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Gresham, Oregon | March 15, 2013 | Volume 48, Issue 21

advocate

The independent student voice of Mt. Hood Community College

the

www. advocate-online . ne t

Field narrowed to three

D.C. looks to cut from Head Start Katelyn Hilsenbeck The Advocate

Name

Name

Name

Debra Derr

Suzanne Miles

Jacob Ng

Position

Position

Position

President

Interim Chancellor

Vice Chancellor

Institution

Institution

Institution

North Iowa Area Community College

Pima Community College

Peralta Community College District

Finalists for president job announced John Tkebuchava the Advocate

And then there were three. A day after the MHCC District Board unveiled three finalists for the job of Mt. Hood president during its meeting Wednesday night, the narrowed pool of competition has been a topic of discussion on campus. Winnowed from the initial field of 38 applicants, the trio is vying to replace current MHCC president Michael Hay, who will retire June 30. The three announced finalists are Debra Derr, Suzanne Miles and Jacob Ng. Derr is a former MHCC employee of 15 years and is the current president of Northern Iowa Area Community College, a position she has held since 2008. In one response to the reveal of the finalists, Jack Schommer, a television and production technology instructor, said, “I was pleased with what I saw, I think the results were good. Debra has a background in the position. I don’t know if that’s a plus or minus, there isn’t a lot of information yet.” Jennie Bellingham, a student service specialist, said, “I think it’s nice to see two female candidates.” At MHCC, Derr held numerous positions, including counselor and coordinator of the Special Services Program; associate dean of Advising and Counseling; dean of Career Development Services;

and finally, vice president of Student Services, a post she held until she left Mt. Hood in 2002. Derr holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Linfield College, a master’s in counseling from Portland State University and a doctorate in community college leadership and higher education administration from Oregon State University. “The reason I am very, very interested in the MHCC position is, number one, Oregon is my home. I want to be able to be close to my family,” Derr said in a phone interview on Thursday. She said her mother and many of her children and grandchildren live in the state. One daughter is a student at PSU. Asked what she feels gives her an edge in the selection process, she replied she has five years as a sitting president. Derr’s Iowa school serves about 3,700 students in a rural service area that covers 3,600 square miles. She said it has been in some tough financial times but is now in an “incredible financial position,” even compared to other colleges in Iowa. “I’m just really honored and very excited about the possibility of returning to Oregon and working with MHCC,” Derr said. Another finalist, Suzanne Miles has served the past 12 months as the interim chancellor for Pima Community College in Tucson, Ariz. Miles has worked for Pima for 26 years. Before her work at Pima, which serves about 30,000 students, Miles worked at Oakland University in Rochester, Mich., and worked in radio and television news in Anchorage, Alaska.

For continuing coverage of the presidential search, see www.advocateonline.net

See “Finalists” on Page 4

See MHCC

instructor and State Representative Chris Gorsek’s ongoing blog

on www.advocate-online. net beginning in April

The director of the Head Start preschool program at MHCC estimates about 30 slots for preschool children will be dropped, after federal government “sequester” budget cuts became reality on March 1. A 5 percent funding reduction for Head Start programs in Oregon and Washington might also mean staff reductions and a shorter school year at the MHCC facility, which currently serves about 1,100 children. According to a White House press release issued Feb. 28, 70,000 slots will be removed from Head Start programs around the country. The release shows a potential 600 slots eliminated in the 30 Head Start programs across Oregon. Jean Wagner, director of the MHCC Head Start facility, said the anticipated cutbacks will have impact on families when they take effect after July 1, start of the program’s fiscal year. “I imagine some people will really feel it because they won’t have Head Start anymore,” Wagner said. She hopes to develop a budget-reduction plan within the next few weeks, she said. The cuts will affect staffing and could delay of the start of, and hasten the end of, the next service (school) year, she said. MHCC Head Start offers part-time preschool four days a week and home visits for preschoolers, children age 3-5 in central and east Multnomah County. It offers a home-based Head Start that provides weekly visits. The full-day Head Start and Early Head Start program provides childcare for a limited number of children whose parents are at MHCC, or are working full-time. Eligibility is limited to families who receive childcare subsidies and preference is given to MHCC families.

See “Cuts” on Page 4

Get your nails done

Softball on top

See a photo spread of cosmetology students working on

Leading the NWAACC,

free manicures

page 6

the lady saints head north to extend their streak

page 12


2

Opinion March 15, 2013

Editorial: Why are you at MHCC? Is it your passion or is it to get paid? do it for a career.” And, who knows, you might study something that you originally think is boring but a safe bet, that turns out to be some-

thing you enjoy. “We have one of the best programs around,” said Jeff Mooney, a welding student in his second term at MHCC. “It seemed like it had the best possibilities.” Mooney said he was encouraged to check out welding by an electrician’s union, IBEW, he had hoped to apprentice for. “It’s just a good skill to have. I figured I should get the certificate and it turns out I really like it,” he said. As journalism students, we at The Advocate are constantly being reminded of the claim that “journalism is a dying industry,” which may or may not be true depending on how you look at it. We don’t think it is, but that is an editorial for another time. What’s important is that we all are passionate about reporting, writing and designing and want to work in the industry. Otherwise, we wouldn’t be putting in what has got to be 25+ hours a week for virtually no credit/ money.

Some students don’t know what they want to do, so no one’s told them they can’t do it yet. A little criticism could go a long way to help narrow the overwhelming options we as students face when deciding on a major. “It’s cold-blooded, man,” said Calvin Walker, MHCC academic adviser, about the world outside of school and getting a job there. “Some people know what they want to do, but a lot don’t.” For those that don’t, he recommends they “take either HD210 or HD208” – career and life planning courses offered at MHCC. Walker’s concern for students graduating from school right is making a wise choice. “Menial jobs are being outsourced,” he said. Cutbacks in industries are causing current workers to hold onto jobs while demanding less (pay) for them, yet he sees students signing up for programs to enter an industry that “doesn’t have a lot of attrition” and thus holds little promise for newcomers, he said. Regardless of the status of the job market when a student graduates, “A four-year degree is your passport to life,” said Walker. “It’s so competitive you have to have one. You need a four-year degree just to say Hello.” School can be hard, confusing and defeating at times. So, whatever the reason that drove you to come better mean enough to get you through it, because otherwise, why are you here? And, if you have questions about anything, ask. “There are hundreds of people on campus who want to help you: career, academic and faculty advisors,” said Walker, adding that the only stupid questions are the ones not asked.

Eye on nature: Spring triggers a time of transition by Wally Shriner The transition from winter to spring is jumbled. Water flows in streams full with winter rains, but not yet overflowing with melting snow. Daffodils provide bursts of yellow warmth, while the season of sun remains months away. On a March day, hour-by-hour, minute-by-minute, winter and spring spar, taking turns with shade and sun, warmth and cold. Songbirds let loose a tumble of notes, an auditory cascade of partial songs, mixed up melodies--rehearsal for the season of competition approaching.

And with each day, the energy builds. Buds swell, seeds awaken, an egg is laid in a feather-lined nest. Such promise. Increasing light, awakening earth, life on the verge of birth. Spring! Wally Shriner is an MHCC biology instructor and the Natural Resources Technology program faculty adviser who writes monthly columns that compares the wildlife of MHCC with its visitors.

the advocate Co-Editors-in-Chief

News Editor

Reporters

Advisers

John Tkebuchava & Mike Mata

Mike Mata

Jackie Garrity Hayden Hunter Shaun Lutz Aaron Marshall Cameron Miller Kayla Tatum

Howard Buck Dan Ernst Bob Watkins

Associate Editor Kylie Rogers

Living Arts Editor Shelby Schwartz

Assistant Living Arts Editor Danny Perez-Crouse

Opinion Editor Jeff Hannig

Sports Editor John Tkebuchava

Copy Editors Kylie Rogers

Webmaster Logan Scott

Ad Manager Katelyn Hilsenbeck

Photo Editor Jeff Hannig

Photographer Jonathon Long

Graphic Designer Lauren Bakke

E-mail advocatt@mhcc.edu 503-491-7250 (Main) 503-491-7413 (Office) 503-591-6064 (Fax) www.advocate-online.net

Mt. Hood Community College 26000 SE Stark Street Gresham, Oregon 97030

Photo by Tyler Heyl/The Advocate

As students, one of the most difficult questions we face is naturally one we all ask for help with, at one point in our lives: What am I going to be when I grow up? “My guidance counselor said I wasn’t smart enough, so I became a hair stylist,” said Tracy Brzyscki, now a nursing student at MHCC. Brzyscki was a hair stylist for 14 years until having kids meant she needed to make more money. “I did retail for 14 years,” she said. Although she loved hair styling, nursing was something Brzyscki said she wanted to do “since she was a kid” and her decision to follow her dream now is inspiring her kids. “They see mom getting A’s and they want to, too,” she said. College is a funny thing. The prospect of what you can do or be can be exciting. It’s easy to get wrapped up in how much money you plan on making, how great it will be to jump into a particular industry, or, in Brzyscki’s case, helping people. But then you are sucked back from all that and you’re standing in the main mall of MHCC, late for class, it’s raining and you have at least three terms until you can even think of getting out of here. So, how do we stay focused? How do we decide what we want to do for the rest of our life? Do we gamble and turn our passion into a career? Or do we play it safe and do something that pays well, but is boring? A “medical office billing” certificate will never be compared to a “sky diving instructor” certificate, but Andy Thompson is stoked about it. “It’s a sustainable job that will be around for many years and allows me to work from home,” said Thompson, who originally wanted to go into cyber technology. “A lot of people who go into something they have a passion for, they usually burn out when they

“Why did you choose your major?” ◊ I’m good at it ◊ For the Money ◊ I love doing it ◊ My parents ◊ Aptitude test

www.advocate-online.net

Corrections: In the Feb. 28 issue of The Advocate, in the WLEE story “Hanging on,” Bryan Anaclerio’s first name was misspelled. The Advocate regrets the error. In the March 8 editorial, “Whatever the method, put in the study time,” The Advocate misprinted the hours of the Learning Success Center. The center is open MondayThursday 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday noon to 5 p.m., and Sunday from 1 to 6 p.m. We regret the error.

Submissions

The Advocate encourages readers to share their opinion by letters to the editor and guest columns for publication. All submissions must be typed and include the writer’s name and contact information. Contact information will not be printed unless requested. Original copies will not be returned to the author. The Advocate will not print any unsigned submission. Letters to the editor should not exceed 300 words and guest columns should not exceed 600. The decision to publish is at the discretion of the editorial board. The Advocate reserves the right to edit for style, punctuation, grammar and length. Please bring submissions to The Advocate in Room 1369, or e-mail them to advocatt@mhcc.edu. Submissions must be received by 5 p.m. Monday the week of publication to be considered for print. Opinions expressed in columns, letters to the editor or advertisements are the views of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of The Advocate or MHCC.


3

Opinion March 15, 2013

A diet with meat, or avoid helpless animals?

A cow couldn’t express anymore emotion than a carrot

Danny Perez–Crouse

Kylie Rogers

The Advocate

I don’t know if a day has gone by where I haven’t eaten some kind of animal. I am never happier than when I am tearing into a beautiful steak or munching on some fresh bacon. However, some people don’t really feel the same way. These curious creatures are known as vegetarians. People become vegetarians for two big reasons; one of them is to get healthy. I can kind of understand this, because if your pants aren’t fitting very well anymore, you want to cut out things that are leading you to the obesity club. However, abstaining from all meat really isn’t smart. The meat that is probably making you fat is fast food meat, which is barely meat anyway. Meat is our No. 1 source of protein, which gives you energy that you can use to work out more and get even healthier. Yes, you can get protein from tofu and nuts, but not nearly the same amount. Turkey breast is the food with the highest amount of protein per-calorie that is clean, very low in fat, contains no carbs and is low on calories. A half-breast with some greens and a glass of water is an excellent meal that will give you loads of energy without making you feel like crap. The other big reason people go vegetarian is because they think killing and eating animals is wrong. This is something I fail to understand. Animals eat each other all the time, and in a more brutal fashion. If a wolf told its kin that

Vegetarians have a lower rate of being overweight

The Advocate

eating animals was wrong, they would think he was a total idiot, and probably get eaten. If animals are cool with it, than I don’t see why we can’t be. They are certainly not going to thank you for not eating them. A cow would probably just fart in your face and a chicken would peck your eyes out if it could. I also don’t understand why vegetables are more acceptable to eat than animals. Aren’t plants and vegetables another form of life? They are born, they grow, they have sexual organs and some would argue that plants have souls. Why is one form of life more acceptable to eat than the other? A cow couldn’t express any more emotion than a carrot, and maybe that carrot you are chopping up had hopes and dreams, too. Maybe that carrot wanted to live a long and happy life in a bushel with its own carrot family. Perhaps it wanted to roll into another bushel and find carrot love, not to be ripped from its roots, mutilated and served in a salad of plant genocide. If all this were true, a real vegetarian wouldn’t eat anything. If you have decided to go vegetarian, I’m going to tell you right now, you’re missing out. Meat is freaking delicious. Nothing in the world can match the flavor of big juicy steaks, crispy fried chicken, fresh hamburgers, shredded pork and bacon. Now if you’ll excuse me, writing this has made me very hungry. I’m thinking...meat.

Do you eat this? Can you eat this? What is this made of? How do you get your protein? But it tastes so good! I cannot tell you how many times I’ve heard these questions and logic over the past six years and, frankly, I don’t entirely mind. At least people are curious about alternative eating. I’ve been vegetarian for a little over six years and I haven’t looked back. Originally, it started as a way to show I oppose the killing of animals for consumption. While I still feel morally that I cannot consume something that was living, I primarily continue to avoid meat for health reasons. This is typically the part where people say, “Well, plants are living things, too.” Technically, yes, they are. However, plants don’t have a central nervous system and it is much easier for me to plant vegetables to eat than it is to grow another cow. Now, for what I eat. There are several types of vegetarian: pescatarian, lactoovo vegetarian and vegan. It gets more extreme from there, but I will settle for explaining these. A pescatarian is an individual who eats no meat, other than fish. They can consume eggs and dairy. I don’t consider this a type of vegetarian because in my mind, I consider fish to be meat. It also causes confusion over whether vegetarians eat fish or not. I am a lacto-ovo vegetarian. I do not eat fish, poultry, pork, beef, shellfish or animal flesh. I also do not eat gelatin or animal-based stocks, but those choices seem up for debate within the vegetarian community. Lacto-ovo vegetarians also may eat eggs and dairy. Vegans do not consume anything that

came from an animal, either directly or indirectly. No meat, no eggs, no dairy and typically, no honey. This also can include avoiding products that have been tested on animals. People are extremely curious about where protein comes from when you don’t eat meat. If you eat a wide variety of plant-based foods, it is fairly easy. My favorites are beans, hummus, nuts and quinoa. I don’t miss the taste of meat, to some people’s surprise. My lovely younger brother has tried to slip meat into my meals and it happens on occasion by accident in restaurants and I catch it every time. The taste seems relatively bizarre now and almost makes me gag. It’s my response to these accidents that makes me sure I won’t eat meat again. What I’ve been able to enjoy more recently is the ever-growing variety of vegetarian “meat” products. It adds a little variety to what I eat and makes sharing my meals with omnivores less uncomfortable for them. It also brings more awareness to alternative eating. For people who follow a healthy vegetarian diet, one not loaded with carbs, it lowers the risk of several types of cancer and diabetes. There are several health benefits gained by eating veggie, and vegetarians are known to have a lower rate of being overweight. It is my choice to be vegetarian as much as it is anyone else’s to decide how and what he or she eats. While questions are appreciated from those who are genuinely curious, being bombarded for “being wrong” is a little less okay. It happens more often than you would expect, for living just outside a city as green as Portland.


4

News March 15, 2013

New hire starts work on skill training and labor negotiations Hayden Hunter The Advocate

MHCC’s new senior labor relations adviser, in addition to working on union contract negotiations, will seek to improve skill training and efficiency at MHCC. Randy Wardlow started working full time at MHCC in February. According to Gale Blessing, chief human resources officer and director of institutional safety & security, Wardlow is responsible for “providing guidance, trainings and strategic support to the college on matters related to labor relations, including contract negotiations, grievances, unfair labor practices, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) complaints and arbitrations. Wardlow said will provide support and consultation to the MHCC administration and staff regarding labor relations questions and concerns. “I hope to bring forward suggestions to improve employee training and development, build more proactive approaches to employee/management concerns, and to provide skill building opportunities to employees in order to be more effective and efficient at our work and thus better serve the students and community,” said Wardlow. For the past five weeks, he said he has been doing a lot of “meet and greets” with MHCC’s staff to get to familiarize himself with MHCC. When he gets a staff issue, Wardlow said he figures out what he needs to do to fix it quickly and effectively. He said, “In my experience the best approach to addressing questions is to spend as much time as necessary trying to really understand the issues, then providing a well thought-out, thoroughly researched, accurate and implementable option.” If he can’t come up with the best answer to everybody’s issues, Wardlow said he tries to do what is “right” according to the rules and statutes in place here at MHCC. According to Blessing, Wardlow will play a central role in negotiations of all labor contracts, including mid-term negotiations, with the full-time faculty, part-time faculty, and classified employee associations. Wardlow said, “I believe MHCC hired me due to the belief that I have certain sets of skills and experiences that will be helpful in continuing to establish and build a positive, engaged, transparent and collaborative relationship amongst all MHCC employees so that we may better meet the needs of our students and community.” A graduate of the University of Oregon, Wardlow also worked at the U of O as an associate director in Human Resources’ Employee and Labor Relations Office since January 2009. Blessing said, “He managed the employee relations program with primary responsibility for labor relations, including collective bargaining, grievances, contract administration and preparing and presenting arbitrations cases” At the U of O, Wardlow also conducted training for managers and supervisors in contract administration. “He brings more than 19 years of HR experience, six of which have been directly related to labor relations,” Blessing added.

Cuts: Sequester results in Head Start reductions

Finalists: Forum set for April 5 Continued from Page 1 She has a bachelor’s degree in speech from Northwestern University and holds a masters degree in communication from Arizona State University and a doctorate in communications from the University of Arizona. The third candidate, Jacob Ng is the chancellor of Student Services at Peralta Community College District, which oversees four schools in urban Oakland, Berkley and Alameda in California. Ng has a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Evangel University in Missouri, as well as a

master’s in counseling/clinical psychology from Cal Lutheran University. Miles and Ng did not return calls by The Advocate’s deadline on Thursday for any statements. A key part of next step in the presidential selection process are public forums on April 5 at the main MHCC campus, scheduled for 11:30 a.m., 12:15 p.m. and 1:20 p. m. One day later, on April 6, the district board will conduct second interviews with the candidates.

Presidential public forums: April 5: 11:20, 12:15, 1:20 Order of appearence TBA

Women’s ‘Herstory’ is history Shelby Schwartz The Advocate

Although MHCC has held a variety of March programs in the past to celebrate “Woman’s Herstory Month,” this year is proving to be different. This year, the Student Activities Board (SAB) will host an event April 9 called “History is Herstory too: Women hold half the sky.” The event, being planned by SAB Multicultural Coordinator Jorge Guzman, is “an event focused to honor women, because of Women’s History Month,” he said. Guzman has booked speaker Lauren Zuniga, an MHCC student, and is working to get a Transitions

student to speak as well. He said the speaker was booked for a different month, so the event will take place in April instead of March. Zuniga will be speaking of things that affect women in the times of social media and how they affect the lives of young women. The “History is Herstory too” event will be April 9 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Student Union. MHCC bookkeeper Mary Burlingame said, “In the past, (Women’s Herstory) was an all-month long thing” that included events such as speakers, reading and singing acts to celebrate the month. Last year’s tribute was combined with First Thursday events in March, to help produce “a cost savings for the college,” Burlingame said.

MORE REAL THAN REALITY?

FILM IS IT. B.A. IN MEDIA & FILM STUDIES

Continued from Page 1 The announced cuts come two years after a new $6 million Early Childhood Center was constructed at MHCC. With capacity to serve 184 children, the Center houses the Head Start and Early Head Start programs and a kitchen used to prepare food for 15 programs in the area. MHCC students studying early childhood development also use the new building. The Center is where cuts are most likely to occur, said Wagner.

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News

the advocate

What the finals?

5

Test prep suggestions abound in the final days before exams Q: “What do you do on the day of the test?” Photo by Jeff Hannig/The Advocate

A:

Student responses to the question “What do you do on the day of the test?” during Wednesday’s seminar, “How to succeed on tests“ led by Learning Commons Specialist Tim Bradley. Bradley gave those in attendance diverse suggestions on how to better study for final exams.

Jeff Hannig The Advocate

With final exams rushing up on Monday, the staff of the Learning Success Center (LSC) is hard at work preparing students for exams. The LSC puts on a number of seminars throughout each semester, and on Wednesday, Learning Commons Specialist Tim Bradley led the “How to succeed on tests” seminar. “Reading is not enough,” said Bradley in an interview after the seminar, stressing that as his main message to students. He added that it is “too easy to go into auto pilot,” and encourages students to engage themselves in the material by either quizzing themselves on what they read as they go along, outlining a concept map, creating a study guide or writing a practice exam for themself or for a classmate. Creating a practice test and taking the test on your own, in “test-like conditions,” is the best way to combat test anxiety, said Bradley. “Test-like conditions” means setting a time limit and doing the test from start to finish. If you don’t know how long you will have for a test, Bradley said, ask an instructor or make an appointment with a learning specialist

at the LSC. “Teachers are happy to help and might even give you an old test,” he said. “They now believe and have confidence they can do it,” he told the group after explaining about a test he helped a student create in the LSC. When designing a test for yourself, Bradley said, “You have to get inside their [your teacher’s] head a little bit,” adding that “your teacher thinks in course outcomes and coverage.” Bradley led the group through one student’s study question that ultimately started the conversation on making practice tests. For creating a practice test or outline, look at old tests and quizzes, then look at the material that correlated with them. “Relate the level of detail,” said Bradley of the questions you write. Other helpful techniques Bradley had for the group included using flash cards on a ring that can be kept in your pocket and studying them (not just reading them but trying to recall the information every time) while taking a walk, “far away from your test.” He explained the benefits of not being stressed while studying. He suggested to find a partner and “be hard on each other” when you test. Tape notes/flashcards/maps/anatomy

Finals schedule

CLASS HOURS

7:00-7:59 am

8:00-8:59 am

9:00-9:59 am

10:00-10:59 am

11:00-11:59 am

12:00-12:59 pm

1:00-1:59 pm

2:00-2:59 pm

3:00-3:59 pm

4:00-4:59 pm

5:00-5:59 pm

WEEKDAYS TIMES

WEEKDAYS MWF

MWF

MWF

MWF

MWF

MWF

MWF

MWF

MWF

MWF

MWF

EXAM TIME

8:00-9:45 am

8:00-9:45 am

8:00-9:45 am

10:00-11:45 am

10:00-11:45 am

12:00-1:45 pm

12:00-1:45 pm

2:00-3:45 pm

2:00-3:45 pm

4:00-5:45 pm

4:00-5:45 pm

EXAM DAY

Mon, 3/18

Mon, 3/18

Wed, 3/20

Mon, 3/18

Wed, 3/20

Mon, 3/18

Wed, 3/20

Mon, 3/18

Wed, 3/20

Mon, 3/18

Wed, 3/20

CLASS HOURS

7:00-7:59 am

8:00-8:59 am

9:00-9:59 am

10:00-10:59 am

11:00-11:59 am

12:00-12:59 pm

1:00-1:59 pm

2:00-2:59 pm

3:00-3:59 pm

4:00-4:59 pm

5:00-5:59 pm

notes on a mirror or a place where you’ll see them throughout the day. Organize the study guide your teacher gives you in your own way. Bradley stressed the importance of getting the information on paper in a way you can go over it and digest it. “This will help to recall the information,” he said. As far as specific test taking tips, Bradley said to narrow your choices to two on multiple-choice sections and to cover the rest of the test. “Teachers will put two distractors, the answer and one with a little twist – the twist is just wrong enough to ensure the student fully understands the concept.” Covering the questions further down on the page can help to alleviate unnecessary anxiety. For essay questions, Bradley suggested students outline sections of reading into three points to study and be able to recall them for the test – not to try and memorize a whole passage. The group talked a little about the differences between the definitions of “analyze” and “discuss.” “Analyze” is to break it down into parts while “discuss” is generally understood to tell all you can about a subject. For more information on test taking, studying and anxiety, contact the Learning Success Center at (503) 491-7108 or drop by and make an appointment.

WEEKDAYS

EXAM TIME

T-Th

8:00-9:45 am

T-Th

10:00-11:45 am

T-Th

T-Th

T-Th

T-Th

T-Th

T-Th T-Th

T-Th

T-Th

8:00-9:45 am 8:00-9:45 am

10:00-11:45 am

12:00-1:45 pm 12:00-1:45 pm

2:00-3:45 pm

2:00-3:45 pm

4:00-5:45 pm 4:00-5:45 pm

The Learning Success Center will be open extended hours on Friday, March 15 from 9:00am-5:00pm FINALS WEEK HOURS FOR TUTORING

Mon

9:00-7:00 pm

Tues

9:00-7:00 pm

Wed

9:00-5:00 pm

EXAM DAY

Thur, 3/21

Thur, 3/21

Tues, 3/19 Thur, 3/21

Tues, 3/19 Thur, 3/21

Tues, 3/19 Thur, 3/21

Tues, 3/19 Thur, 3/21

Tues, 3/19

Finals Week Hours for Computer Lab AC3333 Mon

9:00-7:00 pm

Tues

9:00-7:00 pm

Wed

9:00-5:00 pm

Thur

9:00-4:00 pm


6

Living Arts March 15, 2013

MHCC Spring Break Plans What are you doing during spring break?

“Going to the beach, with my family. Spending time with my family. We don’t live together, so any quality time spent together is a good time.” -Cole Albee, second year funeral services student

“Oh, God, I wish I had plans. I am actually going to be spending most of my vacation putting the finishing touches on a new online math class that I’m designing.” -Rob Hauss, MHCC math instructor, MTH111 and MTH60

“I’m going to Mount Bachelor. I’m just going to go snowboarding with my boyfriend’s family.” -Janine Rillera, second year student, general studies.

What’s the best part about spring break? “Just socializing with friends, taking a break from the monotony of life.” “I have plans to go to a leadership meeting with TRiO. Besides that, just have some fun. You know play a little soccer, lift weights, trying to get that summer body going.” -Clemente Tascahua, receptionist at SEED

-Michael Zharoff, MHCC Aquatic Center clerk


7

Living Arts

the advocate

Cosmetology manicures in steps

Tools for a manicure are soaked in disinfectant to be sterilized for clients, and dipped in sanitizer gel throughout the process. Tools include: Pusher Plus, Dexterity, Nippers.

Step 1:

-Shaping the nail -Soak nails to soften -General shaping using buffer and file

Step 2:

-Nippers, “nips away the cuticle,” said cosmetology student Chelsea Dieringer -Push back the cuticles -The hardest part of this process: to “not make the person bleed.”

1

Step 3:

-Apply Bond Aid, helps the polish adhere to the nail -Wait to dry -Apply base coat, prevents the polish from staining the nail plate -Spray Rapid Dry -Repeat

Step 4:

-Top Coat

3 Photos by Jeff Hannig/ The Advocate

2

Cosmetology student Chelsea Dieringer sprays Rapid Dry after the first coat of Bond Aid and base coat to Amanda Talbert. Talbert said she’d never had her nails done at MHCC, but had previously gone to a salon. “They were done badly and only lasted a week. I came here because I know Chelsea. I wouldn’t have come, but I heard Chelsea does a good job,” she said. Dieringer said she likes doing women’s cuts and coloring the most, “Which is weird, because I came here to be a barber.” - Jeff Hannig

Living Arts Brief Cosmetology fashion show canceled 4

Review: ‘Walk off the Earth’ hits mark Jeff Hannig The Advocate

If Jack Johnson, the Black-eyed Peas (BEP) and Mumford and Sons had a baby, it would play music like Walk Off the Earth does. With that being said, Walk Off the Earth’s newest album, “R.E.V.O,” has some amazing tracks on it. The BEP reference is only slight, pertaining to the fact that Walk Off the Earth makes some really catchy music. “Red Hands,” the second track on the album, will be played at graduation parties around the country with teen girls sobbing, popping bottles and singing at the top of their lungs. It’s that good. If you have watched any of the band’s Youtube videos, you might be confused when you hear this album.

Their videos have a kind of Sublime/jam band feel — cue the Jack Johnson reference, — where in almost every video, each member is playing a different instrument: ukuleles, melodicas, a giant guitar all five members play at once, a completely a capella cover of Taylor Swift’s “I Knew You Were Trouble,” with beat boxer KRNFX, harmonicas, kazoos, trumpets, cigar box guitars, etc. But all those feelings are lost in the album. If you didn’t know to look for that feeling, you’d compare this band to Smash Mouth, not Sublime, and this group would just sound like another pop-sellout BS band. They really are talented and play a multitude of instruments; it just doesn’t come through in this album. The biggest misrepresentation comes on track five,

See “WOTE” on Page 8

The MHCC cosmetology program’s Second Annual Winter Fashion Show has been canceled, due to the low number of submissions from other schools. Last year, there were more than 20 entries in the fashion show. The show focuses on hair and makeup more than the clothing, and carries an overall theme. This year’s theme would have been “Fairy Tale,” and the only judge that was scheduled to be at the event was Landon Browell, owner and creative director of Landon’s Own Hair Care Products. Despite the canceled show, the MHCC cosmetology program is still offering free manicures on campus through Wednesday. The free manicures are only available from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. “Currently the special is: classic manicures are free, the classic pedicures are $5 and the facials are $10,” said first-year cosmetology student and Image Makers Club member Chelsea Sandman. Sandman said the Image Makers Club continues to hold meetings and discuss ways it can fund a trip to the Bellevue Hair Show outside Seattle, since the winter fashion show was dropped. Sandman added, “We still have money left over from last year’s fashion show to help fund our trip.” For more information about free manicures, contact the cosmetology department at 503-491-7192.

-Kayla Tatum


8

Living Arts March 15, 2013

Twenty to perform at tonight’s show Kayla Tatum The Advocate

MHCC will be having a talent show today showcasing some of MHCC’s best student talent on campus in the main auditorium from 7-9pm and it’s free for everyone. According to Emma Bird, SAB receptionist coordinator, “there have been talent shows in the past but it has been a while since MHCC has held one. This is something we’re planning on continuing with in the future.” This winter term will be Bird’s second term being a part of SAB. She has done leadership at Gresham High School and in her senior year she was on the committee to help produce their talent show. When coming to MHCC she realized that there was no talent show and became in-charge of coordinating the talent show at MHCC with the help of her advisor from high school. One of the judges that will for certain be judging at the event used to be Bird’s cheerleading coach at Gresham High School, a former MHCC student and was recently crowned Miss Oregon 2013, Gabriel Neilan. “When I asked her [Neilan] if she could be a judge she said

she would love to come back to MHCC and judge,” said Bird. There is are couple of mystery judges that will be at the show tonight accompanying Neilan that will ultimately decide who will take the 1st, 2nd and 3rd place positions. There were 25-26 people signed up originally but there will be 20 people competing. When asked what are some unexpected talent performances that people would see Bird said, “we have a musician signed up and we also have a baton twirler signed up to do it as well.” Some other talent that will be at the show will be; stand-up comedy, sing/ukulele, singing, rapping, piano medley, poetry; just to name a few. Ramona McFee-Taylor will be performing an original rap tonight and she said she found out about the talent show by reading one of the flyers that was posted on campus, “I haven’t performed this song before. I’m super excited,” she said. Another artist that will be performing a piano medley at the talent show is 19 year-old, Samuel Kaweesa. He said that he has taught himself to play the piano at about the age of 13 and he has never taken any

music classes. “Nobody in my school knew that I could play piano until my senior year of high school. I never taken any music classes” He says with a smile. He doesn’t feel shy when playing in front of people, he performs at his church regularly and he has never entered a competition before. “I’m not nervous. I feel good,” he said when asked about how he felt performing for the first time. His musical medleys when playing are drawn from the music that he listens to which is a mixture of classical, jazz, country, Gospel and R&B. One other talent that will be showcased at the event is comedian. Jeremiah Whitfield who will be performing standup comedy. He said people at the Student Union at MHCC, “know me for being a prankster, so they said that I should sign up for the talent show.” He said people should expect from his skit in the show, “will be an awkward way of thinking, it should be fun,” he said. “I hoping that the show will be a great success and something we continue to do in the future,” said Bird. The talent show is tonight and will be held in the main auditorium from 7-9pm.

Planetarium show teaches galaxy treasures Kylie Rogers The Advocate

The April 1 planetarium show, titled “Galaxy Treasures,” will be the last show of the year to be hosted by planetarium director Pat Hanrahan. The show will focus on Hubble Telescope photos of different galaxies. “I picked out galaxies for one reason: that I always play the galaxy song at the end from Monty Python. It’s a silly song but a lot of the numbers are right,” said Hanrahan. “What I decided to do was go onto the Hubble site and I got Hubble’s best pictures ever of galaxies.” “These are all island universes of their own and a lot of these things are interacting with each other. They’re all different shapes and many of them have black holes in their center, massive black holes which causes some very strange activity,” Hanrahan said. Despite the galaxies being millions of light

years apart, they are still able to interact. “When they interact, they actually rip into each other and smash into each other. When they hit, the stars don’t hit because they’re so far apart. You get these very complex interactions,” said Hanrahan. Hanrahan will have many photos on display to give examples of galaxies interacting and the different shapes galaxies exist in. “I’m not sure I have a favorite. Well, probably my favorite is the one I can see the best in my telescope, and that’s Andromeda. That’s a naked eye galaxy, if you’re out of town,” he said. Asked how to tell the difference between a star and a galaxy in the night sky, Hanrahan said galaxies are “fuzzy.” The show runs at 7 p.m. and 8:15 p.m. on April 1. Admission is free to MHCC students with I.D. and $2 for general admission. Children are welcome and questions are encouraged. Guest speakers will host the last two planetarium shows of the year.

Continued from Page 7

“WOTE” “Sometimes,” where lead singer Gianni Luminati tries his hand at rapping. It’s the only track I had to skip. Their cover of Gotye’s “Someone I Used To Know” is good but that song is tired and pales in comparison to the original. I like when Sarah Blackwood, who plays something like nine instruments and is the only woman in the group, sings and was disappointed to hear so little of her on the album. When she sings on track nine, “Summer Vibe,” she takes a corny song and makes it special. She had me longing to be on the beach hanging out with

friends. All in all, the album is worth listening to, has a few good songs and probably will be played a lot this summer, especially by over-the-moon high school graduates headed to the coast in hopes of margarita and smoke-filled memories. Unfortunately, the band’s spontaneity and talent is over shadowed by its overdone bubblegum pop production. However, track two, “Red Hands,” is undeniably catchy and will be overplayed within a month if not already. They hit a home run with that one for sure.

St. Patrick’s Edition

the day tripper

your weekend event planner

Sat. 3.16 & Sun. 3.17

E. Portland

Come celebrate St. Patrick’s Day at the EastBurn with Guinness beer, live music and corned beef and colcannon. The Dodgy Mountain Men and Closely Watched Trains will play at 10 p.m. Saturday and the Side Street Reny at 10 p.m. Sunday. The celebration starts at 6 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. on Sunday. 21+. 1800 E. Burnside St., Portland.

Saturday 3.16

SE Portland

A family friendly St. Patrick’s Day parade and festival will be held at the St. Agatha Catholic Church in the SellwoodMoreland neighborhoods today, from 10:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. The morning features a 5k fun run, a family parade, carnival and cake auction; there will be live music and performances throughout the day, plus a food and beer garden. No general admission is charged, but the fun run and other events may require an entry fee. For more, see: stagathaschoolpdx.us. 1430 S.E. Nehalem St., Portland.

Sat. 3.16 & Sun. 3.17

Troutdale

McMenamins Edgefield will host its annual St. Patrick’s Day celebration today and tomorrow with music starting at noon both days, going until 8 p.m. The events are free and open to all ages, with restrictions of 21+ in the winery. Besides live music, there will be Irish dancers and a golf Tournament on Sunday morning, starting at 11 a.m. There will be bagpipers, McMenamins Irish Stout, Irish coffee cocktails, Irish food specials and more. 2126 S.W. Halsey St., Troutdale.


the advocate

Budget proposal in April considers 3 scenarios

9

Mike Mata The Advocate

As the final budget request forms come in today from all campus departments, the architects of MHCC’s budget now look to the unions on campus and to Salem to finalize next year’s budget. Heading up year two of an effort to close a $4.6 million deficit, the proposed 2013-14 MHCC operating budget awaits changes before it is to be presented to College President Michael Hay on April 5. From there, Hay will work with the school’s budget team to make any modifications and then present the budget proposal at the first Budget Committee meeting, scheduled for 6 p.m. on April 17 in the district board room. A second Budget Committee meeting May 1 will feature a public forum on the budget plan, taking place at 5:30 p.m. in Room AC1710. On May 8, the committee meets again in the board room following the monthly 6 p.m. MHCC district board meeting.

Graphic courtesy of Jennifer DeMent

Budget plan Budget savings and revenue generation to offset the deficit are carved from four main areas: 30 percent ($2.3 million) would come from new revenue generated by this year’s Access Fee and $5 per credit tuition increase; 30 percent ($2.3 million) in savings wrung from three union contracts now under negotiation; 30 percent ($2.3 million) from reduced administrative costs; and 10 percent ($1 million) from other increased revenue and increased state funding. The current budget plan does not call for further program cuts, nor any new tuition or major fee increases. According to Bill Farver, MHCC vice president of administrative services, $1.9 million of the $2.3 million in revenue expected from increased fees and tuition has been attained. That leaves a $400,000 gap to be filled. Of the budget blueprint’s major parts, “The final 10 percent (component) was an anticipated increase in enrollment based on innovations we’re trying to do,” Farver said. “This may or may not work out, but we’re hoping that the additional state money will fill that revenue gap.” Farver said a “lot of attention” has been focused on the $2.3 million savings administrators hope to reach with the unions representing full-time and part-time faculty members and classified employees. He plans to meet with the unions in the second week of April to present specific options to reach to that goal. Farver said he hopes the $2.3 million savings from contract negotiations will be wrapped up before the budget must be considered and certified by the Tax Supervising Conservation Committee (TSCC) on June 12, and then adopted by the MHCC district board. Failure to wrap up negotiations or reach the $2.3 million goal would complicate the process, he said. All MHCC budgets, as well as most local school district budgets, must pass muster with the TSCC, the public oversight arm of Multnomah County for significant taxing districts. “The idea of the tax supervising commission is that they are acting as the public, so they’re asking the tough questions that the public should be asking,” said Jennifer Dement, MHCC finance director. “They (the

TSCC) actually have to certify our budget before the board can adopt it.”

Funding scenarios In its current form, the MHCC budget plan considers three scenarios that Farver calls “the good, bad and ugly,” based on how the Oregon Legislature chooses to fund higher education in its next budget cycle. Gov. John Kitzhaber and leaders of Joint of Committee on Ways and Means have voiced a desire in their March 4 budget proposal to, at the least, maintain current levels of funding — but little is certain. The state is currently funding community colleges at $395 million, which is Farver’s “ugly” outcome, with no additional money for MHCC.

According to an info-graphic created by DeMent, the $395 million level would produce an ongoing $4.8 million deficit at MHCC. It could trigger another $4 per credit tuition hike and about $4 million in spending cuts. The “bad” plan, at $410 million, would leave MHCC with a $3.95 million deficit and could mean a $2 per credit tuition increase and around $3.5 million in new cuts. The “good” plan foresees state funding at $428 million for higher education. This plan, one that crafters of MHCC’s budget hope for, would still leave a $2.7 million deficit but would not force a tuition increase. Under Oregon’s two-year budget cycle, there’s chance of a 2 percent “hold back” in the 2014-15 budget year if the state’s econo-

my doesn’t improve, DeMent said. With so many unknowns, MHCC planners are working hard to avoid future unpleasant surprises. “We’re trying, for instance, to not eliminate a program,” DeMent said. “As you eliminate a program, you eliminate the revenue that goes with it,” besides possibly damaging the quality of students’ experience, she said. Farver said the student focus is paramount. “To me, it’s all about the students and not the adults,” said Farver. “Sometimes that’s hard for everyone to keep in mind,” he said, adding that the administration still wants to make sure that MHCC employees are treated fairly.


10 Sports

March 15, 2013

NEXT STEP:

PSU

MEET WITH A PSU ADVISER ON YOUR CAMPUS:

APPLY NOW

FO R SUM M E R AN D FALL 2013 Ready to earn a four-year degree? Don’t wait! Apply by May 1 to ensure a seamless transfer. We make it easy: •

Over 60% of PSU students enroll with credits from other colleges. U.S. News & World Report ranks PSU among the top-20 universities nationally for transfer students.

Take the next step. Visit our Virtual Transfer Center for more information and to apply online:

pdx.edu/transferstudent

Wednesday, April 17, 9am to 1pm Academic Center, Rm 2253 Call 503-725-4005 to schedule an appointment

ATTEND A TRANSFER OPEN HOUSE AT PSU These half-day programs include tours of campus and housing, information on financial aid and scholarships, academic and admissions advising, and meetings with faculty and students. Upcoming dates: April 17, May 16, June 19

Pre-registration required. pdx.edu/admissions/transfer-open-house


Sports

the advocate

11

Saints gear up for highly competitive U of O meet John Tkebuchava

sprinter LT Avants and sophomore javelin thrower Tyler Callahan. McLaurin, who was the 2011 Oregon State champion in the long jump, is one of the Saints standouts to compete at the meet. At the team’s first meet at the Eric Anderson Icebreaker, McLaurin fouled out of

The Advocate

With a pair of record-breaking performances under its belt, followed by a weeklong break, the MHCC Saints track and field team is looking to get back in the competitive groove over the next few weeks. Despite the short break this last week, the teams have a full schedule ahead in the second half of March. First up, qualified MHCC athletes will take part in the Oregon Preview meet at Eugene’s Hayward Field on Saturday. The meet will feature many Division 1 universities and participants can expect to face nationally ranked athletes. According to head coach Matt Hart, among the qualified athletes on the women’s team are women’s throwers freshman McKenzie Warren, sophomore Kaitlyn Doyle and sophomore Tori Dixson, both the women’s 4x100-meter relay and 4x400-meter relay teams and freshman Charlene Manning. On the men’s side, are sophomore Zechariah McLaurin, in both the long jump and 4x100-meter relay, sophomore Chris Newell in the 3000-meter steeplechase, sophomore

McLaurin said he was particularly excited to face some of the athletes from Division 1 schools on Saturday. He said this meet gives him the opportunity to get his name out to potential recruiters from universities and scholarships (as he wants to continue his athletic career beyond MHCC).

“I know I can still do better. I hope to do better at the U of O.” Zechariah McLaurin track athlete the long jump, though he still jumped for 6.88 meters, which would have been the best jump at the meet. “I know I can still do better,” said McLaurin. “I hope to do a lot better at the U of O.”

Sport

Another expected high performance participant is the new MHCC record holder in the discus and hammer throw Warren. “I was hoping to get close to my personal record,” said Warren of her expectations go-

SC

ing into the Icebreaker meet. Instead of throwing for just that, Warren broke two MHCC school records, one of which had stood for three decades. Given the season has just started and most programs try to get their athletes peaking near the season’s end, Warren, asked whether she thinks she can top her already record-breaking throws, said, “Oh yeah, I have a lot left in me.” Warren also said she is looking forward to competing against top tier programs. “U of O is a great place to compete,” said Warren. The following week, the whole team will take part in the L and C Invite at Lewis and Clark College on March 22-23. For the team’s final meet before the start of spring term, the Saints will host the Mt. Hood Multi Meet, which will feature a heptathlon for female participants and a decathlon for the men. The Multi Meet is this season’s sole home meet for the Saints. To start off spring term, the Saints will head north for the Shotwell Classic at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Wash., on April 6.

entral

- Blazers Basketball Schedule -

- Saturday -

- Monday -

- Tuesday -

Detroit Pistons

Portland Trail Blazers

Portland Trail Blazers

at

at

at

Portland Trail Blazers

Philadelphia 76ers

Milwaukee Bucks

7 p.m.

4 p.m.

5 p.m.


12 Sports

March 15, 2013

Saints travel south for big match-ups in Nevada Shaun Lutz The Advocate

After taking three of their first four games this spring, the MHCC Saints are heading south to take on national powerhouse Western Nevada. Their road trip began Thursday as they took three buses from Gresham down to Carson City for a pair of doubleheaders against the Wildcats today and Saturday. With only four games under their belt, it would seem to put them at a disadvantage compared to the 28 games played by Western Nevada. “We learned a lot about ourselves (in games so far). We can keep things simple and be successful,” said head coach Bryan Donohue. He also added, “There’s a tremendous amount of clarity with our players and what

their role is on the team.” Donohue mentioned that MHCC has something in common with Western Nevada, bringing up the recruitning battle they wage in the off season. “Whenever we talk with recruits and ask who else they’ve been in touch with, Western Nevada is a common school that comes up. They have a few local guys that we were after, so we’re

excited to make this trip,” said Donohue. Donohue said he and his staff were able to receive scouting reports on the Wildcats from a few of their connections. “All our guys are geared up for the trip, and we’re not surprised that they want to play us. It’s a challenge we want to take on. We expect to be in every ball game,” said Donohue.

Having the chance to take on a nationally recognized club, a team that has reached the NJCAA World Series twice in the last four seasons, is a great opportunity for MHCC to put themselves on somewhat of a national stage. Donohue called their trip “a cool opportunity to represent the Northwest, the NWAACC and MHCC.” He also wants to break the

“All our guys are geared up for the trip, and we’re not surprised that they want to play us. It’s a challenge we want to take on.” head coach Bryan Donohue

stereotype that Southern schools are superiors to the Northwest, regardless of the benefits, amenities and facilities at their disposal. “We want to disprove the bias that Southern region schools are ‘better’,” he said. With this tough test ahead, MHCC will be able to use this trip as a launching pad into its league schedule. Before Southern Region play begins, the Saints will travel to Pasco, Wash., for a doubleheader against the Columbia Basin Hawks on March 23, then go to Pendleton for a double dip a twin-bill against the Blue Mountain Timberwolves. MHCC opens league play March 30 when they will host the South Western Community College Lakers at 1 p.m., followed by a 2 p.m. game April 2 vs. Chemeketa in Salem.

Softball team goes 4-0 over weekend; now stand at 10-0 Aaron Marshall The Advocate

This past weekend, the Saints softball team continued its hot streak, going 4-0 by sweeping double-headers with Walla Walla Community College and Columbia Basin Community College. The team is now 10-0, best record in the NWAACC. “There have been several very talented teams to wear the MHCC jersey. This team is unique in the fact we have more depth than other teams,” said head coach Meadow McWhorter. “We need to remain focused on what we can control: our preparation, our attitude and our effort. Every day is an opportunity to get better, no steps backwards,” said McWhorter, explaining the team’s approach. The Saints dominated Walla Walla in both matchups, winning 14-2 and then 14-3. In the two games, MHCC had a combined 36 hits. Freshman shortstop Teaunna Hughes hit three home runs and batted in seven runs in the first game, in which the team had nine different players with multiple hits. In the second game, freshman pitcher Kristen Crawford allowed three runs in seven innings pitched and ended with a 1.08 ERA. Sophomore leadoff hitter Heather Jett hit two triples and had two RBIs. McWhorter said she expects the competition to be harder when Mt. Hood’s conference games start. “The South is very tough. We will face quality pitching, hitting and defense. Every game will be a battle and every game matters,” she said.

In the first match-up against Columbia Basin, MHCC won 8-0. The second game was closer, with MHCC winning 8-7. “CBC (Columbia Basin) is a tough team. They battle at the plate and played defense well,” said McWhorter. “That win was the most beneficial game for us; we had to fight.” Currently, Mt. Hood has three players among the top five in the NWAACC for home runs. Hughes leads the league in home runs with eight, sophomore Kylee Gasper is tied for second with Blue Mountain Community College infielder Jessilyn Stephens, at four home runs, and sophomore Maycee Abendschein is fourth in the league with three. Through 11 games, the team has consistently hit well. “This year we have the most depth offensively that we have ever had. Every hitter is hungry for (her) opportunity at the plate,” said McWhorter. The Saints’ all-around success is due to “execution and power at the plate, quality pitching and defense,” she added. “Our pitchers battle on the mound. This is not a selfish team, they (players) play for each other.” This weekend, the team plays in Longview, Wash., in the South Interregion tournament. On March 23-24 the team plays in the West Interregion tournament and on March 28 plays its first home game, against Centralia Community College. That game starts at 2 p.m.

Upcoming Softball Schedule: n 3/16-17

South Interregion Tournament– Longview, Wash n 3/16

1 p.m. vs. Centralia CC 3 p.m. vs. Grays Harbor CC n 3/17

11 a.m. vs. South Puget Sound CC 1 p.m. vs. Shoreline CC n 3/23-24

West Interregion Tournament – Centrailia, Wash (TBA) n 3/28

2 p.m. vs. Centralia CC Gresham,Ore


The Advocate, Issue 21, March 15, 2013