Page 1

Gresham, Oregon | May 10, 2013 | Volume 48, Issue 27

advocate

The independent student voice of Mt. Hood Community College

the

www. advocate-online . ne t

Flouride vote hinges on .7 % additive Jeff Hannig The Advocate

Measure 26-151, better known as the measure to fluoridate Portland’s drinking water, is up for vote this month. The addition of fluoride, as done by most major American cities, is credited with strengthening tooth enamel, especially in growing children susceptible to tooth decay. It is supported by advocates at healthykidshealthyportland.org and opposed by foes who align with cleanwaterportland.org. Supporting statements in the Multnomah County May 21 voters’ guide declare the addition of fluoride is “the most important thing we can do to improve the health of all Portlanders – especially children.” They say, simply, “Fluoridation makes teeth stronger and healthier.” Opponents’ statements in the voters’ guide warn that fluoridation “is a risk we cannot afford” and that fluoridation chemicals “present a threat to Portland’s clean drinking water and would increase water rates when there are more cost-effective solutions to protect children’s dental health.” In the same voters’ guide, it is estimated that the cost to design and construct a fluoridation facility would be $5 million, “which the City expects will be funded through adjustments to current and future capital budgets without changing the forecast water rates.” Still, Portland officials estimate that plant-operating costs would require a 25cent increase on water users’ monthly bills. Asked specifically whether she believes the alleged risks of fluoridating drinking water outweigh the benefits, Raye

Anne Yapp, director of and instructor for MHCC’s Dental Hygiene program, said, “I do not. “I hate to negate someone’s opinion, but the hard science does not bear out the risks that (opponents are) bringing up,” she said. In her 27 years as a dental hygienist, Yapp said she has seen this proposal surface in Portland more than once, but never win approval. “This is a public health issue. Yes, it’s another cost and yes, some feel it’s another government interference, but this is another fabulous way to improve the public’s health,” Yapp said. “When we take patients, we [hygienists] can tell where a patient was raised for the first few years of their lives.” That is, patients raised without added fluoride are commonly saddled with poor teeth. “In a perfect world, we wouldn’t have to put anything in the water,” Yapp said. She explained that while she can respect opponents not wanting any kind of government interference with what goes into the water supply, she believes some government regulation/interference is necessary for the public’s health. An example of government interference or regulation already taking place is the chlorine and ammonia Portland has long added to its drinking water to kill microorganisms. In areas where fluoride is naturally occurring, east of Colorado, tap water is actually de-fluoridated by local governments. “Fluoride knits itself into the tooth and forms a stronger crystal. The tooth becomes much harder for life,” said Yapp adding that it’s important to remember “we’re talking about .7 to one part per million (the amount of fluoride in drinking water if the

ASG voting ends with verdict due Saturday night Mike Mata The Advocate

bill is passed). A little bit goes a long way. The benefit so much outweighs the risks,” Yapp said. She said she hopes that “people will learn the facts and make an educated decision.” Many highly accredited institutions and public health organizations also support fluoridating Portland’s water. Dr. Katrina Hedberg, the state epidemiologist and chief science officer of the Oregon Health Authority’s Public Health Division, is one such supporter. In a letter to then-Mayor Sam Adams and City Council members last year, Hedberg said, “We are in a dental health crisis in Oregon. Our ‘Smile Survey’ results show that among Oregon first- through thirdgrade children, 64 percent of kids had cavities, 36 percent had untreated tooth decay, and 20 percent, or one in five, had rampant decay (seven or more decayed teeth). “We rank near the bottom of states in the U.S. on children’s dental health,” Hedberg wrote. She continued: “Tooth decay is a serious problem and fluoridation is an effective, affordable and, most importantly, safe way to improve the public’s health.”

Polling for the Associated Student Government presidential election closed last night at 11:59 p.m. The winners of the election will be announced tomorrow night at the Spring Dinner Dance. The dance goes from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m., with the ASG president-elect announced at 9:30 p.m. There were three regular candidate tickets: Steven Page for president and Grace Eide for vice president, Brett Slaughter for president with Kyle Schwartz as his running mate and Jeremiah Whitfield for president and William Scott Powers as his vice president. There were also two write-in candidate tickets: Laura Aguon for president with Eduardo Ortiz as her running mate and Nathan Doering for president and Jonathen Gates as his vice president. Doering was Aguon’s original vice presidential running mate, however difference between the two of them during the week of the debates led Doering to drop out of the race only to reenter this week as a write-in. With Doering dropping out, Aguon sought Ortiz as her new running mate and they also became writein candidates. As of 8 a.m. yesterday, 712 ballots had been cast, as the Elections Committee was in the Main Mall encouraging students to vote, hoping to beat last year’s 1086 votes. Check The Advocate’s website this weekend for final results.

Spring play review and remaining dates Page 6

Summer

registration opens Monday

Baseball sweeps double-header against SWocc over weekend

student works occupy visual arts gallery page 7

page 12


2

Opinion May 10, 2013

Editorial: Yellot’s refusal to speak to the media is perplexing MHCC District board candidate George “Sonny” Yellot has refused to speak with multiple Advocate staff members because of his skepticism of the media, which he accused of “not comporting itself properly over the last 10 years.” For the last several years, transparency has been one of the main focuses of the MHCC board but Yellot, whether he has intended to or not, has thus far shown he does not want to follow in their footsteps. Of course, even though an accusation of improper conduct or yellow journalism may apply to some newspapers and other media base organizations, refusing to make even a statement about why you are running for a public position to the media, which is the only real way to get that information to said public, is downright perplexing. After all, though we may be a newspaper, we are still students, and if he is not willing to speak with people (specifically those that would be impacted should he be elected) who have a vital interest in his potential role in the college, how does he expect to fulfill

his role as MHCC board member if he does not know what the concerns of its members are? In addition, this situation can be frustrating because though Yellot has refused to speak with The Advocate (as well as any other publication for that matter), as a public figure, every word he says at any board meeting (which is when the board makes its official actions) is a matter of public record. The Advocate always has a staff member at the monthly board meetings. We write about the actions the board takes and we often include quotes spoken by members and include them in our articles. Will Yellot also refuse to speak at these meetings in fear that we may print slanderous “lies?” To what extent will he make efforts to evade the questions that a board member must answer from those that it represents? The Gresham Outlook said it very well in an editorial in their May 7 issue: “By refusing to discuss his candidacy with local media, (Yellot) is telling voters they are not

entitled to a deeper understanding of the positions he holds most dear.” As it is, The Advocate has nothing much to tell you about Yellot. All we know is that he doesn’t think much of the “media.” We don’t know what his specific desires for the college as a board member would be, we don’t know if he hates cute kittens — heck, we don’t know if he really knows anything about MHCC at all. But that’s not to say Yellot is not a decent fit for MHCC (though his unwillingness to be transparent makes that less likely). He just hasn’t given us the opportunity to find out and being asked to fill a pivotal decisionmaking position with little or no valid information about a candidate is not something we feel comfortable with. In a way, he’s already shown he is unwilling to support at least one MHCC program (media). What other programs is he unwilling to support? Given this situation, The Advocate believes there are two things that may need to be done here.

Either Yellot needs to face his apparent phobia of the media and realize that speaking with the student newspaper at a college he claims he wants to help is something he shouldn’t feel uncomfortable with — or Oregonians should look to write-in a different name for this board position, because at this point The Advocate cannot in good conscience support electing such a candidate

Visit The Advocate’s website at www.advocate-online.net

Screw the Kool-Aid, drink the water instead

Mike Mata The Advocate

In the recent tumult and uproar surrounding the issue of fluoridating the water of the Portland metro area, one major reason Portlanders seem to be against the measure is that it would be government putting an additive in our water. Why should the government be adding chemicals to my water, and my kids’ water, these misguided hippie granola-heads cry en masse? The government is going to give my kid some unheard of and rare fluoride disease and then they’ll have jacked-up teeth. However, the point that seems to be missed by these detractors is that the government is trying to introduce increased health

benefits to the populace in a passive manner, by adding it to our water supply, and thereby ensuring that the majority of people get to enjoy those benefits without really having to put in any effort. I find this to be an admirable effort by the government, trying to enhance and enrich the lives of its citizens through the simple yet effective means of tap water. Already, the majority of this glorious nation partakes of fluoride in their water, so why not us as well? The benefits of stronger and better-looking teeth would far outweigh the risks of some poor schmuck getting a little gum irritation from the fluoride dose. In fact, the stronger and better looking teeth would lead to the citizens of this nation being able to chew their food better as well as attract mates easier and thus further our nation through increased population and better digested food. Why stop at fluoride, though? Why not continue to add to the water, make it even more beneficial to every citizen of this illustrious nation? If a little bit of chemicals in our water will go a long way, then a lot of chemicals in our water will take us all the way to the top. Let fluoride be the vanguard in a national movement to create chemical compounds that will enhance the skeletal structure, gen-

erate more muscle tone, increase the rate and breadth at which our bodies grow and develop and increase the sharpness of our eyesight and hearing ability. We might as well add vitamins and minerals to increase the health of the citizens, and add caffeine and other energizing additives to increase the focus and productivity of the populace. But if these additives and chemicals negatively affect some people, would-be detractors will bleat? Then those weaklings don’t deserve the benefits of this super-water. The United States has already done much of the legwork over the last two centuries to assimilate and integrate all the best traits from multiple races, which when married to the effects of widespread consumption of this super-water, would result in a populace so above and beyond the rest of the globe that America shall rise to previously unforeseen heights and lead a renaissance of human achievement and a rebirth of the greatness of the Roman Empire. Thus, in the special election on May 21, all eligible Portland voters should vote to fluoridate their water and thus begin the process of turning Americans into the true master race.

the advocate Co-Editors-in-Chief

Assistant News Editor

Reporters

Advisers

John Tkebuchava & Mike Mata

Danny Perez-Crouse

Associate Editor

Sports Editor

Howard Buck Dan Ernst Bob Watkins

Kylie Rogers

John Tkebuchava

Hayden Hunter Marc Lohn-Thomas Shaun Lutz Cameron Miller Kayla Tatum Jacqueline Beatty

Living Arts Editor Shelby Schwartz

Opinion Editor Jeff Hannig

News Editor Mike Mata

Assistant Sports Editor Aaron Marshall

Copy Editor Kylie Rogers

Ad Manager Katelyn Hilsenbeck

Photo Editor Jeff Hannig

Photographers Jonathon Long Carole Riggs

Graphic Designer Lauren Bakke

“Where do you go for your news?”

E-mail advocatt@mhcc.edu 503-491-7250 (Main) 503-491-7413 (Office) 503-591-6064 (Fax) www.advocate-online.net

Mt. Hood Community College 26000 SE Stark Street Gresham, Oregon 97030

◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊

Submissions

BBC/NPR The New York Times Reddit Facebook CNN Local news

www.advocate-online.net

The Advocate encourages readers to share their opinion by letters to the editor and guest columns for publication. All submissions must be typed and include the writer’s name and contact information. Contact information will not be printed unless requested. Original copies will not be returned to the author. The Advocate will not print any unsigned submission. Letters to the editor should not exceed 300 words and guest columns should not exceed 600. The decision to publish is at the discretion of the editorial board. The Advocate reserves the right to edit for style, punctuation, grammar and length. Please bring submissions to The Advocate in Room 1369, or e-mail them to advocatt@mhcc.edu. Submissions must be received by 5 p.m. Monday the week of publication to be considered for print. Opinions expressed in columns, letters to the editor or advertisements are the views of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of The Advocate or MHCC.


Opinion

the advocate

Collins decision will hopefully do more than make headlines

3 Photo taken from the internet

peted to see who could get the best grades and now every season they see who can lift more weight. Jason said Jarron followed him to Stanford and into the NBA, but when Jason told his brother last summer that he was gay, Jarron had this to say: “I won’t lie. I had no idea.” I think it’s amazing – borderline tragic – that a twin, after 33 years, is surprised to hear that his brother is gay. I share all major events in my life with my family, particularly my older brother. There is little I could hide from him and can’t imagine the amount of strain it would put on me and/or our relationship to do so. Collins said he resisted impulses in high school and said he felt he had to live a certain kind of life. He even was engaged to a woman for some time. “I kept telling myself the sky was red, but I always knew it was blue,” The Collin brothers join Oprah for an interview in Los Angeles he said in his story. only active professional athlete in a major U.S. sport to be Now, I assume that Collins, who is 7-foot, 255-pounds, openly gay. Does this seem weird to anyone else? wasn’t ever afraid of coming out. But he said he felt he had Maybe it’s because I wasn’t alive for the civil rights certain expectations to live up to. movement and the gay rights movement is the closest fight He cited a number of reasons that fueled his decision to in reach that I feel so passionately about. Maybe it’s because come out. The Boston Marathon Bombing made him realize almost every gay man I’ve ever met has been either wonderthat life can change in an instant — “so why not live truth- fully compassionate, creative, intelligent or, at the very least, fully?” — and also his old college roommate Joe Kennedy, interesting. now a Massachusetts congressman, marched in Boston’s The point is, I hope this helps chip away at the battle 2012 Gay Pride Parade. He said that made him envious. “I young gays face every day when it comes to their choice of wanted to take a stand and say, ‘Me, too,’ ” he said in SI. living truthfully or carrying on a lie they feel they are exI hope that Collins’ coming out inspires others to live pected to live. In the end, I think Jarron Collins said it best: truthfully. Charles Barkley recently said in a statement that “He’s my brother, he’s a great guy, and I want him to be he played alongside teammates knowing they were gay. happy. Jason has taken a huge weight off his shoulders. And Players have come out after retiring, but Collins remains the I’ve never been more proud of him.”

Jeff Hannig The Advocate

Jason Collins is a professional basketball player. Strike that: Jason Collins is an openly gay professional athlete. In an explanation he wrote for Sports Illustrated (SI), Collins didn’t say he came out for the good of the gay community or that he thought he was a pioneer — he came out for himself. I’m not here to recap the man’s story. It’s well written, and I recommend it, but I want to give some context to what I feel is a bizarre issue that is still a very real today: people living in fear because of their sexual orientation. Collins first noticed he was gay when he and his twin brother, Jarron, were in high school. In his story for SI, he said, “It was around this time that I began noticing subtle differences between Jarron and me. Our twinness was no longer synchronized. I couldn’t identify with his attraction to girls.” Jarron wrote a sidebar to his brother’s story saying that they always have and still do push each other. They com-

In the recent tumult and uproar surrounding the issue of fluoridating the water of the Portland metro area, one major reason Portlanders seem to be against the measure is that it would be government putting an additive in our water. Why should the government be adding chemicals to my water, and my kids’ water, these misguided hippie granolaheads cry en masse? The government is going to give my kid some unheard of and rare fluoride disease and then they’ll have jacked-up teeth. However, the point that seems to be missed by these detractors is that the government is trying to introduce increased health benefits to the populace in a passive manner, by adding it to our water supply, and thereby ensuring that the majority of people get to enjoy those benefits without really having to put in any effort. I find this to be an admirable effort by the government, trying to enhance and enrich the lives of its citizens through the simple yet effective means of tap water. Already, the majority of this glorious nation partakes of fluoride in their water, so why not us as well? The benefits of stronger and better-looking teeth would far outweigh the risks of some poor schmuck getting a little gum irritation from the fluoride dose. In fact, the stronger and better looking teeth would lead to the citizens of this nation being able to chew their food better as well as attract mates easier and thus further our nation through increased population and better digested food. Why stop at fluoride, though? Why not continue to add to the

water, make it even more beneficial to every citizen of this illustrious nation? If a little bit of chemicals in our water will go a long way, then a lot of chemicals in our water will take us all the way to the top. Let fluoride be the vanguard in a national movement to create chemical compounds that will enhance the skeletal structure, generate more muscle tone, increase the rate and breadth at which our bodies grow and develop and increase the sharpness of our eyesight and hearing ability. We might as well add vitamins and minerals to increase the health of the citizens, and add caffeine and other energizing additives to increase the focus and productivity of the populace. But if these additives and chemicals negatively affect some people, would-be detractors will bleat? Then those weaklings don’t deserve the benefits of this super-water. The United States has already done much of the legwork over the last two centuries to assimilate and integrate all the best traits from multiple races, which when married to the effects of widespread consumption of this super-water, would result in a populace so above and beyond the rest of the globe that America shall rise to previously unforeseen heights and lead a renaissance of human achievement and a rebirth of the greatness of the Roman Empire. Thus, in the special election on May 21, all eligible Portland voters should vote to fluoridate their water and thus begin the process of turning Americans into the true master race.

Notice: Remember to have your ballots in by May 21 for the special election. The ballots should be in your mailboxes by the end of this week.

Photo taken from the internet

Editorial: Social media could have benefits to the college #totally


May 10, 2013

SAB to convert country club into a safari Marc Lohn-Thomas The Advocate

The Spring Dinner Dance hosted by Student Activities Board (SAB) will turn Persimmon Country Club into a safari Saturday night with its adventure theme. Seats are still available for the event and those interested in attending can pick up tickets at the Student Union front desk. This year’s tickets are free to MHCC students and $5 for nonstudent guests. The dance will be at the Persimmon Country Club, 500 S.E. Butler Road in Gresham. Doors open at 7 p.m. and the event runs to 11 p.m. The Associated Student Government (ASG) president-elect will be announced around 9:30 p.m. For those without a ride, Mt. Hood has arranged shuttles to transport guests from the MHCC campus to the country club and back. The shuttles leave every 30 minutes, with the first leaving at 6:30 p.m. and the last one returning Persimmon to MHCC at 11:30 p.m. The Dinner Dance is used to welcome the ASG new president and vice president-elects but also is designed simply for people to have fun, said SAB Director Kristen Stewart. The theme for this year’s event is “Safari Jam.” Anyone who wants to show up in leopard print or tiger stripes is encouraged to do so, Stewart said. If dressing in animal print doesn’t hold appeal, the dance is not formal and there is no dress code, however. The theme was set late during the winter term. The event features a free Mexican Fiesta buffet, with fajitas, tacos, beans and rice. During dinner, guests can enjoy this year’s performer, comedian Geoff Keith. He will perform for one hour before turning the floor over to DJ Dmoe Funk. Dmoe Funk is a MHCC graduate who was involved in student government, Stewart said. He will play from 8:30 to 11 p.m. Everyone is encouraged to dance, but there are many other attractions, including a photo booth, casino games, and prizes.

For additional news coverage see www.advocate-online.net

Spring into student life Top: Students participate in a ring-toss during the Renaissance fair on campus Wednesday. Bottom: Aztec-costumed dancers perform during Tuesday’s ASG Cinco de Mayo event.

Earn your degree in Bend, Oregon Holly Hesse Student | Exercise and Sport Science

There’s yet another reason to get your degree at Oregon State University’s growing branch campus. OSU was named a Fiske Best Buy School. Now you can earn your degree in Bend from Oregon’s leading public research university and know you’re getting excellent value. Come learn about our small classes, field studies, research projects and study abroad opportunities. And see how you can transfer your community college credit into one of 17 majors, and 25 options and minors. You can reach your goals in Central Oregon.

JunE 1 – Summer term application deadline SEptEmBEr 1 – Fall term application deadline

OSUcascades.edu

facebook.com/osucascades

Photos by Jeff Hannig/The Advocate

4

News


News

the advocate

5

Former instructor, Peace Corps alum, vie for board seat Katelyn Hilsenbeck The Advocate

Candidates for the MHCC District board Zone 1 seat are Susie Jones and Sharon Barker, running in the May 21 special election. The winner’s four-year term would begin in June.

Susie Jones A former MHCC student and longtime faculty member, Jones seeks a board seat to represent the community and occupy her time during retirement, she said. Jones left Mt. Hood in 2011 after spending 12 years as a full-time music instructor. Prior to that, she spent 17 years in both the North Clackamas or David Douglas school districts. “I feel strongly about community service and I feel this would be the best use of my talent and knowledge,” Jones said. “I have a pretty good understanding of what students in our community need. (I) will keep that focus and the recent experience that I had and always share that with the board as we make policies and goals,” she said. Jones was a student in the MHCC music program in the 1970s before she earned both a bachelor’s degree in music education and a master’s degree in music and composition from the University of Portland. “Not in her wildest dreams” during her student days at MHCC did she imagine running for the district board someday, she said. “I thought, in my department especially, it was incredibly successful, and the college had a great vibe when I was a student here. I’ve seen some of that erode... I would like to bring back some of that sparkle,” Jones said. In the 80s she was a part-time MHCC faculty member before she returned to finish her career. “I really have a long history here. I really have a strong passion for this

college,” she said. Jones is the president of the Gresham Mt. Hood Jazz Association that produced the Mt. Hood Jazz Festival. She is also on the writing team for a new version of the National Standards for the Arts. “I would like to make sure it’s known that I will be a very good listener and take in information from students, from staff, from community and work collaboratively for the betterment of the college,” she said. “I think team-building is essential for the success of the college.” Jones aims to use her inside knowledge to help represent the public. “I think you need a variety of people on a board to be effective and I think it’s very beneficial to have a teacher, especially one with recent experience,” she said. “Everybody needs to have a voice – students, faculty, community, administration – and having a tie to any of those groups, I feel, is helpful.” She said her goal is to support the mission of the college. “This will be a time for the board and the president to work together to look at the vision of the college and make sure it’s relevant, (to) make any adjustments that need to be made,” she said. “Times change, and I think you need to review every once awhile where you’re going and make sure you’re still headed in the right direction.”

Sharon Barker When Sharon Barker attempted to take several free-of-tuition classes offered for community members of the age of 65, she was caught off-guard by required fees she said she could not afford. She has chosen to run for the MHCC board as an opportunity to eliminate fees on courses for seniors. “I’m not bothering the professors. I’m not taking their tests... I’m adding experi-

Finish your degree at WSU Vancouver

ence. I pay taxes,” Barker said, explaining what she hopes to offer. “He (the instructor) doesn’t have to do anything but take my knowledge. He doesn’t have to do any extra work.” Barker has 17 years of experience with the City of Portland, working primarily in payroll, management and budgeting, as well as serving on various committees and associations. She joined the Peace Corps and traveled to Poland where she started the first Youth Volunteer Corp, which won the Corps’ First Democracy award, she said. When she returned home, she adopted and raised her four grandchildren. She has moved on to help caring for her great-grand children. She uses her life and work experience as a selling point. “The work that you have done in your lifetime, and the volunteer work, the work with the community and with young people, that’s the foundation,” she said. “But, it’s the caring and the concern and the interest that will help with the board.” Also while attempting to attend MHCC, Barker had sought a school library card. But when library staff demanded a social security number, something she believes is unnecessary given her experience as a former Social Security employee, she refused to provide the information. “The students have to, because they’re already on file... but (community members don’t) have to, or shouldn’t have to,” she said. Barker has a bachelor’s degree in business from Portland State University and hopes to finish her thesis for her master’s degree in law and public administration at Lewis and Clark next year. Besides eliminating fees for seniors, Barker hopes to help working families in transition and better inform the community about the resources MHCC has to offer.

“The college has a diversity of programs, things that will get you actual jobs, and that’s what people need,” Barker said. She suggests more partnerships with the community to help graduates and veterans find jobs. If elected, she intends to make sure the community knows who she is and that she will bring its voice to the MHCC board, she said. “They have a theater arts program here that I don’t think the community comes to enough, because I don’t think (the residents) know,” she said. “If I am on the board, they definitely will know. At least in my district, they will know.” “I don’t want to represent just me, because I have lots of ideas, but my constituents may have different ideas,” she added. Barker said that promoting Mt. Hood to potential students within the college district is important, as well as those in Portland Public Schools. She has enjoyed talking to community members during the election run-up, which has been a new experience for her. “I’ve always been on the other side of it, doing volunteer work. I’ve never run a campaign for myself,” she said. “This has really been interesting.”

This is the second installment of the profiles for District Board candidates. The final installment will be next week and feature James Zordich and Ron Weisdorfer

News Briefs Bikes now targeted for crime on campus As April faded to May, MHCC has experienced a spike in bike-related thefts. Three bikes and a separate bike seat were stolen between April 20 and 29 and May 1 and 3. The main areas where the thefts occurred were at the bike racks near AC1000, AC1300 and HPE. According to an email sent out by Manager of Public Safety Wayne Feagle, the thefts are estimated to have taken place between 8:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. Feagle included some tips on how to keep your

Scan the code to hear what transfer students, like Morgan, think about WSU Vancouver.

Call. Visit. Apply. vancouver.wsu.edu the bout Ask a ill— it lets r B B orde iden ts n re s o g e tion r O te tui s. a t s -­ pa y in to 8 credit p for u

bike safe: lock your bike frame to the bike rack with “an alloy hardened U-shaped lock,” and try to attach the front wheel to the lock as well. According to Feagle, the bikes that were stolen were locked with a chain and padlock. Feagle added that any parts on a bike “that are quick-release,” such as seats, should be taken with the owner. He also recommended to keep a record of your bike’s serial number.

— Mike Mata

Summer carpool permits now available Summer term carpool permits will be available to students, free of charge, beginning Thursday. To qualify for the parking pass, students must carpool at least three times a week. This summer MHCC will give out 75 passes that allow the driver to use one of 26 spots designated in campus parking lots for carpools. Permit holders must have at least one passenger on the day they use the spots. Having a permit does not guarantee a spot, but the spots are located close to class buildings as an incentive for being eco-friendly.

The permits are issued on a term-by-term basis, so a spring pass will not be valid during summer. Drivers interested in carpooling who don’t have riders already arranged may talk to Public Safety about resources to help find matches. Last term, not all of the passes were distributed. Applications for the permits also are available in the Public Safety office and can be submitted starting on Thursday. Permits are granted the same day an application is approved.

— Marc Lohn-Thomas


6

Living Arts May 10, 2013

“One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest”

Starting top center and moving clockwis confrontation with Nurse Ratched (Sydne Bottom Center: Bill Curtis as Scanlon and Far left: Drew Pierce as Chief Bromden an is on the right side of Rowning.

The remaining dates for the spring play are May 10-11, 16-18 at 7:30 p.m. in the Studio Theater. Adult tickets are $10. Student and senior tickets are $5.

Review: Student directed ‘Cuckoo’ is well worth seei Kylie Rogers The Advocate

“You can’t be sent to an institution. You’re already here,” said the big nurse —and I could do nothing but agree that I was in a psych ward. Mt. Hood’s student production of “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” — which opened Thursday in the Studio Theater — was one of the most impressive MHCC performances of the past three years as seen during Wednesday night’s dress rehearsal. This reviewer had not read the book or seen the movie of the same title but had a clear idea of what would happen: Some guy goes into a mental institution and causes problems. What I watched was a play that firmly held my interest and was pieced together quite well. The production has an approximate run time of two hours and 25 minutes, including a 15-minute intermission, but it never felt too long. The content is appropriate for a college audience,

with references to alcohol and rape, and has enough comedic relief to not feel too serious in its entirety. I wouldn’t recommend anyone under the age of 13 attend the play and to keep in mind that the 1975 film was rated R. The set was detailed and realistic and that was much appreciated. It turned the intimate Studio Theater into a room in a psych ward. The details of the tile floor and the staff room behind glass were wonderful touches. All in all, it felt most like a movie with the invisible fourth wall where the audience is seated. The play maintained the integrity of reallife throughout its scenes. While dialogue was exchanged between primary characters on the stage, the other remaining characters continued to do whatever they were doing. For example, the acute patients would be playing a game of cards and interacting with each other while the staff would be silently but visibly conversing, just as there are multiple things happening in any room with multiple groupings.

The costumes were appropriate to the setting but also conveyed critical character information. The loose sweats and baggy t-shirts of the patients added to the honesty of the set while Randle McMurphy’s (Matt Rowning) greaser appearance assisted his “I don’t give a fuck” attitude. Nurse Ratched (Sydney Hope), Nurse Flinn (Amanda Dike) and Doctor Spivey (Tyler Whalen) all had professional garb to help emphasize their authoritative roles. The acting overall was genuine. There were a few moments where things felt over-rehearsed — such as when the aides Williams (Dylan Gardner) and Warren (Dante Zambrano) came in — but nothing that detracted from the play. The actors’ ability to adjust to mistakes was mostly flawless, with the best example coming from an interaction between McMurphy and Nurse Ratched. The nurse had placed her hand underneath McMurphy’s chin for him to spit out the gum he was chewing that she didn’t approve of. During the dress rehearsal, Rowning, as Mc-

Murphy, spit out the gum out but it fe floor instead of into the nurse’s hand. The actors’ response was perfect and character. Instead of bending over to pic gum, Hope, as Nurse Ratched, stood th posing and authoritative as ever and stil for the gum in her hand. Rowning res in the rebellious nature of McMurphy, ing up the gum, putting it back in his m chewing some more before spitting it fully into Hope’s hand. I was impresse of the most flawless cover-ups I have s it was funny enough that I wouldn’t m always happened that way. The play is definitely worth seeing. T performances tonight and Saturday at 7 as well as May 16-18 at 7:30 p.m. Ticket for general admission and $5 for student niors and available at www.mhcc.edu/t at the box office.


Living Arts

the advocate

ell on the

d well in ck up his here, imll waiting sponded, by pickmouth and successed at one seen and mind if it

There are 7:30 p.m. ts are $10 ts and setheatre or

Photos by Jeff Hannig/ The Advocate

Photos by Shelby Schwartz/ The Advocate

Student art on display in gallery

Above is a sculpture entitled “La Dolce Vita,” by student Ashley LeGore, created in an Art 291 sculpture I class at MHCC. The sculpture can be seen on display in the Visual Arts gallery until June 6.

Shelby Schwartz The Advocate

The annual MHCC Visual Arts Student Exhibit is on display now in the Visual Arts Gallery, through June 6. The juried exhibit features work done by MHCC students during the current academic year. The show was scheduled to open next Monday, but Gallery Coordinator Miles Browne finished hanging the pieces earlier this week. Browne said there are about 200 pieces in the show, with about 150 students participating. Each student is limited to four pieces. The lone requirement for entries is that the work had to have been created for an active class during the 201213 school year. The exhibit will be judged for the categories of best of show, composition/use of elements, technical skill, emergence of a personal vision and voice, and original-

se: Matt Rowning as McMurphy (far right,) sits in a chair before an angry ey Hope) on Wednesday nights dress rehearsal in the studio theater. d Alex Giorgi as Dale Harding converse during a scene. nd Rowning as McMurphy enter a scene after receiving shock therapy, Hope

ing

7

ity by MHCC full-time art faculty members, including painting, ceramics, sculpture, drawing and design instructors. Browne said prizes for the four main categories include a certificate and art supplies. There also will be honorable mention awards. Any student taking any level of art class through out the year is eligible to enter the competition, which results in great diversity. “It’s pretty much all the classes we offer, so we have ceramics, sculpture, drawing, life drawing, painting, calligraphy and digital art,” Brown said. “It’s all these levels, so I think that’s the great part about this show. You know some (students) are beginners, some are more advanced,” he said. Differences can center on age groups or personal backgrounds, he said. “It’s a cool show to see just in terms of variety.” The awards reception will take place on Thursday from 11:30 am to 1:30 p.m.

Living Arts Brief RICE club luau on Tuesday MHCC’s R.I.C.E. club will be hosting its 2nd Annual Island Vibin’ Luau on Tuesday in the Gresham campus Main Mall. The R.I.C.E. club is MHCC’s Pacific Islander organization, and the luau will reflect the culture with authentic food, traditional dancing, a pig roast and live music with Pacific Islander artist Ras Mas performing a range of reggae, rap and hip-hop. The event is free, and runs 4 to 8 p.m. in the Main Mall.

-Shelby Schwartz

The hanging sculpture “Bees” by Antonio Martinez was created in an Art 291 sculpture I class at MHCC. This sculpture can also be seen on display in the Visual Arts gallery until June 6.


8

Living Arts May 10, 2013

Review: Album needs more of niche Katelyn Hilsenbeck The Advocate

With their signature odd introductions and echoing vocals, the Canadian-based alternative band the Abramson Singers debut their second album “Late Risers” on Tuesday. The album satisfies my ears, but with two incredibly short songs and upbeat tunes that don’t seem to fit their niche, it leaves me longing for more of their slow tunes with hopefully more diversity. The first song on their album, “Factory Reprise 1,” does not seem long enough to hold a full spot for a song at only 48 seconds. On top of that, it seems a bit like a funeral mixed with a penny being shaken in a metal water bottle. The next song, “Liftoff Canon,” leaves a better impression. The song uses three vocal layers: background notes are repeated throughout the majority of the song, Leah Abramson begins singing a few seconds into the song and shortly after is overlaid with herself singing a different verse. The combination of vocals provides a stark contrast from their vocal-less first track. The ending unifies the whole song, as each layer of singing is stripped away one at a time, leaving the listener with the same beginning, repetitive male vocal of Lucien Durey. When it comes to “Jack of Diamonds,” the next song on the album, the only negative is the first 10 seconds, which resembles a bee buzzing around your ear. The rest of the song has a light and summery feel that was enjoyable to listen to, yet it does not remain consistent with their previous album. “Marguerite” presents itself in an almost haunting manner. The message of the song is unclear due to its mostly French makeup (which proved an issue previously as their first album had a French song as well, “Un Jeune Malade”). My favorite song on the album is

“Fight or Flight.” The use of a guitar and Durey’s backup vocals makes the song feel very raw and more the genre I see the band fitting in. Remaining consistent with the type of vocals Abramson displayed in the previous four songs is “Drowning Man.” It’s almost as if you could switch the words of two songs and they would sound basically the same. The song remains at one intensity, even when it attempts to bump it up a notch during the chorus. Another short instrumental that doesn’t seem to deserve a full song’s spot is “All Night Reprise.” I kept waiting for vocals, but was left disappointed. “ L o s e Lose” takes on an upbeat and echo-y feel similar to “Jack of Diamonds,” and a “do whatever you want” attitude, but halfway through the song, it becomes repetitive and screechy. It mimics that of “Fool’s Gold,” from their first album together in 2010. Carrying over the same style as most of the other songs, “Déjà Vu” is complete with the prominent echoing male background vocals in the chorus. Ambramson’s strength comes when she is talking versus belting out her lyrics so that they become almost indistinguishable. This is demonstrated in “Skull & Crossbones,” which becomes almost monotone and predictable while “Red River Valley” presents her strengths with conversational lyrics. The latter builds and builds in intensity and wraps up with a full chorus feel that is repetitive, yet impactful. As a new band, “The Abramson Singers” noted that this album would help them find their sound. I would recommend they stick to the “Fight or Flight” slower style, complete with the echoing vocals. Overall, I enjoyed The Abramson Singer’s new album “Late Risers,” which will be available on their website www.leahabramson.com.

the day tripper your weekend event planner

Saturday 5.11

Ne Portland

The Oregon Convention Center is hosting the Crafty Wonderland Super Colossal Spring Sale in Hall D from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission is free, and the event is for all ages. The first 200 shoppers receive free goodie bags. 777 N.E. MLK Jr. Blvd., Portland.

Saturday 5.11

St. Johns

The 7th Annual “St. Johns Bizarre” will run from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. in the North Portland neighborhood, between Philadelphia and Leavitt avenues. The St. Johns street fair includes live music, vendors and more. All ages are welcome and admission is free. Among the highlights is the historic St. Johns parade, which starts promptly at noon and then travels east along Lombard Street.

Sunday 5.12

Se Portland

Southeast Portland gets its turn on Portland’s Sunday Parkways calendar, with special, free activities staged from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Lents Park (and also Bloomington, Ed Benedict and Glenwood parks). Activities include food, vendors, music and more. See: www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/article/446055. Lents Park is at the intersection of Southeast 92nd Avenue and Holgate Boulevard, Portland.

Monday 5.13

PSU

Portland State University will host the “Middle East Studies Center Lecture Series.” This lecture will cover “Seth: Ancient Egypt’s Evil God of Power and Might.” The event will be free and open to the public. Dr. Eugene Cruz-Uribe, professor of global history and world civilizations at California State University, will be reviewing some of the work he did in Egypt. The lecture will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 238, 1825 S.W. Broadway St., Portland.

AN INFO SESSION ON A

SATURDAY MORNING?

CLEARLY WE ATTRACT A DIFFERENT SORT OF STUDENT.

Living Arts Brief Japanese culture event on Saturday The MHCC Japanese Club and the Gresham Sister City Association will host a Japanese culture event, “Skosh (A little) Japanese: Children’s Festival & Cultural Fair,” Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event will begin by the flagpoles by the main entrance and move down to the Main Mall where maps and schedules will be available. All ages are welcome to attend

the event. The event will include performances, children’s activities, arts and crafts tables, and Portland Taiko. Art will be displayed throughout the campus, including in the College Theater and Student Union. The free festival is expected to be the largest Japanese culture event in the Gresham area.

-Aaron Marshall

You. Unlimited.

Marylhurst offers a quality education from professors who practice what they teach and knowledge you can apply out in the real world. Featuring two new bachelor’s degrees: Media & Film Studies and Digital Humanities UNDERGRADUATE INFO SESSION Sat. May 11, 9 a.m. - noon BP John Administration Building

admissions@marylhurst.edu 503.699.6268 marylhurst.edu/grownups

17600 Pacific Highway [Hwy. 43] – 10 miles south of Portland

CommCollege_5.89x6_UndergradINFOv2.indd 2

12/20/12 4:34 PM


9

the advocate

NEXT STEP:

PSU

MEET WITH A PSU ADVISER ON YOUR CAMPUS:

APPLY NOW

FO R SUM M E R AN D FALL 2013 Ready to earn a four-year degree? Don’t wait! Apply by May 1 to ensure a seamless transfer. We make it easy: •

Over 60% of PSU students enroll with credits from other colleges. U.S. News & World Report ranks PSU among the top-20 universities nationally for transfer students.

Take the next step. Visit our Virtual Transfer Center for more information and to apply online:

pdx.edu/transferstudent

Wednesday, April 17, 9am to 1pm Academic Center, Rm 2253 Call 503-725-4005 to schedule an appointment

ATTEND A TRANSFER OPEN HOUSE AT PSU These half-day programs include tours of campus and housing, information on financial aid and scholarships, academic and admissions advising, and meetings with faculty and students. Upcoming dates: April 17, May 16, June 19

Pre-registration required. pdx.edu/admissions/transfer-open-house


10 Sports

May 10, 2013

Saints top numerous events as they head into championships The MHCC track and field team currently holds three number one ranks in various events John Tkebuchava The Advocate

After taking part in the Pacific Twilight at Pacific University last weekend, the MHCC track and field team has only its championships meets left, including the NWAACC Southern Region Championship that runs today. At the Pacific Twilight meet, which drew many fouryear university athletes besides community college athletes, the Saints women’s 4x100-meter relay managed to win first place again, finishing with a time of 47.61. The relay team members also placed highly in their solo events, including freshman Charlene Manning’s sixth place in the 100-meter hurdles (15.77), sophomore Molly Scoles’ fourth place in the 400-meter hurdles (1:05) and freshman Kristi Kachel’s seventh place in the long jump (5.14 meters). The women’s 4x400-meter relay placed fourth at the meet, finishing in 3:57. On the men’s team, sophomore Zechariah McLaurin placed third in the long jump, hitting a dead-even 7 meters,

and freshman Cody Quinton placed fifth in the discus (42.98 meters). With the Pacific Twilight meet results, several Saints were able to move their way higher up the NWAACC standings or to further solidify their position. Going into Southern Regions, on the women’s team, Scoles leads the NWAACC in the women’s 400-meter hurdles (1:03.73). Freshman McKenzie Warren leads in the women’s hammer throw (49.44 meters) and is also second in the shot put (12.65 meters). Warren is also second in the discus (44.24 meter). Sophomore Tori Dixson, the reigning NWAACC shot put champion, is currently ranked fifth (11.97 meters) in the event and also is fourth in the discus (37.86 meters). Sophomore Christa Collmer is ranked in the top five in two different events, being ranked third in the 800-meter (2:17) (at less than half a second away from first place) and second in the 1500 meter (4:47). In the women’s jumps, freshman Carrie Haguewood is ranked fourth in the high jump (1.56 meters).

Sport

SC

The two women’s relay teams both rank third going into the championship week, the 4x100-meter relay team at 50.12 and the 4x400-meter squad at 4:05. On the men’s side, both relay teams also sit in the top five, with the 4x100-meter relay ranked fourth (43.28) and the 4x400-meter relay in fifth (3:28). In the men’s 3000-meter steeplechase, sophomore Chris Newell is ranked fifth (10:02). McLaurin is ranked fourth in the long jump (6.91 meters). In the throw events, sophomore Tyler Callahan is the sole Saints man who leads the NWAACC, his event being the javelin (68.15 meters, also the MHCC school record) and freshman Cody Quinton is fourth in the discus (42.98 meters). The Southern Region Championships will be held today, at Lane Community College in Eugene. After the Southern meet, competitors who qualify will make their way to the NWAACC Championships on May 20-21, at Spokane Falls Community College.

entral

Changing of the guard begins in Major League Baseball

Shaun Lutz The Advocate

There’s a youth movement happening in the MLB. All-stars such as Albert Pujols, Derek Jeter and David Ortiz have dominated the game over the past decade or so. But as Father Tme catches up, a new crop of young guns is rapidly emerging. Last season’s American League rookie of the year, Mike Trout, has not only become a feared hitter and fielder but his popularity has reached new heights since he broke into the Show. Same goes for Bryce Harper, the reigning National League rookie of the year. Those are two of the more

familiar names in pro baseball, but many others are doing their best to put their print on the game. Manny Machado, in his first full year with the Baltimore Orioles (he debuted last August) is tied for third in hits in the American League. At 20 years old, he has already solidified himself as a cornerstone player for the Orioles for years to come. His elite defense and disciplined hitting are recognized leaguewide. Starling Marte of the Pittsburgh Pirates has also made his presence felt so far this year. After being called up last July, Marte has posted the fifth best batting average in the NL, hitting at a .331 clip, while also being tied for second in the league with 10 stolen bases. Combine him with the already polished Andrew McCutchen in the Pittsburgh outfield, and they have a nucleus built for future success. Shortstop Jean Seguera, 23, goes a bit unnoticed, yet he was one of the key pieces to a deal that sent Cy Young pitcher Zack Greinke to

the Angels last summer. Seguera is currently tied for the most triples in the NL and his .328 average is good for sixth best in the National League. Along with being a sensational defensive player, his all-around game is bolstered by his statistical output. Left-handed starter Matt Moore is widely considered one of, if not the, top pitching prospect in the majors. He broke

is one of two American League pitchers to start the year 6-0. Along with a paper-thin 2.14 ERA, and holding opposing hitters to a .176 batting average, he is producing the numbers many thought we would see. The Florida native will most likely become the front line starter for the Rays since their ace David Price looking at free agency after the season. Finally we have Matt Har-

walks and hits for every inning pitched (Harvery sits at an astounding 0.69). Couple that with being second in the National league in strikeouts as well as third in strikeouts per nine innings thrown, Harvey is already being talked about as a serious Cy Young candidate. Earlier this week, he took a no decision during a 10-inning victory for the Mets. However, Harvery

“All-stars such as Albert Pujols, Derek Jeter and David Ortiz have dominated the game over the past decade or so.” into the league in 2011 with one start for the Tampa Bay Rays, but had a so-so 2012 campaign, going 11-11 with a 3.81 ERA. However, having a rough go of it during his rookie season fueled the fire for him to come out blazing this season. Moore

vey. The New York Mets right hander may be having the best season of all these young men. His accolades thus far into the young season include leading the NL in ERA (1.28), opponents batting average (.133) and WHIP, which combines

surrendered only one hit (a lazy infield single at that) and struck out 12 White Sox hitters. While there are many young studs in the league, these are a handful of standouts looking to take the reins as perennial superstars MLB has to offer.


Sports

the advocate

11

Softball eyes NWAACC title with regular season coming to an end Aaron Marshall The Advocate

Photos by Jonathon Long/The Advocate

With the season winding down, MHCC softball continued it impressive run by winning three of four games in the past week. The Saints are now victors in nine of their last 10 games, including two wins against Chemeketa Community College Saturday and one of two against Clackamas Tuesday. In the matchup with Clackamas, MHCC came out strong in the top of the second as sophomore infielder Lola Ciu hit a solo home run. But in the bottom of the fourth, the Saints gave up four runs as Clackamas forged a 4-1 lead. But in the top of the fifth, the Saints batted in more runs as freshman infielder Teauna Hughes hit a two-run home run bringing

the score to 4-3. But the Saints gave up two more runs in the bottom of the fifth and ended with a 6-3 loss. “We had some physical and mental mistakes on defense that led to three unearned runs,” said coach Meadow McWhorter. Game two was much different for the Saints. Starting freshman pitcher Ann-Marie Guischer pitched a complete game, which included 10 strikeouts and she gave up only two earned runs. Seven hitters batted in runs, including home runs from Hughes and freshman catcher Bianca Hancock. Sophomore outfielder Heather Jett also added three hits. Scoring six runs in the top of the sixth made a big difference for the Saints, as they won 10-3. “We made some great plays on defense, adjustments at the plate and we controlled what we could control.  Heather

Jett had an excellent day at the plate and really ignited our offense,” said McWhorter. Last Saturday, in the Saints final home games of the regular season against Chemekta, the team came ready to play and won both games, 12-4 and 12-2. “They were two excellent wins. It was nice to finish our home schedule and send our sophomores out with two wins,” said McWhorter.  The Saints clinched a playoff spot and will be headed to the NWAACC tournament next weekend (May 17-20) at Delta Park in Portland.. “This team is determined.  They have shown fight all year and are on a mission to bring the NWAACC title back to MHCC,” said McWhorter.  Last week, Guischer was awarded player of the week by the NWAACC. This season Guischer is 9-4 with six complete games, 1.40 ERA, and team-leading 128 strikeouts. “We’re very proud of Ann-Marie and her success on the mound.   All of our pitchers are working hard to win games together.  They are a small team within the team,” said McWhorter. The team has its final match-up of the season today against Lower Columbia Community College in Longview, Wash. Doubleheader begins at 3 p.m.

Softball Schedule: n 5/10

3 p.m. vs. Lower Columbia CC Longview, Wash. n 5/17-20

NWAACC Tournament - Delta Park Left: Sophomore catcher Courtney McCarthy attempts a bunt during the Saints game against Chemeketa Community College last Saturday. Right: Freshman Infielder Teauna Hughes works to catch a Chemeketa player in a run-down.

- Correction Two staff sports columns about the French Open tennis tournament produced a double-fault in last week’s Advocate. Bylines and staff photos on the columns by Danny PerezCrouse and Kayla Tatum were advertently reversed. Tatum’s column focused primarily on the leading women contenders while PerezCrouse concentrated mostly on the men. Tatum played varsity tennis for her Grant High School team while Perez-Crouse was the number one player on The Dalles-Wahtonka varsity. The columns were accurately presented on The Advocate website. The Advocate regrets the error and any confusion.


12 Sports

May 10, 2013

Photos by Jonathon Long/The Advocate

Baseball takes two wins over SWOCC over the weekend

Sophomore Cody Childs sends the ball flying back to homebase at the Saints’ doubleheader against Southwest Oregon. MHCC won both games with a score of 3-1.

Shaun Lutz The Advocate

The Saints baseball team continued its winning ways this past week as the final part of their season approaches. Over the weekend, they swept a home doubleheader against Southwest Oregon. In game one, freshman Zane Bambusch started for MHCC and threw seven strong innings, allowing only one run while striking out five Laker hitters. The bullpen combination of freshman Joe Piercey and sophomore Zev Egli allowed only one hit between the two pitchers. Egli recorded the save. The Saints offense scored in the first, third and fourth innings, highlighted by three hits from sophomore outfielder Hunter Weiss. Sophomores Jake Thran and Ryan Degner each drove in a run, as well as freshman designated hitter Dakota Farmer during the 3-1 victory. In the second game, freshman Clint Burris started for MHCC, threw four innings and was touched up for eight hits and one run. The Saints trailed 1-0 after three innings, but eventually brought their offense around. Runs in the fourth, fifth and sixth innings gave MHCC the lead. Despite only having five hits to SWOCC’s 11, the Saints edged out another 3-1 victory. Sophomore Brandon Williams earned the win in his two innings of relief, and Egli closed the game to gain his NWAACC-leading fifth save of the season. In a Tuesday doubleheader which head coach Bryan Donohue called “fun to watch,” the Saints took care of business by taking two games from fourth-place Chemeketa. “We piled on a lot of hits on the road against a team we’ve battled with in previous years,” said Donohue, who’s squad compiled 24 hits during the sweep over the Storm.

Seven position players recorded at least one hit, and sophomore designated hitter Ian Erickson had three hits including a double during Hood’s 6-4 win in game one. Degner hit his third home run of the season during the win. The Saints found themselves behind 2-1 after four innings during the back half of the doubleheader, but a five-run fifth gave them a lead they would not relinguish. An insurance run in the top of the seventh put the game away, with the final score being 7-4. “One thing that’s shown up every day is our pitching. That and our defense,” said Donohue when asked which part of his team has been the most consistent. The stats back up his statement, as his pitching staff is seventh in opponents batting average, as well as boasting the best team ERA in the NWAACC. Four of the team’s remaining six games are against the second- and third-place teams in the South — LinnBenton and Lane — but that doesn’t seem to threaten MHCC. “We don’t care who we play; we just want to secure the south,” Donohue said. “Right now I feel that we’re at our best, offensively, that we’ve been all year,” he added, which is important with the NWAACC tournament right around the corner. According to the NWAACC website, as of Thursday, MHCC was first in the Southern Region with a 19-5 record. Linn-Benton (16-8) was three games back and Lane (15-9) was four behind. With three games being the “magic number” for the Saints to clinch a division title, they travel to Lane for a 1 p.m. doubleheader Saturday as their quest to win the South continues. On Tuesday, the Saints will square off against Clackamas in a 1 p.m. doubleheader in Oregon City. On Thursday, Linn-Benton will come to Gresham to play the Saints in a doubleheader to end the regular season. Game one is slated for 1 p.m.

“We don’t care who we play; we just want to secure the south. Right now I feel that we’re at our best offensively, that we’ve been all year.” baseball coach Bryan Donohue

The Advocate, Issue 27, May 10, 2013  

The Advocate, the student voice of Mt Hood Community College for over 47 years.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you