transporting drugs and guns. Essentially, they were racially profiling — the same way Arizona law enforcement is — to see if they could catch illegal conduct in action. Hypocrisy is amazing. No matter who is doing the profiling, citizens should instead turn their prying eyes to obese Americans preying on

and feeding our national debt. While estimates of cost of illegal immigrants range from $1.9 billion to $19.3 billion (according to The Urban Institute and Rice University, respectively), neither number comes close to the hefty cost of fat folks: Business Insider reported one year ago that fat people cost the U.S. economy $117 billion, a fact supported by the Office of the Surgeon General. The conservative Center for Immigration Studies said in a report the net federal cost of illegal immigrants is under $10.4 billion a year. “In terms of welfare use, receipt of cash assistance programs tends to be very low, while Medicaid use, though significant, is still less than for other households,” the report said. Considering most of the Medicaid costs were for children born in the United States, also known as American citizens, that number should shrink to under $10 billion, according to factcheck.org. The report also said they estimate more than half of illegals “work on the books,” which allows them to pay taxes. Meanwhile, two-thirds of American adults over the age of 20 are overweight or obese according to Business Insider. Because food production accounts for about one-fifth of greenhouse gas emissions, and fat people eat more food, they’re also responsible for one ton more carbon dioxide per year than thin people, according to the New York Daily News. Fat people get worse gas mileage for their vehicles, because for every 100-pound increase in the weight a vehicle is carrying, you can count on losing at least 2 percent in gas mileage. Fat people are also less likely to achieve the types of high-paying jobs others might due to the fact that, you guessed it, they’re fat. A staggering 93 percent of British Human Resource officers would rather give a promotion to a thin person than a fat person, even if they’re equally qualified, according to research by The Telegraph. Fat people can also count on the possibility of employers starting to dock paychecks for being too fat. Clarian Health, a hospital in Indianapolis, has already begun this process to help cover increasing health care costs. And why not? Unhealthy people should pay more for health care; it’s those

Inhabited by mostly fat people same people who are weighing the system down. Similar stances should be invoked on airlines as well, whose fuel costs on average have increased by $275 million per year because of fatter flyers. Airline companies: Start charging by the pound. The health risks are obvious to all who can see but fat people might be too stupid to realize them. Seriously. Several U.S. and European studies have found fat people to have less brain tissue, worse cognitive ability and get worse grades on average than skinny folks. All this might be disheartening, fat people, but don’t kill yourselves yet: Fat people cost more to bury because they take up more space in a cemetery. Perhaps Tea-Baggers, whose movement of collectively angry, old, white people hell-bent on curbing all excess costs, should do something productive and turn against themselves. Here’s some Tea-Bagger logic: Most Tea-Baggers are white, and most white people are fat. Start cutting costs by cutting some bacon off your own backs. Have a diet ice water. Stop eating greasy, crappy food, and spend some time on a treadmill. To all you ageists, racists, sexists: Get over those things — they can’t be naturally controlled. Instead, join a movement with a true benefit and a healthy purpose.

Letter to the Editor

Guest Columns

Senate bill does not disregard democratic process

Everyone should strive to end modern-day racism

Dear Editor, The ASMHCC Senate exists to represent the students of Mt. Hood Community College and we take this responsibility very seriously. It is very disheartening that the campus media has been so uninformed and unsupportive in their reporting of recent events. Bill #09-116, Disciplinary Procedures, passed by the ASMHCC Senate, is modeled after the impeachment process of the United States Government. As stated in article. I. – The Legislative Branch, Section 3 of the U.S. Constitution, “The Senate shall have the sole power to try all impeachments . . . and no person shall be convicted without the concurrence of two thirds of the members present.” Just as students’ votes are not a part of the removal of a student body president as ASMHCC, the vote of the American people is not a part of the impeachment process outlined in the U.S. Constitution. The bill #09116 calls for a 4/5ths majority which is 12 of 15 seated senators. Two thirds would only be 10 out of 15 seated senators. The complaint that bill #09-116 disregards the democratic process is uninformed and inflammatory. Many other colleges across the country have a removal process similar to the ASMHCC, for example Santa Fe College. Anyone can access their by-laws at: http://dept.sfcollege.edu/stuorg/stugov/ content/docs/studentgovermentcontitiution. pdf Check out Article 7, Impeachment. The ASG office is located in the College Center. Please feel free to come speak with the ASMHCC Senate to clear up any concerns you may have. Verity Bishop Chair of the ASG Membership Committee Senator of nursing and allied health Editor’s note: ASMHCC Senate bill #09-116 outlines a removal process for the ASG president without an impeachment process. An impeachment process involves a public trial, while the removal process does not include a public trial. One can be impeached without being removed from office.

David L. Minger

Vice President for Student Success and Enrollment Management

As we conclude our spring Diversity Weeks, I find myself reflecting on my first months at our college. Unfortunately, this year we have seen incidents of racist hate language, bigoted bathroom graffiti, and shouted parking lot obscenities from a small number in our community. We are fortunate that freedom of expression – even hateful speech – is often ensured in the United States. Yet history shows that violence can follow hateful utterances. We have seen this in injustice perpetrated by various “us vs. them” hate groups in American life and history. Because of history, those of us who

are alarmed by bigotry will, I hope, be excused for feeling great concern when we see hate raise its ugly head. In the 20th century alone, some 35,654,000 people were killed in conflicts worldwide, nearly 1,000 people on average every day of every year for a century – 35 million incidents of terror, pain, and loss, of broken hearts, minds, and bodies, of destroyed hopes, dreams, and potential. Who knows who lies in the wasteland of unmarked 20th century graves? Someone who might have cured cancer? A leader who could have bridged Western and Muslim worlds? Another Shakespeare, Gabriel García Márquez, Lao Tsu, Nguyen Van Ly or Tolstoy?

We will never know what we have lost. Yet we can embrace what we may yet become as a human race – fully appreciative of the richness of our diversity; understanding that what I lack, you may have; seeing for me what I cannot; sharing with others what they need. In the end, people cannot realize their own humanity until they recognize the humanity of others. We can become far more together than we can separately. I want to thank the students, staff, and faculty who put on our diversity events. Through such efforts, we can and will create a better world for one another, a world in which we call all strive to reach our full potential.

Student letter to ASG about new bill labeled 'hate-speak' William A. York MHCC student

Editor’s note: On May 19, the ASMHCC Senate approved a bill which allows the Senate to remove the ASG president with 4/5th’s majority vote. I sent the following letter to a group of ASG senators about 8:30 a.m. Monday morning, May 24. To date (Wednesday, May 26) I have had no responses. In voting for this bill, you have removed the right of the students to weigh in on the process of removing the only two positions in ASG that are elected by the vote of students. I am somewhat familiar with the issues involved, and I must say that drafting this bill while in the middle of what is effectively an ongoing witch hunt against ASG President Bradley Best is not just poor timing, but reeks of corruption, and foul play on your part. Were it left up to me, it is you who should be removed from office, for your aggressive attitude towards not involving students in this process. I should not have had to find out in the college paper of your heinous, reprehensible and irresponsible actions. This is proof that you have ignored your fiduciary responsibility to represent the students in this college by acting in collusion with other senators and ASG executive cabinet members. Thankfully, your conspiracy has not gone unnoticed. Sincerely, William York I express revulsion that the senators have left students out of the process. It is my opinion that the senators that wrote, sponsored

and voted for this bill should be removed. It is my belief that by not more fully involving students in this process, the ASG senators involved have violated a duty that they have sworn an oath to uphold. I have been told by several of my peers on campus that some senators have openly stated that they feel my letter is “hate mail” and some, I am told, have even called my letter “hatespeech.” Perhaps it is my age, 53, or that I am a U.S. Navy veteran, but when others who are in public positions of power, are a privileged minority, have access to funds, have priority access to administration officials, and who are charged with representing all students at MHCC, take steps to remove the rights of other students, I feel I have no choice to speak up. And loudly. By not responding in a timely fashion, what it does say is that dialogue on this topic is not wanted. Which only further proves my point that the senators behave as though they are not sincerely interested in student opinion. I reached out to them, expressing my extreme displeasure at how they have behaved in this matter, with the hopes that it would stimulate a dialogue. Since it is understood that silence equals agreement, and since it has been over 48 hours, and no senator has responded or replied to me, should I assume that by their silence that they agree with my assessment of their actions? I’m guessing no. Doesn’t change how I feel about their behavior as public officials. I spoke up, and I spoke out about what I see is the wrongful usurpation of MHCC students rights, by a privileged few. My reward has been to be ignored and ridiculed. My crime? Getting involved. Is this the new face of ASG? I sincerely hope not.


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may 28, 2010

College works on improving advising center by adding new software to create better understanding for students Ollie Barker

ing is advising software to produce a schedule for students’ specific needs. The software is The Advocate Changes have been implemented in the an opportunity for students to become more Academic Advising Center with hopes in efficient; it helps pick the best match for longcreating better understanding and process term career goals. We are trying to set up live for students, according to David Minger, vice chats with academic advisers here on campus president of student success and enrollment for those who have busy schedules.” “The software has a series of tests that management. Minger said he has been trying for a help evaluate different values and personchange he thinks will be a benefit for both alities for possible future direction.  It is perfectly fine for students not knowing which faculty and students. Minger said, “One significant change we direction they want to go. We are gathering are starting with is group advising.”  There the information from students and helping are signs around campus showing that group them make decisions later. Students have a advising will be available starting next term.  purpose, to explore and find what they want Minger said, “Students have a lot of the to do.”  In a best case scenario, this advising same questions. Having group advising is a program will be offered best scenario summore efficient way of addressing those ques- mer term, Minger said; otherwise, the latest tions.”  Students can discuss questions in the will be fall term. Getting to know new programs can cause group and everyone can hear the advisers frustration for both students and faculty.  reply.  Minger said, “Another thing we are start- Minger addressed these challenges by having the advising staff learn the new technology to show students how to make it work for “Some advisers have them.  worked with group “The Challenge with the new programs is getting people comfortable with the new sessions, and every adviser technology; it pushes us out of our comfort zone, and it’s natural for us to fear the has gone through training worst, the normal human fear of change.”  on how to use the programs Once the program is working, and advisers comfortable with the software, it will cut and how to help students.” are costs, Minger said. Peggy Maas Peggy Maas Manager of enrollment management and advising services, said, Manager of enrollment “The group advising started this week. managment and advising services Workshops are available two times a day

"Challenges with the new programs are getting people comfortable with the new techonology, it pushes us out of our comfort zone, and it's natural for us to fear the worst" David Minger Vice president of student success and enrollment Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, starting everyday after July 12. Students seem to appreciate the help they’re getting on how to pick courses, navigate through the website, and other issues that arrive.” Maas said, “This way we’re able to help serve several students at one time.” The workshops consist of 12 students and two advisers who answer each of the questions asked.   Each student has a computer to work on during the advising session.  The workshop is about an hour and a half long. Maas said, “Some advisers have worked with group sessions, and every adviser has gone through training on how to use the programs and how to help students.” She said, “We also might start calling students to remind them that they signed up for a workshop.”

Senate continued from page 1:

Best: No need to change from current disciplinary process done. Or to vote against that and it’s vetoed and it dies and doesn’t come back.” Another issue Best said was a factor in his decision not to sign the bill is his belief that there is already a formal complaint and disciplinary process in place and administered by MHCC. He said there should be no reason for there to be another disciplinary process handled by Senate. “MHCC already has a formal process for complaints,” he said. “I just went through it myself.” The formal process Best went through happened as a result of a complaint being lodged against him for harassment and following a student to class on April 30. Best said in an interview Tuesday that he presented evidence supporting his defense that he would have been unable to follow the student at the time they

claimed. “It seems to me that the ASMHCC Senate is trying to generate a double whammy,” Best said at the Senate meeting. “You can be tried for breaking the student code of conduct in the Senate and you can be tried for breaking the student code of conduct by MHCC at the same time.” Best continued by comparing the “double whammy” to what is a “double jeopardy” in federal law. “You cannot be tried for the same crimes again, and again, and again,” he said. The question of whether it would be considered the same as a double jeopardy was addressed later by Robert Cox, dean of student services. “The conduct process is not a legal process. Federal courts all the way to the federal Su-

preme Court have said college campuses can do conduct processes completely separate from the legal processes because it’s an educational way for students to learn from their behavior and move successfully through life and their education,” said Cox. “The word double jeopardy doesn’t even apply in this case.” In his explanation, Cox used the example of a student caught cheating on a test. According to the student code of conduct, the teacher has three choices. They can send it to Cox for conduct review, or handle it on their own by giving the student an F on the test, or they can choose to do both. Cox said ASG has the option of dealing with the issue on their own and/ or send to him for conduct review but that it may not meet Senate’s needs “in terms of moving together in a harmonious organization for the remainder of the year.”

College prepares to bid farewell to graduating students Sanne Godfrey The Advocate

MHCC is getting ready for graduation and commencement ceremonies on June 10 and 11. The GED/Adult High School Diploma Graduation will begin at 7 p.m. on June 10 in the Earl Klapstein Stadium, while the College Commencement Ceremony will start at 7 p.m. on June 11 at the same location. ASG President Bradley Best will be speaking during the commencement ceremony about “being your dream” MHCC President John

150-day faculty contract negotiation period begins Jordan Tichenor The Advocate

The state-mandated 150-day time period for contract negotiations began Wednesday in the MHCC full-time faculty contract negotiations. The faculty association proposed that the 150-day period start with Wednesday’s bargaining session. While the administration did not comment during the meeting, Randy Stedman, the labor relations consultant hired by the board to bargain the contract for the administration, said after the meeting the administration has “no objection” to the clock starting with Wednesday’s session. The negotiations must be concluded within this 150-day period. The full-time faculty association also gave their list of proposals to the administration. The administration appeared to accept the proposals, with the exception of wording in Article 7. The administration will give their list of proposals during Wednesday’s 4:30 p.m. bargaining session in the district board room.

Sygielski will also be speaking at the event. Graduating students are asked to be in the gymnasium no later than 6 p.m. the day of the ceremony. A rehearsal for the commencement ceremony will take place at 2 p.m. and instructions will be mailed early June, according to the MHCC website. Caps and gowns are available at the MHCC bookstore for $27.99 until June 11. Seating for the ceremony will be by general admission, therefore no tickets are required.

Venture Magazine hits newstands on campus Wednesday at all Advocate Newstands!

Calendar FRIDAY, MAY 28 Student Success Seminar “Steps to Successful Test Taking” from noon to 1 p.m. in Room 3315

Saturday, MAY 29 CRST Big Wave Decathon From 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. at the Aquatic Center

Sunday, MAY 30 CRST Big Wave Decathlon From 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. at the Aquatic Center

Monday, MAY 31 Student Success Seminar “Study Techniques for Line Learners” From noon to 1 p.m. in Room 2307 Student Success Seminar “How to Write a Resume” From 2 to 3 p.m. in Room 1152

Tuesday, JUNE 1 Student Success Seminar “Understanding Test Anxiety”

From noon to 1 p.m. in Room 2307

Wednesday, JUNE 2 Jazz Night From 7:30 p.m. to in the College Theater Student Success Seminar “Steps to Successful Test Taking” From noon to 1 p.m. in toom 1152 Student Success Seminar “Understanding Test Anxiety” From 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. in Room 2307

Thursday, JUNE 3

Student Sucess Seminar “Green Careers” From 2 to 3 p.m. in Room 1152 Student Success Seminar “Time Management” From 4 to 5 p.m. in Room 2307

Friday, JUNE 4 The Advocate Issue 25 In news stands around campus Student Sucess Seminar "Getting the Most From Your Textbooks” From 3 to 4 p.m. in Room 2307 Softball at Clackamas C.C. Starts at 3 p.m. in Oregon City, Ore.

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May 28, 2010

Saints earn second straight NWAACC title Sports p. 6-7

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MHCC finishes record breaking season at NWAACCs

Contributed photo by Matt Hart

MHCC athlete (center) Micah Strong passes the baton to Nick Mulich in the 4x100 meter race setting a new school record with a time of 41.65 at the NWAACC Championsips in Spokane, Wash. last Tuesday.

Two school records broken throughout the track and field season Sanne Godfrey The Advocate

Contributed photo by Matt Hart

Anaiah Rhodes (far left) running for a second place finish at the 2010 NWAACC Championships in Spokane, Wash. Rhodes finished second in the 100 and 200-meter dash.

“At first I was disappointed but I’m glad to have the opportunity to compete.”

Anaiah Rhodes MHCC athlete

Two MHCC athletes won their events Monday and Tuesday at the NWAACC Track and Field Championship in Spokane, Wash. Jr. Velasquez won the shot put with a distance of 52’6.5” and Chris Zeller won the 400-meter dash with a time of 48.40. Head coach Matt Hart said he expected both of these athletes to do well because they had been NWAACC leaders all year long. Zeller ran a lifetime PR in the 400 meters when he went from 51.10 to 48.40 during the championship. Hart said, “That’s a huge jump in terms of times.” Zeller also ran the final leg in the 4x100meter relay where the men’s team finished second with a time of 41.65, shattering the school record set in 1978 with a time of 42.01. Hart said that assistant distance coach Keith Maneval and he had been trying to break the record for years and the team came together this year with continuity and consistency and it was a real team effort. Hart said the team passed the baton well and with 100 meters to go the team was in the lead but Spokane, who ended up winning the relay with a time of 41.40, put their strongest runner Michael Vetter in last. Vetter had won the 100 meters the day before. Hart said he’s proud of the team for pushing it all the way through and shattering the record. “This was the best fit for everybody,” said Hart. “It highlighted the strength and characteristics of running.” The MHCC relay team came in third in the 4x400 meters with a time of 3:21.58 behind Clackamas and Spokane. Sophomore Micah Strong, who also competed in both relays, came in second in the 100 meters with a time of 11.04 and third in the 200 meters with a time of 22.24. Women’s sprinter Anaiah Rhodes came in second in the 100 meters with a time of 12.58 and third in the 200 meters with a time of 25.43. Rhodes said, “At first I was disappointed

but I’m glad to have the opportunity to compete.” Hart said Rhodes is a very poised athlete and competed strong in both events. Rhodes also competed in the 4x400-meter relay where the team finished sixth with a time of 4:23.04. Rhodes said she was very nervous the second day. Fellow Saint Kelsey Strot finished second in the shot put with a distance of 42’11.5” and she came in fourth in the discus with a distance of 114’9” Adrian Weber came in fourth place in the discus for the men with a distance of 141’10.” Weber said about NWAACCs that “overall it was okay, but the year was good.” Weber also competed in the shot put where he placed tenth with a distance of 39’10.5”. In the hammer throw, he finished tenth with a distance of 94’2” and he finished eighth in the javelin with a distance of 167’4”. Weber had PRs in all events throughout the year. Hart said this year the team was a goaloriented and team-oriented bunch of people with great personalities and no drama, just success. Hart has been recruiting for next year and said that if everything goes according to plan, the teams will shape up well next year. Sophomore Brian Howelton was injured earlier in the season and is a medical redshirt this year. Hart hopes he’ll be back next year. Hart said there are several strong athletes returning to MHCC next year, including Zach Young who came in fifth in the 400-meter hurdles with a time of 54.99 and eighth in the 110- meter hurdles with a time of 15.80. This is if all the students come through, he said, and when asked if he had confidence, Hart said that nowadays there is no such thing. He was confident at the beginning of this year with the women’s team but lost quite a few athletes due to “flipping out, flaking out or flunking out.” However, Hart said, these are student-athletes and that their education is a very important piece of this equation.


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SPO

The Advocate

Saints softball repeat sweep in NW

The Saints pinchrunner Kerri Yoder slides safely into home against the Wenatchee Valley Warriors in the quarterfinals during Monday’s NWAACC Championship Tournament at Delta Park. The Saints went 4-0 to win their second stra

Sophomore class le Jake Fray

The Advocate

For sophomore third baseman Nicole Colpron, winning the NWAACC championship once wasn’t enough for her and her fellow sophomores. This was the year they wanted to be remembered as “‘08 The Great” since all the sophomores graduated high school in 2008. “We worked hard for this,” Colpron said. That motto propelled them all the way to the title game against Southwestern Oregon Community College where the Saints won their second title in a row Monday at Delta Park. “Words can’t describe how I feel,” said fellow sophomore and Saints second baseman Ari VanHorn. “All this work we put into this year and having it pay off just makes me unable to describe it. It is just the best feeling in the world.” Unlike last season where the Saints rode to the title on the arm of Lauren Hadenfeld, this team relied on what had been working for them all season long with freshmen Chelsea Schriber and Kayla Anderson and sophomore Myranda Sawyer all picking up wins in the tournament. “I can’t tell you how proud of all of them I was,” said Head Coach Meadow McWhorter. “They all knew they were a team and we weren’t going to rely on just one of them. They all were there to help each other in every game.” The tournament started off rough, as bad weather forced the Saints to play a waiting game. Originally scheduled to start play on Friday, the Saints started a day late on Saturday but were only able to play two innings before rain halted their first game against Centralia CC. “We never lost our focus,” said VanHorn. “When there was a chance we could have been playing a game at midnight, we

“Words can’t describe how I feel. All this work we put into this year and having it pay off just makes me unable to describe it. It is just the best feeling in the world.” Photo by Brett Stanley/ The Advocate

Sophomores Ari VanHorn slides into third base during the championship game while Head Coach Meadow McWhorter tells her to stop. The Saints won the championship game 7-4 against Southwestern Oregon Community College Monday at Delta Park.

Ari VanHorn Saints softball second baseman


ORTS

May 28, 2010

WAACC championship

Softball NWAACC Championship 2010 Box Score Game 4-Monday Championship Game

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Game 1-Sunday

Photo by Brett Stanley/ The Advocate Photo by Brett Stanley/ The Advocate

aight NWAACC title.

Sophomores Ari VanHorn (12) and Sarah McGregor give a chest bump during the semifinal game against Lower Columbia Community College with the Saints winning 8-5 Monday.

eads the way; Fulkerson earns MVP “The Southern Region is a hard conference to play in. We face the toughest pitchers every game in NWAACC so we were ready. We felt we were more deserving than them.”

didn’t care. We were ready to take care of business.” The tournament was then switched to a single elimination tournament in which the Saints had to win three straight games with just 15 minutes between games. But even that didn’t slow the Saints in their quest to their second NWAACC title. “It helped we had that 6-0 lead after two innings against Centralia,” said McWhorter. “It kept the tension down which really helped us.” The Saints ended up winning 19-1 after five innings. The Saints then had to wait until Monday before going against NWAACC pitcher of the year Sydnee Jerome of Wenatchee Valley. The Saints exploded quickly with nine hits to win the game 5-1. On one side of the semifinals, it became an all-Southern Region affair with the Saints facing off against Lower Columbia. Clackamas was up against SWOCC on the other side of the draw. “The Southern Region is a hard conference to play in,” said sophomore centerfielder Bre Thomas who went 8-8 on leadoff bunts in the tournament. “We face the toughest pitchers every game in NWAACC so we were ready. We felt we were more deserving than them.” NWAACC tournament MVP catcher Ariel Fulkerson said the Saints were ready to go to battle against Lower Columbia. “When our bats came alive, it became contagious,” she said. “Bre leads off for us and then you get a hit and pretty soon the whole team starts to hit. We couldn’t be beat.” Thomas said, “In my head, I always said if I can start it, we will do well at the plate.” The Saints headed into the finals against SWOCC ready to play and full of respect. “We respect that team so much,” said Colpron, “how they act on the field and how they play. We respect them as a team. We were happy they beat Clackamas and we got to play them for the title.” Fulkerson said pitcher Chelsea Schriber was more than ready to lead the team. “I always make sure my pitchers are ready to go,” she said. “Their success is my success. It is my job to get them ready and go out and help the team.” The Saints scored first against SWOCC before giving up three runs in the third inning to be down 3-1. “I didn’t have to tell them anything,” said McWhorter. “If I had to talk to them and tell them what to do, I wouldn’t be doing my job correctly. They knew what needed to happen in that moment and that is what they did.” The Saints scored six runs in the next two innings to win the game.

Bre Thomas Saints softball centerfielder

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Saints NWAACC Tournament Honors NWAACC Coach of the Year : Meadow McWhorter All-Tournament Team: MVP - Ariel Fulkerson, catcher Nicole Colpron - third base Bre Thomas - center field Jessica Guy - right field Chelsea Schriber - pitcher

“Mentally this team was 100 percent prepared to win the tournament,” said McWhorter. VanHorn said, “She had us out there running sprints that morning and we were the only team doing that.” McWhorter said, “My girls train harder than any team in the NWAACCs and that is why we deserved this.” For the second straight year, McWhorter earned NWAACC coach of the year while Fulkerson earned her tournament MVP award. “With how hard she works for us, she deserves it,” said Thomas. “It is her job to call the game for us and she was the leader of the team.” Colpron said, “She memorizes every number off every player before a game and knows exactly how to pitch to every single one of them. She doesn’t look at Coach for the signs. She is the one calling the pitches and totally deserves to be the MVP.” McWhorter said, “It takes a lot of respect and confidence to let a catcher call the game so that shows you how much I believed in her all year. She earned her MVP award because she called the shots.” VanHorn said, “I have the utmost respect for her as a person. She has a good head on her shoulders and when she speaks, people listen.” As for next year, the Saints are already gearing up for a threepeat and can’t wait for next season, according to McWhorter. “At the tournament, the freshmen were already talking about next year,” she said. “The NWAACC is getting stronger every year so we have to be ready if we want to win it again.”

-Information gathered by Jon Fuccillo

Ariel Fulkerson Tournament MVP


SPORTS

8 The Advocate

May 28, 2010

Saints luck finally runs out... Jon Fuccillo The Advocate

Saints softball deserves all the respect in the world

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or the second consecutive year, the Saints softball team has gone where only the best of the best can go: they are NWAACC champions. Not only did they sweep the 16team tournament, but they did it in a do-or-die format dictated by weather constrictions. Since the Northwest weather gods produced a downpour that seemed to last 48 straight hours, the tournament officials were forced to scrap the normal format where a team could get a second chance coming out of the losers bracket, if necessary. The only way to survive was winning and advancing. And that is exactly what they did — and proved that MHCC softball has, hands down, the most energetic and charismatic team on campus. Although it may seem cliché and an easy task to write a column about an enormously successful team (33-9 overall), this column is not about their record or talent. It is about much more than that. It starts with the magical coaching staff and extends all the way down the chain of players. What this program has to offer on a yearly basis is highly contagious. It begins with the skipper, Meadow McWhorter, who still holds many records as a pitcher here. She is full of positives and smiles, not to mention being one of the most gentle souls you could meet. All teams should hope to experience a leader of this type. She also holds a special passion for the game that you need to witness in person. You can see the fire in her eyes, the will to settle for nothing less than a championship with a championship group of players. McWhorter would be the first one to tell you that there isn’t one MVP on this team, and that it’s a group effort. Thinking back on last year’s title team, it was hard to imagine a more well-rounded group of young women. But this year’s team added to that success with a blend of strong sophomore leadership, kindness and respect that took down any form of adversity in its path. The old saying, “Kill them with kindness,” played a significant role in their domination. There was never a moment when any one player wore a frown on her face. It was all smiles, all the time. Of course, amazing skill at every position didn’t hurt the cause. This produced remarkable back-to-backto-back victories on Monday — at 10 a.m., noon and 2:30 p.m. — to be crowned champs. According to the unwritten rules of softball, they played the game the right way. No one individual stood out from the others. There wasn’t a single person on the playing field or on the bench who didn’t contribute to their four-game sweep of the championship. The chants, screaming, laughing, praising, smiling, thumbs up after clutch hits, handshakes, high fives of all sorts — anything that you can imagine — played a factor in separating themselves from their opponents. As a bystander or fan of the game, it was as if you were right there in the action. That was the vibe that spread through Delta Park when the Saints played. You could tell they wanted it more. It was apparent in their performance. And for that reason, they persevered and executed time after time in mustwin situations.

Contributed photo by Bill Jaworski

Freshman first baseman Grant Fink takes to the plate in the Saints final home game of the season. They finished the season with an overall record of 25-19.

Saint lose final game, miss postseason for first time in 16 years Jon Fuccillo “This is motivation for next year. A rare occurrence took place May 20: The Saints baseball team The team as a whole (next season) missed out on this season’s NWAACC tournament. The Saints split a doubleheader against the Clackamas Communiwill be a little bit more hungry." ty College Cougars but missed the playoffs by two games and finished The Advocate

Bryan Donohue

the season in third place in the South Region with a record of 18-12 (25-19 overall). With all of the circumstances that needed to occur on that last day for the team to make the postseason — including losses by both the Chemeketa Community College Storm (21-9) and the Lane Commu“I think we exceeded expectations, coming in with no college exnity College Titans (20-10) — it became too much to handle with little perience,” said the relief pitcher who ended the year with a perfect to no time left in the season. record of 3-0, seven saves and a 1.82 ERA. “What stood out to me Nevertheless, the Saints took six out of eight games in the final was our confidence on the mound. We weren’t fazed and played up stretch of the season. to the level of our opponents from the get-go. We just needed to work “There are always should-haves, could-haves and whaton consistency.” ifs,” said catcher Corey Davis, who will attend Wright Asked when it started to sink in that they wouldn’t be State (Dayton, Ohio) next year, on the outcome of playing in the NWAACC tournament this year, cothe season. “But unfortunately, that’s baseball for captain Davis said it wasn’t until after the loss that you.” he realized it was too late. Saints ‘09-‘10 Stats Head Coach Bryan Donohue added, “Honestly, it really didn’t start to hit home “We weren’t happy, but I was real proud of until we actually lost the game,” said Davis. “I Overall Record: these guys for coming together at the end. thought we had the most talent in the region. This is motivation for next year. The team But you can’t just win games based on talent. 25-19 as a whole (next season) will be a little bit Other teams capitalized on our mistakes all more hungry.” Southern Region season long.” Lefty Nate Dolman tossed seven inAlthough the Saints didn’t make the postRecord nings of one-run ball in game one against season, they once again dominated in the the Cougars to improve to 3-1. The Saints Southern Region awards categories. Nine 18-12 ran away with a 9-1 victory with a strong players were selected for either first-team or offensive performance behind Dolman. second-team honors. On the first team were: Third in “He did what he did all year,” said DonoBlake (outfield), Davis (catcher), Tanner HodgSouthern Region hue on Dolman’s performance o n es (shortstop), Griffin Boyd (third base), Jeremy the mound. “He looked really good.” Burright (starting pitcher) and Derek Hough (utilThe Saints offense beat up on the pitching of ity). On the second team were: Nylen (outfield), DolTaylor Hill (5-7) of the Cougars. The team ended the man (starting pitcher) and Seifert (relief pitcher) pitcher). game with 15 hits, including a 4-for-5 performance by centerDavis, Hodges and Boyd were all awarded regional gold gloves in fielder Michael Blake, who led the Southern Region with a .387 bat- their respective positions. ting average. Four Saints were selected to play this summer for the Corvallis Left-fielder Matt Nylen hit a three-run shot over the left-field fence Knights, one of the elite summer league teams in the Northwest. The in the bottom of the second inning to take a 5-0 lead. This was Nylen’s Knights play their home games at Goss Stadium in Corvallis, home first homerun of the season. of the Oregon State Beavers. They are part of the West Coast League In game two of the doubleheader, the tides turned for the Saints (WCL). Davis and Blake grabbed roster spots while Boyd and Burright and they fell apart quickly. Matt Pechmann (3-4) threw less than two were offered 10-day contracts. innings before Donohue pulled him when the Cougars broke out with Last season’s MHCC first baseman Taylor Ard became the fifth an early 3-0 lead. player in the Knight’s history since 1990 to lead the team in homeruns Freshmen John Yearout, Alex Keenan and Cam Foster all saw ac- (5), RBIs (40) and batting average (.387). Last season, the Knights fintion in relief in the 7-2 loss. ished the summer 49-13 and were the WCL West Champions. Freshman Michael Seifert, who did not play in the final doubleThe four MHCC players will reunite with former Saint and now header, was very impressed with the pitching staff this season. Beaver Dylan Jones, who will be a utility player.

Head baseball coach

Basketball to host scramble golf tournament fundraiser Jake Fray

The Advocate

The men’s basketball team is holding a four-person scramble golf tournament June 18 at Gresham Golf Course. “We are just trying to raise some money for the team,” said Saints forward Dustin Jones. “It’s a fun tournament to raise some money for us next year. It’s nice to see the support.” All proceeds from the event will go to covering the team’s traveling expenses, commu-

nity service projects, team apparel and teambuilding events. “It’s not a competitive tournament,” said Jones. “We are just going out there to raise money and have fun. It’s not a competition.” However, Head Coach Geoff Gibor says it gets competitive out there. “It gets pretty competitive,” said Gibor. “The competition gets going out there but that is because they are a competitive group of guys. The players are out there at every hole talking” to the golfers.

To register, contact Gibor at 503-4492306. To play, it costs $100 per player or $500 per foursome, which includes a hole sponsorship. The fees cover 18 holes, a golf cart, and a buffet dinner and awards banquet. Prizes include shot closest to the pin and longest drive and the basketball team will also give out raffle prizes. “It will be nice to see all the people out there knowing they are supporting us for next season,” said Jones.


A&E

MAY 28, 2010

The Advocate

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Perceptions commemorates its 2010 magazine with a dinner party at McMenamins - Edgefield Devin Courtright The Advocate

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Mt. Hood Community College’s literary magazine “Perceptions” had its debut dinner party Wednesday at McMenamins-Edgefield. The reading started at 7 p.m., with participants reading their poems and fictional stories. Toni Partington, who read her poem “Driven by Hope,” said, “It’s always fun, it’s always really fun. The audiences are different each time so my goal is to try and convey the spirit of the poem, what my intention was and take the audience’s reaction and build on that.” After the readings, a break was used to view short films, photography and fine art submissions on a projector screen. The last poetry reading occurred in the last 30 minutes of the dinner party, with three people reading their short stories. Megan Jones, managing editor of “Perceptions,” planned on 75 people showing up but actually said about 100 people attended. “That was a good turnout. A lot

of people from Mt. Hood came out,” said Jones. “More people showed up than I was expecting.” Jones also read piece of her own poetry. She also said this year’s magazine is about a third of the size of last year’s publication. “It was a nice amount of reading. Everybody seemed to enjoy it,” said Jones. “I was happy with this one.” The editors of “Perceptions” also selected the best piece for each genre and awarded $50 cash prizes. Catherine Thompson won best artwork, Laura LeHew won best fiction, Larry John King won best in non-fiction, Howie Good won best poetry and Sabrina Guitart won best photography. Jones said her goal for next year’s magazine is to get more Mt. Hood students to attend next year and knows “a couple of people who want to come back and work on the staff ” next year. “It was cool to see people excited about being in the magazine,” said Jones. “The other five genres were all people from Oregon who won the awards.”

Photo by Devin Courtright/The Advocate

Around 100 people attended the Perceptions Dinner Party, though Perceptions’ managing editor Megan Jones said she had expected around 75.

KMHD2 celebrates launch with festivities in Vista Ollie Barker The Advocate

The radio broadcasting students held a launch party Wednesday in the Vista Dining Center to get the word out about MHCC’s high definition radio station KMHD2. Broadcasting student Mara Becker said, “We’ve been in HD for a couple weeks; the launch party is to make a public announcement. “Since we’ve gone HD, we’ve been able to reach a larger listening audience. The launch party was an opportunity to celebrate that accomplishment.”  The party featured the Portland band No Kind of Rider, Daryl Kirk, and the hip-hop group Flynn. The station also gave away two HD radios to students who entered the online contest featured on www.facebook.com. Students who attended the launch party were offered cake, popcorn, and

raffled off prize packs that included CDs. Associated Student Government President-elect Larry Collins-Morgan and Vice president-elect Jon Francis were the masters of ceremonies for the event. The two are also broadcasting students. Collins-Morgan said of KMHD2, “People should expect to hear sport, talk, and variety shows, and music on the station.” The party was originally scheduled to be held in the Main Mall but was moved into the Vista Dining Center due to rainy weather.   KMHD2 can be listened to via a high definition radio or the live streaming available from the station’s website kmhd2.org. The station is also broadcast on campus.  The station offers a variety of music including rock, hip-hop, metal.  To find more about the new radio station, go to kmhd2.org website for show schedules and a local concert calendar.

Photos by Ollie Barker/The Advocate

A party was held Wednesday in the Vista Dining Center to celebrate the launch of MHCC’s radio station KMHD2. The station is in high definition and will be available for listening through HD radios, the web and on campus.

Ceramics sale benefits club account, gets 'wonderful reactions' Thelma M. Lucas The Advocate

The spring student ceramic sale this week in the Main Mall represented a wide variety of techniques including soda glaze, wood-fired pots and pots finished in high-fire gas kilns. Stephen Mickey, instructor of visual arts, said, “The Ceramics Club is a group of ceramics students who raise money so the club can go on field trips, build special kilns for club usage and organize visiting artist events in the classroom.”

There was some porcelain dinnerware, tea ware and decorative vases. “There were beautiful pieces of ceramics. There were wonderful reactions from staff and faculty.” said Mickey. Ceramics student Elisa Mitchell said, “My art is very therapeutic; it’s a great way to meditate when you are throwing.

Photos by Thelma Lucas/ The Advocate

Ceramic pieces created by students in the Ceramics Club were sold this week to replenish the club’s account.

It’s just you and the clay and you don’t have any outside interference. You have a lot of time to think about everything.” The Ceramics Club promotes and organizes ceramic workshop activities, field trips and hold a yearly ceramic sale as a fundraiser for the club. Although an exact dollar amount for the sale is still unknown, according to Mickey, “It helped re-fill the club account.” For more information about the Ceramics Club, stop by the College Center, Room 1051, for an application to join the club and meeting times, or call 503-491-7277.  Chanel Hill also contributed information for this story.


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MUSIC

The Advocate

May 28, 2010

Cleaning up the beats Story and photos by Devin Courtright

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or singers interested in being recorded, Cameron Monaco, a custodian at Mt. Hood Community College, can help because he’s also an independent music producer. “I put an ad out on craigslist and started meeting different singers,” said Monaco. “I met a guy online and) I’m actually helping him do a CD . It’s the first played song on my myspace page. “He sings for me and I record him,” said Monaco. “I record him singing and I do his whole album for him, so it works out well.” Monaco, 30, says even though he’s a music producer, he’s never thought of actually being called a producer until recently because he originally thought a music producer was a “bigwig” type of person in the music industry. However, he says all a music producer does is “record music and help put it together.” “I’m still adjusting to being called that,” Monaco said. “It’s kind of weird to hear someone say, ‘What’s it like to be a producer?’ It’s just a dude in his room doing what he loves to do (record music).” Monaco said he’s been making and selling beats to recording artists for about six years. As for as rates and fees, he said, “It’s not really about the money for me, it’s about if I spend hours working on something. “I would encourage anybody that’s interested, that needs music, to call me before saying ‘Oh, he’s too much’ because I may not charge him anything,” said Monaco. “If it’s something I want to do, and I’m able to do it and they like my abilities, I may end up doing it for free just for the chance to do it.” Monaco has been interested in music since he was 5 years

old and said, “I started off as a kid playing any instrument I can get my hands on and in school I played percussion. “When I was a kid growing up, I was always a fan of hiphop music but never really played it or got really involved with it,” said Monaco. “These programs make it so easy (to make beats) that I started playing around with it and the next thing I know it I’m listening to it.” After high school, Monaco said he played guitar in a metal band called “Eye Lid Up.” He said, “Performing is fun but I really like making things.” “I don’t think I got as good on one instrument as maybe I would have liked to because I was always focused on songwriting and) creating things,” said Monaco. Cameron Monaco Monaco said he built his own inhouse recording studio with a PC, about eight years ago, and in the beginning he didn’t have much “luck at all.” “It wasn’t so easy back then because everything wasn’t quite as accessible (as today),” said Monaco. “It was a struggle and I tried all these different things.” While he was trying to figure out how to become an independent music producer, Monaco enrolled in an Electronic Music Production class in the music program at MHCC. He said the class was beneficial to him because that’s where he learned all about MIDI (musical instrument digital interface). “I took the MIDI class here (and) that changed my life,” said Monaco. “That just opened my world to MIDI.” Monaco said currently MIDI is “90 percent” of what

people listen to on the radio for music. He said, “It’s a computer program that takes a recorded version” of the music being heard and said “even the stuff that sounds real takes a recorded version.” “They record each individual instrument and then you can control it with the keyboard,” said Monaco. “I got turned on to that and pretty much any wind (instrument) I can blow into I can play, even those that sounded like you were blowing into them, on keyboards.” Monaco said after learning about MIDI, he started downloading a cappella (songs using only vocals) versions of remake songs that he would use to create his own variations of an original song. “I did a Nine Inch Nails song and made it all mellow,” said Monaco. “It’s on my (myspace) page.” Asked if creating mash-ups is difficult, Monaco said when it comes to programming, “it depends.” “The cool thing about it is if you understand how music works, like the layout of time. You can program it,” said Monaco. “You’re looking at a grid (on the computer screen) and you just program the music together.” He also records himself playing his guitars and other instruments, and tries to collaborate with a variety of singers because he said he “doesn’t sing so well.”  He laughs and said, “I’m still working on that one. I haven’t gotten past the point of (saying) ‘Well, that’s okay.”   “Until then, it’s all about finding people to collaborate with,” said Monaco. People who are interested in being recorded can contact Monaco at myspace.com/cameronmonacomusic. “My goal is to meet as many people as possible who want music made for them,” said Monaco.

MHCC Music department closes Sweet sounds of Spring out year with a week of concerts Photo by L. John King/The Advocate

Instructors are using concerts as an opportunity to grade David Gambill The Advocate

The MHCC bands and choirs will share the billing during four days of performances on campus next week with their final concerts of the 2009-2010 school year.   Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. Vista:

Malachi Sterling, general studies major, takes a moment to play acoustic guitar in the main mall Thursday.

The first concert starts Tuesday, in the Vista at 7:30 p.m. where the symphonic choir, chamber choir and symphonic band will perform.   “It’s a group performance showing some of the things we’ve been working on all term,” said band director Susie Jones.    Jones said she has seen a lot of growth in all her music students throughout the year, “Half of our students are freshman.  They come from various high schools with varying programs and it takes them a while to meld into a group and become a cohesive unit because their backgrounds are so different,” she said.  “Now they’re like a well oiled machine and they’re hitting on all cylinders,” she said.    Additionally, Tuesday night’s symphonic bands will feature student conductors.  About six stu-

dents get the opportunity to student conduct every spring term, Jones said. “A lot of these students are thinking that they might go into music education or they are conducting their church group or some other organization so they are working on some conducting skills,” she said.  Conducting is only open to the second year students, Jones said.  Wednesday, 7:30 p.m. College Theater:  

Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. the Orchestra will accompany the chamber and symphonic choir presenting musical selections from Mozart’s “Die Zauberflote,” which translates into English as, “The Magic Flute.” Choral director Solveig Nyberg said the performance will be semi staged with the main characters acting in costumes.   Thursday, 7:30 p.m. College Theater:  

Thursday at 7:30 p.m. Jazz Band I and II will perform as will two student jazz combos, smaller jazz groups, in the College The-

ater. Jones said she wouldn’t be surprised if the jazz combos performed original works. She said these works may include premiers, which are songs that have never been performed live.   The Thursday performance will not be the final performance for the Jazz Bands; they will still be performing at the G.E.D. ceremony and commencement, Jones said.  She said they would not be doing a feature song at this year’s graduation, “We are going to do our part to keep the graduation ceremony short.” Friday, 11 a.m. College Theater:  

The final concert will be on Friday, June 4, 11 a.m. to noon in the student center. The chamber choir will perform Brahm’s  “Liebeslieder Waltzes,”  which are 18 waltzes for choir and one piano, four hands, said Choral director Solveig Nyberg.  She said the four hands will be choir accompanist Frances Fu and student accompanist Jessica Muscgrave.     Jones and Nyberg said that the shows will be the final exams for their performing students. 


News

May 28, 2010

MHCC starts discussion on semester vs. quarters

The Advocate 11

Construction near campus

Chealsey Fischer The Advocate

A study to see whether college students perform better in a semester system versus a quarter system may result in a statewide transition. According to David Minger, vice president for student success and enrollment management, the Oregon Legislature passed a bill in 2009 to conduct a study on the transition from quarters to semesters to see how students learn. One argument is that semesters are better for students as well as instructors because it allows more time to get deeper into a subject and therefore the students will learn more. Currently no decisions are being made, Minger said, but the results of the study will be presented to the Oregon Legislature in August. “This is a statewide discussion about the possibility of switching to semesters. There would be many impacts on students. Students would buy books less frequently and classes would last more weeks, for example,” Minger said. “My understanding is that this is a required discussion, required by Oregon legislation,” he added. Minger said he has worked in schools both on a semester structure as well as schools on quarter terms and he said, “They both have definite pros and cons. Therefore I can’t say I prefer one over the other.” As for tuition, “It would probably stay the same,” Minger said, “It wouldn’t need to go up. Financial aid would stay the same also.” The major differences for a two-year degree is that in a semester structure, it would only take 60 credits as opposed to the 90 credits it takes in a quarter term school because the classes are longer. Summer classes would still be offered, but would be structured in a slightly different way and worth fewer credits because the summer term is shorter than each semester would be if the switch were to take place, Minger said.

Forensics completed a successful season Rho Theta inducts 200+ students Photo by Chanel Hill/The Advocate

The city of Gresham is constructing a new traffic signal at Northeast 23rd Street and Kane Drive at the south entrance to Mt. Hood Community College.

Mario Rubio The Advocate

The MHCC forensics team finished a successful year with a strong showing at the recent national competition in Minneapolis, forensics coach Shannon Valdivia said this week. Jeff Lewis won the excellence award in prose interpretation and the team brought home a quarterfinalist award in duo interpretation at the Pi Kappa Delta Nationals in Minneapolis, Minn. MHCC’s debate team had a busy year, Valdivia said, traveling all across the country debating with 64 other colleges and universities. Valdivia expressed optimism when discussing the team. “We placed in the top three of every tournament we attended this year before leading up to nationals” says Valdivia. “That’s quite an accomplishment for such a young team.” The team garnered many honors at competitions this year, she said. “We went down with four students and came away with a sweepstakes at a tournament that is very brutal and known for tough competition,” Valdivia said. “This year I am particularly proud of the third-place finish at the Point Ploma (California)” competition, said Valdivia. Valdivia said she’s excited for the 2010-2011 season. She said five students will be returning and three more students will be joining the team. “Right now we are preparing presentations for next year’s season,” said Valdivia. She is looking forward to MHCC hosting the 99th annual Pi Kappa Delta National Championships and Convention in March 2011.

Chanel Hill

events, and possibly become board members,” said Nichelle-Peres. Aside from active members goRho Theta, the MHCC chaping on retreats, there is leadership ter of Phi Theta Kappa Internatraining and a chance to volunteer tional Honor Society, inducted within the community. more than 200 members ThursMembers are also privy to benday. efits exclusive to Rho Theta mem“The ceremony will be old bers. “You get so much more from school. We will say vows, discuss joining. You have access symbols, there will be to scholarships no one a candle lighting. It’s “You get so much more from else is offered, as well pretty formal,” said as easier transitions to Heather Nichellejoining. You have access to a number of schools by Peres, vice president of Rho Theta, on scholarships no one else is offered, just being chapter members,” said NichelleWednesday. as well as easier transitions to a Peres. Every year MHCC At graduation, active Rho Theta inducts number of schools by just being members can wear their new members to their chapter members.” gold honors stole, gold exclusive international honor society. Heather Nichelle-Peres tassel and Phi Theta Kappa medallion. Students must Vice president of Rho Theta have a cumulative The Advocate

GPA of 3.65 to be invited to join; once accepted, a student must maintain a 3.0 to remain a member as well as pay a $60 fee. “Inactive members just pay the $60 fee; after that it’s up to them to look at our website to find different resources. More active members will attend regular meetings,

SOC/Senate budget used for student events Sanne Godfrey

counting office needed those requests turned in by the 30th of April.” ASG Vice President Bethany Peterman said they The Associated Student Government Senate and SOC budgets have been out of money since April 30, have to be out of money, because the money for SOC which is a reflection of how active clubs and students and Senate comes from student fees and therefore were this year, according to ASG President Bradley have to be used within the academic year. Peterman said the funding requests that were Best. denied were for Director of Stuevents that did dent Organizations Dee “I feel that the clubs in SOC had a take place, beHawes said, “I feel that cause the clubs the clubs in SOC had great year and put on a lot of good were able to get a great year and put events for the students at Mt. Hood funding in a difon a lot of good events ferent way. for the students at Mt. Community College.” The clubs’ Hood Community Colfor lege. There were numerDee Hawes deadline funding requests ous events and speakers ASG Director of Student Organizations was set on April brought to the campus 26, because this for the enrichment for those who chose to attend the events that were spon- fell on a Monday, which is when SOC meets. The clubs also have their own accounts where they sored by the individual clubs.” Best said all the money in the budget was utilized can deposit funds raised through fundraisers. SOC will not meet officially during the summer for good purposes. “There were funding requests that did not get pro- and even though the budget will get funds starting cessed because the clubs had used the allotted funds July 1 the funds will not be available until fall term, for the year on their various projects,” said Hawes. according to Hawes. Best said, “When Larry (Collins-Morgan, the ASG “The effect on the clubs (students) is irrelevant because even if there were funds, the clubs would not president-elect) takes over, he’ll have a new budget.” be able to have access to those funds because the acThe Advocate

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12

NEWS

The Advocate

May 28, 2010

Panel takes a look at 'Queer Issues in Politics' Wednesday

QSA looks to 'open up students to new experiences' with it's annual Pride Week Ollie Barker The Advocate

A trio of Portland-area guest speakers Wednesday discussed “Queer Issues in Politics” as a highlight of QSA Pride Week sponsored by the Queer Straight Alliance. QSA President Heather Nichelle-Peres spoke for the club in the College Center event, and asked questions dealing with queer issues. Nichelle-Peres introduced the guest speakers: Karol Collymore, David Martinez and Jeff Lawrence. Nichelle-Peres opened the discussion with the “don’t ask don’t tell” policy in the military. She said, “Congress will be voting on the ‘don’t ask don’t tell’ policy this week. President Obama asked for the policy to be repealed.” Karol Collymore, guest speaker representing the Multnomah County chair, said, "Politics should be inclusive and representative of the community." She also said, "Who people decide to be with doesn't mean anything. We are all human beings.” She talked about how she is helping to defend gay rights. Collymore just ran for the Multnomah County Com-

mission for District 2 in the May 18 primaries. She is in a November runoff for the position. She lives and is active in communities of the Portland area. Jeff Lawrence, running for Oregon Congress, said, "We need fairness to treat people equally. Members of Congress are taking steps in the right direction.” David Martinez, outreach and orientation coordinator from Portland Community College, is also on the board of the Portland Latino Pride Festival. The Pride Festival will begin June 2. Nichelle-Peres said, “The event went really well. The guest speakers didn’t agree on all the issues,” but, she said, “They did all agree queer rights are important.” Many issues involving gay rights were raised, and the three guest speakers answered questions from the audience. The Queer Straight Alliance hosted a series of events this week to inform, educate and provide fun for QSA Pride Week. On Monday, local Portland electro band Serious Business played in the College Center from noon to one while students danced to their music.

Nichelle-Peres said, "The main goal of the events is visibility, to open students up to new experiences." She said after the set of the local Portland band The Lovers, who also performed in the College Center Tuesday from noon to one, "People have been really receptive of the events so far." Nichelle-Peres said six people on the QSA board helped organize the event. She also said, "Lots of people have been signing up to be in the Portland Pride Parade which is the weekend after finals.” To sign up, students can send an email to qsa@mhcc.edu. Bobbi Briseno, an MHCC student who recently joined QSA, said, "People wanting to be involved should come. There is lots of energy, and interesting people in this club. It's important for gay students to get involved for proper representation of our gay community. "I joined because I felt it was something important to put attention toward," Briseno said. She said she hopes others will come to help support something positive. QSA has been voted the most active MHCC club for the past three years. This was the third annual Pride Week the club has hosted.

Tutor looks at causes of test anxiety; offers students tips Jen Ashenberner

especially to do things you need to do before the test and still get Sweaty palms, a nervous stom- there a little early,” according to ach and rapid heartbeat are the the website. English agreed with the website symptoms commonly experienced when a college student is experi- and said students should prepare encing test anxiety, according to mentally and ask themselves what Stephanie English, tutor in the they will do if they run into a question that wasn’t expected; this can Learning Success Center As MHCC is rapidly approach- help keep them from being dising the end of the term, final ex- couraged. “If a student looks at the entire ams will run June 7 to June 11 and the problem with anxiety grows test and does the ones they know because this is the last term of the first to get started, sometimes that helps,” she said. academic school year. Some students’ anxiety is a reEnglish said, “Test anxiety can be as simple as having a mental sult of being prone to distraction block and having a hard time get- while taking an exam, and English ting started on a test.” However, said she has recommended stushe said there are students who can dents wear earplugs if it’s difficult experience panic attacks or faint- to focus with noise in the background. If movement is a distracing spells. The Learning Success Center tion, she recommends choosing can help with minor test anxiety a seat in a location where people but according to English, the more may not be moving so much. Positive selfsevere cases are motivation is a referred to the counselors in the "We try to get to the major factor in how much anxiCareer Planning root of the cause. ety a student and Counseling It's sometimes just faces, according Center. “We are to both English primarily learnbecause they are and studygs.net. ing specialists, Accordnot trained in unprepared or the ing to studygs. psychological isavoiding sues,” said Eng- test was harder than net, lish. “So those they thought. So we other students who are not cases where students are feeltalk about how to prepared or exnegative ing faint or can’t know when you're press thoughts about eat or sleep will the exam can be referred to well prepared..." influence how counselors.” Stephanie English, one feels before Causes of test anxiety vary, Learning Success an exam. “Sometimes said English. Center tutor just positive self“We usually find talk — remindthat there’s a ing themselves combination of things that cause test anxiety. A lot that they did everything they could of the time it’s pressure students to prepare and that they should do well on an exam instead of ‘I’m put on themselves.” She said students sometimes going to fail’ — can make all of have had a poor test experience in the difference,” said English. The Learning Success Center the past that causes them to stress is holding a student success semiabout tests now. “We try to get to the root of the nar “Understanding Test Anxicause. It’s sometimes just because ety” on Wednesday from noon to they are unprepared or the test was 1 p.m. and Thursday 2 p.m. to 3 harder than they thought,” said p.m. in Room 1152 for students English. “So we talk about how to who would like to find out more know when you’re well prepared, information about test anxiety. So to those students who find how to practice so you will know the material, and starting to pre- themselves freezing up or blanking out when taking a test, here’s the pare earlier.” According to studygs.net, some opportunity to address the probother ways to help manage test lem and possibly resolve it before anxiety include time management, finals. English said, “After a student taking care of one’s self physically, and mentally preparing before an has addressed the issue, they sometimes come back and say it was exam. “Allow yourself plenty of time, better. Not perfect, but better.” The Advocate

The Advocate's website gets new features, more to come Following up on last year’s overhaul of The Advocate website, Web Editor Chelsea Van Baalen has taken it one step further with the help of Opinion Editor Jordan Tichenor. “We are always trying to find new things to implement to make the website more interactive,” said Van Baalen. “We want it to be user-friendly and draw people in to look at it.” After a few months of discussion between Van Baalen and Tichenor, they decided to add a slide show across the top of the home page linked to stories, an idea pushed along with the help of assistant adviser Dan Ernst. “We talked about it with Dan and decided we needed to try and implement it,” said Van Baalen. “Jordan found the software online to do it and that was when we started it. Tichenor said, “It makes the website more appealing now to students. We can always improve our site and I thought it would make it stand out a little more instead of having just one photo on the index page.” Along with the new slideshow, Tichenor also came up with the idea of implementing Google calendar into the website. “I thought it was a good service to our readers,” he said. “It is a cleaner and more user-friendly interface than what we had before. Also, students can now copy and paste it into their Google calendar, which is nice.” Along with many ideas still in the works, one of things to come around came from the idea of Music Editor Jen Ashenberner of loading mp3 songs of performances she reviews in the music section every week of The Advocate. “I wanted students to be able to listen to the bands and understand what was being written about them,” she said. “I ran the idea by Dan and Chelsea and they liked the idea. It is just one more thing that we could do to help the reader get more interactive with the web.” One idea surfacing this week is the website will now be featuring galleries of photos along with the story so that people can see more than what the paper version runs. “I was getting frustrated because Brett (Stanley) was taking so many great photos and with limited space on the page I wanted to find a way to show more of his pictures to our readers,” said Sports Editor Jake Fray. “So when the slideshow idea came up, I asked Jordan and Dan what they thought about having slideshows of photos along with the story and they liked the idea. This is the first week we can implement this idea, which I am glad to finally have the chance to do.” For Van Baalen, with all these new changes to the web, she says it truly resembles what the paper is all about. “Our whole staff works on it,” she said. “It is a collaboration that truly represents our paper. Our main goal when we redesigned the web was to get the readers more involved. Now we have polls, they can leave comments on stories, we have videos, music and lots of photos. We are always working on ideas to improve it but I feel we have done a great job as a staff to make a great website.”

The Advocate Issue 30  

© The Advocate, the student voice of Mt Hood Community College for over 25 years.

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