March 2019

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www.theactiveage.com Kansas’Award-winning Award-winningTop Top55+ 55+News NewsSource Source Kansas’

Vol 40 • No. 4

Riveting Rosies

Senior funds lag behind

Women helped win war on homefront

ACTIVE AGING PUBLISHING, INC 125 S West St., Suite 105 Wichita, Ks 67213

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By Nancy Carver Singleton Connie Palacioz worked twice on the storied B-29 Superfortress known as “Doc.” As a teenager, she put rivets into Doc and hundreds of other B-29s during World War II. More than half a century later she was among hundreds of volunteers who helped restore the plane. In May 1943, Palacioz was just out of high school in Newton when she heard that the Boeing Aircraft Company needed workers. The 17-year-old trained two weeks as a riveter. During her first day at Boeing, Palacioz could not do her job because there was no available “bucker” another type of aircraft employee - to work in tandem with a riveter. The next day, she was told there was a bucker named Jerry Wordan whom nobody wanted to work with because she was African American. "I told my supervisor I don’t mind working with her," Palacioz, 94, said. “I’m a minority, too. She (Wordan) was the best bucker. Oh, she was so good. I could not have riveted without her as a bucker.” They worked on the first B-29 built at the plant. Palacioz and Wordan earned a reputation for being See Rosie, page 9

March 2019

Photo of Connie Palacioz courtesy of Doc's Friends/ Brett Schauf

By Joe Stumpe A Sedgwick County commissioner says more money is needed now for senior-related programs and services, along with a way to make sure that funding grows in the future. Jim Howell, who represents the 5th district, said the current system of allocating money for programs such as Meals on Wheels, in-home care and community senior centers has failed to keep pace with overall county spending and ignores the fact that the elderly population is growing rapidly. County budget figures provided to the active age by Howell show that from 2000 to last year, the amount of property taxes annually collected and dedicated to aging programs grew from $1,951,474 to $2,309,816. That’s about an 18 percent increase, or some half-million dollars less than if the growth had been tied to the average annual inflation rate of 2 percent. Meanwhile, total property taxSee Senior, page 2

Mexican melting pot draws US travelers By Rob Howes There are places in this world where cultures come together, mix their offerings and create a delicious array of food. One such locale is found in Mexico. Guadalajara, in the state of Jalisco, is the second largest city in Mexico. About 30 miles south of this metropolis lies freshwater Lake Chapala, stretching some 50 miles east to west and 10 miles north to south. Along the northwest shore lies a string of small villages: Chapala, San Antonio Tlacapan and Ajijic. These villages date back long before the Spanish arrived in the 16th century. The area has become a mecca for retirees from the United States and Canada, along with a few folks from other continents. Drawn to the area by the climate and relatively low

cost of living, many have put down roots. It has been said that old gringos go there and forget to die. Expose this group to local ingredients and recipes, let their cultures dance or bang heads and – boom! – a delightfully diverse cuisine emerges. I’ll start describing my Photo By Rob Howes culinary adventures A taco vendor works his magic on Lake Chapala in in the area by mentioning an Italian Mexico. there, one that stands out is a melon restaurant. It is owned and operated gazpacho, presented with two small by an Italian fellow and staffed VFRRSV RI PHORQ VKHUEHW ÀRDWLQJ by well-trained young locals. Of See Mexican , page 22 many outstanding dishes I’ve eaten

Questions about services? Central Plains Area Agency on Aging or call your county Department on Aging: 1-855-200-2372

Butler County: (316) 775-0500 or 1-800- 279-3655 Harvey County: (316) 284-6880 or 1-800-279-3655


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the active age

Senior

In the early 1980s, county voters overwhelmingly authorized the county to collect “up to� 1 mill for that purFrom Page 1 pose. But the county has never fully es collected annually by Sedgwick used that option. A mill is a tax of $1 County grew from $74,600,943 to applied to every $1,000 of a property’s $137,441,377, or 84 percent, during assessed value. The aging mill levy rate that same period. is set each year to generate enough “As the economy expands, there should be a natural increase in funding� money for the budget approved by commissioners. of senior-related programs, Howell Through the years, the county has said.

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March 2019

cut the rate of the aging mill levy as overall property valuations have risen, keeping revenue flat or even reducing it. Last year, for instance, the aging mill levy rate fell to .494 from .523 in 2017, generating $60,000 less for senior programs. The highest mill rate the county ever used was .864 in 1989. “Our process today is that we politically fund what we want to fund and don’t want to fund,� Howell said. “Then we backwards calculate the (aging) mill levy. To me, that’s the not the process voters approved.� Howell says commissioners should establish a static rate for the aging mill levy, similar to 1.5 mills collected each year for Wichita State University. Howell’s comments come as the county commission begins work on the county’s 2020 budget. Chairman David Dennis called it “early in the budget process to be thinking about taking a certain mill levy and earmarking it for certain services.� “All of our different programs compete for a finite amount of dollars". Commissioner Michael O’Donnell agreed with Howell that funding for aging services hasn’t kept up with the overall county budget, but says that reflects the public’s demand for more spending in other areas, chiefly law en-

forcement and roads. O’Donnell supports spending more on services such as the senior centers, but thinks a static mill levy “is going to be a hard sell based on other needs in the budget.� Two new commissioners – Lacey Cruse and Pete Meitzner – are starting work on their first county budget. Both said senior-related issues need attention but that they want to become more familiar with county finances before committing to specific actions. The aging levy currently helps pay for 15 different programs. The biggest – 16 senior centers and smaller clubs located in the county – have had their funding frozen since 2010. “I think aging is just not a priority with anybody,� said Laurel Alkire, executive director of Senior Services, Inc., a nonprofit that runs Meals on Wheels, four senior centers and other programs. Alkire said her agency appreciates the county money it receives and could not operate without it, but notes that there’s currently a four-week waiting list for people to receive Meals on Wheels because it can’t afford to hire enough people. “We can’t accomplish what we need to do because there’s no money.� Contact Joe Stumpe at joe@theactiveage.com

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March 2019

the active age

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‘Oatmeal Twins’ Laurine and Florine turn 98 the active age It was snowing that night in 1921 when a doctor rode out to an Oklahoma farmhouse to help a couple expecting their first baby. Everybody was in for a surprise. Laurine Endres (now Moeder) arrived first, followed three minutes later by Florine (now Seely). Someone joked that Florine pushed her identical twin out and has been bossing her around ever since. At 5.5 pounds each, they slept in a couple of dresser drawers. Not long after, an oatmeal company put their photographs on its box, promising their parents free product until they reached the age of 2. Laurine and Florine were written up in the local paper as the “oatmeal twins.” By the way, they’d sure like to find one of those boxes. “If you can find one, I’ll give you a hundred dollars,” Florine says. They grew up outside Okemah, Okla. “We milked cows, fed chickens, cut wood for the fire,” Laurine recalls. They never pretended to be each other, although two fellows who they double dated accused them of it. “So we walked home,” Florine says. Opinions differ as to just how

Photo By Joe Stumpe

Laurine Moeder, left, and Florine Seely were honored recently at a social for 90-somethings at Aldersgate United Methodist Church.

much other trouble they got into. Laurine recalls Florine swiping her clothes and giving her an unauthorized haircut. “I never got in trouble,” Florine says. They both lived in Los Angeles for a while. Laurine married a western Kansas boy and had several children

while Florine served in the Women’s Army Corps during World War II before getting hitched and starting her own family. Laurine made her way to Wichita some 65 years ago. Florine lived in a few other places before eventually settling here, too. Laurine had 10 children and Florine five, so there are dozens of grands, great-grands and great-great-grands to dote on. They were active in Catholic churches and schools and volunteered at the Lord’s Diner. They would take juice drained from fruit cans there and add sugar to make a liqueur called “Bounce.” All their grandchildren know how to make sauerkraut. At 85, Laurine took a turn around a pond on water skis. In 2016, they

were chosen as honorary masters of ceremony of the annual Okemah Rattlesnake Roundup. They each chopped a head off a snake. Both drove and lived on their own until moving into Park West Plaza a couple years ago. They enjoy playing cards, bingo and dominoes. They like people and don’t mind attention. Although back problems have caused Florine to lose a little height, people still get them confused at times. Family members helped the twins celebrate their 98th birthday last month. Laurine says having a look-alike who’s also your best and oldest friend meant “we trusted each other more.” “You and I didn’t ever get upset with each other, did we?” Florine adds. “I didn’t.”

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the active age

March 2019

%DVHEDOO DQG Ă€RZHUV Ă€LQJ XV EDFN LQWR 6SULQJ in the early ‘90s so I also love the start of baseball season. My favorite sport is basketball so the NCAA basketball tournament provides some exciting times. I hope you are looking forward to being outside more often and being active. As our publication’s name implies,

Dear Reader By Spike Anderson March means more sunshine, warmer temperatures and beautiful colors of spring. I love the blooming flowers and the smell of freshly cut grass. I played baseball at Wichita State

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our focus is to keep seniors active and on the move. Please take advantage of opportunities to get out and about in the community. The active age includes a calendar of events; use it to familiarize yourself with free and interesting offerings in your area. Anderson I grew up and

live in Valley Center. My community has a vibrant senior group. They offer delicious $5 lunches on Tuesdays and Thursdays, exercise groups, bingo, pitch and line dancing, to name a few events. The activities are becoming more and more popular with seniors in the area. If you like reading our publication, please keep us in mind when you make charitable gifts. Any contribution helps keep our publication free. Stay active and enjoy March! Spike Anderson is a vice president of the active age board.

New board member for the active age named Julie Schaar of Valley Center has joined the board of the active age newspaper, bringing with her 23 years experience in health care. “One of my first jobs was as a nurse’s aide in long-term care,� Schaar said. “That just cultivated my passion for not only health care but taking care of seniors -- taking care of those who once took care of us.� Born in Smith Center, Schaar moved to Valley Center with her parents, Jim and Diane Grauerholz, when she was 3 years old. She attended school there, earned a nursing degree from Bethel College and later a master’s degree in health care leadership from Friends University. Schaar worked as a nurse at Kansas Heart Hospital, Stormont Vail Hospital in Topeka and Wesley Medical

Center before going to work at Via Christi 13 years ago. She is now director of physician operations for Ascension Via Christi. Schaar and her husband, Tony, have a 20-year-old daughter and 17-year-old twins. She enjoys attending her childrens’ events, concerts and theater productions. She is a “huge Shocker fan.� “My dream Schaar hobby is to have a beautiful garden,� she said. “Maybe in retirement?� Schaar replaced board longtime member Elvira Crocker, who plans to continue writing for the active age.

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The active age, published the first of each month, is distributed in Butler, Harvey and Sedgwick counties. To subscribe, call 316-942-5385, write the active age or visit theactiveage.com.

Editor: Joe Stumpe joe@theactiveage.com Advertising Director: Mike Parker

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Business Manager: Tammara Fogle

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Board of Directors President: Mary Corrigan • Vice President: Spike Anderson Secretary: Susan Howell • Treasurer: Diana Wolfe Board Members: Shana Gregory • Ruth Ann Messener • Fran Kentling Julie Schaar • LaChalle Shay • Dorothy Zook

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March 2019

the active age

Cecil Riney is alive and, well, busy From the Editor By Joe Stumpe I’ve made my share of mistakes as a journalist but hadn’t caused any actual physical harm until last month when I prematurely killed off Cecil Riney, surely one of the best-known folks in Wichita. I put “late” in front of Riney’s name in an article, and I didn’t mean as in tardy. I meant deceased, expired, kaput. I don’t know why I thought Riney had slipped this mortal coil except that his name adorns the Fine Arts Building at Friends University, and aren’t buildings usually named for, you know, dead people? (Charles Koch Arena notwithstanding.) Anyway, Riney and his wife, Verna, had a good chuckle over the error and were gracious when I called to apologize. “I’ve had worse things said about me,” he joked. Riney, in case you’re as uninformed as I , served as chair of Friends’ fine arts division and director of its

Honor Roll of Donors Barbara Carlson Barbara Coats Harold Connell Michael Girrens Clinton Hinman Carolyn Loop Betty Marshall Dorothy McKay Robert Puckett Kenneth & Norma Leblanc These readers recently contributed $75 or more to the 2018 donation campaign.

Courtesy Photo

Cecil Riney and Lisa Hittle, a former colleague at Friends University.

Singing Quakers choir for 45 years, until his retirement in 2005. He then returned to serve as interim chair for two years when the position suddenly became vacant. He’s still a busy guy, especially for

Page 5

one who’s come back from the dead, so to speak. The first time I called, he was attending a board meeting of the Koch Cultural Trust, which awards grants to aspiring young musicians, actors and artists with connections to Kansas. The next time, he’d just come in from the North Y, where he works out four or five times a week. Nothing too strenuous, just a little sweating on the treadmill, stationary bike and light weights. Riney is 87. Riney also serves on the board of the Salvation Army and volunteers at Youth Horizons and Trinity Academy. A lot of his volunteer work involves asking other people to donate money for some cause or project, something he admits he’s pretty good at. “If I’m really sold on the project, I’m not at all hesitant to ask.” Riney and Verna, a longtime piano teacher, both attended Friends after growing up in western Kansas. Riney went on to earn a master’s degree at the University of Kansas and then

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take his doctorate at the University of Southern California. For the first time in about 50 years, he’s not directing a church choir in Wichita. Northridge Friends, First Presbyterian, Central Christian, Eastminster and Chapel Hill United Methodist are congregations that benefited from his prowess in that area. So maybe there’s a little more time for Cecil and Verna to spend with their grandkids. Their daughter Michelle, who chairs the fine arts department at Trinity, has three children: Katie, who’s married to Matt Braeuer, former Shocker basketball favorite (and now an assistant basketball coach at North Texas State University); Scott, manager of Ashley Furniture in Wichita; and Kelli, a graphic designer here. Their son, Doug, who just retired as choral director at East High after 20 years, has a boy, Paul, who’s 14 and “actually a very good percussionist,” Riney said. “I could talk all day about them.”

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the active age

March 2019

The art of architecture Editor’s note: Ronda Voorhis recently published an art book called "Drawing Wichita", which features 97 pen-andink illustrations of historical buildings and beloved sites in Wichita. The book is on sale for $27.99 at The Workroom and Doo Dah Diner, and can also be ordered at DrawingKansas.com. Voorhis is giving a free presentation about the book at 1:00 p.m., March 12 at the Downtown Senior Center in Delano. By Ronda Voorhis I have always been interested in buildings and the details on them. Or lack of them. People walk around downtown every day and never look at the intricacies of artwork on the

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buildings without thinking that someone drew, carved, created all that by hand more than 100 years ago. I wanted to preserve a moment in time looking at Wichita as it is in 2018. Some things are going to be lost, such as Lawrence Dumont Stadium, and others will morph or need to be renovated. Just looking at pictures, it is difficult to see the details of cornices and fireplace chimneys and overhangs. But drawing them in black and white gives clarity to even the most mundane. In the past, all architectural drawings were done by hand. When I was in college at Kansas State University, architectural rendering was a class for fifth-year architecture students. I took it even though I was a magazine journalism student and graphic arts major. Those drawing skills have mostly been lost because students started using computers in 1988 for everything. So I’m the last of the last. I work in a large format, 17 by 14 inches or larger. And I use tiny, tiny pen tips (0.7 is the normal pen tip for writing utensils we use everyday; I’m using 0.005 and 0.003 Micron pens.) I work from my own photos, have them enlarged at CityBlue and trace the outline. And then I draw from my computer screen where I can see the details at 700 percent. Some details are in shadows and I can bring those out in my drawings that you can’t do with photos. And I try to put some kind of artistic flair into the drawings so they aren’t just flat renderings.Â

The Carnegie Library, top, and Old City Hall are two buildings featured in Drawing Wichita. I am interested in the history of these forgotten or preserved buildings, so I wrote a bit about each one for the book and then added on a map. I want to tackle other Kansas cities with amazing stories and build-

ings. Lawrence is the first on my list. Abilene is fantastic. And the small towns that have one or two or more extraordinary buildings that are boarded up or past their prime deserve to be remembered and honored.Â

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March 2019

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Page 7

Digging into the seedy side of gardening can pay off Gardening By Janice Sroufe I am a notorious collector of seeds. It’s fascinating that a tiny, dead-looking speck of fiber or rock-like nugget can, with soil, light and water, turn into a huge plant Little globs of fluff, dry particles, tiny cones or weird-looking winged things find their way into my pockets, my camera bag or the bottom of my purse whenever I go outdoors. I am not organized enough to carry envelopes and a Sharpie to label them, so I just plant them and see what happens. They almost always germinate and grow (although keeping them growing is tricky in this crazy Kansas climate). The good news about seeds is that many of them can be grown with certainty just by following the instructions on the seed packet, which means you probably should purchase them from a reliable source in the year that you intend to plant. Along with local garden centers, which have an extensive variety, seeds can be ordered from mail order catalogs or online. Light is imperative for starting seeds successfully indoors. You need a lot of it, probably more than provided by a sunny window. Unless a cli-

mate-controlled greenhouse is available, you will be more successful with some artificial light, florescent or LED. The lights need to be adjustable so they can be really close to your planting containers and then raised as the plants grow. Old shelving in the corner of my furnace room, with lights hanging above and between the shelves, became my indoor seed-starting garden. The lights are hung with chains, which allows adjustment as the plants get taller. A timer on the plug-in keeps the lights shining 14-16 hours a day without me having to turn them on and off. This set-up works well as long as I remember to water occasionally. Here are a few other things to keep in mind when you start seeds indoors: • Read the seed packet or Google how much time the plants need to grow inside. Some take longer than others. • Use clean containers. Buy new ones or wash used ones with soap and water. • Use new potting soil to avoid infecting your baby plants with disease. • Wet the soil so that it is moist and crumbly before you plant your seeds and water carefully so that your seedlings stay hydrated, but not soggy.

•

•

Planting trays with covers are helpful in conserving moisture as the seeds germinate and the plants grow. When they get a couple inches tall, you can remove the covers and raise the lights above the top of the plants. When the prescribed time has pass, the ground is warm enough and the plants are ready to go outdoors, be sure to acclimate them to the sun and wind grad-

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ually. Besides the satisfaction that comes from growing plants from seed, I have experienced fewer diseases in plants I start myself. Seed starting probably won’t save you time or money, but it is a fun and interesting experience. Janice Sroufe is a Sedgwick County Master Gardener. She welcomes comments and questions. Contact her at janice. sro@gmail.com

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March 2019

Former Rosie: 'I really wanted to do something for my country' 1943 and 1945, South Pacific theater during World time. I really Ball took a job War II. wanted a job with the Coleman When he returned, he was building airplanes company in hospitalized in San Diego, suffering because those Wichita because from malaria and what was then called planes were to it was closer to battle fatigue, now known as posthelp those in her downtown traumatic stress disorder. She took the war. I really apartment. She a train to see him. Eventually they wanted to do made a brief married in California. something for my return to aircraft They returned to Kansas to raise country.” manufacturing their daughter and son, Randy. They Ball said she after the war both became very involved in the “got to be a good and early in her American Legion. Her husband served riveter and a good marriage, when she as the Kansas state commander; the bucker, too.” A and her husband Legion’s bingo hall in El Dorado is riveter was the were living in named after him. Ball is helping plan person who was California. and publicize efforts to celebrate the putting in the A selfAmerican Legion’s 100th anniversary in rivets that held described shy, 2020. together the sheets introverted girl George died in 2000 of lung of metal, while the Photo By Amy Geiszler-Jones who grew up on a cancer due to the cigarette habit he bucker was the picked up during World War II when person bracing the Virginia Ball took pride in her work as a farm near Rosalia in Butler County, military rations included packs of metal on the other Rosie the Riveter. Ball met her future cigarettes. side. husband, Pleas George Ball Jr., when Not long after his death, Ball put “In my mind, I didn’t want a wrong he worked for her dad. They dated together a binder filled with stories rivet that could make that plane go during high school but had a “terrible about their lives and pictures to share down.” disagreement” before he went off to with her grandchildren. In her off time, she would knit war. Still, they exchanged letters while “Everyone has a story and they scarves and bake cookies, along with he served with the Marines in the should share that,” she said. others in a VFW post, to send to the overseas soldiers. Rosies recognized After working for Boeing between The Kansas Department of the baker, Wichita; Mary Stella Converse, American Legion Auxiliary recently Wichita; Grace Emma Allen Eddy, honored more than 100 women, living Wichita; Willa Gertrude Field, Wichand deceased, who served as “Rosie the ita; Virginia Emma Harnan, Wichita; Riveters” during World War II. The list Marjorie “Sally” Hansford, Wichita; was compiled from friends and family Winnie Herman, Wichita; Ethel Kimmembers and is not exhaustive. merly, El Dorado; Nada Etress JackIn the Wichita area, those honored son Mahaney, Wichita; Lois Martin, I created a trust several years ago and took steps to make sure everything I included: Wichita; Elizabeth “Mummy” Nickel, owned was retitled in the name of my trust. I have now come to a place in my Lillian Jean Mostrom Bailey, Wichita; Betty Noeller, Wichita; Rose life where I want my daughter to be able to pay bills and sign checks for me. Wichita; Florence Pearl “Peggy” Bald- Weber Neuburger, Wichita; Connie We went to the bank and were told that I cannot put her on my bank account win, Wichita; Virginia Ball, El DoraPalacioz, Newton; Elsie Remmert, El because it is in the trust. Would you please explain how this happened? do; Mary Britt, Haysvill; Patty BruDorado.

By Amy Geiszler-Jones EL DORADO--It took just a few weeks of training back in 1943 for 17-year-old Virginia Ball to learn to be a Rosie the Riveter, but it made for a lifetime of memories. It’s a role she still embraces today at age 93 as she fundraises and volunteers for the American Legion. When she’s at an event to raise money for veterans, she often tucks the funds into a Rosie the Riveter lunchbox. Her car is decorated with Rosie and American Legion decals, and a flag flies in her front yard. Ball and more than 100 former Rosie the Riveters from Kansas were recently honored during a ceremony in Dodge City. While she’s proud to have contributed to the war effort in any way she could, the real heroes were the soldiers in the war, she said, including the man with whom she enjoyed a 55year marriage. “You have to remember our loved ones were overseas. I got paid and went home to a warm bed every night. They went through heck over there,” Ball said in the El Dorado home where she runs a reflexology business with her daughter, Georgia Ann. “You just had to get a job at that

Remember that your trust is a separate legal entity. Only a Trustee of the trust (the fiduciary) has the authority to transact business for the trust. If your daughter is not a current Trustee or CoTrustee, she cannot do any business for the trust. Even if she is your attorney-infact or agent under a durable power of attorney, with a few limited exceptions, she will be denied access to any property that is owned in your trust’s name. A solution may be to appoint her to serve as Co-Trustee with you so that she will have authority to take care of trust busi-

ness. Many trusts are drafted to allow a current trustee (i.e., you) to appoint a Co-Trustee. You will want to review your trust for this provision and to certain that authority can be delegated to the Co-Trustee under the Trustee’s powers provisions. You might be tempted to remove your bank account from your trust, but you should not unless you do so under the guidance of your estate attorney. Such actions may result in the creation of probate property or subject the assets to claims by creditors of a joint owner.

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March 2019

Rosie From Page 1 fast and good. Inspectors seldom told them to redo rivets and they sometimes were asked to replace rivets done by other teams. A bus brought Palacioz and other women from Newton to Wichita for their 12-hour shifts. They often worked weekends. Outside work, Palacioz baked cookies for soldiers on the troop trains stopping in Newton. Her starting pay at Boeing was 75 cents an hour. “ At that time 75 cents could buy a lot of stuff. You could buy a loaf of bread for 5 cents. I thought it was good money.” With nickel increases from favorable monthly reviews, Palacioz soon made $1 an hour, Boeing’s maximum wage. Women at the plant were laid off in August of 1945. Palacioz did not mind. “I was so happy because I had a brother and a fiancé in the war and they were coming home. To me it was a great day when the war was over.” She married, had four children, earned a cosmetology degree and worked as a beautician for 49 years. Then in 2000 she heard that Doc was being brought back to Boeing Wichita for restoration. Palacioz started driving to Wichita twice a week to

the active age work on the plane. She hoped to see Wordan, whom she lost touch with four years after the war. But Palacioz was the only former World War II female aircraft employee Connie Palacioz involved. Doc had been in the Mojave Dessert since the late 1950s. “It was a mess. Pigeons had been in there. We had to wear coveralls and masks,” said Palacioz, who was part of a group that spent almost four months cleaning the plane’s interior. She later polished parts along with sorting and organizing blueprints. Palacioz cleaned switches, all 345 of them. “There were six we had to replace, but the rest are the original.” The body of the plane had been used for military target practice, but the nose section was relatively untouched. All but seven of the original rivets were there. “Those were the ones I riveted with Jerry back then. I love that plane!” she said. Today, it is one of only two surviving B-29s in flying condition. Palacioz portrays Rosie the Riveter at events surrounding Doc, donning

blue coveralls and a red kerchief. She twice flew with Doc’s crew to the AirVentures air show in Oshkosh, Wis., selling posters with her likeness to raise money for Doc’s Friends, the organization formed to restore the plane. She flew on Doc to the Spirit of St. Louis Air Show, posing for photographs and signing autographs while there. Closer to home, she gives talks about building B-29s during World War II. In late January, she cut the ribbon for Doc’s

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Page 9 new home in a 32,000-square-foot, $6.5 million hangar. Once a week she bakes treats for Doc’s Friends. Palacioz is also active in Newton, singing in the Our Lady of Guadalupe Church choir and working church suppers, fundraisers and funeral meals. “I have been blessed with good health,” she said. “I thank the Lord every day.” Contact Nancy Carver Singleton at ncsingleton@att.net


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March 2019

Is it time to change the time one more time? By Ted Blankenship A bill may soon be introduced in the Kansas Legislature to - as my late mother-in-law would have described it - keep the state on “God’s time.” In other words, the Good Lord would not continue to punish us by requiring us to mess with the clock on the microwave.

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Or to put it another way, we wouldn’t have to “sprint forward and fall back.” Or is it “spring back and fall forward”? Most people think that daylight saving time or DST (not to be confused with LSD, which causes hallucinations) was started in the early 20th Century. Actually, it began as a joke some 200 years earlier. The idea came from Benjamin Franklin, whose best idea up to that time was holding a metal key attached to a kite he flew into an electrical storm. In a 1784 essay published in a newspaper, Franklin suggested that

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changing the clocks twice a year could help maximize the amount of sunlight time. As most of us know, changing our clocks has no effect on the sun, which comes up and goes down with the earth’s rotation. Before we go any further, let’s clear up a grammar problem: It’s “daylight saving time,” not “daylight savings time.” The second word is an adjective, not a verb, so the singular is grammatically correct. Hey, don’t blame me, it’s the English language and we’re stuck with it. Unfortunately, I know about history as I do about grammar. A little more research reveals that ol’ Ben Franklin didn’t really originate moving clocks forward and back. By the time he was a 78-year-old American envoy in Paris in 1784, the guy who wrote about the virtues of “early to bed and early to rise” didn’t practice what he preached. After he was awakened at 6 a.m. by the summer sun streaming through his Paris window, he wrote an essay in which he figured that if Frenchmen woke at dawn, they could save the modern-day equivalent of $200 million in candles. Franklin wasn’t the only statesman fascinated by making better use of the

sun. Englishman William Willett was the first real advocate for daylight saving time. He was riding his horse on the outskirts of London in 1905 when he had an epiphany of sorts. It occurred to him that the United Kingdom should move its clocks forward by an hour and 20 minutes between April and October so that people could “enjoy the plentiful sunlight.” Apparently, Willett forgot that English fog would blot out the sun through most if not all of the six months between April and October. At least, there would have been no microwave clocks to set and reset. Daylight saving time in the U.S. began during World War I, was repealed after the war, reinstated in World War II and repealed again. It became national law in 1966, but states have the option to stay on standard time the year-round. Farm animals and wildlife have survived through myriad changes in the time we all set on our clocks. The rest of us probably will, too. Contact Ted Blankenship at tblankenship@cox.net

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March 2019

the active age

By Diana Morton With spring in the air, it’s time to shake off those winter blues and try something new – like a fabulous month of live stage productions.

225 W. Douglas. Children of Eden, Stephen Schwartz and John Caird. Enjoy a joyous and inspirational musical about parents, children, and faith… not to mention centuries of unresolved family business. An expansive and ambitious musical. 7:30 pm Fri-Sat, Mar 1-2, 2:30 pm Sun, Mar 3. Tickets $10-15. 316-262-2282

Forum Theatre, at the Wilke Center, 1st United Methodist Church, 330 N. Broadway. Dolly Parton: Hee You Come Again. Dolly Parton is not only a distinctive voice in country music, she is a highly skilled songwriter known for thoughtful narratives. Her solo career is marked by hit songs like “Joshua,” “Jolene,” “I Will Always Love You,” “Here You Come Again” and more. Her infamous shapely curves, petite stature, belie a visionary artist with a strong business sense. 8 pm Sat, Mar 16, 2 pm Sun, Mar 17. Tickets $23$25. 316-618-0444

Mosley Street Melodrama, 234 N. Mosley. The Gold Miner’s Daughter or Who Got the Shaft? by Tom Frye. Set in the Yukon, this spine tingling epic tale of villains, heroines, and heroes will keep you on the edge of ....something. Enjoy such characters as Vinnie, Bullmoose Bad Bart, Hannah (she’s Hard Hearted) and Tequila Tessie. There’s a heroine tied to the railroad tracks and put in danger by the saw at the sawmill.A new Musical Comedy Review follows. Dinner 6:15 pm, show begins 7:50 pm. now-Mar 30. Tickets $26$30; Show only, $20. 316-263-0222

Guild Hall Players, St. James Episcopal Church, 3750 E. Douglas. A Doll’s House, Part 2, by Lucas Hnath. A 2016 Tony award winner, Hnath considers what would happen if Nora, heroine of Ibsen’s classic, were to return home to her husband and family. 8 pm Thu–Sat, Mar 28-30; 7 pm Sun, Mar 31. Tickets $12, students $10. 316-683-5686

Prairie Pines Playhouse, 4055 N. Tyler Road. Noir Suspicions. This comic sequel to Murder at Café Noir has ex private eye, Nick Archer, now the confused manager of Café Noir on the island of Mustique. He is confronted with a corpse on the dock, a mysterious femme fatale, a French blackmailer, and a businessman who wants both the café and the woman. The production includes a catered, dinner. Check-in by 6:30 pm, Fri-Sat, Mar 15–April 20.

March Theatre

Music Theatre for Young People, Mary Jane Teal Theatre, Century II,

Page 11 and learning until your stomach aches. Fri-Sat, 8:00 pm, Sun, 2 pm, now-Mar 31. Tickets $20-$30. 316-265-4400

Tickets $39.95. 316-303-2037 Roxy’s Downtown, 412 E. Douglas, cabaret-style theatre. The Golden Girls; Season 4. Thank you for being a friend! Due to the overwhelming success of past productions and audience requests, the show has been renewed for a fourth season with the antics of those four mature women living in Miami experiencing the joys and angst of their golden years. Wichita favorites include Monte Wheeler, Kyle Vespestad, Scott Noah and Tom Frye with guest appearance by Christine Tasheff. See 3 new episodes, laughing

Wichita Community Theatre, 258 N. Fountain. All My Sons by Arthur Miller. How far would a man go to protect his family, his interests, and his legacy? Joe Keller, the patriarch in All My Sons, desperately wants to secure and maintain the financial security and legacy he spent so many years building, ready to hand it down to his surviving son Chris. are in love and want to get married. This is a post-war American family in a tragic downfall of lies, greed, love, and loss. 8 pm Wed-Sat, 2 pm Sun, Mar 6-17. Tickets $15 or $13 for military/seniors/students. $12 opening night only. 316-686-1282 Contact Diana Morton at dianamorton12@sbcglobal.net

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March 2019

Getting to know your next Kansas Silver Haired Legislature By Monica Cissell The Kansas Silver Haired Legislature is a group of advocates who work on seniors’ behalf during their two-year terms. Composed of 125 representatives from across Kansas, all over 60, the SHL develops bills and resolutions that are presented to the Kansas Legislature and governor as recommendations for state policy. These individuals are running unopposed for terms starting April 2019: Sedgwick County Carl Williams - District 1 Interests include social justice and representing people over 60. He has served in the SHL since 2011. Brian Scarbrough – District 2 Interests include advocating for individuals with mental illness, working with youth in the juvenile

corrections system and supporting older adults in need. Craig Shove - District 3 Interests include promoting pickleball and volunteering for Senior Health Insurance Counselors of Kansas (SHICK). He has served in the SHL since 2017. Joyce Lofgreen – District 4 Interests include mental health advocacy, health insurance and Medicaid expansion in Kansas. She has served in the SHL since 2018. Donna Lehane – District 5 Interests include advocating for the rights of older adults, caregiving and caregiver issues, and promoting community programs.

Charles (Chuck) Schmidt – At Large Interests include health care and mental health. Butler County Don A. Durflinger Interests include older adult issues and the concerns of Butler County seniors. He has served in the SHL since 2013. Harvey County Wayne Valentine Interests include services that support seniors living in the

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community and the RSVP volunteer program. He has served in the SHL since 2017. Any Kansan can advocate for seniors. To contact your state elected officials, go to www.kslegislature.org or call 1-800-432-3924. Monica Cissell is director of information and community outreach for the Central Plains Area Agency on Aging. For information about available programs or services call 855-200-2372. People you can TRUST. • Agency Direct. • We provide a customized care plan. • The well-being, dignity, and safety of our clients is our priority. - Home Health Aides - Medical Alerts - Medication Dispensers - Nursing Services - Agency Direct Service - CNAs - Sleep Cycle Support

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March 2019

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Opinion: Don't let family courts erase grandparents from their grandkids' lives By Will Mitchell Everyone can agree that it’s in the best interest of children to share equal time with two divorced or separated parents who are fit and able. Yet, through Kansas’ outdated child custody laws, too many good parents routinely lose physical custody because they weren’t deemed the “best� parent – without any finding of insufficient parenting – and judges routinely give sole custody to one side of the family over the other (traditionally in about 80 percent of cases). Children lose out. Parents lose out. And grandparents who might have been woven into their grandkids’ lives prior to the ruling are shut out, too. Kansas is strongly considering changing its child custody laws from a system pitting parent against parent

in a winner/loser take all situation into the family friendly “shared parenting� arrangement that’s sweeping the country, including in in Missouri. Shared parenting, equal decision making and parenting time for capable parents is extremely popular and supported by significant research. Grandparents are also hit hard by financial implications. Many parents go bankrupt paying attorney fees during these lengthy legal battles and grandparents might wind up paying thousands of dollars in legal fees in order to help their children – and their children’s children. Senior citizens are cashing out retirement plans they spent a life time acquiring in order to help their children get more time with their kids – and their grandchildren. We can eliminate this with one

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simple fix: treat parents equally from the start. Shared parenting, where children spend as close to equal time with both parents if they are fit and able, has support from an overwhelming amount of research showing that significant time with mom and dad post-divorce is in the best interest of children. Wake Forest University Professor Linda Nielsen released a report earlier this year summarizing more than 60 studies spanning multiple decades and numerous countries and concluded that shared parenting is definitively linked to better outcomes for children when compared to sole custody. The state of Kansas has the opportunity to allow for children to be able to maintain their cherished bonds with all of their extended family, give grand-

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Will Mitchell serves as Chair of National Parents Organization of Kansas. Senate Bill 157, creating a presumption in favor of shared parenting, is pending before the Kansas Legislature.

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parents the right to maintain loving relationships with children they love, and stop the outrageous attorney fees families are forced to pay– all by passing shared parenting into law. What will all of these benefits to our children and families cost the taxpayers? Nothing. I urge anyone interested in the passage of this law to contact their legislators immediately. If you would like to learn more about how to help grandparents enjoy time with their grandchildren, contact me at willmitchell@nationalparentsorganization.org

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the active age

March 2019

Simple steps can extend driving years, cut drug costs Dear Savvy Senior, What tips or resources can you recommend to help elderly seniors extend their driving years? My dad, who’s 82, is still a decent driver, but I worry about his safety going forward. Inquiring Daughter Dear Inquiring, With more than 40 million licensed drivers in the U.S. over the age of 65, there are lots of resources available today to help keep older drivers safe and behind the wheel longer. Here are some simple steps you can take to help keep your dad driving safely. Get his eyes checked: Because about 90 percent of the information necessary to drive is received through our eyes, getting your dad’s eyes checked every year to be sure his vision and eyewear is up to par is an important first step. Check his meds: Does your dad take any medicine or combination of medicines that make him sleepy, light-headed or loopy? If so, make a list of all his medications (prescription and over-the-counter) and dietary supplements, and take it to his doctor or pharmacist for a review. You can also get help with this online at RoadwiseRX.com.

Preplan Your

Evaluate his driving: To stay on top of any potential driving issues, you should take a ride with your dad from time-to-time watching for problem areas, such as: Does he drive at inappropriate speeds, tailgate or drift between lanes? Does he have difficulty seeing, backing up or changing lanes? Does he react slowly, get confused easily or make poor driving decisions? For more tips, see the National Caregivers Library driving assessment checklist at SeniorDriverChecklist.org. If your dad needs a more thorough evaluation, you can turn to a driver rehabilitation specialist who’s trained to evaluate older drivers. This type of assessment typically costs between $100 and $200. To locate a professional in your area, visit AOTA.org/older-driver orADED.net. Take a refresher course: AAA and AARP both have older driver refresher courses that can help your dad tuneup his driving skills, and learn how to adjust for slower reflexes, weaker vision and other age-related changes that

Care Journey

affect driving. Taking a class may also earn him a discount on his auto insurance. To locate a class, contact your local AAA (AAA.com), or AARP (AARP.org/ drive, 888-227-7669). Most courses cost around $15 to $30 and can be taken in the classroom or online. Another good resource to look into is CarFit. This is a free assessment program that will help your dad adjust his vehicle for a better fit, making it easier and safer to drive. CarFit events are held around the country in select locations. See Car-Fit.org to look for one near you. Make some adjustments: Recognizing your dad’s driving vulnerabilities and making small changes on when and where he drives can go a long way in helping keep him safe and driving longer. Adjustments may include not driving after dark or during rush hour traffic, avoiding major highways or other busy roads, and not driving in poor weather conditions. You can find more tips at AAA Senior Driving at SeniorDriving.AAA.com. And finally, when it gets to the point that your dad’s driving isn’t safe anymore and he needs to quit, The Hartford Financial Services Group and MIT AgeLab offers two helpful resources. Go to TheHartford.com/lifetime – click on “Publications” on the menu bar – and download or order the “At the Crossroads” and/or “We Need to Talk” guides.

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March 2019

the active age

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Page 16

the active age

Briefs Garden talk

Sedgwick County master gardeners are offering courses on a variety of timely topics at the Wichita Public Library’s Rockwell and Evergreen branches. The schedule includes: Spring and Summer Annuals for Sun and Shade, March 19 (Rockwell) and March 21 (Evergreen); No Till Gardening, March 26 (Rockwell) and March 28 (Evergreen); Basic Tomato Gardening, April 2 (Rockwell) and April 4 (Evergreen); Planning Your Successful

Vegetable Garden, April 9 (Evergreen) and April 11 (Rockwell); Perennials, April 16 (Rockwell) and April 18 (Evergreen). The classes, held-6-7:30 p.m., are free but registration is required. To register, visit wichitalibrary.org or call 316-688-9361 (Evergreen) or 316303-8181 (Rockwell).

Sing a song

The Funtastics singing group is looking for new male and female members to help it entertain residents of care homes. The volunteer group, formed in 1989, performs on many Friday afternoons and usually practices one Monday a month. If interested,

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Celebrations

Clarinet recital

Clarinetist Kaytsua Yuasa will teach and perform at Wichita State University on March 7. At 11 a.m., Yuasa will present a free master class in the Duerksen Fine Arts Center. At 7:30 p.m., he will hold a recital in Wiedemann Hall accompanied by Bridget Hille; a $10 donation is suggested. Yuasa is being presented by the Mu Phi Epsilon Foundation and its local chapter.

The whole enchilada

La Familia Senior and Community Center, 841 W. 21st N., is holding its Enchilada Days fundraiser, featuring homemade enchiladas for dining in or carryout. The event is noon-5 p.m. March 7 and 8, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. March. Call 316-267-1700 to order.

60th Anniversary

Richard and Pauletta Roberts celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary on Feb. 16. The couple have two daughters, Beci (Greg) Hiser of Wichita and Melinda (Richard) Estes of Valley Center, and three grandchildren. Cards can be mailed to 5802 N. Meridian, Wichita, KS, 67204.

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March 2019

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Page 17

CALENDAR OF EVENTS SEDGWICK COUNTY SENIOR CENTERS

BEL AIRE 7651 E Central Park Ave 744-2451, ext 121 www.belaireks.org Mon-Fri: 8-9 am Bel Aire Walkers, Rec Center. Mon 9:30-11:30 am Pickleball Tue: 1 pm Bridge, Rec Center. Wed: 9 am Low impact aerobics, Rec Center. Fri: 1 pm Line dancing, Comm Rm. 1st Thu: 1 pm Game Day, Rec Center. 2nd & 4th Wed: 2 pm Coloring & Conversation, Sr Center. 3rd Wed: 1:30 pm Book Club, Sr Center. 4th Mon: 6 pm Covered Dish & Program, Rec Center.

BENTLEY/EAGLE 504 W Sterling, 796-0027 Open Mon-Fri: 8-11 am Coffee, cookies, exercise. Sat: 8-9 am Breakfast 1st & 3rd Tue: 1 pm Game Day. 2nd Tue: 1 pm Senior Lunch Out. 3rd Fri: noon XYZ potluck, program.

CHENEY 516 Main, 542-3721 Mon-Fri: 11:30 am Hot meal, reservations required, games. Every other Thu: 1 pm Bingo. 1st Tue: 6 pm Potluck dinner.

1006 N Main, 535-1155 Mon-Fri: 8 am Coffee. Wed: 1-3 pm RSVP work. Fri: 1 pm Cards. 1st Fri: noon Potluck, cards. 3rd Fri: 1 pm Birthday/anniversary celebration.

GODDARD 120 N Main, 794-2441 Mon, Wed, Fri: 9-9:30 am Exercise. 1st & 4th Tue: 9:30 am-noon Cards. 2nd & 4th Thu: 10 am-4 pm Covered dish, cards, dominoes.

HAYSVILLE 160 E Karla, 529-5903 Regular activities: Cards, crafts, hot lunch, exercise. Mon-Fri: noon Cards. Tue: 12:30 pm; Fri 9 am TX Hold’em. Mon & Wed: 9 am Walking club 1st & 3rd Wed: 12:30 pm Bingo. Tue & Thu: 10 am STEPS exercise Last Tue: 6-9 pm Game Night. 2nd Fri: 5:30 pm Birthday Dinner, Covered Dish. $3 4th Sat: 8:30 am Friends & Family Senior Breakfast. RSVP: 529-5903. $4

KECHI Kechi City Building, 744-0217, 744-1271 3rd Thu: 6:30-7:30 pm Meeting.

CLEARWATER 921 E Janet, 584-2332 Mon: 10 am-noon Blood pressure check; 1pm Painting, beginning to advanced. Wed: 9 am Morning coffee. Thu: 10 am Bible study. Tue, Fri: 8:45 am Tai Chi; 10 am Exercise class. 2nd Tue: noon Carry-in lunch & program. Every other Thu: 1 pm Bingo. 1st, 3rd & 4th Thu: 9 am Help with technologybring your device.

DERBY 611 N Mulberry Rd, 788-0223 www.derbyweb.com Regular activities: Exercise programs at low cost, foot care, book club, friendship club. 1st and 3rd Tues: 7-9:30 pm Community dance at Derby Welcome Center, all ages welcome.. $3.

DOWNTOWN 200 S Walnut, 267-0197 www.seniorservicesofwichita.org Regular activities: Exercise classes, computer classes, foot care by appt. March 8: 1 pm DIY magnetic boards. $5 per person, preregistration required. Feb 8: 1 pm Do-it-yourself Valentines Succulent arrangement. Pre-registration required, $10 per person. March 12: 9-11 am Senior employment job fair. March 15: 12 pm St. Patty's Day potluck. Bring a favorite dish and RVSP. March 19: 11 am 'Dining in Delano meets st the Delano Diner, 1220 W. Douglas. Please RSVP. Mon: 9:30 am Wanda's exercise; 1 pm Bridge. Wed: 9 am Spanish (adv); 1am Well rep excercise.

EDGEMOOR 5815 E 9th, 688-9392 Mon-Fri: 11:30 am Hot lunch, reservation required; 10-11 am Pool, cards, bingo, dominoes, puzzles. Tue, Sat: 1-3 pm Pickleball. $2.

GARDEN PLAIN

LA FAMILIA 841 W 21st, 267-1700 Mon-Fri: Dance, exercise, pool, dominoes. 11:30 am-12:15 pm Hot lunch. Mon, Wed, Fri: 10 am Exercise/Ejercicio. Tue, Thu: 1 pm Exercise/Ejercicio. Mon: 10 am English Class/Clase de Ingles; 1 pm Line dancing. Tue: 10 am Nutrition class/Clase de nutricion. Thu: 10 am Bingo/loteria. Last Fri: 10 am Music/musica; monthly birthdays.

LINWOOD 1901 S Kansas, 263-3703 www.seniorservicesofwichita.org Regular activities: One-on-one computer training, cards, exercise programs, hot lunch. March 6: 2-4:30 pm "What does you name mean and National Oreo Cookies Day." March 22; 10:15 am Tornad and fire prevention. March 25: 1-2 pm Fireside cha with City Councilman Brandon Johnson. March 27: 2 pm "Secondhand Lions" movie with free popcorn. Tue: 9 am Brain games; 9:30 am Fit & balance; 2:30 pm Belly Dancing for Women. Tue & Thu: 9-11 am Pickleball. 3rd Wed: 10:30 am Birthday Party.

MCADAMS GOLDEN AGE 1329 E 16th, 337-9222 Regular activities: Open gym, walking, hot lunches, dominoes, cards, pool. Sun: 1-3 pm Quilting. Fri: noon-1:30 pm Sewing. Sat: noon-4:30 pm Classes: sewing, jewelry making. 2nd & 4th Tue: 10 am-noon Blood pressure checks.

MT HOPE 105 S Ohio, 667-8956

Mon: 7-10 am Coffee, donuts; 11:30 am-12:30 pm Lunch; 1-4 pm Cards. Tue, Wed, Fri: 9 am Exercise class. Tue, Wed: 10 am-3 pm Crafts, quilting. Thu: 9:30-10:30 am Line dancing. 1st Fri: Noon Senior Citizens’ lunch.

MULVANE 632 E Mulvane, 777-4813 Daily: Walk in the gym, coffee; hot lunch; computers, dominoes, puzzles, pool, book loan. Mon, Wed, Fri: 9:30 am Yoga. Mon, Wed, Fri: 9 am Zumba. 2nd Tue: 7:30-9:30 am Breakfast, $3. 2nd Wed: 11:30 am Blood pressure checks. 3rd Wed: Noon-1 pm Blood pressure checks. 2nd Thur: 11:45 am KFC potluck. Free. Last Fri: 11:45 Birthday Celebrations.

NORTHEAST 2121 E 21st, 269-4444 www.seniorservicesofwichita.org Daily: Dominoes, cards, Wii, pool, hot lunch. library, exercise room, computer lab. March 22: 11:45 am Understanding mental health. March 22: 11:45 am Tornado and fire safety. 1st Wed: Foot care. 946-0722 (leave msessage). Mon, Wed, Fri: 9:30 am WSU exercise. Mon: 12:30 pm Taking Off Pounds Sensibly. Thu: 10:30 am Jewelry class. Fri: 1 pm Bridge.

OAKLAWN 2937 Oaklawn Dr, 524-7545 Daily: 8:30 am-5 pm Computers, pool table; 11:30 pm Friendship meals. Mon: 9 am-noon Dominoes. Wed: 8:30 am Sweets & coffee/Panera Bread. Fri: 12:30 pm Cards. 1st & 3rd Weds: 7 pm OID board meeting. 1st Thu, Fri: 8 am-5pm Commodities. 1st Sat: 8-10am Breakfast fundraiser. $5.

seniorservicesofwichita.org Regular activities: Exercise programs, cards, pool, hot lunch, Wii bowling, dominoes, crafts. March 8 : 11:15 am Explaining the levels of rehab. March 11: 11:15 m Choosing more fruits and vegetables. Mon 9-11 am, Thu 1-3 pm: Pickleball Tue: Noon Duplicate bridge. Wed: 10:30 am-noon Computer lab. Fri: Noon Open pool tables; 12:30 pm Painting

PARK CITY 6100 N Hydraulic, 744-1199 Regular activities: Cards, exercise, pool, hot lunch. Call for details. Mon: 6 pm Pitch. Tue: 1 pm Pool. Fri: 9:15 am Exercise; 1:30 pm Dance aerobics Tue & Thu: 8:30 am Wii Bowling; 10 am WellRep exercise.

VALLEY CENTER VC Community Center 314 E Clay, 755-7350

Mon: 12:30 pm Troopons; 1:30 Line Dancing. Tue: 10 am Donuts & cards; 6:30 pm Pitch. Tue, Thu: 10 am WellREP exercise class. Tue, Thu: noon, lunch. $5. 3rd Wed: noon Classic movie. 4th Thu: 11 am Bingo. 2nd Fri: noon Bunko. TBA Pickleball, VC Intermediate.

To make changes

email Joe at Joe@theactiveage.com or call 316-942-5385 Deadline for the March issue is February 11th

ORCHARD PARK 4808 W 9th, 942-2293

DANCES Andover Senior Dance, 410 Lioba Dr. 7-10 pm 3rd Mon. 733-4441

Orchard Park Golden Age, 4808 W 9th. 7-9:30 pm Fris, Live music. $3, refreshments.

Augusta Sr Center, 640 Osage. Country Jam & Dance, 7-10 pm every other Wed. Donation. Bring covered dish/ snack to share. Info: 755-1060

Park City Sr Center, 6100 N Hydraulic. 7-10 pm 1st, 3rd, 5th Sats. $4, bring covered dish or snack. Info: 755-1060

Derby Sr Center, 611 Mulberry. Commuity dance. 7-9:30 pm: 1st Tue, Honky Tonk Time Band ; 3rd Tue, Moody. $3 donation, refreshments. El Dorado Jam & Dance, Senior Center, 210 E 2nd. Oldtime fiddlers, pickers, singers. Doors open 12:30 pm, music 1:30, 1st Suns. Bring covered dish. $3 donation. Back to Country dance 6 pm Thus. Singles/couples welcome Goldenrod Golden Age, 1340 S Pattie. 7-9:30 pm Weds: Take 3. $3, refreshments. Linwood Golden Age, 1901 S Kansas. 7-9:30 pm Sats. Live music. $3. Minisa Golden Age, 704 W 13th. 7-10 pm Thus: Honky Tonk Time. $3. Info 617-2560. Oaklawn Activity Center cafeteria, 4904 S Clifton. Barn & contra dance, usually 1st Sat. Lesson 6:30 pm, dance 7-9. $5. Info: iamgary48@yahoo.com.

www.theactiveage.com

Prairie Wind Dancers: Learn circle, line & folk dances. 2 pm Mons: Plymouth Congregational Church, 202 N Clifton. Joyce, 683-1122. Oaklawn Activity Center, Village Steppers Square Dance, 4904 S Clifton. 7:30-10:30 pm 2nd, 4th Sats. Info: Nick, 529-2792, or Mike, 650-2469. Community barn & contra dance, 1st Sat most months; lesson 6:30 pm, dance 7. $5, wichitacontra.org. Westside Steppers Square Dance, Clare Hall, 861 N Socora (one block east of Central & Tyler). 7-9:30 pm 1st, 3rd Suns. Info: David, 9927820; email: westsidesteppers@hotmail.com Wichita Solos Square Dance, Dawson UMC, 2741 S Laura. 7:30-10 pm 1st, 3rd, 5th Fris. Couples/singles welcome. Info: Curtis, wichitasolos@yahoo.com.


Page 18

the active age

March 2019

BUTLER COUNTY SENIOR CENTERS ANDOVER 410 Lioba Dr, 733-4441 www.andoverks.com Regular activities: Exercise, bingo, bridge, quilt club, dominoes, pool. Daily:11:30 am-noon Lunch (reservation preferred) 316-733-4441, $3. Mon, Wed, Fri: 10 am Exercise. Tue: noon Music at lunch. Mon: 12:30 pm Movie Monday. Tue: 10 am Blood pressure check; 11 am-2 pm Memory Café; 12:30 Pinochle; 1 pm Pool. Thu: 12:30 pm Pinochle; 1 pm Quilt Club; 7-9 Pitch; Fri: 11:30 Lunch & program; 12:45 pm Prize bingo; 1:45 Pinochle. 4th Sat: 7-10 am Monthly breakfast. Pickleball: Mon-Wed 10 am-3 pm; Tue 6-8 pm; Thu 5-7 pm; Fri 9-11:30 am. Andover Community Center,1008 E 13th. AUGUSTA 640 Osage, 775-1189 Regular activities: Exercise, cards, dominoes, pool, line dancing, lunch daily at 11:30 am. Mon: 6:30 pm 10-point pitch. Fri: 9:30 am Prize bingo. Every other Wed: 7 pm Live Jam Session. 2nd Sat: 7-10 am Breakfast. $4 donation. 4th Mon: 5 pm Evening meal. $6 suggested donation, reservations requested.

BENTON Lion’s Community Bldg, S Main St 2nd & 4th Tue: 9 am-4 pm Cards, games, occasional program. Covered dish. CASSODAY Cassoday Senior Center 133 S. Washington, 620-735-4538 Tue: 10:00 am Round Table. Tue, Thu: 9:30 am Exercise 1st Thu: 11:30 am Lunch Bunch 1st & 4th Mon: 1:30 pm Game Day. 3rd Mon: 6:30 pm Carry-in dinner, BP checks. DOUGLASS 124 W 4th, 746-3227 Regular activities: Exercise, quilting, cards, lunch, reservation required. $5. 1st Mon: 6 pm Finger foods & cards. 3rd Mon: 6 pm Birthday/anniversary covereddish supper, bring own service. Cards. 3rd Sat: 7-9:30 am Breakfast. $4. EL DORADO 210 E 2nd, 321-0142 Regular activities: Exercise, cards, bingo, hot lunch $3, support groups. Mon: 12:30 pm Mexican Train dominoes. Mon, Fri: 10 am Aerobics. Tue: 9 am Coffee; 12:30 pm Bingo; 2 Line dance; 6 Prairie Port Seniors. Tue, Thu: 8:30 am Men's coffee. Wed: 10 am Back in Balance; 1 pm Pinochle. Sat: 6 pm Cards and games.

3rd Tue: 12:30 am Blood pressure checks. LEON 112 S Main, 745-9200 or 742-9905 Regular activities: Lunch served Mon - Fri. Reservations required by 9 am. Wed: 10 am Exercise class; 1 pm Pinochle. 2nd & 4th Tue: 1 pm Bridge club. 3rd Sun: 11am-1 pm Lunch; Drinks included. $8 donation; adults/$4 children. ROSE HILL 207 E Silknitter, 776-0170 Regular activities: Wii, pool table, shuffleboard, home-cooked lunch (reservation required). Mon & Wed: 9 am Strong Women Stay Young exercise. Mon: 7 pm Pitch, games. Wed: 1 pm Bridge. Fri: 7 pm Card game. 1st Fri: 11 am Meeting, covered dish. 3rd Fri: Noon Covered dish. 1st Sat: 7-10 am Breakfast. TOWANDA 317 Main, 776-8999 Open 10:30 am-5 pm Mon, Wed, Fri Thu: 7 am Breakfast/coffee at Stearman Bar & Grill, Benton. WHITEWATER Legion Hall, 108 E Topeka 2nd Tue: noon Potluck, program. 4th Tue: noon Potluck, movie.

HARVEY COUNTY CENTERS BURRTON 124 N Burrton, 620-463-3225 Mon-Fri: 7-8:30 am Early bird coffee. Mon: 7-8 pm Educational film. Tue: 9 am Bible study. Fri: 7-8:30 am Breakfast. 3rd Thu: 7 pm Movie. 4th Thu: 6 pm Potluck supper. 1st Sat: 7-9 am Community breakfast.

HALSTEAD 523 Poplar, 835-2283 Mon & Wed: 9 am Yoga; 1 pm Dominoes Tue & Fri: 9 am Exercise followed by social hour Thu: 12:30 pm Bridge Fri: 1 pm Pitch 1st Sat: 7-10 am Community breakfast 2nd Thu: 6 pm Dine out 3rd Tue: 1:30 pm Movie 3rd Thu: noon Potluck and short program

HESSTON Randall & Main, 620-327-5099 www.hesstonseniorcenter.com

Mon, Wed, Fri: 8 am Stretch bands. Mon & Tue: 1:30 pm Pitch. Tue: 8:30 am Coffee hour; 9 am Film; 1:30 pm Pinochle. Wed: 6:30 am Men’s Bible Study; 1 pm Bridge. 1st & 3rd Tue: 6 pm Singin’ Seniors. 3rd Wed: 11:30 am Healthy luncheon; noon, program. Reservations by previous Fri. 1st Thu: 7 pm Bridge. 2nd Thu: 7 pm Movie night. 1st & 3rd Fri: 1 pm Mexican Train dominoes. 1st Sat: 7:30-9:30 am Community breakfast. 4th Mon: 5:30 pm Gathering; 6 pm Potluck dinner, program follows.

GRAND CENTRAL 122 E 6th, Newton, 283-2222 www.newtonseniorcenter.org Mon: 10-11 am Blood pressure check. Tue: 1 pm Crafts: handwork. Wed: 1 pm Pinochle/pitch/dominoes. Thu: 1 pm Wii bowling; 5:15 pm Tai Chi.

SEDGWICK

Mon: 1 pm Games, bingo, Wii. Tue: 7-8:30 am Breakfast; 1 pm Line dancing. Wed: 9 am Quilting. Mon, Wed, Fri: 9 am Exercise. Fri: 3 pm Bible study 1st Thu: 1 pm Paint with Sue. 2nd Thu: noon Potluck luncheon & biz mtg. 3rd Thu: 5 pm Dinner Night Out. 1st Fri: 7 pm Birthday party.

TRANSPORTATION Sedgwick County Sedgwick Co Transportation, 660-5150 or 1-800-367-7298. Information: 8 am-5 pm, Mon-Fri; closed most holidays. www. sedgwickcounty.org/aging.

Butler County Transit Weekday transportation in El Dorado, Augusta and Andover. Rides to Wichita on Wed, Thu. Information: Augusta, 775-0500; El Dorado, 322-4321; toll free, 1-800-2793655. 48-hr notice required.

SENIOR WEDNESDAYS www.seniorwednesday.org March 6 10 am Wichita Art Museum. Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of LIghtning. JIn celebration of WAM's new Dorothea Lange exhibit, a PBS documentary on the photograper will be shown. 1:30 pm WATER Center. The WSU Economic Finance Center will share about how communities can make environmental changes that improve the quality of life. March 13 10 am Sedgwick County Zoo. Species Reintrodution. 1:30 pm Advanced Learning Library. Hell After Sundown: Keith Wondra of Cowtown will talk about whether Delano was as rowdy as everyone claims. March 20 10 am Ulrich Museum of Art.

107 W. Fifth, 772-0393

Finding the Extraordinary in the Ordinary. Kevin Rabas, poet laureate of Kansas, shares how poetry can illuminate our daily lives. 1:30 pm Kansas African American Museum. The Personal Touch TaDonne Neal discusses personal stories collected by the museum. March 27 10 am Wichita-Sedgwick County Historical Museum. The story of Pizza Hut and the creation of the museum. Rachelle Meineke discusses how the restaurant chain started and co-founder Dan Carney's vision for the Pizza Hut museum. 1:30 pm Exploration Place. Escape the Ordinary -- The Room. Learn about escape rooms and how human beings respond when confronted with challenges.

Harvey County Transportation reservations or information: 316-284-6802 or 1-866-6806802. Round-trip: $8 Newton (wheelchair only), $12 Harvey County, $20 outside Harvey County. AVI to Newton: Tue, 8 am4:30 pm from Burrton, Sedgwick, Halstead, Hesston, Walton.

Support Groups, Organizations Find Support groups at supportgroupsinkansas.org. To add or correct a listing, call 316-9783566 or 1-800-445-0016. Clubs and Organizations are at www.theactiveage. com, Resources category. For changes call 316-942-5345 or email fran@theactiveage.com.

www.theactiveage.com

Friendship Meals Aging Projects serves a hot, nutritious meal weekdays for persons 60 and older in Sedgwick, Harvey and Butler counties. Reservations are necessary. For locations and reservations, call 620-669-8201. WEEK OF MAR. 4 Mon: Southwest chicken bake, cauliflower, applesauce, wheat bread, peanut butter cookie. Tue: Liver & Onions or Salisbury steak, mashed potatoes, gravy, peas , peaches. Wed: Tuna noodle casserole/peas, lentil salad, apricots, grape juice, sweet muffin. Thu: Cranberry meatballs, cooked cabbage, green beans, pears. Fri: Cheesy potato & egg bake,parslied carrots, orange juice,mixed fruit, coffee cake. WEEK OF MAR. 11 Mon: Chili, combination salad,dressing, pineapple, crackers, cinnamon roll. Tue: Hot turkey casserole, mixed vegetables, plums, easy fruit cobbler. Wed: Chicken fajita salad,refried beans, blushing pears, bread pudding. Thu: Pork roast w/ gravy, sweet potatoes, herbed green beans, white cake. Fri: Pimento cheese spread on bread. vegetable soup, banana, green gelatin. WEEK OF MAR. 18 Mon: Mexican pork stew, roasted zucchini, corn relish salad, pears, grape juice. Tue: Sloppy Joe on Bun, french fries, cauliflower bean salad, applesauce, fruit crisp. Wed: Tahitian chix & rice, broccoli, apricots, lemon bar. Thu: Ham & beans, potatoes w/ onions, parslied carrots, glazed blueberries, cornbread. Fri: Fish w/ tartar sauce, macaroni & cheese, mixed vegetables, strawberries, roll. WEEK OF MAR. 25 Mon: Meatloaf, cabbage au gratin, parslied carrots, peaches, pineapple bread. Tue: Chicken & noodles over mashed potatoes, mixed greens salad, blushing pears, roll. Wed: Ham, california mash, peas, strawberries. Thu: Goulash, german mixed vegetables, plums, garlic bread. Fri: Egg Salad on bun, vegetable soup, cole slaw, mixed fruit.

AARP DRIVER SAFETY CLASSES Eight hours of instruction; certificate on completion. Reservation required. $15 for AARP members; $20 others. Downtown Senior Center - Wichita Mon Mar 18, 2019 8:30 Am - 12:30 Pm Tue Mar 19, 2019 8:30 Am - 12:30 Pm Instructor: Timothy Marlar Register: (316) 267-0197 Ext. 246


March 2019

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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

PLACE AN AD: 942-5385

) CEMETERY PROPERTY FOR SALE )

) FOOT CARE )

) HOME CARE )

Two cemetery lots in Garden of the Last Supper at Old Mission Cemetery. MUST SALE. Value $2,080 each. Call 903-440-1310.

Foot Care in home. Home visit $40.00 Call Francine at 316-943-4360. Leave a message.

In-Home Services: Personal care assistance, meal preparation, housekeeping, handymen and more! Phone Chester at the Senior Employment Program, 316-267-1771 or 316-267-0302. Pre-screened, reliable help available.

Lakeview Garden of Holy Rosary, 2 spaces together. Value is $4,990, will sell for $3,800. Seller pays $295 transfer fee. Leave a message at 316-640-1320.

FOOT CARE IN YOUR HOME Cheryl Rosine ~ The Foot Lady ICMT RN

• 316-312-2025 •

Resthaven, Garden of Gospel, space 1 lot 57-A. Double depth lawn crypt w/2 pre-installed vaults w/2 name markers. Call 316-524-0085 for price/details

$40: In-home, Sedgwick & surrounding counties Diabetic, thick toe nails, ingrown & callous care

4 cemetery plots together at Rest Haven for $8000 in the Garden of prayer, next to the road. Call 316-263-4228

) FOR RENT)

Lakeview Gardens, Meditation section, Lot 32B, Spaces 3 and 4. Selling together for $4,500. Transaction at Lakeview Office. Buyer pays $295 transfer fee. Call 816-279-2325. Will consider ALL offers. Old Mission, 2 spaces in Acacia currently valued @ $2,834 each. Call 316-992-2373. In old mission Acacadia section D row D space 21&22. $4500 for both. Call 417-876-8999. Resthaven, Garden of Freedom, two adjoining lots just west of the Eagle statue. Value $4,295 each. Sell $2,500 for each. 316-304-3150. 2 Cemetery plots, Garden of Devotion in Old Mission Cemetery. $2,000 each includes transfer fee. 316-734-3368 or 316-641-9941. Old Mission Cemetery, 2 plots in the Garden of Prayer. Asking $4,000 for both. Call 316-838-4897. Two plots at White Chapel Memorial. Lot 271-A, spaces 3 & 4 in Sermon on the Mount. Cash only transaction at the White Chapel Office. $2,325 for both which includes buyer paying transfer fee of $425. Email Kenls49@cox.net or call 316-283-1849. 2 cemetery plots. Lakeview Gardens in Garden of meditation $2500 each For info call 407-247-2413

) ESTATE SALES ) KC ESTATE SALES Complete estate & moving sale services. We can do the sale at your residence or place your items with another sale. Expert pricing, selling & clean-up. Packing & moving services available. Excellent results. Free consultation. Call Carolyn Moshier. 316-634-0040 Sale By Gayle Complete estate sale service.from setup to clean out. Free Consultation.20 yrs experience. Serving Wichita and surrounding areas. Insured & Bonded. Visit our website www.salebygayle.com 316-838-3521 or 316-227-7640 Call for FREE Brochure! CUSTOMIZED ESTATE SALES GREATER PROFITS WITH LESS STRESS Insured with 20 years experience Free Consultations 316-806-7360 Julie

You will love living in this extra nice 2 bdrm duplex w/ carport. Located in a quiet neighborhood with easy access to all parts of the city. Central & Heat and Air(abbrev.). All Appliances including washer and dryer. Lawn maintained. Trash Paid. Non-Smokers. No pets. Deposit and References required. Perfect for mature single or couple. Call 316-262-1287.

) FOR SALE) Estate Sale: Van Briggle Pottery, Persian Rose Color. Fostoria Crystal, Americana pattern, many unique pieces. Crystal cut glass. Fenton Cranberry Glass. Opalescent glass. 316-6367689 Shop rider Electric Wheel chair asking $350. 2 dehumidifiers asking $125 each. Call 316727-1991. Easy Rest Twin XL Adjustable Beds. Excellent condition 316-737-5374

) HELP WANTED)

WE NEED HELP Outside Sales Rep Wanted We are looking for a self motivated person who would like to make some extra $$$$$$ promoting the active age Must be comfortable with cold calls. This is a straight commision position Call Mike at 613-3547 or email mike@theactiveage.com

) FURNITURE ) I Buy Estates Cash paid for good used furniture. Will buy entire housefuls. Call Kelly 316-283-8536. Furniture Warehouse 200 Main Newton, KS

) HOME BASED BARBER SHOP)

Archie's Barber Shop 38 years in Business * KS Board Certified Haircuts for the Family, Hot Lather Shaves, Outline shave w/ Services, Body Massages, Chair Massages $1/min Open Tues-Wed-Thurs By Appointment 10am-6pm 1118 Waddington * 316-721-1525

Can’t bathe yourself like you used to? Need light housekeeping? Need private-duty aide? I can accommodate all your needs. Flexible hours; 2 to 12 hour shifts available. Cynthia CNA/HHA 316-992-6711. Loving Touch Cleaning Husband & Wife Team. Residential cleaning. Senior, Military and referral discounts. Insured. 20+ years experience. Call for a Free Estimate. Wichita and Suburbs. Mary 316-650-9206

) HOME IMPROVEMENTS ) Dave’s Improvements Painting—interior/exterior. Doors and windows replaced, grab bars, wheelchair ramps. All general repairs. Guaranteed lowest rates. Senior citizen discount. Lic #7904. 316-312-2177 Marv’s Home Improvements & Repair Doors, trim, decks, ramps, patio covers, fences, siding, flooring. Painting. Honest and dependable. Senior discounts. Free estimates. 35 years. 316-737-4646.

) HOME IMPROVEMENTS CONT ) HAULING HANDYMAN Pick up/Delivery/Brush, Junk /Trash Removal

Sheet Rock, Light Painting, Minor Repairs MISC. ODD JOBS, NO JOB TOO SMALL. HONEST & REASONABLE 316-807-4989. Molina Electric - Wichita Lic #1364 Comm. or Residential wiring. Service calls. New electric service. Troubleshooting. Cell 316461-2199. SAFE BATHING CONCERNS? Call 316-633-9967 We Supply & Install National Brands Walk-in Showers & Walk-in Tubs @ Huge DISCOUNTED PRICING!!!! Bathe Safe & FEEL SAFE!! bathroomheadquarters.com "Tub to shower conversions specialist" From Small Home Remodels to Repairs Call Lucky's Handyman and Remodeling for quality work and competitive pricing. FREE estimates! 316-796-3100 Need privacy fence repair? Call Dan for free estimates. 316-516-3949. Insured. Member of the Better Business Bureau.

JS Guttering & Construction

Wright One Home Improvements Kitchen & Bath remodeling. Painting. Windows. Doors. Siding. All types of flooring and home repairs. Free estimates. 316-409-2160.

5"-6" SEAMLESS GUTTER WHOLE HOUSE PAINTING SIDING & WINDOWS

Cowboy Construction Remodeling, siding, decks, fences, windows, doors and more. 20 years locally owned. Free estimates. Senior discounts. Todd Wenzel 316-393-4488

316-393-8921

Semi-retired maintenance man. Experienced in most phases of maintenance & roofing. Light hauling. Sedgwick County only. Call Paul 316-312-9970 From Small Home Remodels to your Home Repairs call Lucky's Handyman and Remodeling. Quality work and competitive pricing. FREE estimates! 316-796-3100.

Call Josh for an estimate

AGAPE ROOFING Three Generations of Local Roofers Quality Work – Fair Prices Residential & Commercial

Siding - Guttering - Windows

316-807-8650 Call for Free Roof Inspection Locally Owned, Licensed & Insured

PLUMBCO

Compare Our Prices Weekly Plumbing Specials

Ins/Lic #5803

316-942-1967

ALL HOMES REPAIRS Painting, Sheetrock & Finish Carpenter, Lite Elect, Plumbing, Etc. No Job too Small. 40 yrs

316-806-2492

Wayne 316-214-9668

LIFT-RITE GARAGE DOORS

Scheduled maintenance, repair, sales on all garage doors. *Springs-Torsion & Extension *Garage Door Openers, Doors & More

Paul Williams (316) 650-8807 www.theactiveage.com

Grandpa’s Plumbing Repairs, Free estimates

316.312.4391 Free Estimates


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the active age

March 2019

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING ) HOME IMPROVEMENTS CONT )

BRICK & STONE WORK OF ANY KIND Tuck-pointing, foundation & chimney repair. Insured. Free Estimates.

CALL DAN 316-516-3949

Dave’s Improvements General Contractor KS Registration 14-006471 City License 07904

Pole Barns, Roofing, Siding, Gutters, Windows, Room Additions, Garages, Bath Remodel Senior Discount

316-312-2177 ĂůůĂƌĚ ,ĞĂƟŶŐ͕ WůƵŵďŝŶŐ Θ ŽŽůŝŶŐ • • • •

FREE estimates Senior Discounts HVAC change outs Buy an AC,get a Furnace FREE Licensed & Insured

Call Brad at 316-260-0136 www.BallardPHC.com

Heating/AC, Plumbing Light Electrical, Drywall, Painting, Tile, Basic Home Repairs Licensed & Insured 25% Senior Discount

Don’t Fix it Alone!

Our background-checked, bonded, insured, employee Craftsmen will fix it for you. Our work is GUARANTEED. We’re looking forward to your call…

773-0303 ) LAWN AND GARDEN )

Call for Specials for New Customers • • •

Spring Clean-Ups Early Sign-Up Discounts Free Estimates

Licensed & Insured

) LAWN AND GARDEN CONT ) Mike E. 316-708-1472 SNOW REMOVAL! Garage clean out, mowing leaf and gutter cleanup, tree trimming, hauling, roto-tilling. BRICK, BLOCK AND STONE repair. Dave’s Hauling Services Solid waste removal, property cleanup, tree & fence line clearing, general landscape removal, other lawn and garden services. All fence, porch and patio work. Call 316832-2201. Total yard clean-up, flower beds and bushes, tree trimming and stump grinding. Removal & Clean-up. Firewood Available for Delivery. LEAF cleanup and HAULING. Including all yard debris. 316-516-4630 or 316-838-5710 All Season Clean Up Lawn Care Quality Lawn Care • Yard Clean Up Tree Trimming • Gutter Cleaning Fall through Spring raking. Free estimates, senior discounts. 316-409-8780. Christian Lawn Care Mowing-$20, verti-slicing, core-aerating, over-seeding, new lawns, mulching flower beds, fall cleanup, leaves, shrub trimming and removal, gutter cleaning, hauling. Senior discount. Steve 316-685-2145 HAULING HANDYMAN Pick up/Delivery/Brush, Junk /Trash Removal. Sheet Rock, Light Painting, Minor Repairs MISC. ODD JOBS, NO JOB TOO SMALL. HONEST & REASONABLE 316-807-4989. MOWING Impact LawnCare CALL FOR FULL LIST OF QUALITY SERVICES! Snow Removal • Spring Cleanup • shrub trimming/removal • gutter cleaning Family owned and operated with over 30 years experience and fully insured! Kevin 316-737-4890 Mowing, trimming, yard and leaf cleanup. If you need any of these services call Perry, 316-619-6126 ASC Spring Clean Up * Complete Lawn Care Tree Trimming * Gutter Cleaning Fence Repair * Decks * Home Repairs Flooring *Free estimates! Senior discounts. 316-807-8649 Mowing, Edging, Yard/Small Business. West Wichita Only. Veteran/USPS Retired. Reasonable Rates. Call Tom 316-214-4914

PLACE AN AD: 942-5385

) LAWN AND GARDEN CONT ) Spring Leaf and yard clean-ups. Shrub Trimming. Now Available Call Jason. 316-469-8765. Free estimates.

) PAINTING ) Painting & Remodeling by Harley Worthey Interior/Exterior & Odd jobs Husband & Wife Team. Liability Insurance. 316-648-4478 McCoy Painting 316-516-6443 Do you need any interior or exterior painting done? I’m your man. Free estimates, affordable rates. References available. Ron Goodwin’s Painting Painting, interior/exterior. Power washing, gutter cleaning, roofing repairs, handyman services and odd jobs. 30 years experience. Senior discounts. 316-461-2510

Affordable Painting "We've Been Covering The Town For 30 Years!"

316-945-9473

Senior Citizen Discounts • Residential and Commercial • Painting for Interior and Exterior • Power Washing • Some Home Improvements

Free Estimates

www.affordablepaintingwichita.com

) QUILTING ) Full service machine quilting including t-shirts, memory, grand kid and friendship quilts. 316-992-6194

) TREE SERVICE ) ALL AROUND TREE SERVICE Stump GRINDING & Chip Clean-up Trimming, deadwood, tree removal. Total yard, leaf clean-up & hauling. Flower beds and bushes. Free estimates. Experienced. Good prices. Insured. Tom King, 316-516-4630,316-838-5710. Felipe Tree Service Evergreen trimming. Tree removal. Brush hauling. Splitting. Deadwooding. Free estimates. 12 years experience. 316-807-4419 Bruce’s Tree Service FIREWOOD Trees, hedgerows, evergreens & shrubs. Crown reduction, trimming or removal. Line clearing and roofs of branches/limbs. Bucket truck available, will climb . Senior. Discounts. Insured. Prompt, immediate and professional service. Over 30 years experience. ALL FARM & RURAL AREAS Call 316-207-8047

Alfred's A lffred reed d's S Superior Su uperior Tree Trree Service T Seer viice S ccee 316-522-9458 ooo&Yd^j]\klj]]&[ge Yd^j]\klj]]8hapamk&f]l pruning - tree removal - stump grinding - debris/ brush haul off - chemical sprays - emergency k]jna[]k % Új]ogg\ % [gfkmdlYlagfk % \]egdalagfk

Professional & Insured • Certified Arborist Residential & Commercial

TREE BOSS

) ROOMMATE WANTED ) Looking for Roommate! 16x80 mobile home. Reasonable Bills that will be split 2 ways. Call 316-993-0683 for more information.

) SERVICES ) Need help on your electric scooter, power or lift chair, stair or platform lift or hand controls? Call Howard Distribution at 316-648-1694. Howard is a certified service center and dealer for Best Bath walk-in tubs, Bruno, EMC, Golden Tech, Pace Saver, Pride and Ricon. Working for you since 1987. Need a ride? Doctor appointments, ride home from hospital, court, casino, mini vacation or family reunion. You name the place, I will take you there. 316-259-6212.

Robert Rodriguez Owner/ Operator 316-806-9592

• • • • • •

Tree Removal Trimming Deadwood Stump Removal Firewood Specials FREE ESTIMATES

Licensed & Insured

) VEIN CARE)

Callll 316 C 316-573-4850 573 4850 tto llearn more about b t our FREE monthly vein screenings!

Kansas Surgical Arts specializes in vein care, cosmetic surgery, and aesthetic services within our MedSpa. www.kansassurgicalarts.com

West at 3460 N Ridge Road, Suite 160*East at 10096 E 13th St. N, Suite 142

Brush, Limbs, Debris, Hauling and Junk Removal. Lawn mowing. Leaf removal. Free Estimates. Call David at 316-213-8880

MOWING

Tree Trimming, Junk Removal, Spring & Fall Clean-Up Brock Eastman 316.765.1677

) THRIFT SHOP ) Gently Used Resale (Thrift Shop) 2523 S. Seneca (Westway Plaza) Wichita, Ks. Store & Donation Hours Mon & Thu 9 am-7 pm Tue, Wed, Fri & Sat 9 am-5 pm Purchase with a purpose. Benefits those served by the Bethesda Lutheran Communities to enhance the lives of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities through services that share the good news of Jesus Christ. Volunteers & Donations always needed. Like us on Facebook. 316-267-5800

www.theactiveage.com

) WANTED ) Want to Purchase mineral and other oil/ gas interests. Send details to P.O Box 13557, Denver CO 80201 Donate your Durable Medical Equipment. Will pick up. Tax credit. Medical Loan Closet of Wichita. 316-779-8989

) WOOD FOR SALE ) Seasoned split and delivered premium firewood. Premium Oak mix, locust, pecan, hot stove mix. Any quantity. 316-807-8650.


March 2019

the active age

Page 21

Music brings generations together By Joe Stumpe “Rosy cheeks!� “I want to see this little baby better!� “I’m telling you, she’s going to be a drummer!� When some young children come to make music for residents of the Caritas Nursing Center, they definitely find a receptive audience. In fact, most of the residents – who are Catholic Sisters of the Adorers of the Blood of Christ order – sing and clap along. The children, none older than five, are part of Riverside Music Together, which is affiliated with an international early childhood music program. The Music Together program is usually built around 45-minute classes in which children and their parents or caregivers sing, dance, play simple percussion instruments and generally have a great time. The idea is that the children develop much more than just music skills during the sessions. At the request of Caritas Nursing Center, Erin Flory Robertson, energetic director of Riverside Music Together, has been bringing one of her classes there each week. Founded in Italy in 1834, the Adorers of the Blood of

Photos by Joe Stumpe

Christ came to Wichita in 1902 and in 1933 started Sacred Heart Junior College, which became Newman University. Their ministry includes education and helping the homeless and victims of domestic violence. On a chilly Monday morning in February, a half-dozen casually dressed young mothers and their children took part with about the same number of active, semi-active and retired sisters. They sang the “Hello� song, as in “Hello, Sister Marie, so glad to see you.� They sang the“Wiggle Your Finger� songs, persuading most of the sisters to do just that. They sang

the“Hi Ho!� song, danced with scarves and then broke out a bag filled with drums, tambourines, maracas and all manner of noise-makers. “This is our most favorite moment,� one of the sisters said with a grin. Although most of the sisters are content to sing and tap their feet from their chairs, Robertson said, “Some are able to get up and boogie with us.� About the time it looks like a few of the younger children and older sisters may be ready for a nap, it’s time for the “Goodbye, so long, farewell� song. Susan Tuwey, who is director of

Sister Janice holds Archie; Sister Maryann listens to the music. At Left, children, moms and sisters hold hands during a song.

nursing at Caritas as well as a Music Together parent, said everybody present – kids, moms and residents – gets something out of the sessions. “I like the community and the relationship it builds with seniors,� she said. “Our kids don’t have their grandparents here. And it allows us to be silly.� Sister Diane Rawlings said most of her colleagues “spent their whole lives as teachers and professional educators,� surrounded by children. “This really gives them a chance to remember and reconnect.�

GraceMed & Medicare: Together we’ve got you covered. At GraceMed, we welcome new Medicare patients. Yes, we know not everyone does. But we always will. We are a RTKXCVG PQPRTQƂV JGCNVJ ENKPKE FGFKECVGF VQ OCMKPI VJG JKIJGUV SWCNKV[ ECTG CEEGUUKDNG VQ GXGT[QPG +PENWFKPI /GFKECTG patients. ;QW ECP WUG [QWT /GFKECTG RNCP VQ EQXGT both medical and vision care at )TCEG/GF ;QW ECP IGV dental care CV C EQUV VJCV ECP DG CFLWUVGF DCUGF QP [QWT KPEQOG #PF KH [QWoTG QPG QH QWT RCVKGPVU YG ECP GXGP ƂNN OCP[ QH [QWT RTGUETKRVKQPU CV QWT in-house, discount pharmacy.

9G EWTTGPVN[ ECTG HQT CDQWV /GFKECTG RCVKGPVU $WV VJGTGoU RNGPV[ QH TQQO HQT OQTG 'URGEKCNN[ PQY VJCV Internal Medicine Residents from the KU School of Medicine-Wichita are seeing RCVKGPVU TKIJV CNQPIUKFG QWT UVCHH #PF VJG SWCNKV[ QH ECTG YG RTQXKFG JCU GCTPGF GraceMed VJG JKIJGUV TGEQIPKVKQP QH VJG 0CVKQPCN %QOOKVVGG HQT 3WCNKV[ #UUWTCPEG 0%3# So welcome to GraceMed, Medicare patients. ;QWT ECTG YKNN CNYC[U DG QWT RTKXKNGIG VQ FGNKXGT ;QWT VTWUV YKNN DG QWT JQPQT VQ WRJQNF

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Page 22

the active age

Mexican From Page 1 gracefully in a rosy soup bursting with PHORQ Ă€DYRU Not far away is the shrimp lady, serving up shrimp cocktail as you have QHYHU KDG WKHP LQ WDOO JODVVHV ÂżOOHG with shrimp, avocado, peppers and onions, all married together with a tomato sauce. In Ajijic, a charming little French restaurant, serves beautiful croissants and baguettes. A food truck offers a credible version of falafel. As with all adventures, there are some rough spots. Many restaurants in the area seem to believe they need to adopt certain North American recipes. It is almost always a disaster. Not only do they struggle to source certain ingredients but they also struggle with translation. The description on the accompanying menu should say “Fish baked in parchment paperâ€? instead of “Fish based wallpaper.â€? On the other hand, a number of places do nice things with a sort of relaxed fusion cooking, using local ingredients in recipes that originated elsewhere. One such dish is the sort-of Italian eggplant parmesan served with penne pasta at Adelita’s, a favorite of gringos in San Antonio Tlacapan. The

Photo By Rob Howes Lake Chapala draws many visitors and full tme residents from the United States.

gorgeously quaint surroundings don’t hurt. My comments about variety aside, what I really enjoy is the local cuisine, what Mexican construction workers, policeman, retail clerks and domestics eat. Many can be found at the central market in Chapala. Options there range from small stalls on the balcony where you almost never see a gringo WR ¿UVW ÀRRU HDWHULHV WKDW RSHQ RQWR WKH VTXDUH 7KHUH LV D ¿VK PDUNHW RQ the balcony where you can buy a fresh snapper, have it cleaned, then walk around the corner to a small eatery where a woman cooks it for you. In my RSLQLRQ LW LV WKH EHVW ¿VK LQ WKH DUHD (I have ordered snapper at a high-end restaurant on the lake and there is no

comparison.) On the balcony I also found lots of soup - menudo, pozole, EHHI DQG ¿VK VRXS On the square I enjoyed chilaquiles served with refried beans and a bolillo (roll). The beans have a distinct local flavor and texture. There are always fresh chicharones available at the butcher stand inside, good for a nibble as I wander through the market stalls. My favorite market is the one held every Wednesday in Ajijic. Here one finds a marvelous selection of stews based on pork, beef, tongue and chunks of meat that I couldn’t identify, all melt-in-your-mouth tender and especially delicious when floating in a chili-infused broth. One staff offers simple boiled vegetables – potato, beet,

Marchant Grove

Small Town Living in Haysville • • • • • • •

Affordable No steps 2 bedroom 1100 sq ft Oversized Garage w/ opener Safe Room Covered Patio

March 2019 carrot and chayote – swimming in crème fresh and chili sauce. Another local delicacy is chicken grilled along the highway, known as “dusty chickenâ€? in gringo circles. It LV EXWWHUĂ€LHG PDULQDWHG DQG JULOOHG WR PRLVW SHUIHFWLRQ WKHQ Ă€RSSHG GRZQ on a tree limb and cut up with a large knife, the pieces scooped into a plastic bag for the lucky buyer. It is the best grilled chicken I’ve ever eaten. Did I mention tacos? I’m pretty VXUH Ă€RXU WRUWLOODV DUH LOOHJDO LQ -DOLVFR but the little corn tortillas that are GRXEOHG XS WR KROG WKHLU ÂżOOLQJV DUH wonderful. The taco stands must be chosen by locals based on price because they are all good. I love to watch taco vendors work their mobile stovetops and comals, large circular grills.  The cooking areas provide three or four different temperature zones, letting meat and vegetables slowly lounge until it’s time to quickly fry and toss them into tortillas. It’s up to you to dress them up, choosing from a wardrobe of radishes, cabbage, cilantro, onions and salsa. For my last meal, I just might choose two carne asada tacos. I’ve even learned to cook a few dishes like the locals. The accompanying recipe for a tomatoSee next page

Saturday April 27th Catholic Care Center

45th Street & Woodlawn

Steps away from the Haysville Senior Center

Call for an appointment:

Curtis (316) 461-0107 Steve (316) 655-8171

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March 2019

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Page 23

Mexican

From previous page

pepper sauce was taught to me by Lupita, a friend in Jalisco, and is great for making enchiladas. Contact Rob Howes at gonzorob@cox.net

Enchiladas Corn or flour tortillas Vegetable oil Mexican Mother Sauce (see accompanying recipe) Filling: cooked chicken, ground beef or shrimp, mashed potatoes and cooked peas, minced onion and cilantro, shredded cheese, etc. In a skillet, heat 1 teaspoon oil over medium-high heat. Add a tortilla and cook about 10 seconds per side, until just softened. Using tongs, remove tortilla from skillet and dredge through Mexican Mother Sauce. Roll tortilla around choice of filling. These can be served immediately or placed in a pan, topped with a little more sauce and cheese and bake at 350 until bubbly.

Senior Law

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Arlene M. Burrow ATTORNEY AT LAW

Mexican Mother Sauce 4 Roma Tomatoes 3 Ancho, Pasilla or New Mexico dried chili peppers Garlic and salt to taste Remove stems and seeds from the dried peppers. I sometimes add a single dried habanero for taste and heat; a tablespoon of the seeds will also increase the heat. Place the cleaned peppers and tomatoes in a sauce pan. Cover with water and boil until the tomatoes are soft. Remove the peppers and tomatoes and add to a blender with just enough water to blend. Use fresh water or taste the cooking liquid to verify that it’s not bitter. (Also, when picking dried chilies make sure they are a little pliable, not dry and crispy.) Blend the mixture to a puree. Pour the puree into a fine mesh strainer and work it through with a large spoon or plastic scraper. Add enough water to achieve the consistency you like. Add garlic and salt to taste. Note: When choosing dried chiles, make sure they are pliable, not dry and crispy. Spices such as oregano, cumin and/or cinnamon can be added if desired.

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Monday 6 p.m. March 18, 4–6 B i Bring your ffamily il and join us for a ďŹ esta! Enjoy a delicious taco bar served by our talented chefs.

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Page 24

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