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THEY ARE HERE FOR US. WE NEED TO BE THERE FOR THEM.

Atlanta Fire Rescue Foundation, Inc. 2019 Annual Report


ATLANTA FIRE RESCUE FOUNDATION, INC. | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT


TABLE OF CONTENTS STATEMENT

1

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

2

MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIRMAN

4

LETTER FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

5

YOUTH PATHWAY PROGRAMS Camp Ignite

8

AFRD Cadet Program

10

ADOPT A FIRE STATION

11

TUITION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (TAP)

13

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT Breakfast with Our Bravest (BWOB)

16

Station 16 Holiday Party

20

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Financial Position

22

Activities

23

Statement of Cash Flows

24

2019 Functional Expenses

25

2018 Functional Expenses

26

MILESTONES

27


WHO WE ARE. WHAT WE DO. WHY WE SERVE. The Atlanta Fire Rescue Foundation (AFRF) is a nonprofit organization that is independent of the City of Atlanta but works closely with the Mayor and the Fire Chief. The AFRF raises funds through individual monetary and in-kind donations, community partnerships, and corporate sponsorships. AFRF is essential to funding critical and unmet needs at a time when the day-in-the-life of a firefighter never looked so different.

VISION To make Atlanta a safe, prepared and nationally leading city in fire safety and protection.

MISSION The Atlanta Fire Rescue Foundation supports Atlanta Fire Rescue Department in saving lives and property by providing essential equipment, training and community engagement to enhance city resources.

Photo Credit: IngImage

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ATLANTA FIRE RESCUE FOUNDATION, INC. | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

YOUNG EXECUTIVES BOARD

Chairman: Addison Meriwether

Chair: Jim Sturm

Executive Director, Cushman & Wakefield

Associate Counsel, Margaritaville Enterprises

Vice-Chair: Jeffrey Butterworth

Vice-Chair: Adam Parker

External Affairs Manager, Georgia Power

Director, Carter

Treasurer: Debbie McGlaun

Eric Hamilton

Senior Manager, Smith & Howard

Firefighter, Atlanta Fire Station 16

Secretary: Pat Warner

Cedric Matheny

Vice President of Culture, Waffle House

Principal & Vice President, Dallas Smith & Company LLC

TAP Chair: Hany Y. Atallah

Brandon Ralston

MD, Grady Health System

S&O Process Leader, DiversiTech Corp.

Governance Chair: Jacques Murphy

Corey Slaughter

AFRF Board Chair, 2013-2018 Retired Chairman of the Board, Buckhead Coalition

Firefighter, Atlanta Fire Station 16

Ashley Stukes-West Senior Public Relations and Corporate Communication Specialist, Georgia Power

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Sam Williams

Ryan Anderson

U.S. Attorney's Office, Northern District of Georgia

Vice-President, Synovus

Erich Meier

Jeff Maggs

Senior Account Manager, Brunner

Managing Director, Brunner

Perri Nitzberg

Marcus Margerum

Account Executive, Chemistry

VP of Government & Community Affairs, Atlanta Convention & Visitors Bureau

STAFF MEMBERS

Christopher Matthews

Shirley Anne Smith

Tax Partner, PWC

Executive Director

Dennis Moon

Vonda Malbrough

Head of Operations, Roadie

Development Director

Justice Nwaigwe

Captain Craig Simmons

District Manager, Wells Fargo

AFRD, Retired, Program Director

Jeffrey Nix

Kiara Alexandra Ostolaza-Artreches

Attorney, Taylor English

Intern

Jeff Perry Nelson Mullins, Of Counsel

Katelyn Stewart Director of Practice Growth, Windham Brannon

ADVISORY BOARD MEMBERS Charles Meriwether Cynthia Williams Mark Zimmerman

ATLANTA FIRE RESCUE FOUNDATION, INC. | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

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Photo Credit: IngImage


MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIRMAN As we enter a new decade, we are encountering challenges in our community we have never contemplated. Now more than ever, we need to be assured our city is safe. The Atlanta Fire Rescue Foundation conveys a vision for a safe and prepared City of Atlanta.  Today’s firefighters must be ready for all of the hazards that threaten the property, residents and guests of our City. Fire service does not shelter in place or work from home. The members of the Atlanta Fire Rescue Department are the soldiers against all things that threaten our safety and property. As a city, as a community and as individuals, we must collectively ensure those on the front lines are prepared to protect. Tax revenue is the primary funding source of a fire service in any city. The reality of budget constraints limit available dollars to sufficiently meet the needs of a 1,100 member department serving a city that is home to nearly 500,000 residents, and a daytime population that swells to twice that number. This is the case in the City of Atlanta which also serves as the economic hub for the region's six million residents. The Atlanta Fire Rescue Foundation cultivates public-private partnerships to assist in meeting the critical needs of firefighters. We are grateful for strong corporate partners who want to protect their businesses and employees. We value partnerships with the hospitality and entertainment industries that have keen interest in keeping their guests and patrons safe. We are thankful for committed residents, civic organizations and philanthropic foundations that have a deep-seated desire to bolster a solid fire department. Safety does not occur without preparedness and success does not happen without leadership.  The significance of leadership and collaboration between the City of Atlanta, the Atlanta Fire Rescue Department and the Atlanta Fire Rescue Foundation have allowed for an enhanced department and a safer Atlanta. It is a constant campaign to be the best trained, equipped and educated department.  It requires continuous investment in its members as well as commitment from the community. We must commit to serving those who yearn to run toward the danger and to serve in our darkest hour. The Atlanta Fire Rescue Foundation invites you to be good stewards of those who serve. As I reflect on my time as part of the leadership team with the Foundation, I am so proud of how the entire community has begun to view the fire service through a different lens. I challenge all to step forward and to make the women and men who are the firefighters, paramedics and emergency medical technicians of our beloved city – a priority. Let crisis avoidance drive you to act rather than a crisis to drive you to react.

Addison H. Meriwether Chairman Atlanta Fire Rescue Foundation, Inc.

ATLANTA FIRE RESCUE FOUNDATION, INC. | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

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LETTER FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Dear Atlanta Fire Rescue Foundation Supporter: Since 2016, I have had the honor and privilege of leading the Atlanta Fire Rescue Foundation (AFRF) as Executive Director. Having worked with the Girl Scouts and having been a Girl Scout and pledged to the motto “make the world a better place,” I knew that AFRF was the perfect platform to make a difference in our community and the City of Atlanta. The Atlanta Fire Rescue Foundation, Inc. was established in 2004 as the sole public safety foundation devoted to supporting firefighters in their efforts to save lives and property in the City of Atlanta. Fifteen years later, the Foundation continues its commitment to the women and men of the Fire Rescue Department including the promotion and advancement of public safety for the region. This is our inaugural Annual Report to the community. This year’s mantra was “Step Forward.” Armed with the support of friends, neighbors and gifts from donors, we stepped forward to champion Atlanta’s firefighters in ways that have transformed the local landscape and strengthened our foothold as a national leader in the fire industry.” 2019 Milestones of the Atlanta Fire Rescue Foundation: • Commissioned a pay study, in partnership with the City of Atlanta, which resulted in the Mayor and City Council approving a 25 percent base pay salary increase for all AFRD firefighters; • Raised $218,000 in unrestricted funds at our signature fundraiser, Breakfast With Our Bravest; • Launched Camp Ignite and the Cadet Program, two innovative youth pathways that introduce young women and men, ages 14-18, to careers in the fire and emergency medical services industry; • Funded 20% of all equipment and supplies for the city’s fire stations to enhance daily, critical resources; and • Supported Station 16 and its nearly 50-year Christmas tradition of holiday lunch and gifts. The annual community event brings together neighboring children and families of Vine City in Atlanta’s historic Westside. The sustainability of these funding programs is not possible without the substantial financial and in-kind support of our generous community. Our donors also took the pledge to “step forward” and their stewardship is making a difference for those who live, work and play in Atlanta. Thank you to all who have invested in our firefighters throughout the year. I am incredibly proud of the accomplishments to date, and I look ahead with optimism. I wholeheartedly, along with the Board of Directors, commit to the mission of our organization and the opportunity to replicate and to grow our success in years to come. Respectfully,

Shirley Anne Smith Executive Director

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ATLANTA FIRE RESCUE FOUNDATION, INC. | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT


ATLANTA MAYOR KEISHA LANCE BOTTOMS ANNOUNCES HISTORIC PAY RAISE • DECEMBER 11, 2019

Photo Credit: City of Atlanta


BREAKING BARRIERS “Thank you! Seeing other women just like me inspired me to continue to chase my dreams and still become a firefighter no matter what people around me think.” --Talia Williams, 17, Senior at Carver Early College High School

Photo Credit: Atlanta Fire Rescue Foundation


YOUTH PATHWAY PROGRAMS World Class Talent: The Next Generation of Atlanta’s Firefighters At a time when the day-in-the-life of a firefighter has never looked so different, cultivating the next generation of firefighters, EMTs and paramedics remains a top priority for the Foundation as a funding organization. To address this, program services have been developed and funded for youth pathways and young girls who have been otherwise underrepresented. Aligned with community partners including the City of Atlanta Office of the Mayor, United Way of Greater Atlanta and Chick-fil-A, pathway programs are proving instrumental in the effort to recruit and train young cadets and sustain a world-class pool of first responders for Atlanta. These best-in-class programs underscore AFRF’s mission to provide training for the underserved youth audience:

#GirlBoss An innovative outreach to recruit young women, ages 14-18, Camp Ignite is intentionally aligned with Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and her administration’s focus on opportunities and career training for the city’s youth. City of Atlanta firefighters are 1,100 members strong and male dominated. Each year more young women are expressing an interest in the cadet program as a result of Camp Ignite. Nationally, women represent only 4% of professional firefighters. In response, the Foundation launched Camp Ignite in 2019 with the vision of a rewarding mentorship experience for young women curious about a profession in fire service, EMS or public safety.

Photo Credit: Atlanta Fire Rescue Foundation

WATCH CAMP IGNITE IN ACTION! ATLANTA FIRE RESCUE FOUNDATION, INC. | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

8


Photo Credit: Atlanta Fire Rescue Foundation


In partnership with the Atlanta Fire Rescue Department (AFRD) , the Cadet Program is designed for men and women, ages 16-18 years old. Cadets work side by side with active and retired firefighters for a behind-the-scenes look at fire and emergency services. The Cadet Program serves to support AFRD’s long-term strategic goal to hire within the city and to reduce current vacancy rates. The program outreaches to young women and men at Atlanta Public Schools and Atlanta Technical College. The training regimen reveals the life of service in the fire industry and introduces Cadets to the expected principles and responsibilities of life at a public safety agency. Designed with high school students in mind and to improve college and career readiness, the pathway supports the United Way of Greater Atlanta’s goal to increase the child-wellness index for youth. Each Cadet participates in activities across five core areas: career opportunities, character development, life skills, leadership and citizenship. This includes hand-on experience in basic firefighting skills, hands-only CPR, emergency preparedness, tools and equipment maintenance, fire prevention and community service. These activities are designed to not only properly prepare a Cadet as a prospective firefighter and a candidate for the academy but also to promote the pursuit of productive citizenry and a more resilient community. All City of Atlanta firefighters are crossed trained. This year the Chick-fil-A Foundation stepped forward with a commitment to sponsor the youth program at Fire Station 16 on Atlanta’s historic Westside where they received instruction from real life firefighters. Nearly 20 young adults committed to seven months of Saturday morning classes to train in hose lays, extrication, climbing ladders, door and wall breach, search and rescue, arson investigation, CPR, physical agility, and rappelling. The training program expects to graduate it first class of Cadets in summer 2020. Upon graduation, these candidates are eligible for the firefighter academy and career opportunities with the Atlanta Fire Rescue Department.

Photo Credit: Atlanta Fire Rescue Foundation

MORE ABOUT THE AFRD CADETS ATLANTA FIRE RESCUE FOUNDATION, INC. | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

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ADOPT A FIRE STATION Neighbors Helping Neighbors Nearly all of the 36 City of Atlanta fire stations are located in residential neighborhoods with the exception of the stations at Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport. The idea to launch a program that allows neighbors and the community to adopt their local fire station is very personal. In 2016, Elizabeth Gill’s daughter died in a 5-alarm fire. The 911 call triggered all five of the Buckhead fire stations to the rescue. And while her daughter did not come out alive, Gill credits the firefighters for getting her daughter out of the burning apartment. It was profoundly important for Gill to give something back to the fearless men and women who rushed into the fire that night to search and rescue. The purpose of Adopt a Fire Station is to partner with the community in a collective effort and to provide basic enhancements to support a fire station’s public service capabilities, features and equipment. From office to kitchen to outdoor equipment and supplies including computers, dishes and lawn mowers, the partnership provides the essentials to operate a modern and efficient neighborhood fire station.

DID YOU KNOW?

There’s an average of 240 million 911 calls annually; 99% of those calls reach a firefighter first.

2019 Highlights • 8 of the 36 City of Atlanta fire stations were officially adopted through the Foundation’s initiative in its first year. • The inaugural program raised more than $74,000 in cash donations. • Program sponsors included Elizabeth Blake, Dan Gordon, Georgia Power, Novare Group, Rotary Club of Buckhead and Quincy Springs, IV.

Why Step Forward? “Firefighters go toward the direction of the fire … people need to understand the depth of that level of service.” – Quincy Springs, IV “…incredibly inspiring and so impressed with the level of sacrifice (firefighters) make to keep us safe and their deep connection to the community.” - Dan Gordon

WATCH ADOPT A FIRE STATION Buckhead Rotary Club

Elizabeth Blake • Dan Gordan • Quincy Springs, IV 11

ATLANTA FIRE RESCUE FOUNDATION, INC. | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT


Photo Credit: City of Atlanta


TUITION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (TAP) Never Stop Learning Benjamin Franklin said it best: “An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.” The Foundation values preparedness and recognizes that firefighters need the essential tools – both equipment and resources - to accomplish their daily mission with confidence and pride. A direct path to success starts with knowledge. More important than the number of TAP grants awarded each year and the funds allocated, the Foundation believes that the real value in a program like TAP is the learning experience, the practical knowledge and the discovery of how an education is converted into opportunity, a lifelong career and a future for a firefighter. The Tuition Assistance Program or TAP was launched to offer sworn and civilian members of the Atlanta Fire Rescue Department (AFRD) an opportunity to further their education. Tuition assistance is granted annually to eligible applicants with the following requirements: 1. must have completed AFRD employment probationary period; 2. not under any disciplinary probation of suspension at time of application; 3. agree to employment of service for two consecutive years following dispersion of assistance, otherwise must reimburse AFRF for all tuition assistance; and 4. working toward a degree from a university regionally accredited through the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA).

2019 Highlights • Associate’s, Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees are all being sought at the following institutions of higher learning by Atlanta firefighters who want to further their education. Because of the unpredictability of a firefighter’s schedule, classes are conducted online with occasional meet ups with fellow students and instructors.   Albany State University American Military University Atlanta Metropolitan State College Georgia Institute of Technology Kennesaw State University Liberty University Northern Arizona University West Georgia Tech West Texas A & M • More than $42,000 in tuition assistance was awarded to applicants in 2019. • 100% of the 23 firefighters who applied for tuition assistance were approved for the TAP program.

13

ATLANTA FIRE RESCUE FOUNDATION, INC. | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

Captain William Pearson


Captain Nick Golden

Q&A with Nick Golden, TAP Recipient

One of the first applicants of the Foundation’s TAP, Nick Golden graduated in 2020 with a degree in Homeland Security from American Military University. He is currently the Homeland Security Representative – the only person in this unique role - for the Atlanta Fire Rescue Department. Nick credits the Foundation but also, deservedly, his own personal drive and commitment to the four year degree he recently completed which ultimately landed him his ‘dream job.’ As a former firefighter, why are programs like TAP invaluable? “I encourage colleagues to take advantage of the tuition assistance. For anyone who wants to expand their career, it’s a no brainer. Beyond the Captain title, promotions are based on exams and appointments. Degrees are appealing to the Chief and will get you noticed. I’m grateful for the Foundation and opportunities like TAP. The program is an amazing incentive and it pushed me to go back to school. My studies absolutely boosted my confidence and credibility. I honestly do not think that I would have received the job offer for my current position without my degree.” What does the front line look like for you on any given day? “I’m inside the yellow tape on most of my calls as my responsibilities are to liaise with both Atlanta Fire, Atlanta Police and the FBI Task Force. I’m part of the team that answers to all City of Atlanta bomb threats, counter terrorism and active shooter incidents. I meet weekly with Fire Chief Slaughter’s office to brief his executive team and share vital information to maintain safety and order on behalf of the citizens of Atlanta.” Any interest in pursuing additional degrees, certificates or professional development courses? “Absolutely! I think I caught the school bug since graduating with my Homeland Security degree. When I began my professional career, I had only earned a two-year Associate’s degree mostly as a result of committing to the Coast Guard and transferring schools to follow life opportunities. There’s a Master’s degree in counter terrorism that I’m very interested in pursuing with available funding through the Department of Homeland Security. I might have rediscovered my love of learning.” ATLANTA FIRE RESCUE FOUNDATION, INC. | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

14


Left to Right: Dan Gordon, Shirley Anne Smith, Fire Chief Randall B. Slaughter, First Deputy Chief Byron Kennedy, Bentina Chilsom Terry, Addison Meriweter

Photo Credit: City of Atlanta


BREAKFAST WITH OUR BRAVEST (BWOB) The most important meal of the day, for the most important first responders. Considered the most important meal of the day, breakfast is the theme for this signature event and annual fundraiser for the AFRF. It’s a morning to officially recognize, honor and thank the most important first responders – the city’s fearless firefighters, paramedics and EMTs – who are surrounded and applauded by civic leadership, corporate and community supporters, private citizens, and peers. Affectionately known as ‘BWOB,’ this special event has become a tradition that everyone looks forward to, a unique gathering to catch up with friends old and new, and an opportunity to give a high five and a hug of appreciation and gratitude to Atlanta’s bravest. A decade ago, the Foundation knew one of the best ways to tell their story, elevate awareness of their mission and to raise significant funds was to host a memorable event. The dollars raised at the breakfast provide funding for the Foundation’s ongoing programs to support critical areas of need for the fire rescue department including youth recruitment, cadet training and professional development. The breakfast event also raises seed funding for new initiatives such as 2019’s ‘Adopt a Fire Station,’ a grass roots program to aid in the provision of everyday supplies and equipment to neighborhood fire rescue stations.

2019 Highlights • A record attendance of more than 600 patrons, including 55 corporate sponsors, raised a record high of $218,000. • The Honorable Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms attended and shared remarks. • Fire Chief Randall Slaughter proudly presented Firefighter of the Year to Sergeant Darrow Harden; • The program was led by emcee Tyisha Fernandes of WSB-TV; and honorary co-chairs Dan Gordon, COO, Emory University and Bentina Terry, Senior Vice President, Georgia Power • Presenting Sponsors: Rotary Club of Buckhead, Flourish and Legendary Events

Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms

Photo Credits: Atlanta Fire Rescue Foundation

Medal of Valor

Sergeant Darrow Harden

ATLANTA FIRE RESCUE FOUNDATION, INC. | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

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Photo Credit: Atlanta Fire Rescue Foundation

AFRD HONOR GUARD AND 2020 VOCALIST, NATALYE HOWARD


BREAKFAST WITH OUR BRAVEST SPONSORS PRESENTING SPONSOR

Buckhead

Rotary Club HERO SPONSORS

CHIEF SPONSORS

CAPTAIN SPONSORS

AT L A N T A UNITED DISTRIBUTORS, INC.

LIEUTENANT SPONSORS

FIREFIGHTER SPONSORS Atlanta Police Foundation Atlanta Property Group Bennett Fire Products Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Cleveland Electric Group Columbia Southern University Fifth Third Bank

Goodwill of North Georgia Kenneth S. Nugent P.C. MarketPros Responsive Solutions, LLC. NAFECO Nelson Mullins Portman Holdings Renasant Bank

Roadie Robert W. Woodruff Library Smith & Howard Thompson Hines Waldorf University Windham Brannon

ATLANTA FIRE RESCUE FOUNDATION, INC. | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

18


Photo Credit: A Better Way Ministries


STATION 16 HOLIDAY PARTY A Giving Tradition of Purpose & Impact When firefighters aren’t fighting fires, it’s not rare to find them organizing to support a community initiative. Atlanta Fire Rescue Stations and their firefighters are very much a part of the neighborhoods in which they work and live across their 24-hour shifts. Sometimes they are the catalyst for the initiative. Such is the case with the Christmas Party started in 1970 at Atlanta Fire Rescue Station 16. Known for its historic address on Atlanta’s Westside and also its historic firsts with the first African American and also female firefighters beginning their careers of service at Station 16. The event was started by the 16 firemen to integrate the department and who were the first to be trained and authorized to work during Mayor Ivan Allen’s administration. The event will celebrate its 50th anniversary in 2020 and has grown to host more than 500 families and children for a festive holiday lunch and gifts. Community partners like the Chick-fil-A Foundation, A Better Way Ministries and individual citizens have all stepped forward with their generosity. Civic leaders including city of Atlanta Council members Antonio Brown (District 3) and Michael Julian Bond (Post 1 At Large) participate and share in the holiday cheer. Philanthropist and author Marnie Schneider donated her popular children’s book “Gameday in Atlanta” featuring the Atlanta Falcons. The collective support led by the Fire Foundation has kept this long-standing tradition funded and delivers the spirit of the season with brand new bicycles for children from the Vine City, English Avenue and Washington Park neighborhoods.


Photo Credit: IngImage


ATLANTA FIRE RESCUE FOUNDATION, INC. STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL POSITION DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018 ASSETS

2019

2018

Cash and cash equivalents Contributions receivable Property and equipment, net Other assets

$383,985 $72,184 $2,760 $9,058

$363,999 $22,536 $3,558 $9,058

Total assets

$467,987

$399,151

Liabilities: Accounts payable Accrued liabilities

$675

$2,626 $2,800

Total liabilities

$675

$5,426

Net assets: Without donor restrictions: Expended for property and equipment Board designated Available for operations Total net assets without donor restrictions With donor restrictions Total net assets

$2,760 $50,000 $99,732 $152,492 $314,820 $467,312

$3,558 $50,000 $255,063 $308,621 $85,104 $393,725

Total liabilities and net assets

$467,987

$399,151

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

Commitments and contingencies

ATLANTA FIRE RESCUE FOUNDATION, INC. | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT 22


ATLANTA FIRE RESCUE FOUNDATION, INC. STATEMENTS OF ACTIVITIES FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018 2019

2018

$15,459 $3,845

$11,321 $25,596

$176,620 $215,321 $1,732 $64,727

$134,523 $267,526 $14,098 $25,224

$477,704

$478,288

$541,172 $14,741 $77,920 $633,833 $156,129

$472,131 $12,587 $28,495 $513,213 $34,925

Changes in net assets with donor restrictions: Contributions Net assets released from restrictions Increase in net assets with donor restrictions Increase (decrease) in net assets

$294,443 $64,727 $229,716 $73,587

$43,019 $25,224 $17,795 $17,130

Net assets at beginning of year

$393,725

$410,855

Net assets at end of year

$467,312

$393,725

Changes in net assets without donor restrictions: Revenues, gains and support: Contributions Program fees Special event revenue, net of direct expenses of $77,734 and $56,493 In-kind donations Other income Net assets released from restrictions Total revenues, gains and support without donor restrictions Expenses: Program expenses General and administrative Fundraising Total expenses Decrease in net assets without donor restrictions

23

ATLANTA FIRE RESCUE FOUNDATION, INC. | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT


ATLANTA FIRE RESCUE FOUNDATION, INC. STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

Cash flows from operating activities: Increase (decrease) in net assets Adjustments to reconcile increase (decrease) in net assets to net cash provided by (used in) operating activities: Depreciation Change in assets and liabilities: Increase in contributions receivable Increase (decrease) in accounts payable Accrued expenses Total adjustments Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities

2019

2018

$73,587

($17,130)

$798

$435

($49,648)

($22,536)

($4,751) ($53,601)

($5,426) ($16,675)

$19,986

($33,805)

Cash flows from investing activities: Purchase of property and equipment

($3,993)

Net cash used in investing activities

($3,993)

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents $19, 986

($37,798)

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of year

$363,999

$401,797

Cash and cash equivalents, end of year

$383,985

$363,999

ATLANTA FIRE RESCUE FOUNDATION, INC. | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT 24


ATLANTA FIRE RESCUE FOUNDATION, INC. STATEMENT OF FUNCTIONAL EXPENSES FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019

Program

General and Administrative

Fundraising Total

Salaries and wages Tuition assistance Travel and meals Marketing Computer software and website Supplies Firefighter training Rent Station equipment and supplies Recruitment expense Memorial event Community outreach Community education Youth workforce development Professional fees - other Professional fees - pay study Charitable donations Department team building events Depreciation Other

$86,156 $42,984 $3,037

$1,722

$57,436

$61

$2,025

$4,159

$83 $2,233

$2,773

$168

$5,586

$70,293 $1,500 $5,124 $474 $7,570

$9 $80

$315 $4,163

$145,314 $42,984 $5,123 $5,622 $7,015 $2,233 $30,704 $14,134 $30,093 $165,378 $2,552 $50,080 $5,822 $26,866 $10,385 $70,293 $1,500 $5,124 $798 $11,813

Total expenses

$541,172

$14,741

$77,920

$633,833

Percentage of total

86%

2%

12%

100%

$30,704 $8,380 $30,093 $165,378 $2,552 $50,080 $5,822 $26,866

$10,385

12% 2% Program General and Administrative Fundraising

86%

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ATLANTA FIRE RESCUE FOUNDATION, INC. | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT


ATLANTA FIRE RESCUE FOUNDATION, INC. STATEMENT OF FUNCTIONAL EXPENSES FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2018 Program

General and Administrative

Fundraising Total

Salaries and wages Tuition assistance Travel and meals Marketing Computer software and website Supplies Firefighter training Rent Smoke alarm supplies Station equipment and supplies Housing assistance Recruitment expense Memorial event Community outreach Community education Fire Chief’s retirement Youth workforce development Depreciation Other

$58,665 $28,011 $2,396

$8,381

$16,761

$1,136

$2,273

$43 $571

$88 $4,485

$83,807 $28,011 $3,423 $2,756 $7,236 $1,390 $28,913 $11,365 $257,666 $4,687 $1,000 $15,631 $2,280 $4,768 $20,339 $22,876 $440 $435 $16,190

$342

$5,065

$724 $1,390

$685 $2,756 $1,447

Total expenses

$472,131

$12,587

$28,495

$513,213

Percentage of total

92%

2%

6%

100%

$28,913 $7,956 $257,666 $4,687 $1,000 $15,631 $2,280 $4,768 $20,339 $22,876 $440 $304 $11,134

6% 2%

Program General and Administrative Fundraising

92%

ATLANTA FIRE RESCUE FOUNDATION, INC. | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT 26


MILESTONES: 15 Years of Service to Atlanta’s Firefighters 2004-2019

04

• AFRF Established on March 12th

09

• Inaugural Breakfast with Our Bravest (BWOB) Fundraising Event

15

• Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) Created

16

• First Class of TAP Funded Students • First Executive Director Hired

17

• BWOB raises $125k

18

• BWOB raises $187k

19

• Pay Raise Study and Historic Salary Increase for City Firefighters • BWOB raises $218K • TAP Graduates 6 AFRD Members • Camp Ignite and AFRD Cadet Program Launched

Photo Credit: John Spink, AJC


ATLANTA FIRE RESCUE FOUNDATION, INC. | 2019 ANNUAL REPORT


Phone: 404-538-7112 | Email: info@atlfrf.org | Mail: P.O. Box 19045 Atlanta, GA 31126

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