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HOT 100 WINES 2016/2017 AN ADELAIDE REVIEW PUBLICATION


OUR GOAL IS SIMPLE. TO FIND AND CELEBRATE THE MOST DRINKABLE WINES IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA.

WINE CLASSES –––––––– This year, each wine class is represented by a unique pattern that reflects each category.

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HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

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HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

Project Manager Tamrah Petruzzelli Editor  David Knight 

26 –––––––––––––––– .

Art Director  Sabas Renteria 

Judging without dread: 10 years of the Hot 100

Graphic Designer Kirby Manning Digital Manager  Jess Bayly  Advertising Michelle Pavelic, Emma Goetjens, Lisa Norling

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Hot 10 Wines

Contributors Tony Adey, Paul Baker, James Blackburn, Nathan James Crane, John Dexter, Charles Gent, Nick Ryan, Candice Keller, Duncan Welgemoed Submissions Coordinator Maria Underwood  Marketing Assistant /Acting Head Steward Lisa Ranson Photographer  Jonathan VDK  Videographer Kane Overall Interns  Alexandra Carubia Joanna Chapman Chief Judge Banjo Harris Plane Hot 100 Judges  Aidan Raftery, Brendan Carter, Brooke Adey, Charlie Seppelt, Charlotte Hardy, David Moyle, Duncan Welgemoed, Greg Lane, Kavita Faiella, Mark Protheroe, Meira Harel, Michael Downer, Nick Ryan, Pablo Theodoros, Peter Dredge, Stephen Pannell, Toby Barlow, Valerie Henbest.

Wine Categories 40 –––––– 43.

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Hot 100 Wines 2016/17.

CON TENTS

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Cover story 60 –––––––––––––––– .

Over the fence: chefs in their garden 78 –––––––––––––––– .

Paul Baker’s Hot 100 recipe

44 –––––– 47.

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Doing things differently

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Global Intertrade / Opinion Media Managing Director  Manuel Ortigosa 

Music ambassadors

Publisher The Adelaide Review. Level 8, 33 Franklin Street. Adelaide, SA, 5000.   Ph: 08 7129 1060

(White wines with opulence)

56 –––––– 57.

(Balanced wines with intentional residual sugar)

70 –––––– 73.

(Rosé)

76 –––––– 77.

(Fortified wines and Vermouths)

80 –––––– 83. (Young release style/joven/nouveau with texture)

88 –––––– 93.

(Structural and savoury)

96 –––––– 99.

Stewarding Coordinator Lachlan Harris

(White wines that are all about texture)

52 –––––– 55.

Stewards Mark Reginato, James Hopkins, Jonathan Brook, Soeun Yang (Belle), Salina Fok, Lillian Nanta, Qin Yan, ZongXian Liao, Mae Ni Kong, Shawna Dominelli 

(Aromatic light to medium bodied)

(Power and presence)

108 –––––– 111.

(Fruit forward with finesse)

112 –––––– 114

(Rule breakers)

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

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Printing  Graphic Print COVER ART: DAMIEN COULTHARD ––––––– Mai Wapantyutu

ADELAIDEREVIEW.COM.AU

#HOT100WINES

Hottest Wine Label

Disclaimer: Opinions published in this magazine are not necessarily those of the editor or the publisher. No responsibility is taken for the content, illustration or advertisements.All material subject to copyright.


HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

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WELCOME

Celebrating 10 years: welcome to the 2016/17 Hot 100 Wines By Manuel Ortigosa –––––––

The progressive reputation of the Hot 100 Wines has escaped our state’s borders to be one of Australia’s most respected and relevant wine competitions over the last 10 years. Our search for drinkable wines highlights different varieties and styles, championing diversity, quality and varietal blends that are produced throughout our wine regions. This season was a record breaker with more than 1300 entries from 300 wineries. We, at Opinion Media, are obviously incredibly proud of what has been achieved over the last 10 years, however, the real champions behind this journey are those in the South Australian wine industry. To be able to showcase and promote all that is diverse about South Australia’s wine is a privilege and we thank the industry for embracing and supporting us. The reputation of the Hot 100 was further enhanced this year thanks to a masterclass held as part of the South Australian Government’s trade delegation in Singapore. This event successfully promoted, not only the Hot 100 format and philosophy, but the diversity of our wine industry in a sophisticated market, further enhancing the reputation of our winemakers and local wine. Initiatives of this nature will take the Hot 100 to other destinations in the future, making the Hot 100 unique and differentiating us from other competitions. This year sees Banjo Harris Plane complete his three year term as Head Judge and we would like to acknowledge his contribution and professionalism. Thank you Banjo. Furthermore, Trevor Maskell steps down

after a seven year involvement. Trevor has been an integral part of this competition and we thank him for his tremendous input and contribution. The Hot 100 sponsors are critical to the success of this competition and publication. Thank you to Singapore Airlines, Renewal SA & Adelaide Riverbank, University of Adelaide, Brand SA, PwC, Bendigo Bank, Majestic Hotels, TAFE SA, JamFactory, UBER, Mismatch & Adelaide Hills Cider/Distillery, The Apothecary, Negociants, Aqua Sano & Cape Grim, Music SA, Visualcom, Tandanya and Botanic Gardens Restaurant. We appreciate your support and thank you for being part of the event and publication.

SETTING THE STANDARD, YET AGAIN.

Opinion Media has taken a strong position in promoting food and wine not only in South Australia but nationally and now internationally. This is a position that we are very proud of and, in saying that, I recognise the effort and the passion that the team at The Adelaide Review continuously demonstrate toward this project. This team of professionals do a remarkable job in both co-ordinating the event and producing the publication. To this incredible team, thank you for your passion, commitment and professionalism. You have been doing this for 10 years and have maintained a standard that we are all very proud of. Here’s to another 10 years of evolving the Hot 100 competition and publication into a stronger national and international position.

MANUEL ORTIGOSA––– Managing Director, Opinion Media

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HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

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It is with happy hearts that we celebrate 10 years of Hot 100 Wines this season.

Over that 10-year journey the wine show and publication has proved to be a zeitgeist-capturing annual event as it discovers the best drops to drink straight away, also known as drinkability. But the Hot 100 is more than just a wine show. It celebrates South Australia’s cultural terroir: championing the food identities, artists and designers who make this state a unique hotbed of art and gastronomy.

This season, the Hot 100 will embark on its most ambitious event to date: the Hot 100 Harvest, a two-day public spectacle where the wine regions will journey to the CBD for a celebration of South Australia’s finest food, wine and music. In this year’s magazine we introduce a new element: label design, as some of this state’s leading designers and identities pick the best wine label of this season. This is a competition that will expand in the coming years. The Hottest Wine Label joins the Howard Twelftree Award, which we introduced to the Hot 100 last year, which celebrates a local identity who has improved this state’s gastronomic scene and honours

The Adelaide Review’s long-time food reviewer Howard Twelftree (aka John McGrath). This year marks Banjo Harris Plane’s last year as Chief Judge after three years at the helm. The South Australian born and raised sommelier, restaurant manager and, now, bar owner, raised the Hot 100’s national presence and evolved the wine show to reach new heights. Next year sees a new Chief Judge who will be revealed soon. What a decade.

DAVID KNIGHT––– Editor

Please Call 08_8118_6222

Personally, watching the evolution of the Hot 100 over this past decade has been a complete joy. Each year sees the Hot 100 increase its scope and reach with more entries, more local cultural experiences for the wine judges to enjoy during the four days of tastings, more corresponding events that surround the wine show throughout the year and a larger magazine that records the

results and tells the stories of South Australia’s gastronomy and culture.

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JUDGING WITHOUT DREAD:

10 YEARS OF THE HOT 100

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2007

2008

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2009

By Charles Gent –––––––

It was a necessary task, and the system deserves every credit for its tireless role. The judges’ identification of well-made wines and best winemaking practice was essential in developing a viable commercial industry and in establishing Australia’s international reputation for reliable quality. The show system was also instrumental in our emergence from the misnomers and muddled models that had grown up around fanciful imitations of French wine styles; a new system of classes imposed grape varieties as a more useful yardstick. Given that the need for a technological policeman has dwindled – the incidence of faulty wines submitted to shows is less than one per cent – the major wine shows now play other roles, notably a marketing element through the promotion of winning

wines to the public. Another role – albeit a much more hotly debated one – has been to promote certain styles of winemaking over others. It was the show circuit’s effective endorsement of particular wine styles that produced a pointed observation from winemaker, sommelier and Hot 100 lead judge James Erskine in 2010 when he said that “too many wine shows reward over-extracted blockbuster reds and over-fined undertextured whites”. Erskine and the Hot 100 team went on to hatch a radical plan. To aid in the quest for South Australia’s most drinkable wines, the competition broadened its perspective by expanding the ranks of its judges to include restaurateurs, retailers and others whose knowledge was not technically based; and in 2011, even more heretically, the Hot 100 introduced a set of classes for entries that employed stylistic resemblance rather than grape variety. The idea was to group wines in terms of similarity in weight and style, rather than on the wildly variable basis of constituent grape. So, crisp Pinot Grigios would be

judged against young Sauvignon Blancs, unoaked Chardonnays or juvenile Rieslings, while a barrel-aged Chardonnay would find its rivals in a rich Pinot Gris, Viognier, or venerable Riesling; heavy-bodied reds matured in oak would line up against each other, be they made from Shiraz, Cabernet-Sauvignon or Saperavi, while a class for fresh, fruit-driven reds might draw entries from wines made of Pinot Noir, Tempranillo or Grenache. The winning wine, and the rest of the top 10, could come from any of the category winners. Another conscious decision was not to treat the edicts of science and hygiene as too binding – the show is not an exercise in fault-finding. As current co-ordinating judge Banjo Harris Plane says: “technical perfection is not the be-all and end-all.” Wine journalist and presenter Mike Bennie, who has judged on both sides of the fence, is an evangelical convert to the Hot 100 concept, and is a big fan of the show’s unique inclusion of culinary and cultural elements around the judging process. “Real consumers who are drinking wine don’t taste wine in silence in lab coats, or

assess in small groups pulling apart faults in wines; they drink in social situations, with food, music, atmosphere and easy appreciation,” he says.

2010

2011

2012

“Judges should be open to different styles and be able to see the high quality that can be achieved while making quite different styles of wine from the same grape variety,” he says.

Bennie also says that the Hot 100 classifications provide a way of “mainlining” information to consumers: “it is such a better and more simple way of helping the general public appreciate the results of wine shows”.

The success of the strategy has been self-evident, with entries growing annually and the show’s increasing use in promoting South Australian wines

Master of Wine David Le Mire, who over the past 10 years has judged at the Royal Adelaide, Royal Sydney and the National Wine Show in Canberra as well as at local regional shows, says that a more pluralistic attitude is making its way into the major wine shows. He says that while the show system still retains its role in “improving the breed” by providing benchmarks and feedback for winemakers, many judges – himself included – are striving to be less prescriptive.

“The Hot 100 brings about a different mindset and more real life approach to judging.”

“Any wine assessment is subjective, but drinkability removes some of the arcane, technical pulling apart of wines that dog wine shows in most of their current guises. Drinkability takes into account excellence, but also an inherent purpose for the wine. It shifts judges’ perspectives from fault-finding first to visceral pleasure as the defining ‘best’ of a wine.”

internationally. Winemaker Steve Pannell, the Hot 100’s very first winner who this year closed the circuit by joining the judging panel, put it like this: “the Australian wine scene is fluid and dynamic – this is the gutsy and controversial sort of show it deserves.” And it seems the ripples are spreading.

Right from the early days of Hot 100 Wines, the competition was not like other wine shows, and nor were its judges. English wine writer Andrew Jefford, who chaired the 2009 five-strong judging panel, was happy to admit that the final criterion in assessing the year’s 700 entries was “pleasure”.

Pleasure is a word not much bandied about in the history of Australian wine shows. While the first wine shows to rank Australian wines date well back into the 19th century, the current national show system developed in the decades following the Second World War with an emphasis that was strongly technical, dedicated to weeding out faulty or badly made wines.

HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

2013

2014

2015

Le Mire, who works at Adelaide Hills winery Shaw + Smith and is a partner in Tempranillo specialist La Linea, says that the Hot 100’s less rigid attitude to faults in wines is also percolating into the thinking of major shows. “If there’s a little bit of Brettanomyces or a hint of reduction that doesn’t impact on the wine, then I think those faults can be tolerated in the major wine shows as well as in something like the Hot 100. What you don’t want to tolerate is something that takes away from the wine’s deliciousness.” He’ll get no argument there.


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We present South Australia’s 10 most drinkable wines, as chosen by our Hot 100 judging panel.

HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

One.

–––– Hot10 ––––

HOT 10 WINES

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2015 NOVO SANGIOVESE CLARE VALLEY

A beautifully composed and seductive wine that revels in the beauty of youth. Slightly closed nose to begin but opens up with a hint of smoke and fresh red berries. Nicely pitched, everything in balance here. Red cherry, strawberry and fine green herbs jostle for attention. Some mid-palate grip and a sour-fruit tang to finish keep things moving along nicely. Simple and yet utterly drinkable. Moreish in the best possible way. A fine reminder that simplicity and vitality go a long way towards satisfaction. TEXTURE ––– –––

OUNG RE LE ––– Y ––––

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2015 EDEN VALLEY RIESLING

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CLARE VALLEY

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A ridiculously complex and fragrant nose – lots of tropical fruit, sunshine, ginger, mango and white pepper. A whole basket of fruits, drenched in light summer honey. Spotlessly clean and filled with joy, this also manages to stay light on its feet and succulent despite the sugar. Excellent.

Purity a watchword here – a beautiful nose filled with pure citrus fruit aromas, backed up by wax and rainwater. Bright and salty, finishing with chalky minerality. Good acidity and length with excellent tension all the way through the palate. Refreshing.

A classic style with excellent purity, this displays layered complexity of fruit on the nose, with added notes of honey and hay. Lots of lemon verbena and mandarin peel flavour. It picks up some developed characters, so drink up to enjoy its full texture and lovely balance. Delicious.

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BURGE FAMILY WINEMAKERS

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BIRD IN HAND

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An incredible wine. A heady mixture of iris, violet and apricot dominate the nose, with sour plums and raspberries. Clearly a wine composed of more than just fruit however – forest floor and herbs, a spine of earthen spice; charcuterie, bacon and lemongrass. Recalls great wines from the Northern Rhone Valley. Along with its prettiness, an iron core of sexy svelte tannin runs through this wine. Brilliant.

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A deliciously appealing young wine. Entices from the get-go with beautiful colour, heady fragrance and graceful momentum across the palate.

Super pale with a floral nose and nice minerality. A fabulously easy drinking wine with just enough flesh on the bone to complement food. But as a standalone, drink on and on and on.

Beautifully fragrant, layered and detailed. Dried herbs, earth, leather, blackberry and red fruits. Packs a lot in without bulging at the seams. Medium to full bodied with savoury notes built around structure and complexity. Finishes with fresh acidity and chalky tannin.

It’s a rare wine that manages to strike a balance between lightness of touch with savouriness and structure. This is such a wine. Light, bright and lively without overt sweetness, it features a lovely Campari-like bitter edge.

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APTOS CRUZ GALLERIES STIRLING

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147 Mt Barker Road Stirling SA 5152 | P: 8370 9011 E: info@aptoscruz.com | www.aptoscruz.com.au

AROMAT IC –––– –––

FH429 | Signature Chair by Carl Hansen & Son

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GHT TO ME LI D

Quite an exotic nose, with a definite rainwater character, that is made complex by some classic lime backed up by delicate passionfruit notes. Built in a classic style; round but with good acidity and a mouth-watering finish.

wine by ochota barrels and friends wood oven pizza tinnies & spirituals woodovenwinebar

lostin_aforest

1203 Greenhill Rd | Uraidla 08 8390 3444 | table@lostinaforest.com.au lostinaforest.com.au

HOT 100 WINES 2016/17


HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

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#HOT100WINES

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2016 HOT 100 JUDGES

Judges from left to right: Duncan Welgemoed, Banjo Harris Plane, Valerie Henbest, Mark Protheroe, Charlotte Hardy, Kavita Faiella, Nick Ryan, Toby Barlow, Meira Harel, Brendan Carter,

Peter Dredge, Brooke Adey, Michael Downer, Pablo Theodoros, Aidan Raftery, Charlie Seppelt, David Moyle, Stephen Pannell and Greg Lane.

HOT 100 WINES 2016/17


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HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

Judges

BANJO HARRIS PLANE OWNER, BAR LIBERTY AND REAL WINES (VIC)

Banjo Harris Plane grew up surrounded by vinous influences, from the vineyards of Coonawarra where he lived as a child, to the cellar of his parents’ restaurant in Adelaide. After spending time in London and at some of Sydney’s leading restaurants, he moved to Melbourne to manage internationally-acclaimed restaurant Attica for five years. Recently, he left this role to open his own wine bar – Bar Liberty – and focus on his wine import and distribution business, REAL Wines.

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HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

AIDAN RAFTERY

BRENDAN CARTER

BROOKE ADEY

CHARLIE SEPPELT

CHARLOTTE HARDY

DUNCAN WELGEMOED

GREG LANE

KAVITA FAIELLA

OWNER, PERSILLADE (VIC)

OWNER, UNICO ZELO AND APPLEWOOD DISTILLERY (SA)

RESTAURANT MANAGER, YELLOW (NSW)

WINEMAKER, HICKINBOTHAM (SA)

WINEMAKER, CHARLOTTE DALTON WINES (SA)

OWNER AND EXECUTIVE CHEF, AFRICOLA (SA)

WINEMAKER, SHAW + SMITH (SA)

OWNER, VOYAGEUR SELECTIONS (NSW)

After running restaurants and wine lists from London to New Zealand to Australia for 17 years, Aidan Raftery opened his first venture, Persillade, in 2013. A cave à manger situated in East Melbourne, the wines at Persillade champion Australia’s recent creative boom in the wine industry along with a smattering of inspirations from around the world. It was this creativity that inspired Raftery’s garagiste winemaking project, Vin du Patron, which had its inaugural vintage in 2013.

Brendan Carter is the chief thinker behind Applewood Distillery, Unico Zelo Winery, Harvest Co-Operative, NØMAD Perfumery and the Gumeracha Cold Stores. He has worked in some of the great creative wineries across France, Italy and Australia before finding a comfortable spot in the Adelaide Hills. Carter is currently searching for unique Australian stories to tell the rest of the world through the mediums of food and beverage with an eye on ultimate sustainability.

Brooke Adey began her journey into hospitality a decade ago, spending almost eight years at Adelaide’s Chianti. She moved to Sydney in 2014 to work as a waiter and sommelier at Bentley Restaurant & Bar after finishing runner-up in the Electrolux Appetite for Excellence Young Waiter of the Year, a title she later claimed in 2015. Since then, Adey has taken on the role of Restaurant Manager at Yellow in Potts Point and is currently undertaking her WSET Diploma.

Wine was all around Charlie Seppelt growing up, as a school student he was shipped off to his uncle Karl’s vineyard where he learnt the cold love of a crowbar and shovel. d’Arenberg was his first vintage and the hands-on experience meant he was hooked. Seppelt is now the winemaker for Hickinbotham Clarendon Vineyard in McLaren Vale, where he has just completed his 26th vintage.

Born in New Zealand, Charlotte Hardy finished her Bachelor of Wine Science through Charles Sturt University in 2003 and set upon the task of wandering around the world making and learning about wine in cool places, before landing in the Adelaide Hills in 2007 to undertake a winemaking job in Hahndorf. Seeing a need for the folk of the Adelaide Hills to have access to local wine analysis, she set up a mobile laboratory business, Wine Lab, in 2008. Hardy went back to work winemaking and fermented the first grapes for Charlotte Dalton Wines in March 2015.

Duncan Welgemoed’s identity as a chef was built on a South African home life defined by passion and eclecticism. He sharpened his knife as a chef in the UK under Executive Chef Michael North at The Goose at Britwell Salome, who was awarded a Michelin star during Welgemoed’s time as Head Chef there. This was followed by a move to the notoriously cut-throat Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons where Welgemoed thrived. Welgemoed’s insatiable curiosity eventually led him Adelaide. Here, the critically acclaimed Bistro Dom was born with Welgemoed as Executive Chef. Welgemoed went solo to open the award-winning Africola in November 2014.

Greg Lane grew up in a wine loving family in Adelaide but it wasn’t until a visit to meet Tony and Lita Brady, the passionate custodians of Wendouree in the Clare Valley, while at school that the idea of a career in winemaking firmed in his mind. After completing the Oenology degree at the University of Adelaide, Lane took off to do vintages in the Clare Valley, McLaren Vale, Hunter Valley, New Zealand, Tuscany, Oregon and Burgundy. In 2013, Lane took a role as assistant winemaker at Shaw + Smith, where he is involved in creating quality cool climate wines from the Adelaide Hills and Tasmania (Tolpuddle Vineyard).

After working with a number of Australia’s most celebrated chefs, including Stefano Manfredi and Neil Perry, Kavita Faiella set her sights on Asia. Firstly, in the Maldives, as head sommelier of the luxurious Conrad property and then as the regional cellar master for Aman Resorts, where she developed the wine programs for some of the world’s most revered properties in Asia. In 2010, she became the wine director of the Press Room Group and Faiella’s work saw her named as one of the 10 most influential wine personalities in India by CNN. After 10 years abroad, Faiella is happy to once again call Sydney home, having recently launched her own consultancy company, Voyageur Selections.

MARK PROTHEROE

MEIRA HAREL

MICHAEL DOWNER

NICK RYAN

PETER DREDGE

STEPHEN PANNELL

PABLO THEODOROS

VALERIE HENBEST

TOBY BARLOW

DAVID MOYLE

CONSULTANT SOMMELIER, MARK PROTHEROE BEVERAGE SERVICES (VIC)

RESTAURANT MANAGER, THE TOWN MOUSE (VIC)

WINEMAKER, MURDOCH HILL (SA)

WINE WRITER (SA)

OWNER AND WINEMAKER, DR EDGE (TAS)

OWNER AND WINEMAKER, S.C. PANNELL (SA)

PUBLICAN, STANLEY BRIDGE TAVERN (SA)

OWNER, SMELLY CHEESE AND SAY CHEESE (SA)

SENIOR WINEMAKER AND WINERIES DIRECTOR, ST HALLETT WINES (SA)

CO-OWNER AND HEAD CHEF, THE FRANKLIN (TAS)

Meria Harel started working in hospitality 10 years ago in an Italian restaurant called Bellini in Tel Aviv, Israel. After rising to become restaurant manager and sommelier, Harel moved to Melbourne in 2012 to learn more about food and wine. In that time she has worked at some of Victoria’s finest restaurants: Brooks, Grossi Florentino and The Lake House. Harel is now restaurant manager and head sommelier at The Town Mouse and was named The Age's Good Food Guide Sommelier of the Year for 2016.

Growing up on his Adelaide Hills family farm with vines, cattle and sheep, Michael Downer’s passion for farming lead to a degree in winemaking. After graduating, Downer honed his skills at Shaw + Smith before embarking on a globe-trotting adventure: touring the great wine regions of the world with harvest experience at Vietti in Barolo, Italy. Downer increased his knowledge of cool climate winemaking by working at Best’s Great Western and then later in the Adelaide Hills at Revenir winery with Peter Leske and Taras Ochota. In 2012, Downer returned to the family winery to create his own wine style from unique vineyards in the Adelaide Hills.

Adelaide boy and career winemaker Peter Dredge graduated from the University of Adelaide in 2002 but started in the wine industry five years earlier. He has held the position of senior winemaker at Petaluma and is a former chief winemaker at Bay of Fires. Dredge currently owns and operates Dr Edge Winemaking and is a partner in Tasmania’s Meadowbank Wines and Project Brian Wines.

Stephen Pannell has been named one of the 50 most influential contributors to the world of wine by Decanter Magazine and voted by his peers as one of the top 10 winemakers in Australia (The Age’s Good Food). Establishing his own label, S.C. Pannell Wines in 2004, Pannell and wife Fiona recently opened their long awaited cellar door in the heart of McLaren Vale. Pannell’s most prestigious highlight is winning the 2014 Jimmy Watson Memorial Trophy at the Royal Melbourne Wine Show for his 2013 Adelaide Hills Syrah, along with the Trevor Mast award and two gold medals. Pannell’s most recent achievement is being named Gourmet Traveller WINE 2015 Australian Winemaker of the Year.

After more than 10 years of working in fine wine retail, Pablo Theodoros left for a venture in the Adelaide Hills, as the publican of the Stanley Bridge Tavern.  Also a co-owner of Mother Vine Wine Bar in Adelaide, being involved in both businesses gives Theodoros a chance to sample wines from all over the world.  

Born and bred in Normandie, the home of Camembert, Henbest came to Australia 20 years ago. Henbest started to select a range of her favourite products and imported them to Australia. It became apparent that there was more to it than French cheese and on following trips she was sourcing new treasures from neighbouring countries such as Spain, Italy, England, Ireland and Switzerland, as well as the USA, which are all now part of her annual pilgrimage.

Toby Barlow grew up in the burbs of Sydney with nothing more than his dad’s clay pipe cellar as a wine reference; which he sampled regularly. A healthy dose of travel wanderlust after school and an arts degree in philosophy lead to a penniless exit from Sydney to set up a vineyard in Victoria. The vineyard experience fired an interest and subsequently Barlow returned to study winemaking at Adelaide University. Barlow has worked across cool climate regions of New Zealand and Oregon to continental northern Rhone Valley and Central Victoria to the warmth of the Hunter Valley and the Barossa; where he currently works at St Hallett Wines crafting modern expressions of this classic Australian wine region.

After stints at Melbourne’s Circa and Byron Bay’s Pacific Dining Room, David Moyle moved to Tasmania to work at The Stackings before taking the reins at The Franklin and turning it into one of the country’s most acclaimed restaurants. Moyle has just set up the Thai-influenced bar and grill Longrain in Melbourne to accompany his Hobart destination.

Protheroe joined Grossi Restaurants in May 2010 and headed up the beverage operations for all venues. Shortly after starting with Grossi Restaurants he won Negociants’ Working with Wine Fellowship. In 2012, he was the runner up in the Sommeliers Australia Best Sommelier of Australia competition. In 2014, Protheroe was awarded Sommelier of the year by The Age’s Good Food Guide. He is currently an active wine show judge, sits on the national executive for Sommeliers Australia, is studying for his Master Sommelier qualification and also acts as a mentor for some of Australia’s up and coming sommeliers.

Thrown out of university in Adelaide and moving to Sydney, Nick Ryan used the knowledge he’d gained raiding his old man’s cellar to land a job with one of Sydney’s leading wine merchants. Realising that writing about it was easier than lifting it has led him to where he is now. He’s a columnist for Gourmet Traveller WINE magazine, a widely experienced wine show judge and in-demand commentator and presenter. He is adamant that wines should be just as interesting by the fourth glass as they are at the first and would give it all up to play one game for the Port Adelaide Football Club.


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41.

ANDERSON HILL

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KIRRIHILL 2016 REGIONAL SELECTION

2016 THE CHUCKLING

RIESLING

SAUVIGNON BLANC

CLARE VALLEY

ADELAIDE HILLS

Beautiful guava and lime aromatics with a wonderful long and zesty palate.

A lovely talc floral lift is strengthened with a pure palate of pristine fruit.

–––– Whites ––––

A R O M AT I C LIGHT TO MEDIUM BODIED These wines are clean, crisp and free from obvious signs of artifact from winemaking techniques such as lees stirring, oak and controlled oxidation.

LONGVIEW VINEYARD

PENNA LANE

2016 QUEENIE

2015 SKILLY VALLEY

PINOT GRIGIO

RIESLING

ADELAIDE HILLS

CLARE VALLEY

Fragrant lemon, honeysuckle and fresh limes are intensely aromatic and pure. Nice drive of fruits with a great linear check of tannin. Lovely.

This mouth-watering classic style has quite an exotic nose with rainwater freshness. Round yet acidy.

HOT 100 WINES 2016/17


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HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

MARKO’S VINEYARD

#HOT100WINES

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Z WINE 2016 SAUL

43.

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BIRD IN HAND

HENTLEY FARM

MAJELLA WINES

2015 CHARDONNAY

RIESLING

2016 GRÜNER VELTLINER

2016

2016 RIESLING

ADELAIDE HILLS

EDEN VALLEY

ADELAIDE HILLS

BRASS MONKEY VINEYARDS

COONAWARRA

HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

PINOT GRIGIO

Ripe with tropical aromas. Nice flavoursome palate with ample flavour and pleasant acid balance.

EDEN HALL WINES

Beautifully composed, balanced and assured. Enticing aromatic lift. Lovely tension between sugar and acid.

ELDERSLIE 2016

Ripe tropical aromatics with good length and rigid palate. Zippy and nice.

HEIRLOOM VINEYARDS

2016 RIESLING

HILLS BLEND #1

2016 PINOT GRIGIO

EDEN VALLEY

ADELAIDE HILLS

ADELAIDE HILLS

ADELAIDE HILLS

Lovely saline freshness. Taut and tangy. A delicious style.

A nice mix of funk and fruit. Flawless start with an equally as pleasant finish; lengthy in flavour. Well played.

O’LEARY WALKER WINES 2016 THE LUCKY PUNTER

RIESLINGFREAK

E S TAT E

G R O W N

F A M I LY

O W N E D

Exceptional cool climate wines from the Eden Valley, Barossa.

2016 NO. 4 RIESLING EDEN VALLEY

SAUVIGNON BLANC

A great wholesome wine of lovely grace, flow and lemon curd, citrus pie and thyme aromatics.

Great flinty palate with nice autolytic drive that is fleshy and progressive. A lot to like.

Fresh and clean stone fruit blossoms. Lovely savoury drive; quite insular but there is intensity in the distance.

ADELAIDE HILLS

A fantastic wine of salt and zip.

Great fresh florals, pure flint and muddled limes. So much flesh and juiciness; bright and so invoking.

www.edenhall.com.au


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HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

NEPENTHE

NEPENTHE

KNAPPSTEIN

2015 WINEMAKER’S SELECTION

2015 WINEMAKER’S SELECTION

VIOGNIER

ARNEIS

2014 INSIDER

ADELAIDE HILLS

ADELAIDE HILLS

RIESLING

Sweet rose hip with thyme, orange marmalade and ginger spice. A pineapple drive of acidity cleanses the finish brightly.

A super quirky drop that is light and textured.

CLARE VALLEY

–––– Whites ––––

WHITE WINES T H AT A R E ALL ABOUT TEXTURE Textured wine provokes unexpected marriages of food and wine. Texture is usually derived from grape tannins, called phenolics in white wine.

Savoury and slatey on the nose with a lovely middle retaining some of its original and stunning fruit that fades and flirts with you for a long time after you’ve finished the glass.


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LA PROVA

PEWSEY VALE

2016 FIANO

2011

ADELAIDE HILLS

THE CONTOURS

47.

EDEN VALLEY

A classic. Lemon and lime with marmalade. Nice mouthfeel; clean and complex on the palate. Shows tons of freshness and a good acid line.

CRFT WINES

DEVIATION ROAD

2016 GRÜNER VELTLINER

2016 GRÜNER VELTLINER

ADELAIDE HILLS

ADELAIDE HILLS

Nice kaffir lime and spice with juicy acid and good length.

Great crunch and tension, energy and drive.

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HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

just leave it to the experts

RIESLING

An aromatic delight with beautiful light texture.

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HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

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#HOT100WINES

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HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

Cover

RESPECT FOR COUNTRY To celebrate a decade of Hot 100 Wines, Warndu’s Damien Coulthard painted an exclusive piece for the wine show and publication. By David Knight –––––––

Coulthard is one-half of Warndu with his partner Rebecca Sullivan. Together the pair champion native ingredients with their range of brews and oils. They also hold pop-up events that utilise native ingredients in intriguing ways, such as Brew and Broth where the couple served ‘native pho’ using kangaroo and emu broth with Indigenous greens. Coulthard’s painting, called Mai Wapantyutu, which means ‘fruit for the picking’ in the Adnyamathanha language, is a “story of country and a place of creation in relation to the making of wine”. “It represents the actual wine regions of South Australia, the valleys and hills, the soils and sky,” Coulthard says. “It’s not traditional to paint about wine in my culture but I drink wine and love it. I am trying to paint modern pieces reflective of my life while using some aspects of traditional Indigenous art.” With the piece, Coulthard wants viewers to ponder about the importance of country. DAMIEN COULTHARD –––––––– Mai Wapantyutu

“I want people to think about the way we tell stories in my culture and the importance of creation stories,” he says. “Even though this isn’t a traditional piece, it’s still a story of place. Place is central to everything in my culture. This stems from our love of the land and our belief in protecting our country. Respect for country is an important part of our values and beliefs.” Coulthard, who teaches at Le Fevre High and is on the South Australian Native Title board, only started painting this year and has already been commissioned for a piece from a French couple. “Rebecca had bought a piece of Aboriginal art before we met and she wanted to hang it in our home,” he says of how his journey into art began. “I didn’t like it and joking around said I could do better and she said: ‘go on then’. That’s how it started. Now I can’t stop. I have always had an interest in art since I was young. I just never pursued it until now.”

Sullivan and Coulthard started Warndu, which primarily sells native brews and oils, in early 2016. Sullivan, who also runs Dirty Girl Kitchen, says they will expand to skincare and wellbeing products soon. They decided to start Warndu after Coulthard’s grandfather died and realised that the knowledge, culture and skill of Coulthard’s family could one day be lost. “We thought: ‘how can we do something that represents what we care about, protects a bit of the culture and tradition in a respectful way and champions Australian native ingredients’,” Sullivan says. “That’s where the conversations started and then we thought, ‘well, we might as well do something in food considering that’s my area of expertise’."

of our brews yet, as we’re only trying to work with Australian ingredients. We didn’t want to limit ourselves to that, so we decided to make it more of a wellbeing brand because we realised that all of these ingredients are functional, and they would potentially make good skincare supplements. So, from a business perspective, we are trying to think of more than just food.” One of Warndu’s objectives is linked to being a social enterprise, so they’ve partnered with Why Warriors and Hope for Health, as well as City Reach.

They decided to initially concentrate on brews.

“We’ll be launching, not necessarily a soup kitchen, but we’re going to collaborate with a church group, called City Reach in Bowden where we’ll be supplying our broth as soup for homeless people in our neighbourhood, Bowden.”

“Originally, we were just going to start a tea brand, or a brew brand, we call it brew because we don’t have any caffeine in any

WARNDU.COM–––


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South Australia’s best Wine Regions 51.

McL AREN VALE

ADEL AIDE HILLS

HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

BAROSSA

A CERTAIN SOMETHING 2016 marked the 10th anniversary of Hot 100 Wines. A remarkable achievement for a remarkable show, which continues to evolve and challenge the status quo in regards to the place that wine shows occupy in the Australian vinous landscape. By Banjo Harris Plane –––––––

A fitting way to mark this anniversary was with our biggest show ever, as more South Australian wineries enter their wines every year, and the diversity continues to amaze. Each year, new wineries emerge and existing ones diversify with new styles and different varieties. Every South Australian region is represented; from Kangaroo Island to the Riverland; from Mount Remarkable to Mount Gambier. It’s thrilling to see so many passionate and committed vignerons and grape growers contributing to Australia’s leading wine state. The show brought together leading sommeliers, journalists and winemakers from across Australia, with the welcome inclusion, as usual, of some excellent palates from outside the wine industry. This diversity of experience

helped generate some lively discussion throughout the judging process and the final decision was incredibly close. Our mandate to discover the most drinkable wine in South Australia each year is an enjoyable one, but one that generates much debate. Often, wine shows seek out technically correct wines that either lack a certain something or perhaps have been excessively artificially influenced in the winemaking process, or simply are not ready to drink. We aim to discover the South Australian wine that is not only well made, but is ready to drink now. We’ve also made steps in recent years to be more transparent with our feedback to the wineries that enter the show. Every wine that is entered receives a tasting note and feedback

from the judges, in the interest of improving the quality of wine across the state. This feedback is from what I term ‘professional drinkers’ – people that do it every day and are in touch with what the general public is drinking and enjoying. It’s an important part of the process, and something I’m proud to push forward in the Hot 100 schedule.

to judge, this year again proved no exception.

Our state’s vinous offering is wonderful and varied, and it’s exciting to see people exploring new vineyard sites and alternate winemaking techniques. We celebrate this in the Hot 100 by awarding a prize to the top judged wine in a class we call Rule Breakers. Here, winemakers enter small production wines that they believe offer something different, an unusual grape variety or an uncommon winemaking technique. There are no rules. Always a fun class of wines

We look forward to sharing the next chapter of Hot 100 Wines with you in 2017, beginning with the next phase of our evolution – the Hot 100 Harvest. We’ll bring together food, wine and music, as the wine show comes to you. Taking place on February 10 and 11, I’m proud to see a bridge between the wine show judging and those who consume the wines.

This is my final year as Chief Judge of the show – after two years a judge, I took the position of Chief Judge in 2014, and have loved every minute of it. There are a multitude of people that have made the show a success, and my heartfelt thanks to each and every one of them.

I look forward to seeing you there.

Cellar Door 13-23 Clacton Road, Dover Gardens | Open 9.00am to 5.00pm Monday to Saturday

patritti.com.au

 /PatrittiWines


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53.

NEPENTHE 2015 ITHACA CHARDONNAY ADELAIDE HILLS

An attractive nose gives way to big stone fruit on the palate and closes with racy acid.

–––– Whites ––––

WHITE WINES WITH OPULENCE Rich white wines with depth, flavour and body.

CHAFFEY BROS. WINE CO. 2016 DÜFTE PUNKT EDEN VALLEY

Beautiful cold tea and flowers. Delicate palate and length with a touch of green strawberry and herbs.

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HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

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NGERINGA VINEYARDS

BIRD IN HAND

BIRD IN HAND

2014 VIOGNIER

2012

2015 CHARDONNAY

ADELAIDE HILLS

NEST EGG

ADELAIDE HILLS

CHARDONNAY

Super developed colour with bold apricot flavours.

ADELAIDE HILLS

Delicious fruit and length.

Showing some maturity, this drop impresses with a massive length of flavour.

weddings parties, anything PENFOLDS

YALUMBA

2015

2015

MAX’S CHARDONNAY

THE VIRGILIUS

ADELAIDE HILLS

VIOGNIER

respect

basket pressed

EDEN VALLEY

Opulent and beautiful. Refreshing acidity coils the rich fruit. Good stuff.

sustainable farming

small batch open fermentation

Strong stone fruit with great complexity and allure. Very drinkable and flavoursome.

purity and balance open 7 days 11am – 5pm

no fining or filtration

CHAPEL HILL WINERY 1 Chapel Hill Road McLaren Vale SA 5171 | chapelhillwine.com.au | winery@chapelhillwine.com.au | 08 8323 8429


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57.

VERTIGO

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HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

D’ARENBERG

PEWSEY VALE

RIESLING

2015 THE NOBLE WRINKLED

2016 PRIMA

ADELAIDE HILLS

RIESLING

RIESLING

MCLAREN VALE

EDEN VALLEY

A flavoursome old school big ripe Aussie dessert wine with good intensity and length.

With a citrus aroma and flavour, this has nice length and sugar balance.

2016 25GR

Fragrant citrus with a lovely gentle palate and good balance.

–––– Whites ––––

BALANCED WINES WITH INTENTIONAL R ESI DUA L SUGA R Wines where producers have intentionally worked with unfermented grape juice sugars for a full sweet wine or to leave a hint of sweetness.

100% SA BAR & BOTTLE SHOP THINK GLOBAL DRINK LOCAL OPEN 7 DAYS FROM 11AM CNR KING WILLIAM & STURT ST. ADELAIDE CBD

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HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

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E V E RY FA M I LY HAS A SECRET

#HOT100WINES

58.

59.

JOIN VALERIE HENBEST FOR THE ULTIMATE CHEESE EXPERIENCE Catering for a wide range of corporate events, social groups and private celebrations.

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HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

Tailored to your needs, Valerie embraces her subject with an infectious enthusiasm and takes you on a passionate journey through a wonderful world of cheese. Contact georgia@saycheese.net.au to organise your next event.

DAVID DANBY ––––––––

PATRICK MADDEN ––––––––

THE AMBASSADORS

For the first time in our 10 year history, Hot 100 Wines has brought a set of industry ambassadors on board for the 2016/17 season. By John Dexter –––––––

These industry ambassadors are not the prize-winners. They are not winery-owners or import/export merchants. They are at the coal-face of an under-appreciated, yet utterly crucial portal of the Australian wine industry: hospitality. Proof’s Caitlin MacPherson, Mother Vine’s Patrick Madden, Apothecary’s Paola Coro and Hains & Co.’s David Danby are this year’s Hot 100 Wines Industry Ambassadors. In each of these esteemed Adelaide venues, wine is a big deal. The patient and courteous hospitality workers at each are well-versed in the wines they stock and able to communicate with clients – be they connoisseurs or novices – about wine’s virtues and unique characteristics.

As Adelaide’s wine culture grows, so too the public’s tastes and expectations. Much of this understanding is shaped by people like our industry ambassadors. So who better to get an insight on how South Australia’s wine world is maturing, than these fine professionals? Mother Vine’s Madden says that he has noticed a “change in pre-conceived ideas of wine” in recent years. “Consumers used to be fixated on wines from iconic regions, made in a certain style using well known varieties. I now notice consumers, young and old, willing to try new varieties, new styles from lesser known regions.” He is excited by this shift and explosion of diversity, which is happily reflected in the

PAOLA CORO ––––––––

sheer variety of this year’s Hot 100 list. Mother Vine caters to a crowd as broad as their taste in wine, explains Madden, but wine selection for the venue is a simple calculation: “If the wine is good and we like it, we get it in.” “Our approach is to look at each wine for its quality, regardless of style or pre-conceived idea,“he says. “It is not so much about favouring styles, whether the wine be natural or conventional, old or young, from an established region or producer or not. If the wine can stand up on its own quality alone, then it is a fit for us.”

CAITLIN MACPHERSON ––––––––

“Since Mother Vine’s inception in 2014, we have always received interest in wines that have placed well in the Hot 100. We embrace this, get the wines in and encourage our guests to get involved and see what it’s all about.”

It’s a simple-sounding ethos but a relatively new one in an industry that has so often relied on preconceptions about regionality, variety and style. It is in this that Madden’s philosophy lines up so well with the key criteria behind Hot 100 Wines: drinkability. “‘Drinkability’ is a term we see used more and more lately,” Madden says. “Some of the best wines I’ve seen lately have been young, fresh and highly drinkable. In my opinion, there is space for many styles. Sometimes an older wine with layers of complexity is great to sit down with friends and pick apart the different aspects of the wine and really get into the nitty gritty of it. Other times it’s about drinking something that’s delicious, fresh and highly ‘smashable’.”

DISCOVER

OURS

Hot 100 Wines makes its mark each year for an ambassador like Madden, and helps contribute to his venue’s own wine list. “Since Mother Vine’s inception in 2014, we have always received interest in wines that have placed well in the Hot 100. We embrace this, get the wines in and encourage our guests to get involved and see what it’s all about.”

117 C H A L K H I L L R O A D , M c L A R E N V A L E ANGOVE.COM.AU


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HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

OVER THE GARDEN WALL

By David Knight –––––––

KENJI ITO ––––––––

Travelling to McLaren Vale, Klemzig and the city to shoot chefs and cooks in their garden of choice, we get a flavour of what inspires some of this state’s gastronomic identities from their backyard and beyond.

REBECCA SULLIVAN AND DAMIEN COULTHARD ––––––––

KARENA ARMSTRONG ––––––––

it’s all in the making Experience unparalleled access to South Australia’s best craftspeople, creative spaces, bespoke product and produce. Explore Well Made today to find a special gift, commission one of the State’s finest or discover what’s happening across our creative industry.

wellmade.com.au

Well Made is a Guildhouse initiative.

Government Partner

Media Partner

Lex Stobie, Fair-&-Square (tray), Photographer Jonathan VDK

JORDAN JEAVONS ––––––––

PREMIUM ESTATE GROWN WINES

office@pennalanewines.com.au pennalanewines.com.au


HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

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JORDAN JEAVONS The Happy Motel’s Jordan Jeavons spent many years of his youth at Coriole, as his dad, Russell Jeavons (Russell’s Pizza), used to run cooking classes in the gardens of the McLaren Vale winery. Years later, Coriole, owned by the Lloyd family, is the home of Jeavons’ Here’s To Now festival, an annual music, food and wine day out held in early January.

curated parties. The influence of the food, wine and hospitality characters of McLaren Vale continues to inspire Jeavons and his Happy Motel endeavours.

“The Lloyd boys were always close mates and we grew up throwing pretty spectacular parties together,” Jeavons says. “Here’s To Now grew out of that. Coriole is a very special place for me; it combines a genuine and holistic love of food, wine, music and arts in a very authentic way and in a spectacular setting.

“Growing up at Russell’s Pizza surrounded by the Vale’s food and wine personalities and characters certainly helped shape a sense of genuine hospitality and warmth. I was lucky to have many mentors that helped shape my interests and skills. The rustically beautiful setting of McLaren Vale certainly influenced my love for cooking outside with fire.”

“Whenever I cook at Coriole, whether it’s for an event or for friends, I love to go into the [kitchen] garden and see what I can find, there’s always plenty there. I have many special people who grow beautiful food for us. Anyone who chooses to grow food for a living is a hero in my book. Having an abundant garden of my own would be the dream.” Originally a loose collective of gastronomic renegades, Happy Motel is now run by Jeavons, who has just collaborated with the Social Creative to open Superfish. The Happy Motel made their name with infamous pop-ups such as Barrio’s Neon Lobster and events like Nebula Deluxe as well as raucous

THEHAPPYMOTEL .COM–––

“Whenever I cook at Coriole, whether it’s for an event or for friends, I love to go into the [kitchen] garden and see what I can find, there’s always plenty there. I have many special people who grow beautiful food for us.”

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HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

WARNDU

With Warndu, Damien Coulthard and Rebecca Sullivan champion Australian native ingredients through their brews, vinegars and oils as they want home cooks to start utilising outback ingredients so the industry is sustainable. They launched their brews early in 2016 and a pop-up restaurant came later in the year, where the star attraction was an Indigenous ‘pho’ featuring kangaroo and smoked emu broth with native greens and finger lime. Aiming to add wellbeing and skincare products to the range of brew bags (including river mint and ant and quandong and aniseed myrtle) and cooking oils (such as wattleseed balsamic vinegar and native thyme oil), Warndu currently source their ingredients from Coulthard’s family as well as producers and farmers, but sourcing native produce is a tad trickier than other ingredients. “We, like anyone who has come into the industry, had to learn the hard way,” says Sullivan, who launched the Granny Skills movement in Australia a few years ago. “You have to build relationships in the industry, you can’t just pick up the phone and go, ‘Hey, I want 15 kilos of Warragul greens’. It doesn’t work like that. We had to spend a good two years just figuring out where to buy all of this stuff from and who to buy it from.” They also source ingredients from distributers such as Outback Pride and Something Wild as well as forage in the Adelaide Hills and source from Coulthard’s family in the Flinders Ranges.

“Our major objective is to be growers as well,” Sullivan says. “We’ve just started getting the soil ready at my parents place in Clare and at Damien’s parents place in Quorn. We’re just in the process of getting our soil really healthy to start planting next year. We’re also looking to do similar things with a bunch of other people. We’ve been chatting to Brendan [Carter] from Unico Zelo about growing stuff together.” While there have been native ingredient booms in the past, Sullivan believes that the current Indigenous food trend needs to escape restaurants for home kitchens to be sustainable. “It’s had three of four major spikes in the past five decades where it’s been trendy, it’s been on a menu in a fancy restaurant and then it’s trickled down to the magazines. Farmers then plant it with expectations it will be really popular, but no one really knows how to use it at home. That’s what we’re trying to set up, so people can cook this stuff at home. We hope by way of doing that, and working together with our peers, we can grow a sustainable industry so that when someone goes and plants a lot of native ingredients they’re not going to get ripped out a year later because no one’s buying it.”

WARNDU.COM–––


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KARENA ARMSTRONG Overlooking picturesque vines on the western side of Karena Armstrong’s McLaren Vale property is a large kitchen garden that the chef utilises for her restaurant, the acclaimed Salopian Inn. Armstrong, who worked at big shot interstate eateries such as Billy Kwong, Icebergs and The Lake House, returned home to South Australia a few years back, taking over the Salopian Inn with her husband after stints at The Victory Hotel and Star of Greece. The chef planted the garden, which is run using biodynamic principles and provides at least 40 bunches of herbs to the Salopian Inn kitchen every week, after transforming the much-loved McLaren Vale institution into one of this state’s most acclaimed regional restaurants.

Armstrong and her Salopian Inn team, which only use local and seasonal produce, have now added a raised bed-garden at the restaurant as they occasionally run out of lettuce, kale and herbs mid-service. Armstrong says she seeks “other biodynamic producers” when looking for ingredients she can’t grow herself but understands if they aren’t biodynamic as “it is a very demanding way of farming”. “Local and grown with love are our real purchasing requirements,” she says.

SALOPIAN.COM. AU–––

“We focus on growing what we can’t buy and items that have better flavour [when] grown by us,” Armstrong says of the kitchen garden. “On a good week the garden supplies 70 per cent of what we need [in the kitchen].“ She says the garden challenges her to look at every fruit and vegetable to identify the ideal time to pick each item, and to know what can be preserved, what can be eaten straight away as well as inspiring the chef to be creative when there is a glut of a certain ingredient.

“We focus on growing what we can’t buy and items that have better flavour [when] grown by us. On a good week the garden supplies 70 per cent of what we need [in the kitchen].“

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KENJI ITO There aren’t many cities where you can live 10 minutes out of the CBD and have a kitchen garden as majestic as Kenji Ito’s. The Japanese-born chef, who opened his famed eponymous restaurant a decade ago, uses his backyard garden to supply his Hutt Street restaurant with Japanese and Asian ingredients that are either seldom found in Australia or are easier for him to grow from his Klemzig backyard.

herbs and vegetables. Also, it’s good for our staff to study how they grow and learn the seasons.” And everything he grows is featured on the menu of his restaurant, Kenji.

Ito, who set up his garden seven years ago specifically to serve at his restaurant, is a keen gardener as his dream many years ago was to open a restaurant and grow vegetables. “In Japan, lots of restaurants grow their own vegetables,“ Ito says. “The reason why I came to Adelaide was that I can own a restaurant and grow vegetables. That’s what I wanted to do.” Some of the herbs, fruits and vegetables to be found in Ito’s garden include yuzu, Japanese ginger, watercress, wasabi rocket, radicchio, mustard spinach and sansho pepper. “Japanese herbs are very hard to get,” he says. “That’s why I wanted to grow my own

KENJIMODERNJAPANESE.COM. AU–––

“Japanese herbs are very hard to get,” Ito says. “That’s why I wanted to grow my own herbs and vegetables. Also, it’s good for our staff to study how they grow and learn the seasons.”


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ROSÉ Unlike other categories in the Hot 100, you know what you are getting with Rosé.

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LONGVIEW VINEYARD

MUSTER WINES

2016 NEBBIOLO ROSATO

2016 LE VAILLANT ROSÉ

ADELAIDE HILLS

MCLAREN VALE

Pale colour with peach flesh mid-palate. Dry and slightly mineral finish. Really good drinking.

Great filigree acidity. Complex on the nose but this is the bottle you reach for on a warm summer’s day.

MEET. EAT. TASTE. STAY. Premium, estate-grown wines from our cool-climate single vineyard are just the beginning. Longview is the ‘Pick of the Adelaide Hills’ for all occasions. Visit longviewvineyard.com.au for inquiries regarding weddings, accommodation, events, Sunday tapas and a brand-new cellar door experience coming soon.

Longview Vineyard. 154 Pound Rd. Macclesfield, SA (08) 8388 9694

HOT 100 WINES 2016/17


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OLIVER’S TARANGA VINEYARDS

TEMPLE BRUER WINES

2016 CHICA MENCIA ROSÉ

2015 WILDFLOWERS OF EDEN

MCLAREN VALE

DRY ROSÉ

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HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

EDEN VALLEY

Really intriguing palate, texture and flavour with delicious acidity.

DABBLEBROOK WINES

Hints of Amaro and Campari. Herbaceous with nice sweet and sour contrast and chalky tannin.

MITOLO WINES 2016 ROSÉ

2016

GRENACHE

LONG LUNCH ROSÉ

MCLAREN VALE

MCLAREN VALE

Really interesting spectrum of fruit with great savoury flavours of length and balance.

Touches of spicy, savoury flavours with delicious acidity. Perfectly balanced.

When our founders swapped their family’s cleavers for pruners to establish St Hallett, they instilled in us the knowledge that change takes a dash of faith and a mountain of dedication. Our St Hallett Butcher’s Cart Shiraz is a tribute to these earthy attributes; be proud, do it once, do it right.

STHALLETT.COM.AU

STHALLETTWINES


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finger to the corporate pub culture of South Australia. It was, and still is, glorious. It’s one of the few venues that encourages you to not pander to the orthodox, but to do what you want and make sure it’s bloody good. Emily Trott was born in McLaren Vale and raised at Wirra Wirra winery. Her winemaker father Greg Trott was a forefather to the emergence of the modern Australian wine industry. Greg was a champion for regionality and community; a characteristic that he imparted in no small way to Emily. Her love for ‘Thebartonia’, the Thebarton community in the west, and her passion for supporting local booze and events forever changed the way Adelaide viewed itself.

Emily Trott. Photo: Kari Scannell

HOWARD TWELFTREE AWARD

Inaugural Howard Twelftree Award winner Duncan Welgemoed remembers Emily Trott, this year’s winner of the annual award for outstanding contribution to gastronomy in South Australia, who sadly passed away earlier this year. By Duncan Welgemoed –––––––

Emily ‘Trotty’ Trott has always been an inspiration to me. She was dedicated and no bullshit, something that she imparted onto whoever was in the room. Humble and kind, Emily was always the sort of person the turn to for advice on your venue. Was your staff on point? Was the ‘atmos’ right? The first beer I drank on my arrival to Adelaide was at the The Wheatie (formerly

known as The Wheatsheaf Hotel). It was an excellent example of how to take your passion and knowledge and realise them in a no-frills, no-schnitty, no-TAB, no-pokies and no-TV pub. A venue that pushed the craft beer and natural wine scene before they were ever things. A pub that celebrated whiskey and did an incredible amount for the local music scene. A high-integrity venue that gave the middle

After completing her degree, she returned to the Fleurieu and gained her first proper experience in hospitality at the award winning Salopian Inn restaurant in McLaren Vale. After successful stints in many iconic pubs, it was at the Exeter where she met Jade Flavell and Liz O’Dea and they decided to purchase their pub, The Wheatsheaf Hotel, in 2003. Emily was a woman of many passions and talents. Through the pub she championed the arts and live original music. Emily was also passionate about sport, supporting the Adelaide Roller Derby league through the Wheatsheaf, and was a dedicated AFL and cricket fan. Her influence is felt across the small bars, restaurants and pubs in Adelaide and the regions. Trotty’s intangible something – that seems to have imbued itself into Adelaide – is one of the key reasons our local scene has become so unique. There was no creative industry left untouched in South Australia by her.

I wasn’t aware of her illness; it was only months before she had to leave us that she walked past Africola. I grabbed her, sat her down and fed her. Whenever I had the opportunity to do it, I would. It is such a joy to cook for someone who you respect and admire. Trotty died at home in May 2016 of cancer. News of her death on Facebook saw 1700 people acknowledge the notification page – and more than 260 people wrote a tribute. Several hundred mourners joined Emily’s New Orleans-style funeral procession, complete with a brass band. They rumbled through the streets of Thebarton before a wake at the Wheatsheaf, aptly named ‘TrottFest’. The funeral service at her childhood home at Wirra Wirra winery saw around 1000 friends and family attend to celebrate her humility, humour, creative spirit, and indefatigable passion. Tributes representing her life, included a raffia goose (goosey) – a gift from her father and the Wheatsheaf’s official mascot – and a Polaroid camera (she was a talented photographer) were laid on her hand-painted casket. Such an out-pouring of love in a single place, such a celebration of life lived to maximum at every given moment, makes me think that perhaps ‘funeral’ would be a misnomer. It was so beautiful, so untouchable, so melancholic and pitch-perfect. Even at the last, Emily was embracing it all. There is no-one more deserving of this award and none contributed or sacrificed more to our industry than Emily Trott. I am incredibly lucky to have known Em and her legacy will live on in South Australia for generations. Emily is survived by her partner, Katie Crocker, and sister Catherine Trott.

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DOGRIDGE

KALLESKE WINES

FORTIFIED

2015

VIOGNIER

JMK SHIRAZ VP

HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

BAROSSA VALLEY

Beautiful black tea with jasmine, lemon and honey. Sweet with lovely integration and great drive. Precise.

Very complete and balanced. Fruit weight is long and refined with a crisp cleanse of spirit at the finish. Beautiful.

FORTIFIED WINES AND VERMOUTHS This category covers the wonderful world of fortifieds

PATRITTI

DUTSCHKE WINES

2006 FORTIFIED VIOGNIER

SUN DRIED SHIRAZ

SOUTHERN FLEURIEU

BAROSSA VALLEY

A lively dancing palate of jasmine tea, burnt honey and fragrance. Fresh from entry to finish.

Riper end of fruit profile; intense primary blue fruits; powerful style; lots of prowess and purity; some age here but graceful.

“When you taste a Kirrihill wine you experience the soil, climate and aspect of our vineyards that have been nurtured by our viticulturist and winemaker each vintage.”


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HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

PIG’S BLOOD CAKE

Food

––––– INGREDIENTS

A WINNING RECIPE

– 1.25L pig’s blood – 100mL duck fat – 2 fennel bulbs (finely diced) – 6 cloves garlic (finely chopped) – ½ bunch each chopped sage, thyme and marjoram – 2 tbsp smoked paprika – 1 tbsp all spice – 1 tsp ground black pepper – 125g fine polenta – 375g diced pork back fat

Botanic Gardens Restaurant’s Head Chef Paul Baker matches this year’s winning Hot 100 wine with a delicious recipe that will stun your guests when they pop around for a meal and a glass or two of Mr. Mick’s 2015 Novo Sangiovese.

––––– METHOD

By Paul Baker –––––––

CONFIT BERKSHIRE PORK JOWL WITH BLOOD CAKE, AGRODOLCE RADICCHIO, CELERIAC PUREE AND QUAIL EGG (Serves four)

––––– INGREDIENTS

– 4 quail eggs – Confit jowl – 2 large pork jowls – 3L duck fat or extra virgin olive oil ––––– METHOD

1.

Salt pork jowls for four to six hours using salt mix (adjacent).

2.

Wash and dry jowls, place in half bain and cover with duck fat.

3.

Set oven to 100 degrees and cook for eight hours.

4.

Remove from oil and lightly press between two trays for four to six hours.

––––– METHOD

5.

Trim edges and cut into two rectangles.

6.

In a medium to hot pan place jowls skin side down and cook until golden brown.

7.

Place in 200 degree oven to warm through.

Place all ingredients in food processor and blend until everything is incorporated.

CELERIAC PURÉE  ––––– INGREDIENTS

SALT MIX ––––– INGREDIENTS

– 500g Olsson’s table salt – 1tbsp peppercorns – 4 cloves – 1 sprig fresh thyme – 1 fresh chilli – 1tbsp coriander seeds – 1tbsp fennel seeds

– 1 large celeriac, cut into 2cm squares – 50g butter – 500mL milk – 200mL cream – 2 sprigs thyme – Sea salt – White pepper

2.

Simmer for five to 10 minutes or until celeriac is tender.

3.

Over a bowl or saucepan, strain celeriac into a colander retaining the liquid and remove the thyme.

4.

Place celeriac in a jug blender and purée ‘til smooth using the retained liquid to adjust the thickness. You want the purée to be thick and creamy.

5.

Season further with salt and white pepper to taste

AGRODOLCE RADICCHIO

––––– METHOD

1.

––––– INGREDIENTS

Sweat celeriac in butter until it starts to soften, then add milk, cream, thyme and salt.

– 2 radicchio (cored and leaves separated)

– 50mL olive oil – 200mL red wine vinegar – 85mL honey  – 30g raisins – Pinch salt – Pinch pepper ––––– METHOD

1.

Season the radicchio with salt, pepper and olive oil.

2.

Lightly grill each piece of radicchio until it just starts to wilt and lay into a narrow dish.

3.

In a pan bring vinegar, honey and raisins to the boil and pour mixture over your radicchio and leave to cool.

4.

Reheat when required.

1.

Sweat onions and garlic in duck fat.

2.

Add herbs and spices

3.

Add blood and rice, slowly rise temperature until it starts to thicken and coats the back of a spoon.

4.

Add back fat and season to taste.

5.

Line a terrine dish with layers of cling wrap and pour in blood mix and cover with foil.

6.

Place in a deep bain and pour water three quarters up the terrine and place in a 180 degree oven for an hour or until set.

7.

Chill overnight.

8.

Slice and pan fry as required.

BOTANICGARDENS RESTAURANT.COM. AU–––


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81.

CHAFFEY BROS. WINE CO.

_______________________

HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

PRESENTS

2016 PAX AETERNA GRENACHE BAROSSA VALLEY

Beautifully lithe and supple. Finely framed, poised and precise.

–––– Reds ––––

YO U N G R E L E A S E ST YL E / J OVEN / NOUVEAU WITH TEXTURE Ready to drink young-release style wines show little influence from wood. They celebrate the freshness and vitality of spring.

SIX BOTTLES EVERY SIX WEEKS FREE DELIVERY ALPHABOXDICE.COM PAXTON WINES 2016 NOW SHIRAZ MCLAREN VALE

Deep and bright purple colour impresses as does the fresh aromas and huge middle.


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VINTELOPER

BANROCK STATION

2016 PARK WINE / RED

2015 THE BOARDWALK

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

MONTEPULCIANO

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HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

RIVERLAND

AWARDED 2016 AUSTRALIAN APERITIF DISTILLERY OF THE YEAR

Beautiful bright cherry with floral aromas. Nice cleanse of acid complements the finish.

Vibrant and fresh, this moreish drop is devilishly attractive and presented perfectly.

INSPIRED BY THE CLASSIC APERITIFS OF ITALY. INFLUENCED BY THE ADELAIDE HILLS.

LANDAIRE 2015 TEMPRANILLO COONAWARRA

WIRRA WIRRA 2015 ESPERANZA TOURIGA NACIONAL

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Lovely lift with fresh violets and berries. Palate is immensely drinkable.

M

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MCLAREN VALE

PE

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Hyper juicy and bright with blueberry skins in this uplifting style. Some confection comforts the palate.

Ap

e ri

t i f D is t i ll e

ry

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ADELAIDEHILLS DISTILLERY.COM.AU

designfurniture.com.au

Contra Chairs by Koush Design, Created by Design Furniture. Photography by Craig Arnold.


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DOING THINGS DIFFERENTLY Wine shows are curious beasts, quixotic exercises in squeezing the subjective into objective holes. By Nick Ryan –––––––

Ultimately they all have the same aim – to find the best wines – but they don’t always take the same path to get there. But no wine show before or since has forged a trail quite like Hot 100 Wines. From its inception a decade ago, the Hot 100 has done things differently. It focused solely on South Australian wines at the outset and from that foundation of geographical rigour it has expanded to become the most open-minded, free thinking and adventurous wine show in the country. As it developed and evolved with each passing year the parameters of what a wine show could be, both at the tasting bench and after hours, were redefined. It didn’t take long for the rest of the wine world to take notice. I’ve judged most of the wine shows in this country, as well as the last couple of years at the Hot 100, and this straddling position provides an interesting perspective on how

the innovations of the Hot 100 have spread to the wider wine show world. Let’s call it ‘The Hot 100 Effect’. The most significant manifestation of this centres on the notion of ‘drinkability’ that lies at the heart of the Hot 100 approach. The concept of assessing a wine based on the drinking pleasure it provides might seem kind of obvious to those unaccustomed to the way things had always been done, but the idea was really rather radical at the time. The Australian Wine Show system was born from the agricultural shows run by the Royal Societies in each state. Just like the cows, the pigs, the wheat and the wool, wine was assessed in order to weed out the faulty and flawed, a vaguely Darwinian pursuit designed to ‘improve the breed.’ The Hot 100 has always looked at judging a little differently, taken a slightly more holistic approach to what constitutes a

‘good’ wine and acknowledged some the wines we most enjoyed drinking were not the styles that did well in other wine shows. Where the traditional wine shows adhered to the notion that a wine had to be technically correct to be considered good, the Hot 100 allows its judges a more wide-ranging brief. Seek the beautiful, the alluring the enticing and the delicious. It’s a mindset that is now working its way into the more traditional wine shows as well. While technical considerations are still important, there is a greater willingness to accept that most people see a glass of wine as something to be enjoyed rather than forensically dissected. There is also some consideration of adopting, partly if not entirely, the Hot 100 approach of organising judging classes by style rather than variety. This is one of the Hot 100’s great strengths and asking judges to consider

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wines in terms of their stylistic ambition – rather than just asking if the wine exhibits the defined characteristics of the grapes listed on the label – helps deliver, in my opinion anyway, more interesting results. It’s just one of the reasons why the Hot 100 is far and away the most enjoyable wine show to judge. It takes the nourishment of its judges seriously, both gastronomically and intellectually. The tradition of guest chefs coming out to Regency Park to cook lunch for the judges is undoubtedly the show’s greatest perk and puts to shame every other wine show lunch in the country. It’s probably the single most significant reason I’m so often asked by other wine show judges, “How do I get a flag to the Hot 100?” But it’s not just what’s on the menu that makes lunchtime at the Hot 100 so enjoyable. At other wine shows you grab lunch when you can, each panel having a different window of opportunity during the day to refuel. But at the Hot 100, a single shared meal means everyone eats together and that’s significant because it plays into another of the show’s great strengths. The diversity of the judging contingent is perhaps the Hot 100’s best contribution to changing the way we think about wine shows.

HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

Like other wine shows, it has its fair share of winemakers, wine writers and sommeliers, but the Hot 100 delves deeper into the ‘fraternity of flavour’ to seek unique perspectives. Chefs, cheese makers, chocolatiers and brewers have all helped add layers of detail and understanding that enrich not just the results but their fellow judges too. When you bring a group of people together like this, when you give each year’s show a different them upon which you ask them to dwell and when you take pride in showing off the cultural capacities of the city in which they perform their task, something very special happens. And that’s the real Hot 100 effect.

Let’s call it ‘The Hot 100 Effect’. The most significant manifestation of this centres on the notion of ‘drinkability’ that lies at the heart of the Hot 100 approach.

2016 SAUL RIESING E

IN

TL S P I R ITS C O

Single Vineyard | High Eden | Classic Purity

M

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2016

GO

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HOT

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@ZWINEBAROSSA

Z WINE - Barossa Valley

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The group’s bold use of materiality, striking form and functionality was the centre of much discussion during the judging process and demonstrated a strong commitment to craftsmanship, originality and initiative in an already densely-populated industry: coffee making.

DRINK DINE DESIGN

Continuing the innovation of the project, they documented their making processes on film, joining forces with filmmaker Liam Somerville and electronic sound artist Sebastian Vivian, to produce a three-minute visual presentation, which they used for their entry, a first in the competition’s history. JamFactory CEO Brian Parkes: “We were impressed by the way the video highlighted the highly handcrafted nature of the objects created for the café and the way it

A COLLABORATIVE APPROACH The winning project for this year’s Drink Dine Design award is unique, not just for the entry’s use of film, but its underlying collaborative nature.

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HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

revealed the design and making processes.” It was the collective initiative and desire to create a distinctive and bespoke design solution that ultimately raised the project to be a standout amongst a group of extremely well considered entries this year.

NATHAN JAMES CRANE ––– was a judge of this year’s Drink Dine Design along with BRIAN PARKES (JamFactory)––– ,

LIAM

RYAN GENESIN (Genesin

MUGAVIN–––

Design)––– , JANE LAWRENCE

Curator of this year's

(University of South Australia)–––

winning Drink Dine

and SHARON ROMEO (FINO).

Design Award

By Nathan James Crane –––––––

The joint project, entered by Liam Fleming, Liam Somerville, Steve Soeffky, Sebastian Vivian and Ulrica Trulsson, was curated by last year’s Drink Dine Design winner Liam Mugavin for Coffee Bondi Beach, a coffee bar and roaster with a focus on education, experience, sustainability and quality. In late 2015, the client approached JamFactory alumnus Mugavin with the opportunity not only to apply his skills as a designer and maker, but also to engage and collaborate with peers. Taking on this challenge, Mugavin and his collaborators created a series of objects and furniture for the space, including glass

blown elements by Fleming, lighting by Soeffky, 60 pieces of ceramics by Trulsson and furniture and timber components by Mugavin. Influenced by Mugavin’s research during his Masters in Sustainable Design at the University of South Australia, the project aims to engage with the client’s business ethos which is to serve only what they produce. The multi-disciplinary approach was a standout aspect of the group entry. Highlighting the diversity proffered by this sort of collaboration, the panel was especially keen to recognise and acknowledge that each of the elements maintained their merit, and yet

“[It] establishes a new paradigm for creative craft and design based practices. It is significant as it foregrounds a collection of idiosyncratic and beautifully crafted objects specifically created for a commercial setting where one could argue that the sum of each part is as great as the whole.”

ultimately worked together to create a cohesive and unified interior experience. Judging panel member Jane Lawrence says of the winning project: “[It] establishes a new paradigm for creative craft and design based practices. It is

significant as it foregrounds a collection of idiosyncratic and beautifully crafted objects specifically created for a commercial setting where one could argue that the sum of each part is as great as the whole.”

Taste Eden Valley’s most prestigious artisan collection of single vineyard wines... Open 7 days 10am - 5pm 6 Washington Street, Angaston SA 5353 T. 08 8564 2435 tasteedenvalley.com.au

3rd annual Taste Eden Riesling Festival Saturday 28th January 2017 tasteedenvalley.com.au for more information


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AXIOM WINES

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HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

NEPENTHE

BLEASDALE

2014 WINEMAKER’S SELECT

2014 POWDER MONKEY

2013 MATHIEU

SHIRAZ VIOGNIER

SHIRAZ

GSM

ADELAIDE HILLS

LANGHORNE CREEK

An uber fragrant drop that is exotically spiced and texturally compelling.

Has a defined floral aromatic profile in the geranium/violet spectrum, and then moves on to blackberry and liquorice on the palate. Sturdy and firm, this is very well made.

GEMTREE

GLAETZER

2015 LUNA ROJA

2015 WALLACE

MUSTER WINES

TEMPRANILLO

SHIRAZ/GRENACHE

2015 SHIRAZ

MCLAREN VALE

BAROSSA VALLEY

BAROSSA VALLEY

A charming wine, with a scattering of dried herbs intermingled with red and black fruits on the nose. Olive, pepper and vanilla define the palate, with firm tannins to close.

Very youthful and appealing with perky fruits.

Bright and punchy with crunchy purple fruits. Great Rhone-like spice.

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Quite suave and supple, a generous mixture of finely tuned fruit characters. Generous middle palate and, with some air, a twinge of tannin appears and smartens things up. Nicely done.

–––– Reds ––––

ST RUCTUR A L A N D SAVO U RY These are tannin-rich wines usually associated with Italian and Mediteranian red varities; examples include Agliancio, Mencia, Nebbiolo, Sangiovese and Tempranillo.


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90.

OCHOTA BARRELS

CATLIN WINES

2016 THE PRICE

2014 SHIRAZ

JOHANN’S GARDEN

OF SILENCE

ADELAIDE HILLS

GMS

Composed, detailed and nicely balanced.

Incredibly bright in the glass with bramble and sour cherry.

TEMPLE BRUER WINES

MR. MICK 2014 TEMPRANILLO CLARE VALLEY

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Bright and dazzling this is a wine that is hard to ignore. Purple in the glass and remarkable perfume. Nicely done.

Intensely vibrant with passionate purple fruits and light crispness.

WOLF BLASS 2015 SHIRAZ LANGHORNE CREEK

2016 PRESERVATIVE FREE SHIRAZ

2015

BAROSSA VALLEY

GAMAY ADELAIDE HILLS

HENSCHKE

Vibrant fruit; silky on the mouth. Rose petals complement the savoury edge. A super drop of red.

A majestic wine: enormous middle palate, overflowing with fruits. Simply lavish. This is all about the fruit.

91.

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92.

CHAPEL HILL

GUTHRIE WINES

MERLOT CABERNET SAUVIGNON

2015

2015 ASHTON

ADELAIDE HILLS

THE PARSON

PINOT NOIR

GSM

ADELAIDE HILLS

2012 ABBOTTS PRAYER

A beautifully elegant and composed wine that moves across the palate with grace and tightens through the finish with seductive tannins.

MCLAREN VALE

HEIRLOOM VINEYARDS

HOLLICK

Bright in the glass. Full of sweet blueberries and liquorice. A dense, full-bodied wine, but framed with savoury tannins and beautifully harmonious for such a big wine.

2014 STOCK ROUTE

Earthy and brined. Nice textural depth with mushroom heartiness and a great flow of savoury fruits.

ST HALLETT WINES

2015 TOURIGA

SHIRAZ CABERNET SAUVIGNON

2015 SHIRAZ

MCLAREN VALE

COONAWARRA

EDEN VALLEY

Dark black in colour but comes alive in the glass with pretty rose petals and Earl Grey tea. Some apparent whole bunch use appealing and then the fine, yet firm, palate impresses.

Big wine with bold flavours that are dense, ripe and brooding.

Nice and fresh; boysenberry and similar fruits mean this is super bright and moreish. The tannin is well weighted and props the all-important core of fruit flavour. Drink on.

93.

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94.

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Tasting Australia’s fresh menu By Ross Ganf –––––––

Lonely Planet and half-a-million international visitors can’t be wrong. South Australia offers the “coolest mix of brilliant wine country, abundant produce festivals” and pristine, peaceful beaches that would “make the Bahamas jealous”. That’s why the institution of travel guides, Lonely Planet, has named Adelaide at number five in the Top 10 regions to visit in 2017. More uncharted than a best-kept secret, Adelaide is an emerging mecca for food and wine experiences that are authentic, raw and dirty. This is where foodies come to discover what’s new on the menu, direct from the source – often a small organic vegetable patch in the Adelaide foothills, or via a splosh straight out of a Fleurieu Peninsula barrel. And so in 2017 Tasting Australia – Adelaide’s eight-day eating and drinking festival – is going on tour to celebrate these roots and the homegrown heroes of

the kitchen, cellar, garden, vineyard and beyond. The festival, which is one of Australia’s foremost food and wine events, will maintain a strong base in the city of Adelaide in its debut annual appearance. But the program will also be curated to drive the food curious and wine enthusiasts throughout the state’s food bowls just 30 to 60 minutes out of the CBD. A roving, pop-up hub will bring communities and guests together at an abundant and nourishing table.

HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

“We have so many ‘real food heroes’ who are producing the world’s best seafood, awardwinning wines and unbelievable dishes everyday – and it’s all available so close to Adelaide.”

Food

WHERE THE WILD EXPERIENCES GROW

_______________________

Tasting Australia creative director Simon Bryant is certain that locals and visitors will revel in experiencing food direct from the source. “The theme for Tasting Australia in 2017 is People and what better way to get to know the people behind South Australia’s premium food and wine than to join them at the table? “We have so many ‘real food heroes’ who are producing the world’s best seafood, award-winning wines and unbelievable dishes everyday – and it’s all available so close to Adelaide.

highly-acclaimed debut solo venture, Orana, and his work with native Australian ingredients and sustainable indigenous produce has garnered attention from critics worldwide. Together the two self-proclaimed “pirates” of the cooking world are calling on esteemed colleagues and friends to join the celebration while blending a program of provocative, well-rounded and moreish events. Michelin-starred chefs, Wine & Spirits Top 100-listers, disco balls and Italian heritage will all be added to the Tasting Australia menu in 2017.

“Tasting Australia gives us the moment to celebrate fresh concepts, flavours and perspectives together.”

Hot 100 is also teaming up with Tasting Australia this year to celebrate a decade of outstanding wine and good times. This is your chance to taste more of Australia’s best…

Between April 30 and May 7, join Tasting Australia for an unforgettable epicurean tour of South Australia.

Bryant is joined at the helm in 2017 by newly appointed creative curator Jock Zonfrillo.

So what are you waiting for?

Beginning in the Barossa with big, bold, historical red wines and surprising flavours, the festival will then move south along the coast to the fresh fields of the Fleurieu Peninsula. The program will conclude in the Adelaide Hills where the new guard of producers will present unexpected wines and full-bodied food experiences.

One of Australia’s most sought after and boundary-pushing contemporary chefs, Zonfrillo brings a formidable network of peers to the table along with a hunger to challenge practice and dining experiences.

Event Manager Tasting Australia

Adelaide is home to Zonfrillo’s

TASTINGAUSTRALIA.COM. AU–––

ROSS GANF –––

Temple Bruer are now Carbon Neutral Cradle to gate life cycle analysis Verified by Canopy Vegan Friendly


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96.

97.

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ATZE’S CORNER

FOX GORDON

2014

2015 NERO D’AVOLA

THE GIANT DURIF

ADELAIDE HILLS

BAROSSA VALLEY

Wow, really massive fruit here, but incredibly well handled – doesn’t impose too heavily. Lots of chocolate and mulberry. Well balanced and finishes soft.

HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

ANGOVE FAMILY WINEMAKERS 2015

Bright jubey fruit. Slippery and expressive.

FAMILY CREST SHIRAZ MCLAREN VALE

Attractive green olive brine with bright primary fruits and crushed dried lavender. Lovely poise and comfort.

–––– Reds ––––

POWER AND PRESENCE Representing the riper styles this state is famous for, power and presence is about fruit depth, mouth-filling richness and lingering finishes.

08_7123 4055 LEVELONE@ELECTRAHOUSE.COM.AU ELECTRAHOUSE.COM.AU

LV L 1 , 1 3 1 K I N G W I L L I A M S T R E E T ADELAIDE SA 5000


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HEWITSON 2015 NED & HENRY’S

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98.

HICKINBOTHAM 2014 BROOKS ROAD

K1 BY GEOFF HARDY

99.

MICHAEL HALL 2014 SYRAH EDEN VALLEY

SHIRAZ

2014 SHIRAZ

MCLAREN VALE

ADELAIDE HILLS

Sausage and salami with nice juicy palate and good texture.

Spicy and juicy with a pleasant subtle palate.

BETHANY WINES

BK WINES

CAPE JAFFA

PIONEER ROAD

2014 LE SHIRAZ

2014 MAZI SYRAH

2014 EPIC DROP

2015 SHIRAZ

BAROSSA VALLEY

MCLAREN VALE

SHIRAZ

LANGHORNE CREEK

SHIRAZ BAROSSA VALLEY

Bright colour and lifted aromas. Well balanced with a little spice drive at the finish.

Red fruits and some spice. Medium bodied with a nice drive.

COONAWARRA

Enjoyable lifted fruits and spice; tar and roses with a softening saline edge that tempers the power enough to engulf food. What a great dinner wine.

Herbal aromas of dill and fennel. Subtle palate with nice tannins. Intriguing.

Nice bright fresh red fruits. Elegant long palate with good style.

With fresh blue fruits this is a nice vibrant and youthful drinkable and flavoursome wine.

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F RO M TH E D E E P SOUTH

AGRIBUSINESS – WE'RE LEADING THE WAY IN SA

( SO UTH

M E L BO U RN E )

By James Blackburn –––––––

You’ve probably heard the saying that Australia was built by “riding on the sheep’s back”. This may have been true up to the 1950s, but roll forward to today and we in South Australia are still an agribusiness-driven economy, you just have to look at the numbers. • Agribusiness is an $18.2b a year industry that employs one in five of us. • South Australian wine makes up 70 per cent of Australia’s premium wine exports. • Exports of differentiated and processed food and wine is to exceed $3.5b this year. We punch above our weight and are known around the world for our premium food bowl. This year, Adelaide joined the Great Wine Capitals Global Network adding to the state’s global reputation for premium food and wine tourism.

One of the reasons for this reputation has been our ability to have a go, adapt, try new things and innovate. And there is no better time than now to be innovating and growing your business. The South Australian government has named agribusiness as one of the state’s key strategic priority areas. This means millions of dollars of investment over the next few years into agribusiness to drive innovation, research and infrastructure in this sector. There are many growing SA businesses that are staking their claim as innovative world leaders in the premium food and wine sector. This competition, the Hot100, is known for championing new ideas, methods, and adapting to (or indeed disrupting) the palates of today’s consumer. This

competition has opened local wine makers to new and emerging markets, such as Singapore, and above all else champions drinkability. Think of a Shiraz with a splash of Gewürztraminer… who would have thought? We did. Another example right outside our door gaining worldwide attention is Sundrop Farms – already a global leader in sustainable agriculture, growing fresh fruits and vegetables using renewable energy and sea water. This truly is farming of the future – a hi-tech, capital-intensive system growing food sustainably and cleanly for the masses – all located in rocky, arid country where southeast Australia’s cropping zones meet the Outback and annual rainfall is less than 250mm. Pretty cool stuff right on our backdoor.

Agribusinesses are leading the way with a reputation for food safety, world class products, iconic brands and world leading food and agricultural research. All backed by our clean environment. In the five years that PwC has supported the Hot 100 Wines we have seen enormous growth across a whole range of agribusinesses, all championing the cause as a world leader in this space, and to that we raise our glass.

JAMES BLACKBURN––– Parter, PwC PWC.COM. AU ––

O R D E R AT BO OZ E BU D.C O M


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102.

103.

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BABY CARLA RIVERLAND

Music

CELEBRATING THE BEST OF LOCAL MUSIC

FLAMINGO COONAWARRA AND THE SOUTH EAST

Emerging as one of the city’s most exciting electronic bands, Flamingo is a product of Adelaide’s diversifying musical palate. The three-piece, who discovered the importance of balance dabbling in a concoction of down-tempo drum patterns, infectious

This year, Music SA joined forces with the Hot 100 Wines as the not-for-profit company paired local wine with music from South Australia’s wine regions through curated playlists that were played during the tastings. To do this, the team from Music SA chose music that reflected the cultural and aesthetic attributes for each region, so the Adelaide Hills’ playlist evoked folky forests and winter-like emotions while the music from the Fleurieu Peninsula featured beachy and upbeat music. The seven playlists are available to listen to on Spotify and The Adelaide Review website. To keep the partnership going, groups selected by Music SA will perform at Hot 100 events including the Gala on December 1 and the Hot 100 Harvest on February 10 and 11. Some of the artists on the playlists and the regions they represent are featured on this page.

MUSICSA.COM. AU ––

melodies and off-kilter electronica, owe their sound to an exposure to various styles while supporting the likes of Bonobo, Rüfüs, Giraffage and The Kite String Tangle. Flamingo is the cultivation of determined artistry striving to grow within a vibrant culture.

FRANK YAMMA

THE WINTER GYPSY CLARE VALLEY AND SOUTHERN FLINDERS

The Winter Gypsy is a six-piece indie folk group formed by Tushar Singh and Max Lambert. Forming as a collusion of four separate bands in August, 2015, the band ranges from soft folk melodies and

haunting vocal harmonies to soaring, upbeat instrumentals. The band has a complex dichotomy of ambient sounds and driving, distorted solos. Drawing comparisons to The Middle East, Bon Iver and Bombay Bicycle Club, their sound is complemented by an intense and intricate range of instruments.

Serge Gainsbourg in sequins brandishing a flick knife; Duane Eddy brawling on with the Shangri-Las; Connie Francis fresh from juvy hall with only vengeance on her mind. It’s the guttural twang of surf colliding with the hip-shaking go-go grooves of Yé-Yé. The wax spinning on the platter is the eponymous debut record by Baby Carla. Sleazy layers of guitars hang thick over a swinging rhythm section like the sweat of a sultry summer night, while synths and organs pine like drifting police sirens. And cutting through all that beautiful noise, Baby Carla glides like the breeze that whispers in our ear – finally, things are going to change.

EDEN VALLEY

RIN MCARDLE BAROSSA VALLEY

Having played recently alongside respected international and Australian artists such as Vera Blue, Montaigne and Josh Pyke, Rin McArdle decamped from the coastal surrounds of Sydney’s eastern suburbs to head to Montreal seek out new experiences. Having played at Canadian Music Week. McArdle returned to Australia in support of her debut EP Lefty Lou & The Hamley Street Blues. Powderfinger’s Ian Haug said that he was “immediately impressed with her authenticity, talent and honesty as a performer” and her single Sirens has been played more than 100,000 times on Spotify and Soundcloud. The future is bright for the unique voice that is Rin McArdle.

ROD LADGROVE BAROSSA VALLEY

ABBEY HOWLETT

Frank Yamma is without a doubt one of Australia’s most significant Indigenous songwriters and performers. When Yamma sings, you listen and travel with him. An initiated Pitjantjatjara man from Australia’s central desert, he sings in his native language and English. Although he’s lived in Adelaide for many years, Yamma’s spirit belongs to the heart of Australia.

COONAWARRA AND THE SOUTH EAST

Gliding through earthy rhythmic tones, hypnotising melody and a voice that transcends dimensions, Abbey Howlett has created a significant buzz. Howlett introduced eclectic rhythms, loops and beats to her ever-expanding wilderness of talents; cutting and creating a unique experience. Morphing vintage acoustic melodies into colourful percussive vocal loops and blending hip hop and soul in a uniquely creative ways, Howlett provokes memories of greats such as Bjork, Erykah Badu, Lauryn Hill and Beth Gibbons.

WASTED WANDERERS ADELAIDE HILLS

Wasted Wanderers are hard to define. With backgrounds in rock, pop, blues and folk, the results don’t fall into just one genre. From the rich and earthy lead vocals of Dusty Lee Stephensen, to the gorgeous soulful backing

vocals, there’s a classic, almost vintage, vibe to the delivery of lyrics. In the rhythm and percussion sections, Matt Birkin and Benny Morris bring flair to the arrangements, demonstrative of a wide musical spectrum. From The Black Crowes to Grizzly Bear and Augie March, the diverse influences are part of the appeal of the Wasted Wanderers.

In the midst of a massive 2016, which has seen Ladgrove become a Spotify chill staple with two million listeners, Ladgrove continues the journey inward, one breath at a time, taking on life’s big things. With early blogs making intimidating Bob Dylan comparisons, Ladgrove keeps it cool on Home is Just a State of Mind, his signature plaintive strum mixing with ethereal harmonies and dreamy lyrics builds on a massive 2016.


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104.

105.

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BOTANIC GARDENS RESTAURANT The acclaimed restaurant hosted the Hot 100 judges and sponsors for an exclusive meal prepared by chef Paul Baker

PINK MOON SALOON The Hot 100 judges enjoyed an evening of fine food and wine at the award-winning Pink Moon Saloon

BEHIND THE TASTINGS The behind the scenes action of the tastings at TAFE’s Regency Campus


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106.

107.

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TAFE SA AWARD RULE BREAKERS The only rule is there are no rules By Tony Adey –––––––

TAFE SA has been a major sponsor of the Hot 100 Wines for many years and has previously been proudly associated with the Dreamers and Believers category (winemakers who were prepared to challenge and go outside the norm). 2016 sees the Hot 100 initiate a number of changes to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the wine show and publication. Amongst the changes is the introduction of a new classification – Rule Breakers (the only rule is there are no rules). Katharine Hepburn once said: “If you obey all the rules you miss all the fun.” How true for the winemakers who were bold enough to enter their wines as Rule Breakers. If there was someone who could speak for Rule Breakers, it was Rick Wakeman – keyboard player and songwriter for the bans YES – who broke the rules of rock music for decades: “I always say that it’s about breaking the rules. But the secret of breaking rules in a way that works, is understanding what the rules are in the

first place.” This sums up the winemaker’s approach to this new category. TAFE SA, through its innovative Graduate Certificate in Entrepreneurship of Food and Wine, sees an opportunity to encourage the rule breakers develop the skills to understand the rules and break the norms of their industry. Participation in this program will provide the platform to foster the creation and development of niche businesses in a local, national and global world.

Katharine Hepburn once said: “If you obey all the rules you miss all the fun.” How true for the winemakers who were bold enough to enter their wines as Rule Breakers.

Winner BRASH HIGGINS––– NDV 2015 Nero d’Avola, McLaren Vale

DogRidge Cellar Door, Gallery and Vineyards 129 Bagshaws Road, McLaren Flat | 8383 0140 | Open 7 days. 11am – 5pm | dogridge.com.au |

DogRidge

Only 45 minutes drive from Adelaide CBD - Taste the wines, see the art, meet the dogs


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108.

109.

ALPHA BOX & DICE 2015

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K1 BY GEOFF HARDY

DEAD WINEMAKERS SOCIETY

2015 PINOT NOIR

DOLCETTO

ADELAIDE HILLS

ADELAIDE HILLS

Highly drinkable: complex acid line with a bright crisp crunch of fruit and a very pleasant flow through the palate.

Fragrant with refined elegance. Sour cherries on an aromatic forest floor. Fresh and fleshy fruit. Stylish.

–––– Reds ––––

FRUIT F O R WA R D WITH FINESSE South Australia’s environment is conductive to fruit forward wines. Shiraz is the king of fruit forward and full wines but Cabernets, Durifs, Petit Verdots, Merlots and Mataros are other examples.

SHINGLEBACK

SHINGLEBACK

2015 LOCAL HEROES

2015

SHIRAZ GRENACHE

RED KNOT

MCLAREN VALE

GRENACHE SHIRAZ MOURVEDRE MCLAREN VALE

Vibrant black cherries and solid gritty tannins.

A delicate nose of cherries and berries. Finishes with a little heat.

HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

LLOYD BROTHERS 2014 ADELAIDE HILLS SYRAH ADELAIDE HILLS

Lovely white spice of pepper and black fruits. Medium to full bodied but very classy.


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110.

111.

VANGUARDIST WINES

919 WINES

BLACK BISHOP

2015 TOURIGA NACIONAL

2015 GSM

THE LOON

2015 GRENACHE

RIVERLAND

CLARE VALLEY

SHIRAZ

Fascinating spectrum: watermelon, cherry pip and good flavour persistence. A touch of wet rock and sour acidity increases the drinkability.

Dark, brooding fruit accompanied by some green notes. These provide freshness and lift, and results in a juicy texture and a full bodied wine that is actually good to drink.

MCLAREN VALE

You will fall in love with the lithe easy nature of this wine.

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HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

TORBRECK 2015

BAROSSA VALLEY

Tightly coiled with dark spice and sooty tannins.

YALUMBA 2014 VINE VALE GRENACHE BAROSSA VALLEY

Sexy. Fragrant. Pure.

* Book now for your upcoming Christmas function Contact us on 8232 3444 for more information * RESTAURANT BLACKWOOD 285 RUNDLE STREET

P: 8232 3444

E: INFO@RESTAURANTBLACKWOOD.COM

RESTAURANTBLACKWOOD.COM


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112.

#HOT100WINES

113.

BRASH HIGGINS

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HENSCHKE 2013 THE ROSE GROWER

2015 NDV

NEBBIOLO

NERO D’AVOLA

EDEN VALLEY

MCLAREN VALE

Fruits of the forest, nettles and green herbs. Chalky yet savoury. Gimme more.

–––– Reds/Whites ––––

RULE BREAKERS The only rule is: there are no rules

laissez les bon temps rouler

28 Vardon Ave, Adelaide Function Enquiries: Cheers@nolaadelaide.com /NOLAAdelaide

/NOLAAdelaide

An intriguing balance of sweet and sour. Leavy and savoury. Delicate fruit on the palate.

HOT 100 WINES 2016/17


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GOLDEN CHILD WINES 2016 BEACH BUM ROSÉ PINOT NOIR ADELAIDE HILLS

Beautiful salmon-like orange colour. Tight acid. Textural with crunchy fruit and tomato leaf notes.

KOERNER WINE 2016 PIGATO VERMENTINO CLARE VALLEY

Exotic fruit. Refreshing clean acid line. Delicate fruit on palate. Clean minerality. Highly drinkable.

115.

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116.

NEW CBD SHOWROOM 223 PULTENEY ST ADELAIDE SHOWROOM BY APPOINTMENT

Judges

PREVIOUS JUDGES ––––––– 2006 - 2015 –––––––

A heartfelt thank you to all the Hot 100 judges, who, over the last decade, have helped us find the state’s most drinkable wines.

Alex MacKenzie

Fraser McKinley

Lim Hwee Peng

Samantha Connew

Amanda Yallop

Gabrielle Poy

Louise Radman

Sebastian Crowther

Andre Bishop

Gareth Belton

Matt Wallace

Sharon Romeo

Andrea Frost

Gill Gordon Smith

Max Allen

Sophie Otton

Andrew Guard

Glenn James Pritchard

Michael Andrewartha

Steph Dutton

Andrew Jefford

James Erskine

Michael Ellis

Stephen George

Angas Buchanan

Jane Faulkner

Mike Bennie

Stephen Henschke

Anton van Klopper

Jeni Port

Necia Wilden

Stephen Pannell

Ashley Huntington

Jeremy Prideux

Ned Goodwin

Steven Ter Horst

Banjo Harris Plane

John Duval

Nick Ryan

Sue Bastian

Brad Hickey

Joshua Picken

Nick Stock

Taku Sugaya

Brendon Keys

Julian Forwood

Pablo Theodoros

Taras Ochota

Charlie Seppelt

Justin Lane

Patrick Sullivan

Teresa Heuzenroeder

Daniel Honan

Justine Henschke

Pete Schell

Tom Riley

Daniel Parrott

Katrina Birchmeir

Peter Dredge

Travis Tausend

David Brookes

Kerri Thompson

Rhys Howlett

Tristan Habeck

Derek Hooper

Koen Janssens

Rodger Haden

Vanessa Altman

Eric Semmler

Leanne Altmann

Sam Hughes

Yutaka Ozaki

1000CHAIRS.COM.AU

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JUDGES ––––––––

119.

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HOTTEST ––––– WINE LABEL ELDERSLIE HILLS BLEND #1

ANDREW DOWNER––– Freelance creative

THE ART OF THE WINE LABEL

A wine label can make or break a brand, as what is on the bottle is just as important as what is in the bottle. By Andrew Downer –––––––

We introduced the Hottest Wine Label as part of this year’s Hot 100 to recognise the design talent that helps market our great products across the world. The wine label has shaped South Australia’s design culture as it is the backbone to many studios in South Australia. A specialty not for every designer, there is an art to capturing the unique nature of the juice in the bottle, where it comes from and the creative person behind the wine, as well as designing something visually appealing and unique to the customer at the point of purchase.

From early pioneers such as Wytt Morro to Barrie Tucker and Ian Kidd in the ‘80s and ‘90s through to contemporary designers such as Barbara Harkness, KSD, Parallax, Mash and Voice, these people have shaped the wine label and pushed the boundaries of design, not only in Australia, but internationally. With the Hottest Wine Label award, our aim is to celebrate excellence in wine packaging design. We judged the entries on originality, creativity, functionality and print production.

––– Designer: Parallax This is a striking label. The design sits outside of current label trends and gives the wine a distinct and unique personality. 

SHANE KEANE––– AGDA SA - Charirman

DAVID KNIGHT––– Editor -The Adelaide Review

TAMRAH PETRUZZELLI––– Brand, Marketing & Advertising Manager The Adelaide Review, Hot 100 Wines

Like the wine within, the design is contemporary, intriguing and unique. ––– The concept The combination of the two minds behind the wine is clearly and finely executed. We feel the combination of the two portraits draw the viewer in, demanding a closer look.  Overall, this label sets a high standard in concept and execution and is a fine example of South Australian design.

SECOND –––––––––– MARK REGINATO––– Connect Vines - Purveyor Man of Spirit - Inventor

CHAFFEY BROS. WINE CO. PAX AETERNA ––– Designer: In-house design featuring art by Leah Grant

SABAS RENTERIA––– Design Director - Opinion Media

THIRD –––––––––––– PETER WHITE––– International Sales Director - Multi-Color

GOLDEN CHILD WINES BEACH BUM ROSÉ ––– Designer: Brady&Co

click : www.majellawines.com.au call : 08 8736 3055 email : admin@majellawines.com.au


HOT100 WINES2017 CALENDAR –––––––––

FEBRUARY 10-11

First-time riders only. Expires 31/01/17.

Hot 100 Harvest, location TBC

–––––––––––––

JUNE

Hot 100 Wines season launch

–––––––––––––

JULY

Hot 100 Wines Singapore event

–––––––––––––

JULY

Submissions open for Hot 100 Wines

–––––––––––––

SEPTEMBER Submissions close

–––––––––––––

OCTOBER 30

Hot 100 judging commences for 2017/18 season

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

adelaidereview.com.au

#hot100wines


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HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

WINE INDEX

––––––––– ––––––

#

919 WINES 2015 Touriga Nacional ––––––– 110

ALPHA BOX & DICE 2015 Dead Winemaker’s Society Dolcetto ––––––– 109

ANDERSON HILL 2016 The Chuckling Sauvignon Blanc ––––––– 41

ANGOVE FAMILY WINEMAKERS 2015 Family Crest Shiraz ––––––– 97

ATZE’S CORNER 2014 The Giant Durif ––––––– 97

AXIOM WINES 2013 Mathieu GSM ––––––– 89

––––––

B

BANROCK STATION 2015 The Boardwalk Montepulciano ––––––– 82

BETHANY WINES 2014 LE Shiraz ––––––– 98

–––––––

C

CAPE JAFFA 2014 Epic Drop Shiraz ––––––– 98

CATLIN WINES 2014 Shiraz ––––––– 90

Hot 10 Wine BIRD IN HAND 2016 Riesling ––––––– 31

CHAFFEY BROS. WINE CO. 2016 Düfte Punkt ––––––– 52 2016 Pax Aeterna Grenache ––––––– 81

CHAPEL HILL

––––––

A

#HOT100WINES

122.

2016 Grüner Veltliner ––––––– 42 2012 Nest Egg Chardonnay ––––––– 54 2015 Chardonnay ––––––– 54

BK WINES 2014 Mazi Syrah ––––––– 98

BLACK BISHOP

–––––––

D

Hot 10 Wine

ELDERSLIE WINES 2016 Hills Blend #1 ––––––– 42

––––––

F

–––––––

G

2015 The Noble Wrinkled Riesling ––––––– 57

DABBLEBROOK WINES 2016 Long Lunch Grenache Rosé ––––––– 72

DEVIATION ROAD 2016 Grüner Veltliner ––––––– 46

DOGRIDGE Fortified Viognier ––––––– 77

2012 Abbotts Prayer Merlot Cabernet ––––––– 92 2013 Rose Grower Nebbiolo ––––––– 113

HENTLEY FARM 2016 Brass Monkey Vineyards Pinot Grigio ––––––– 43

HEWITSON 2015 Ned and Henry’s Shiraz ––––––– 98

HICKINBOTHAM 2014 Brooks Road Shiraz ––––––– 98

HOLLICK 2014 Stock Route Shiraz Cabernet Sauvignon ––––––– 92

Hot 10 Wine HOWARD VINEYARD 2016 Cabernet Franc Rosé ––––––– 32

GEMTREE 2015 Luna Roja Tempranillo ––––––– 89

GLAETZER 2015 Wallace Shiraz Grenache ––––––– 89

GOLDEN CHILD WINES 2016 Beach Bum Rosé ––––––– 114

GUTHRIE WINES

BRASH HIGGINS

2015 Eden Valley Riesling ––––––– 31

2016 Riesling ––––––– 42

CRFT WINES 2016 Grüner Veltliner ––––––– 46

2015 The Noble Mud Pie Viognier Arneis ––––––– 30

BURGE FAMILY WINEMAKERS

EDEN HALL WINES

2015 Nero D’avola ––––––– 97

BLEASDALE

Hot 10 Wine

E

FOX GORDON

D’ARENBERG

2015 NDV Nero D’avola ––––––– 113

––––––

2015 The Parson GSM ––––––– 92

2015 GSM ––––––– 110

2014 Powder Monkey Shiraz ––––––– 89

DUTSCHKE WINES Sun-dried Shiraz ––––––– 77

2015 Ashton Pinot Noir ––––––– 92

––––––––

H

HEIRLOOM VINEYARDS 2016 Pinot Grigio ––––––– 42 2015 Touriga ––––––– 92

HENSCHKE 2015 Johann’s Garden GMS ––––––– 90

123.

–––––

L

LA PROVA 2016 Fiano ––––––– 46

LANDAIRE 2015 Tempranillo ––––––– 82

LLOYD BROTHERS 2014 Adelaide Hills Syrah ––––––– 109

K

K1 BY GEOFF HARDY 2014 Shiraz ––––––– 98 2015 Pinot Noir ––––––– 109

KALLESKE WINES 2015 JMK Shiraz VP ––––––– 77

KIRRIHILL 2016 Regional Selection Riesling ––––––– 41

KNAPPSTEIN 2014 Insider Riesling ––––––– 45

KOERNER WINE 2016 Pigato Vermentino ––––––– 114

––––––––

N

Hot 10 Wine

M

MAJELLA WINES 2016 Riesling ––––––– 43

2015 Chardonnay ––––––– 42

MICHAEL HALL 2014 Syrah ––––––– 99

MITOLO WINES 2016 Ninfea Grenache Rosé ––––––– 72

MUSTER WINES 2016 Rosé ––––––– 71 2015 Shiraz ––––––– 89

Hot 10 Wine MR. MICK 2015 Novo Sangiovese ––––––– 29

OLIVER’S TARANGA 2016 Chica Mencia Rosé ––––––– 72

––––––

P

NEPENTHE

PAXTON WINES 2016 NOW Shiraz ––––––– 81

PATRITTI

2016 Queenie Pinot Grigio ––––––– 44 2016 Nebbiolo Rosato ––––––– 71

––––––––

2016 The Price of Silence Gamay ––––––– 90

2015 Good Doctor Pinot Noir ––––––– 33

LONGVIEW VINEYARD

MARKO’S VINEYARD

––––––

2014 Tempranillo ––––––– 90

2006 Fortified Viognier ––––––– 77

PENFOLDS 2015 Winemaker’s Selection Viognier ––––––– 45 2015 Winemaker’s Selection Arneis ––––––– 45 2015 Ithica Chardonnay ––––––– 52 2014 Winemaker’s Select Shiraz Viognier ––––––– 89

2015 Max’s Chardonnay ––––––– 54

Hot 10 Wine

_______________________

––––––

–––––––––

Hot 10 Wine

2015 Esperanza Touriga Nacional ––––––– 82

SCHWARZ WINE CO

2015 Langhorne Creek Shiraz ––––––– 90

S

2015 Meta Mataro ––––––– 33

SHINGLEBACK 2015 Local Heroes Shiraz Grenache ––––––– 109 2015 Red Knot Grenache Shiraz Mourvedre ––––––– 109

PENNA LANE WINES

ST HALLETT WINES

2015 Watervale Riesling ––––––– 34

2015 Touriga Nacional ––––––– 32

O

2016 The Lucky Punter Sauvignon Blanc ––––––– 43

Hot 10 Wine OCHOTA BARRELS 2015 I am the Owl Syrah ––––––– 30

WIRRA WIRRA

WOLF BLASS

–––––––

V

VANGUARDIST 2015 Grenache ––––––– 110

VERTIGO 2016 25GR Riesling ––––––– 57

2016 Park Wine / Red Dolcetto ––––––– 82

––––––

Y

YALUMBA

2014 Viognier ––––––– 54

O’LEARY WALKER WINES

W

VINTELOPER

Hot 10 Wine

NGERINGA VINEYARDS

–––––––

HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

2015 Skilly Valley Riesling ––––––– 41

2015 Shiraz ––––––– 92

PEWSEY VALE

––––––

2011 The Contours Riesling ––––––– 46 2016 Prima Riesling ––––––– 57

PIONEER ROAD 2016 Shiraz ––––––– 99

––––––

R

RIESLINGFREAK 2016 Eden Valley Riesling ––––––– 43

T

TEMPLE BRUER WINES 2015 Wildflowers of Eden Dry Rosé ––––––– 72 2016 Shiraz ––––––– 90

2015 The Virgilius Viognier ––––––– 54 2014 Vine Vale Grenache ––––––– 111

––––––

Z

Z WINE 2016 Saul Riesling ––––––– 42

TORBRECK 2015 The Loon Shiraz ––––––– 111

–––––––– 2016/2017 Wine Index


_______________________

HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

RESPECT THE PAST

The Hot 100 honour roll of past winners

#HOT100WINES

124.

125.

_______________________

A

2015

The Other Wine Co. Grenache 2015 McLaren Vale

E

B

2014 The Gentle Folk Blossoms 2014 Adelaide Hills C

2013

Lofty Valley Wines Steeped Pinot Noir 2012 Adelaide Hills D

2012

B

F

Domaine Lucci Noir de Florette 2012 Adelaide Hills E

2011

U N E A R T H I N G F R E S H F L AVO U R S F R O M G A R D E N TO P L AT E .

919 Pale Dry Apera 919 Wines Riverland

A

F

2010

C

G

Yalumba The Virgilius Viognier 2008 Eden Valley G

2009

Yalumba FDW 7C Chardonnay 2008 Adelaide Hills H

2008

H

Spinifex Indigene 2006 I

2007 D

S.C. Pannell Shiraz Grenache 2005

I

Restaurant | Weddings | Functions | P: 08 8223 3526 | botanicgardensrestaurant.com.au

HOT 100 WINES 2016/17


HOT 100 WINES 2016/17

_______________________

#HOT100WINES

126.

SPECIAL THANKS TO ALL THE WINERIES THAT SUBMITTED THIS YEAR

THANK YOU By Tamrah Petruzzelli –––––––

When people say time flies when you’re having fun, they aren’t joking. I have been involved with the Hot 100 Wines for nine years and over that time I have been influenced, challenged and learnt more than I ever thought I could. I have worked with a plethora of inspiring people over the journey including winemakers, educators and journalists, cheese makers and brewers, saké masters and chocolatiers, chefs and restaurateurs. There are no boundaries with the Hot 100, we all come together for the love of food and wine and a want to find South Australia’s most drinkable wines. This year, I had a huge team of legends that, as always, helped to put the show and surrounding events on. Starting with the team from The Adelaide Review – who not only put up with me and my “crazy ideas’ that meant more work for them and never complained – thank you! A special thanks to Maria Underwood

who, without her guidance and help, this project would not be possible. Thank you to our judges for your investment, your time, your passion and presence and your continued ambassadorship. Thank you to our stewards, many of whom travel from other states to be part of the tasting week, and have stewarded many times before. A special thank you to Lisa Ranson who stepped in and stepped up in leading the stewarding team with professionalism while our Head Steward Trevor Maskell and his wife Gina welcomed the wonderful arrival of their twins Ruby and Winnie. To the senior staff of TAFE SA, who not only accommodate us but collaborate with us, and especially Tony Adey – who has been a real anchor as part of the Hot 100 competition and who has an unwavering positive attitude where no problem is unsolvable – a million times thank you.

A big part of my role as Project Manager of Hot 100 is creating a cultural context for our judges to experience during tasting week. A special thank you to Crispian from Pink Moon Saloon, Joanne, Paul, Steve and Christopher from Botanic Gardens Restaurant, Taras and Nick from Lost in a Forest and Museum of Botany curator Tony Kanellos. The Hot 100 calendar is an every growing one. This year, we made a brave decision to hold our first international event in Singapore which was in line with the South Australian Government delegation. A special thanks to Minister Leon Bignell, Karen Raffen, Marni Ladd, Nick Ryan, Dan Sims, Banjo Harris Plane, Lim Hwee Peng, Andrew Cameron and the staff from Unlisted Collection. This year sees the end of an era with my band of brothers Banjo Harris Plane and Trevor Maskell stepping down. Over many years we have shared many ideas, tears and drinks. So firstly to Banjo

– thank you for all of your hard work and for growing Hot 100 Wines into what it is today. Last but not least to Trevor. What a wonderful many years it has been! Your passion and dedication to this show has been like no other. And most importantly – thank you to all the wineries that submitted this year and congratulations to all the wineries that made it into this year’s Hot 100 wines – I look forward to seeing you on our events circuit throughout the year. Thank you to everyone – from this year back to when we started in 2007 – who have added their special something to the vinous fabric that is the Hot 100 Wines. Thank you and see you next year!

TAMRAH PETRUZZELLI––– Project Manager

2 Mates Wines

Cimicky Wines

Hahndorf Hill Winery

Langmeil Winery

Paxton Wines

Tenafeate Creek Wines

919 Wines

Cirillo Estate Wines

Haselgrove Wines

Lansdowne Vineyard

Penfolds

Terre a Terre

AJ CJ Mitchell

Claymore Wines

Hastwell & Lightfoot

Laughing Jack Wines

Penley Estate

The Black Chook

Alpha Box & Dice

Commune of Buttons

Head in the Clouds wines

Leconfield

Penna Lane Wines

The Deanery Vineyards

Amadio Wines

Coomunga Wines

HEAD Wines

Light’s View Wines

Penny’s Hill

The Islander Estate Vineyards

Anderson Hill

Cooter & Cooter

Heartland Wines

Lindeman’s

Petaluma

The Lane Vineyard

Andrew Garrett

Corduroy Wines

Hedonist Wines

Lino Ramble

Pewsey Vale

The Pawn Wine Co

Angove Family Winemakers

Coriole

Heirloom Vineyards

Lloyd Brothers

Pioneer Road

The Stoke Wines

Annie’s Lane at Quelltaler

Crabtree Watervale Wines

Henry’s Drive Vignerons

Lofty Valley Wines

Places Winery

The Thief?

Anvers Wines

Cragg Cru Wines

Henschke

Lonely Vineyard

Portrait

This Was Tomorrow

Aphelion Wine Co.

CRFT Wines

Hentley Farm

Longview Vineyard

Pruner’s Hut

Thomas Goss

Aramis Vineyards

Dabblebrook Wines

Hersey Vineyard

Loom SV Wines

Purple Hands Wines

Thorn-Clarke Wines

Artwine

Dandelion Vineyards

Hesketh Wines

Lost Buoy Wines

Redbrix

Three Dark Horses

Atze’s Corner

d’Arenberg

Hewitson

Lou Miranda Estate

RedHeads Wine

Tidswell Wines

Axiom Wines

Delinquente Wine Co

Hickinbotham

Main & Cherry

Reillys Wines

Tim Adams Wines

Banrock Station

Deviation Road

Hill & Valley

Majella Wines

Richard Hamilton Wines

Tim Gramp Wines

Basket Range Wines

Doc Adams

Hither&Yon

Marko’s Vineyard

Rieslingfreak

Tomfoolery Wines

Battle of Bosworth Wines

Dodgy Bros

Hollick

Massena

Rileys of Eden Valley

Tomich Wines

Bendbrook Wines

DogRidge

Honey Moon Vineyard

McGuigan Wines

Rockbare

Tonic Wines

Beresford Wines

Dominic Versace

Howard Vineyard

Melton Wines

Rojomoma

Torbreck

Bethany Wines

Dowie Doole

Hugh Hamilton Wines

Michael Hall

Rusty Bike Wines

Torzi Matthews Vintners

Bird in Hand

Down The Rabbit Hole

Hugo Wines

Ministry of Clouds

Rusty Mutt Wines

Tscharke Wines

BK Wines

Dutschke Wines

Irvine Wines

Minko Wines

Salena Estate Wines

Turkey Flat Vineyards

Black Bishop Wines

Eccolo

Ius Wines

Mitolo Wines

Saltram

Turon Wines

Black Stump

Eden Hall Wines

Jeanneret Wines

Mojo

Samuel’s Gorge

Unico Zelo

Bleasdale

Elderslie

Jericho Wines

Mollydooker Wines

Scarpantoni Estate

Vanguardist Wines

Bondar Wines

Eldredge Vineyards

Jim Barry Wines

Mosquito Hill

Schild Estate Wines

Verdun Park Wines

Boston Bay Wines

ess&see Winemakers

Jim Brand

Mountadam Vineyards

Schwarz Wine Co

Vickery

Bowen Estate

Finniss River

John Duval Wines

Mr. Mick

Scott Wines

Vigna Bottin

Brackenwood

First Drop Wines

K1 by Geoff Hardy

Mr. Riggs

Shaw + Smith

Vinrock Wines

Brash Higgins

Five o’clock Somewhere

Kalleske Wines

Mt Billy Wines

Shingleback

Vinteloper

Braydun Hill

Fox Creek Wines

Kangarilla Road Wines

Mt Lofty Ranges Vineyard

Shottesbrooke Vineyards

Wakefield/Taylors Wines

Bremerton Wines

Fox Gordon

Karrawatta

Murdoch Hill

Shut the Gate Wines

Wangolina

Brini Estate Wines

Galway Pipe

Kay Brothers Amery

Muster Wines

Sidewood Estate

WayWood Wines

Brothers in Arms

Gemtree

Kellermeister

Nepenthe

Sieber Wines

Whistler

Browns of Padthaway

Gentle Folk Wines

Kies Family Wines

Next Crop Wines

Sigurd Wines

Whistling Kite Vineyard

Burge Family Winemakers

Geoff Weaver Wines

Kilikanoon Wines

Ngeringa Vineyards

Sister’s Run Winery

Wines by Geoff Hardy

Byrne Vineyards

Georges Exile

Kingston Estate Wines

Nick Haselgrove Wines

SKEW Wine Co.

Wirra Wirra

Cape Barren Wines

Gestalt Wines

Kirrihill Wines

Norfolk Rise Vineyard

Spider Bill Wines

Wolf Blass

Cape Jaffa Wines

Gibson Wines

Knappstein

Norton Summit Vineyards

St Hallett Wines

Woodstock Wine Estate

Catlin Wines

Gipsie Jack Wine Company

Koerner Wine

Nova Vita Wines

St John’s Road

Yalumba & Hill Smith Family

Caudo Vineyard

Glaetzer Wines

Koonowla

Ochota Barrels

Stage Door Wine Co

Vineyards

Caught Redhanded wines

Golden Child Wines

La Bise

O’Leary Walker Wines

Stone Bridge Wines

Yangarra Estate Vineyard

Chaffey Bros. Wine Co.

Golding Wines

La Linea

Oliver’s Taranga Vineyards

Switch Organic Wine

Year Wines

Chain of Ponds

Gomersal Wines

La Prova

Paracombe Premium Wines

Tatachilla Winery

Yelland & Papps

Chalk Hill Wines

Grand Casino Wines

Lake Breeze Wines

Patrick of Coonawarra

Temple Bruer Wines

Z Wine

Chapel Hill

Green Road Wines

Lambrook Wines

Patritti

Tempus Two

Charlotte Dalton Wines

Guthrie Wines

Landaire

Paul Morris Wines

Ten Miles East


#HOT100WINES


Hot 100 Wines South Australia - 2016/17  

An Adelaide Review Publication

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