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Boston College

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Georgia Tech

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Maryland

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Virginia

Duke

Miami

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North Carolina

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Wake Forest

Credits: The 2012 ACC Men’s Basketball Tournament Program is a product of the Atlantic Coast Conference. Cover Design: Martha Walker. Design: O.Henry Magazine, Greensboro, NC. Printing: Cadmus Communications, Richmond, VA. A special thanks to the sports information and media relations staffs throughout the Conference for their assistance with materials.

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Welcome from ACC Commissioner John Swofford ACC Commissioner John Swofford ACC Staff Tradition of Excellence Catch all the ACCtion ACC Basketball by the Numbers 2012 ACC Postgraduate Scholars Making Multimedia Waves ACC Vault ACC Home Courts 2011-2012 in Review 2011-2012 Season Standings ACC Tournament Bracket Players of the Week ACC Overall Stats ACC Conference Stats All-ACC Team ACC Player of the Year ACC Rookie of the Year ACC Defensive Player of the Year Skip Prosser Award (ACC Scholar-Athlete of the Year) Bob Bradley Award ACC Coach of the Year Team Box Scores ACC Tournament Records ACC Hall of Champions The ACC Lights Up Atlanta ACC Scores with Service Upholding A Tradition of Excellence A Tradition of Academic Excellence 30th Anniversary Remembered 2012 ACC Legends All-Time ACC Legends All-Time ACC Champions Year by Year Tournament Results FSU & ACC Celebrate 20th Anniversary 2012 ACC Football Schedule theACC.com 11 theACC.com


FOOD LION and the ACC


ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER

!

Dear ACC Basketball Fans, On behalf of the Atlantic Coast Conference, welcome to the 59th annual ACC Men’s Basketball Tournament. Our conference and the City of Atlanta have worked hard to make this a very special and exciting time for the players, coaches and fans. We sincerely hope you enjoy the games and events that surround the Tournament, and that you find your trip to Atlanta to be a pleasurable experience. The ACC Tournament comes to Atlanta for the sixth time in all but for the first occasion in Philips Arena. A city with so much basketball history is a worthy and appropriate choice to host the ACC Tournament in 2012. Our league’s men’s basketball teams have enjoyed an exciting 2011-12 regular-season and 2012 may well be one of the most competitive tournaments in ACC history. As you watch some of the nation’s finest teams showcase their talents, we hope you will take in the complete tournament experience. Over the past 58 years the ACC basketball programs have produced 60 consensus All-Americans, 30 National Players of the Year, 44 NCAA Final Four teams and 12 NCAA Titles. Enjoy your stay in Atlanta as you witness one of the greatest traditions in college basketball. Sincerely,

John D. Swofford Atlantic Coast Conference Commissioner

4512 WEYBRIDGE LANE • GREENSBORO, NC 27407 MAIN PHONE: (336) 854-8787 • ADVANCED MEDIA/COMMUNICATIONS PHONE: (336) 851-6062 BOSTON COLLEGE • CLEMSON UNIVERSITY • DUKE UNIVERSITY • FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY • GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY BOSTON COLLEGE CLEMSON UNIVERSITY • DUKE UNIVERSITY • FLORIDA STATECAROLINA UNIVERSITY • GEORGIA INSTITUTE OFUNIVERSITY TECHNOLOGY UNIVERSITY OF• MARYLAND • UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI • UNIVERSITY OF NORTH • NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND • UNIVERSITY MIAMI • UNIVERSITY OFAND NORTH CAROLINA • NORTH CAROLINA UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA • VIRGINIAOF POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE STATE UNIVERSITY • WAKE FORESTSTATE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA • VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE AND STATE UNIVERSITY • WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY


John D. Swofford acc commissioner

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ow in his 15th year as Commissioner, and just the fourth in Atlantic Coast Conference history, John Swofford has made a dramatic impact on the ACC and college athletics. Swofford has built his career on the appropriate balance of academics, athletic achievement and integrity and is regarded as one of the top administrators in the NCAA. In addition to overseeing one of the nation’s largest athletic conferences, Swofford has been pivotal in positioning the Atlantic Coast Conference for the future.

VISION

• On September 18, 2011, on behalf of the league’s member institutions and the ACC Council of Presidents, Swofford introduced the University of Pittsburgh and Syracuse University as the newest members of the ACC. The additions further strengthen the league’s rich tradition of balancing academics and athletics while also enhancing the ACC’s reach into the states of New York and Pennsylvania.

STUDENT-ATHLETE WELFARE & OUTREACH

Full Name: John Douglas Swofford Hometown: North Wilkesboro, NC Wife: Nora Swofford Children: Amie, Chad, Autumn (husband Sherman Wooden) Grandchildren: Maya

• Swofford was instrumental in the enhancement of the league’s ACC Postgraduate Scholarship Awards program by ensuring that additional scholarship dollars are distributed to more student-athletes than at any point in the league’s history.

High School: Wilkes Central High School, 1967, North Wilkesboro, NC College: University of North Carolina, 1971 Morehead Scholarship Recipient • BA in Industrial Relations Graduate: Ohio University, 1973 • MEd. in Athletics Administration

• The long-time partnership between the ACC and United Way has flourished under Swofford’s leadership. His commitment to public service and volunteerism across the member institutions has been highlighted through the league’s Public Service Announcements. Across the collegiate landscape, the relationship with United Way is unique to the ACC and its member institutions.

• In July of 2010, Swofford’s leadership and negotiating skills helped the conference secure a new 12-year multimedia rights agreement with ESPN. The extensive television package begins with the 2011-12 academic year and will more than double television revenue to the 12 member institutions. In addition to reaching new heights financially, ACC content will now be televised more, both regionally and nationally, than at any point in league history, while also best positioning the conference within the continuous, ever-changing world of technology.

• Under Swofford’s direction this past year, the ACC launched its “Community Connections” outreach program which sponsored educational and mentoring activities along with donating books to the communities in which the league holds its conference championships. The initiative was created to teach life lessons to elementary and middle school students by the ACC’s student-athletes visiting local schools to discuss topics such as the importance of healthy living and sportsmanship.

• In 2003, on behalf of the league’s member institutions and the ACC Council of Presidents, Swofford led the conference through expansion. In becoming a 12-member league, Swofford helped bring the ACC extended and enhanced exposure across television and national radio packages and strongly positioned it for the future.

• During Swofford’s first 15 years as Commissioner, ACC teams have won 54 national team titles and 1,580 ACC teams have participated in various NCAA championships - an average of more than 110 NCAA teams per year.

• The ACC showcased its inaugural Dr Pepper ACC Football Championship Game in 2005 to a sellout crowd. Now in its eighth year, the game will be played in Charlotte’s Bank of America Stadium for the third consecutive season. Since becoming Commissioner, Swofford has been responsible for securing increased bowl opportunities and for the second year, the ACC has agreements in place with nine bowls including the Discover Orange Bowl, home of the ACC Champion since 2006. Highly respected by his peers, Swofford was a force in the development and growth of the Bowl Championship Series and is the only person to serve two terms as its coordinator. • Under Swofford’s tenure, the prestigious ACC Men’s Basketball Tournament has traveled to many dynamic cities within the footprint of the league including Atlanta, Ga., Washington DC and Tampa, Fla., in addition to the traditional stops in Greensboro and Charlotte. The 2001 ACC Tournament in Atlanta set NCAA attendance records for single session (40,083), per session average (36,505) and total attendance (182,525). • In the sport of basketball, Swofford was instrumental in creating the ACC/ Big Ten Challenge that began in men’s basketball in 1999. Then in 2007, the two conferences hosted the inaugural ACC/Big Ten Women’s Basketball Challenge. • In his first year as Commissioner, Swofford placed an added emphasis on the development of women’s basketball in the ACC with the hiring of an Associate Commissioner for Women’s Basketball to oversee all aspects of the sport on both a conference and national level.

4 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

Personal Information

• A long-time advocate of the importance of academics and student-athlete welfare, Swofford stimulated the formation of the league’s first-ever ACC Student-Athlete Advisory Committee. This group of current ACC studentathletes gives the conference direct feedback on their experiences competing at the highest level of college athletics.

ATHLETIC EXCELLENCE

• In the 2010-11 Division I Learfield Sports Directors’ Cup Standings, the ACC was the only conference with four schools in the Top 10; one of two leagues with five members in the Top 20 and one of only three conferences with all of its members in the Top 75. This past year marks the 10th consecutive year that the ACC has placed four or more teams in the Top 30. • In football, at least seven ACC teams have earned bowl bids in each of the last five seasons. In 2008, the conference set an NCAA record when 10 of its 12 teams (83%) participated in bowl play. • During his tenure, the ACC has won five NCAA Men’s Basketball titles, more than any other conference. In addition, the league was represented by three of its women’s basketball programs in the 2006 NCAA Women’s Basketball Final Four. In that same year, it was an all-ACC final as the conference claimed its second NCAA Women’s Basketball National title. A native of North Wilkesboro, NC, Swofford was a Morehead Scholar at the University of North Carolina and played on UNC’s 1971 ACC Football Championship team. He received his Masters of Education in Athletic Administration from Ohio University and then began his career at the University of Virginia in 1973. He returned to his alma mater in 1976 and became the school’s athletic director on May 1, 1980. At the age of 31, he was the youngest major college Athletics Director in the nation at the time and served as its Director of Athletics from 1980-1997. UNC’s athletic program led the league in both ACC and NCAA Championships during Swofford’s tenure as Athletic Director. John and his wife Nora reside in Greensboro, NC, and together they have three children: Amie, Chad and Autumn, who is married to Sherman Wooden. Autumn and Sherman welcomed Maya, their first child, to the family in April of 2010.

Education

Playing Experience

1965-67 • Two-time All-State QB and three-sport MVP at Wilkes Central High School 1969-71 • North Carolina varsity football team quarterback and defensive back • Peach Bowl, 1970 • Gator Bowl, 1971 • ACC Champions, 1971 • ACC Academic Honor Roll, 1970-71

Athletic Administration Experience

1973-76 • Ticket Manager/Asst. to the Director of Athletic Facilities and Finance • University of Virginia 1976-79 • Assistant Athletics Director and Business Manager University of North Carolina 1979-80 • Assistant Executive Vice-President of the Educational Foundation • University of North Carolina 1980-97 • Director of Athletics, University of North Carolina 1997-present • Commissioner Atlantic Coast Conference

Membership on Boards and Committees • Sports Business Journal’s Sports Business Awards Committee, 2011-present • NCAA Men’s College Basketball Officiating, LLC Board, 2010-present • National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association Honorary Board, 2009-present • College Football Officiating, LLC Board of Managers, 2008-present • North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame Advisory Board, 2008-present • Wyndham Championship Board of Directors, 2002-present • National Letter of Intent Appeals Committee, 2002-present • BCS Coordinator, 2000-01, 2008-09 • IA Collegiate Commissioner’s Assoc. (Chair), 2005-07 • NCAA Football Board of Directors (President), 2004-05 • NCAA Executive Committee, 1995-97 • NCAA Division I Championship Committee (Chair), 1995-97 • NCAA Special Committee to Study a Division I-A Football Championship, 1994-95 • President of NACDA, 1993-94 • NCAA Special Events Committee, 1987-91 • NCAA Communications Committee (Chair), 1987-89 • NCAA Football Television Committee (Chair), 1984

Honors and Awards

• Corbett Award, 2011 (presented annually by NACDA as the highest honor one can achieve in collegiate athletics administration) • Achievement in Business Award, 2011 (presented annually by Ohio University’s College of Business) • Father of the Year, 2011 (recognized by the Greater Greensboro Area Father’s Day Council) • North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame, 2009 • Homer Rice Award, 2005 (presented by the Division 1A Athletic Directors’ Association) • Horizon Award, 2004 (presented by the Atlanta Sports Council recognizing the National Sports Business Executive of the Year) • Chick-fil-A Bowl Hall of Fame, 2003 • Fifth most influential person in U.S. sports by the Sporting News, 2003 • Outstanding American Award for the Triangle Chapter of the College Football Hall of Fame, 2002 • North Carolina High School Athletic Association’s Hall of Fame, 2002 • Ohio University’s Charles R. Higgins Distinguished Alumnus Award, 1984


Atlantic Coast Conference Staff John D. Swofford Commissioner

Brad Hostetter

Associate Commissioner for Compliance & Governance/Human Resources

John Clougherty

Coordinator, Men’s Basketball Officials

Lynne Herndon Director, Business Operations

Steve “Slim” Vollinger Associate Director, Advanced Media

Susan Anthony

Jeff Elliott

Associate Commissioner, Finance & Administration

Brian A. Morrison

Nora Lynn Finch

Associate Commissioner, Women’s Basketball Operations & SWA

Amy Yakola

Mike Finn

Associate Commissioner, Men’s Basketball Operations

Lindsey Babcock

W. Scott McBurney

Associate Commissioner, Men’s Basketball Communications

Associate Commissioner, Public Relations & Marketing

Charlene Curtis

Doug Rhoads Coordinator, Football Officials

Director, Student-Athlete Programs & Compliance

Shamaree Brown

Lee Butler

Kathy C. Hunt

Christina L. Tracey

Allison Doughty

Steve Phillips

Georgia Davis

Donald Moore

Charlotte Zoller

Heather C. Hirschman

Coordinator, Women’s Basketball Officials

Director, Men’s Basketball Operations

Assistant Director, Women’s Basketball & SWA

Jennie Barrett

Director, Information Systems

Assistant Director, Championships

Barb Dery

Assistant Commissioner, Compliance and Governance

Associate Director, Football Operations

Assistant Director, Public Relations & Marketing

Tracey Haith

Administrative Assistant, Administration/Business

Administrative Assistant, Championships

Administrative Assistant, Communications/ Public Relations & Marketing

Administrative Assistant, Student-Athlete Welfare/Compliance & Governance/HR

Seth Barwick

George Lane

Beth Mechum

Gretchen Miller

Intern, Compliance & Student-Athlete Programs

Karl Hicks

Associate Commissioner, Football Communications

Intern, Communications

Intern, Website

Intern, Championships

Assistant Commissioner, Advanced Media

Director, Championships

Associate Director, Communications

Website Coordinator

Karrie B. Tilley

Administrative Assistant, Men’s Basketball Operations/Officiating

Michael Kelly

Associate Commissioner, Broadcasting, Communications & Football Operations

Kris W. Pierce

Assistant Commissioner, Championships

Brad Hecker

Director, Women’s Basketball Operations

Ben Tario

Associate Director, Technology and Operations

Cecelia DiAmico

Executive Assistant to the Commissioner

Emily Watkins

Administrative Assistant, Office Coordinator/Desktop Publishing

Shane Vaassen

Intern, Public Relations & Marketing

theACC.com

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The Atlantic Coast Conference

A tradition of

6 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament


... Then, Now and Always. The Tradition

Consistency. It is the mark of true excellence in any endeavor. However, in today’s intercollegiate athletics, competition has become so balanced and so competitive that it is virtually impossible to maintain a high level of consistency. Yet the Atlantic Coast Conference has defied the odds. Now in its 59th year of competition, the ACC has long enjoyed the reputation as one of the strongest and most competitive intercollegiate conferences in the nation. And that is not mere conjecture, the numbers support it. Since the league’s inception in 1953, ACC schools have captured 122 national championships, including 65 in women’s competition and 57 in men’s. In addition, NCAA individual titles have gone to ACC student-athletes 140 times in men’s competition and 99 times in women’s action. If success is best measured in terms of wins and losses, then the ACC is unrivaled in NCAA annals. With Duke’s victory over Butler in the 2010 NCAA title game, ACC teams have won five of the last 11 NCAA National Championships and 12 overall, including eight over the last 21 years.

founding of the acc, may 8, 1953

The ACC, with Duke, North Carolina and Florida State, was the only conference to have three teams make it to the “Sweet 16” in this past year’s NCAA Tournament. No conference has compiled a better NCAA Tournament record than the ACC. Since the inaugural tournament in 1939, league teams have posted an NCAA Tournament-best mark of 355-179 for a sterling .665 winning percentage against the nation’s toughest competition. The ACC is the only conference to have each of its teams make at least one NCAA Tournament appearance over the past five years. Since 1985, the ACC has produced 24 Final Four teams, an av-

erage of almost one per year and six more than any other conference. The ACC has had at least one team in the Final Four in 19 of the last 23 years. Since the NCAA Tournament was expanded to 64 teams in 1985, ACC teams have compiled a 251126 (.666) NCAA record, including 69 “Sweet 16” appearances and 24 Final Four berths - all NCAA Tournament bests. Since 1985, 70 of the 137 ACC teams receiving NCAA berths have won at least two NCAA Tournament games. North Carolina’s Tar Heels lead all ACC schools with five NCAA basketball championships to their credit. Duke is next with four national titles, followed by NC State with two and Maryland one. The

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ACC EMPHASIZES SPORTSMANSHIP Initiative highlights efforts by member institutions

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he Atlantic Coast Conference announced this past fall that the league will expand its Sportsmanship Awareness Weeks to one week during the fall, winter and spring seasons. The ACC Sportsmanship Awareness Weeks are a campaign to emphasize and promote sportsmanship as it relates to our teams, conference and fans. During the weeks of October 17-23 (Fall), January 2329 (Winter) and April 9-14 (Spring), every league team will showcase its continued dedication to sportsmanship by participating in a pregame handshake prior to each contest. In addition to the teams’ efforts, the conference and member schools will highlight the program to its fans through releases, across social media platforms, videos elements and official websites. “Sportsmanship continues to be a priority within the ACC and the growth of this initiative will be a great way to further highlight and emphasize its importance,” said ACC Commissioner John Swofford. Nearly 40 events were part of the 2012 ACC Winter Sportsmanship Awareness Week, including 12 men’s and 12 women’s basketball games, seven swimming & diving meets, four indoor track and field meets and four wrestling matches.

a

Miami vs. North Carolin

Tar Heels claimed NCAA titles in 1957, 1982, 1993, 2005 and 2009, while the Blue Devils won their fourth title in 2010, following earlier championships in 2001, 1992 and 1991. The Wolfpack walked away with the coveted crown in 1974 and 1983 while the Terps claimed the 2002 national title. The ACC has 10 or more NCAA Tournament wins 13 times overall, and the league has not posted a losing record in NCAA Tournament play since 1987. The conference’s 24-year non-losing streak in NCAA Tournament play is tops among all conferences. Since 1981, the ACC has produced 39 consensus All-Americans - 15 more than any other conference and has accounted for 25 percent of the nation’s consensus All-Americans (39-of-159). Seven of the last 15 and nine of the last 19 consensus National Players of the Year have been from the ACC. Since 1975, the ACC has had 16 consensus National Players of the Year - 12 more than any other conference. In addition, nine of the ACC’s 16 National Players of the Year were unanimous selections. A year ago the ACC had 57 players on NBA rosters. In addition, over the past six years 54 ACC players have made their NBA debuts, including an all-time high 15 in 2006. In this past June’s NBA draft, the ACC had five first round selections and seven players drafted overall. The ACC has had five-or-more first round selections in four of the past five years and has had at least one first-round pick in 23 consecutive NBA drafts. Since 1986, the ACC has had 98 first round selections - 15 more than any other conference. With two teams - Duke (3), North Carolina (7) - listed in the final Associated Press ranking, the ACC extended its streak to 51 consecutive seasons with at least one team ranked in the top 10 of the final AP Poll.

2010-11 in Review Virginia Tech vs. BYU

8 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

The 2010-11 academic year saw league teams capturing two more national team titles and 19


ACC extends its reach Pitt and Syracuse bring league membership to 14

By David Droschak

W

ith one eye focused on the long-term viability of the conference and another on the nation’s everchanging intercollegiate athletic landscape, the ACC made a bold move this fall by expanding to 14 schools by adding Pittsburgh and Syracuse. Less than a decade after adding Boston College, Miami and Virginia Tech, the Panthers and Orange provide the ACC with a pair of programs with extensive histories in football and basketball, along with exceptional, nationallyrecognized institutions of higher learning. “Our culture has long enjoyed a rich tradition of balancing academics and athletics, and the addition of Pitt and Syracuse further strengthens our league,” said ACC Commissioner John Swofford. “In addition, both universities will enhance the ACC’s reach into the states of New York and Pennsylvania and geographically bridges our footprint between Maryland and Massachusetts. With the addition of these two schools, the ACC will cover virtually the entire eastern seaboard of the United States.” Pittsburgh and Syracuse have produced some of the best football players in the history of the game, including Jim Brown (Syracuse), Dan Marino (Pitt), Tony Dorsett (Pitt) and Ernie Davis (Syracuse). In men’s basketball, the Panthers played in the Final Four in 2009 and are a rising basketball power, while the Orange won the 2003 national title behind Carmelo Anthony. ACC teams will also soon be traveling to some of the nation’s top sporting venues, including the Carrier Dome (the largest on-campus basketball arena in the nation), Heinz Field and the $119 million Petersen Events Center on the campus of Pitt. “It’s actually pretty exciting,” said Duke Hall of Fame basketball coach Mike Krzyzewski said. “I think it’s

great for ourconference football-wise, even better basketball-wise. Over the last 25 years if you had to pick the best conference in basketball it is the ACC.” Former Georgia Tech women’s basketball coach Angus Berenato, who now heads up Pitt’s program, echoed Krzyzewski’s excitement. “The ACC has a rich tradition of academics and athletics so Pitt will fit right in,” she said. “I was in the ACC for a long time and it will be nice to return to my roots. The leadership of the ACC has remained the same and Commissioner Swofford is innovative, dedicated and perceptive to the student-athlete’s needs.” Academically, the addition of the two schools gives the ACC 12 institutions in the top 75 of the U.S. News and World Report’s 2012 best universities rankings, while Pittsburgh and Syracuse already partner with various ACC schools in terms of national research grants, along with numerous health-related initiatives. “Though we recruit students from all corners of the globe and have graduates living around the world, our principal focus always has been on the eastern seaboard, to be regularly competing up and down the Atlantic Coast from Boston to Miami,” said Pittsburgh Chancellor Mark Nordenberg. “This is a very big plus for Pitt as a university, particularly during this turbulent time in intercollegiate athletics.” The two high-profile athletic programs in major media markets will provide the ACC with added value to its current TV package with partner ESPN. “We are pleased that Syracuse adds a tremendous New York City dimension to the ACC,” said Nancy Cantor, the school’s chancellor and president. “With 44,000 alumni and growing in that region, we have built a very strong identity and affinity there, and we’re excited to be able to bring ACC games to New York.” theACC.com

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A TRADITION OF EXCELLENCE

individual NCAA crowns. In all, the ACC has won 52 national team titles over the last 14 years and has won two or more NCAA titles in 28 of the past 30 years. The ACC was the only conference in America to place four of its teams in the final Top 10 rankings of the 2009-10 Learfield Director’s Cup Standings--symbolic of the nation’s top overall programs--as Duke (5th), North Carolina (6th), Virginia (7th) and Florida State (9th) all were ranked nationally in the Top 10. This past year also marked the 10th consecutive year that the ACC has placed four or more teams in the Top 30 as Maryland finished 17th in this year’s final rankings. In all, the ACC is one of only three conferences to have all of its member schools in the Top 75. A total of 132 ACC teams placed in NCAA post-season competition in 2010-11. League teams compiled a 125-79-5 (.610) mark against opponents in NCAA championship competition.

ions Maryland field hockey - 2010 national champ

virginia men’s lacrosse - 2011 national champions

2010-11 National Championships Field Hockey Maryland Men’s Lacrosse Virginia

The Championships

The conference will conduct championship competition in 25 sports during the 2010-2011 academic year - 12 for men and 13 for women. The first ACC championship was held in swimming on February 25, 1954. The conference did not conduct championships in cross country, wrestling or tennis during the first year. The 12 sports for men include football, cross country, soccer, basketball, swimming, indoor and outdoor track, wrestling, baseball, tennis, golf and lacrosse. Fencing, which was started in 1971, was discontinued 10 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

in 1981. Women’s sports were initiated in 1977 with the first championship meet held in tennis at Wake Forest University. Championships for women are currently conducted in cross country, field hockey, soccer, basketball, swimming, indoor and outdoor track, tennis, golf, lacrosse, softball and rowing with volleyball deciding its champion by regular season play.

A History

The Atlantic Coast Conference was founded on May 8, 1953, at the Sedgefield Inn near Greensboro, N.C., with seven charter members - Clemson, Duke, Maryland, North Carolina, North Carolina State, South Carolina and Wake Forest - drawing up the conference by-laws. The withdrawal of seven schools from the Southern


ACC Sets the Standard

Conference came early on the morning of May 8, 1953, during the Southern Conference’s annual spring meeting. On June 14, 1953, the seven members met in Raleigh, N.C., where a set of bylaws was adopted and the name became officially the Atlantic Coast Conference. Suggestions from fans for the name of the new conference appeared in the region’s newspapers prior to the meeting in Raleigh. Some of the names suggested were: Dixie, Mid South, Mid Atlantic, East Coast, Seaboard, Colonial, Tobacco, Blue-Gray, Piedmont, Southern Seven and the Shoreline. Duke’s Eddie Cameron recommended that the name of the conference be the Atlantic Coast Conference, and the motion was passed unanimously. The meeting concluded with each member institution assessed $200.00 to pay for conference expenses. On December 4, 1953, conference officials met again at Sedgefield and officially admitted the University of Virginia as the league’s eighth member. The first, and only, withdrawal of a school from the ACC came on June 30, 1971, when the University of South Carolina tendered its resignation. The ACC operated with seven members until April 3, 1978, when the Georgia Institute of Technology was admitted. The Atlanta school had withdrawn from the Southeastern Conference in January of 1964. The ACC expanded to nine members on July 1, 1991, with the addition of Florida State University. The conference expanded to 11 members on July 1, 2004, with the addition of the University of Miami and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. On October 17, 2003, Boston College accepted an invitation to become the league’s 12th member starting July 1, 2005.

Among BCS Conferences in Latest US News & World Report ‘Best Colleges’ Rankings

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ith seven schools listed in the top 38, all 12 in the top 101, the member institutions of the Atlantic Coast Conference lead the way among Bowl Championship Series Conferences in the latest “Best Colleges” rankings released last September by US News & World Report. ACC member institutions rank on average 49.2, marking the sixth time in the last seven years that the ACC has led all BCS conferences. “These rankings exemplify the long-standing commitment to academic excellence and the dedicated leadership of our 12 member institutions,” said ACC Commissioner John Swofford. “The Atlantic Coast Conference is proud to have a collection of schools that are held in such high esteem.” The ACC is the only BCS conference to place seven member institutions among the Top 38; the next highest conference placed four. The ACC is also the only BCS conference with over half of its members in the Top 50 and is one of only two conferences with all its members in the Top 101. Duke boasts the league’s highest ranking at 10th and they are joined in the Top 25 by Virginia (25) and Wake Forest (25). Also in the Top 40 are North Carolina (29), Boston College (31), Georgia Tech (36) and Miami (38). Just out of the Top 50, Maryland ranked 55th, and was followed by Clemson (68), Virginia Tech (71), and Florida State and NC State, which tied at 101st.

Notables: • The ACC has led BCS Conferences in best average rank six of the last seven years. • The ACC is one of only two BCS Conferences to have all schools ranked in the Top 101. • The ACC is the only Conference to have every school ranked in the Top 120 and have at least one school in the Top 10 every year since 2006. • The ACC has had every school rank in the Top 112 every year since 2006.

#10 #25 #25 #29 #31 #36 #38 #55 #68 #71

• The ACC has had a school finish in the Top 10 every year since 2006 [one of only two BCS Conferences that can make that claim].

#101

• In the 2012 rankings, the ACC is the only conference with over half of its member institutions in the Top 50.

#101

• The ACC placed seven schools in the Top 38, three more than any other conference.

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A TRADITION OF EXCELLENCE

School Affiliations BOSTON COLLEGE — Charter member of the Big East Conference in 1979; joined the ACC in July, 2005.

GEORGIA TECH — Charter member

NC STATE — Charter member of

of the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association in 1894; charter member of Southern Conference in 1921; charter member of the SEC in 1932; joined the ACC in April, 1978.

the Southern Conference in 1921; charter member of the ACC in 1953.

VIRGINIA — Charter member of the

the Southern Conference in 1921; charter member of the ACC in 1953.

Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association in 1894; charter member of the Southern Conference in 1921; resigned from Southern Conference in December 1936; joined the ACC in December, 1953.

MIAMI — Charter member of the

VIRGINIATECH — Charter member

DUKE — Joined the Southern

Big East Football Conference in 1991; joined the ACC in July, 2004.

Conference in December, 1928; charter member of the ACC in 1953.

NORTH CAROLINA — Charter

of the Southern Conference in 1921; withdrew from the Southern Conference in June, 1965; became a charter member of the Big East Football Conference in Feb. 5, 1991; joined the ACC in July, 2004.

CLEMSON — Charter member of the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association in 1894; a charter member of the Southern Conference in 1921; a charter member of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) in 1953.

FLORIDA STATE — Charter member of the Dixie Conference in 1948; joined the Metro Conference in July, 1976; joined the ACC July, 1991.

MARYLAND — Charter member of

member of the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association in 1894; charter member of the Southern Conference in 1921; charter member of the ACC in 1953.

WAKE FOREST — Joined the Southern Conference in February, 1936; charter member of the ACC in 1953.

THE ACC RECOGNIZES THE FOLLOWING DEALERSHIPS FOR THEIR SUPPORT OF THE CONFERENCE OFFICE. CAPITAL OF CARY

CROWN BMW

MABRY AUTO GROUP

REIDSVILLE NISSAN

Cary, NC

Greensboro, NC

Lynchburg, VA

Reidsville, NC

COX TOYOTA

CROWN FORD OF FAYETTEVILLE

MCNEILL FAMILY INVESTMENTS, LLC

TERRY LABONTE CHEVROLET

Fayetteville, NC

Wilkesboro, NC

Greensboro, NC

FOLGERS BUICK – SUBARU

MERCEDES BENZ OF WINSTON-SALEM

WRAY AUTOMOTIVE GROUP

Charlotte, NC

Winston-Salem, NC

Columbia, SC

Burlington, NC

CROWN HONDA Greensboro, NC

12 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament


THE ULTIMATE IN COLLEGE SPORTS. FALL ACC CHAMPIONS

WINTER ACC CHAMPIONS

MEN’S CROSS COUNTRY NC STATE

MEN’S SOCCER NORTH CAROLINA

WOMEN’S SWIMMING & DIVING VIRGINIA

WRESTLING MARYLAND

WOMEN’S CROSS COUNTRY FLORIDA STATE

FOOTBALL CLEMSON

MEN’S SWIMMING & DIVING VIRGINIA

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL MARYLAND

WOMEN’S SOCCER FLORIDA STATE

VOLLEYBALL FLORIDA STATE

MEN’S INDOOR TRACK & FIELD FLORIDA STATE

MEN’S BASKETBALL Philips Arena Atlanta, Ga. March 8-11, 2012

FIELD HOCKEY NORTH CAROLINA

WOMEN’S INDOOR TRACK & FIELD CLEMSON

FALL NCAA CHAMPIONS FIELD HOCKEY MARYLAND

MEN’S SOCCER NORTH CAROLINA SPRING ACC CHAMPIONSHIPS MEN’S TENNIS Cary Tennis Park, Cary, N.C. April 19-22, 2012

WOMEN’S GOLF Sedgefield Country Club Greensboro, N.C. April 13-15, 2012 MEN’S OUTDOOR TRACK & FIELD Charlottesville, Va. Host: University of Virginia April 19-21, 2012 WOMEN’S OUTDOOR TRACK & FIELD Charlottesville, Va. Host: University of Virginia April 19-21, 2012

WOMEN’S TENNIS Cary Tennis Park, Cary, N.C. April 19-22, 2012 WOMEN’S LACROSSE Durham, N.C. Host: Duke University April 20, 21 & 23, 2012

MEN’S LACROSSE Charlottesville, Va. Host: University of Virginia April 20 & 22, 2012

SOFTBALL Chapel Hill, N.C. Host: University of North Carolina May 10-12, 2012

MEN’S GOLF The Old North State Club Uwharrie Point, New London, N.C. April 20-22, 2012

BASEBALL NewBridge Bank Park Greensboro, N.C. May 23-27, 2012

ROWING Lake Hartwell, S.C. Host: Clemson University April 21, 2012

A Tradition of Excellence . . . Then, Now and Always theACC.com


OUR SECOND PASSION? COLLEGE BASKETBALL.

Our first passion? Sharing knowledge. BB&T’s history of sharing knowledge and providing advice dates back to 1872, and has always empowered our clients to make the financial decisions just right for them. But when we’re not at work, we’re in the stands cheering on our favorite teams.

Proud to be the official bank of tHE ACC Member FDIC. © 2012 Branch Banking and Trust Company. BBT.com


Halftime Entertainment Thursday, March 8

Game 1 – 12:00 p.m. Air Elite Game 2 – 2:00 p.m. Flippen Out Game 3 – 7:00 p.m. AT&T Promotion Game 4 – 9:00 p.m. Quick Change

Friday, March 9

Game 5 – 12:00 p.m. Bouncing Bulldogs Game 6 – 2:00 p.m. ACC Mascot Basketball Game Game 7 – 7:00 p.m. GEICO Simon Sez Promotion Game 8 – 9:00 p.m. Red Panda

Saturday, March 10

Semifinal I – 1:00 p.m. 2012 ACC Legends Semifinal 2 – 3:00 p.m. Wheelwork

16 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

2012 ACC Legends Brunch Saturday, March 10

Marriott Marquis – 10 a.m.


Friday, 10:00 Am – 12:00 pm 790 the Zone broadcasting live! GECKO Challenge Shootout on Contest Court Autograph session: Johnny Rhodes, Lee Raker

PHILIPS DRIVE Free admission Thursday, 10:00 AM – 12:00 pm Live Music from Packway Handle Band GECKO Challenge Shootout on Contest Court Autograph session: Malcom Mackey Thursday, 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm 790 the Zone broadcasting live! Atlanta Dream Clinic featuring former Duke star Lindsey Harding Autograph session: Randolph Childress, Ron Godfrey, John Bagley, Todd Fuller

Friday, 5:00 pm -7:00 pm Live music from Signal Path Outback Steakhouse Shootout Autograph session: Kenny Dennard, James Collins Saturday, 10:00 AM – 1:00 pm Live Music from The Sun Dogs Shoot to Win Presented by STATS Autograph session: Al Wood, Rodney Monroe, James Forrest Sunday, 11:00 am – 1:00 pm Live Music from Parker Smith and the Bandwith ACC Championship Pennant Shootout Autograph session: Dale Solomon, Sharone Wright

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30 National Players of the Year

12

NCAA Championship

Titles

60

Consensus All-Americans

39 Academic All-Americans 18 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament


355 NCAA Tournament Wins

10

NBA First Overall Draft Picks

20

55

Consensus First Team All-Americans

National Coaches of the Year

173 NBA First Round Draft Picksof the Year

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2012 Postgraduate Scholar-Athletes

T

hirty-six scholar-athletes are honored for showing distinction in competition, classroom and community Atlantic Coast Conference Commissioner John Swofford announced a list of 36 student-athletes who have been selected for the Weaver-James-Corrigan Award, including three student-athletes who will receive the Thacker Award. Additionally, six student-athletes who plan to enter a professional career in their chosen sport were named honorary recipients. The Weaver-James-Corrigan and Jim and Pat Thacker scholarships are awarded to selected student-athletes - three from each league institution - who intend to pursue a graduate degree following completion of their undergraduate requirements. Each recipient will receive $5,000 to contribute to their graduate education. Those honored have performed with distinction in both the classroom and his/her respective sports, while demonstrating exemplary conduct in the community. In addition to those receiving scholarship funds, six student-athletes will receive the Weaver-James-Corrigan Honorary Award. Two men’s basketball players - Clemson’s Tanner Smith and North Carolina’s Tyler Zeller - along with Duke football player Matt Daniels, Georgia Tech golfer James White, NC State baseball player Phillip Williams, and Virginia women’s tennis player Lindsey Hardenbergh will be recognized for their outstanding academic and athletic performance and intend to compete at the professional level. The Weaver-James-Corrigan Award is named in honor of the late Jim Weaver and Bob James, as well as Gene Corrigan, all of whom are former ACC commissioners. The league’s first commissioner, James H. Weaver, served the conference from 1954-70 after a stint as the Director of Athletics at Wake Forest University. His early leadership and uncompromising integrity are largely responsible for the excellent reputation enjoyed by the ACC today. Robert C. James, a former University of

20 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

2012 ACC POSTGRADUATE HONORARY NOMINEES

NAME INSTITUTION SPORT Tanner Smith Matt Daniels James White Tyler Zeller Vance Williams Lindsey Hardenbergh

Clemson Duke Georgia Tech North Carolina NC State Virginia

M-Basketball Football M-Golf M-Basketball Baseball W-Tennis

2012 Weaver-James-Corrigan Award Recipients NAME INSTITUTION SPORT Katarina Gajic Brian Like Kevin Melnick Becca Brown Alyssa Kulik Dawson Zimmerman Sophia Dunworth Rory Erickson-Kulas Becca Ward Deividas Dulkys Katie Rybakova Kimberly Williams Heidi Hatteberg (Thacker Award) Kate Kuzma Viet Ha Ngo Kyle John Corey Peltier Shelby Reyes Ali Becker John Calhoun Lane Carico Taylor Brown Shinann Featherston Blair Meiggs Tanya Cain (Thacker Award) Akash Gujarati Jess Panza Kelly Flynn Rachel Jennings Maggie Kistner Martha Blakely Corrado Degl’lncerti Tocci Blake Trabuchi-Downey Faith Adams Sarah Brobeck (Thacker Award) Michael Hoag

Boston College Boston College Boston College Clemson Clemson Clemson Duke Duke Duke Florida State Florida State Florida State Georgia Tech Georgia Tech Georgia Tech Maryland Maryland Maryland Miami Miami Miami North Carolina North Carolina North Carolina NC State NC State NC State Virginia Virginia Virginia Virginia Tech Virginia Tech Virginia Tech Wake Forest Wake Forest Wake Forest

W-Tennis M-Fencing M-Golf Rowing W-Cross Country Football Volleyball Rowing W-Fencing M-Basketball W-Tennis W-Track & Field W-Swimming/Diving Softball W-Tennis Wrestling Wrestling W-Water Polo Volleyball Football Volleyball Gymnastics W-Tennis Rowing W-Soccer M-Tennis Gymnastics W-Swimming Field Hockey W-Soccer W-Tennis M-Tennis M-Swimming Field Hockey W-Track & Field Football


Maryland football player, was named commissioner in classroom, while the Bob James Award, established in 1971 and served in that capacity for 16 years. During his 1987, also honored outstanding student-athletes. tenure, the league continued to grow in stature and beThe Thacker Award, which originated in 2005, is came recognized as a national leader in athletics and aca- awarded in honor of the late Jim and Pat Thacker of demics, winning 23 national championships and main- Charlotte, N.C. Jim Thacker was the primary play-bytaining standards of excellence in the classroom. play announcer for the ACC’s first television network. Eugene F. Corrigan asRecipients of the award sumed his role as the third must demonstrate outfull-time commissioner of standing performance September 1, 1987, and both in athletic competiserved until August of tion and in the classroom 1997. During Corrigan’s and intend to further tenure, ACC schools captheir education through tured 30 NCAA champipostgraduate studies at an onships and two national ACC institution. football titles. The 42 student-athletes 2011 ACC Postgraduate Scholar-Athletes Prior to 1994, the will be honored at the anWeaver-James postgradunual ACC Postgraduate ate scholarships were given as separate honors. The Jim Luncheon presented by ESPN on April 11, 2012, in the Weaver Award, which originated in 1970, recognized Guilford Ballroom at the Sheraton Greensboro Hotel at exceptional achievement on the playing field and in the the Four Seasons.

2012 ACC POSTGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP LUNCHEON Come join the ACC this April as it honors student-athletes who truly exemplify the balance of academics and athletics Hosted by the Nat Greene Kiwanis April 11, 2012 Koury Convention Center Greensboro, NC Presented by

• For ticket information, visit theACC.com

theACC.com

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ACC makes multimedia waves By Michael Smith

22 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament


I

t was 18 months ago, under the swaying palm trees at Amelia Island, Fla., that ACC Commissioner John Swofford shook hands with ESPN executives on a new media contract that would secure the conference’s financial future. The 12-year deal was the culmination of a long negotiation that involved multiple networks in pursuit of the ACC’s coveted TV rights. But it also represented a new beginning for the conference as it embarked on a new comprehensive media strategy to give its teams the greatest exposure of any conference in the country. In the old days – like five-to-10 years ago in our ever-changing new media world – the commissioner’s job was largely done once he negotiated the TV contract, which is far and away the largest source of revenue for a conference. But now, the TV contract is just a piece – albeit a critical piece – of a larger media approach that must take into consideration all other digital formats, such as online, mobile and tablets. See, there’s not much that’s more important to a conference than its exposure. The more the ACC’s schools are seen, the better they recruit and the more they build their brand. That’s one of the reasons the ACC’s coaches lobbied so staunchly in favor of ESPN versus other networks. They believe that if their games are not on the “Worldwide Leader,” they won’t receive the kind of visibility that’s so important in the recruiting battles. And with that exposure comes the ability for the institution to stay in the public consciousness and market itself to future students in the general population, a facet of athletics that’s often overlooked. Many administrators describe athletics as the sales and marketing division of the university, and to do its job, those teams must be as widely seen as possible. Under Swofford’s guidance in the last 18 months, the ACC has taken giant strides to ensure that the conference’s teams can be seen by just about anyone, anywhere, and any time of the day, providing the league and its schools with important brand extensions that aid their visibility. It has become a reality with new mobile applications, a new online network and improved use of archives in its ACC Vault (a partnership with Denver-based

Thought Equity Motion), all of which have greatly expanded the conference’s branding opportunities. In fact, the conference has even branded this approach by calling it “ACCess” on its official website, TheACC.com, putting it at the forefront of media innovation across the college landscape. One of the most critical additions was the launch of the ACC Digital Network on TheACC.com. “The ACC Digital Network provides a new platform within the digital space that will showcase more content, in more places, than we’ve ever experienced before,” Swofford said. “The depth and reach of the network, including the multitude of platforms, has our league well positioned as we look toward the future. We’re really pleased with the tremendous progress that has been made and also pleased with how much this will mean to our fans.” With the help of the ACC’s partner Silver Chalice, a widely influential technology company based in Chicago, and its longtime production partner, Charlottebased Raycom Sports, the conference began branding the ACC Digital Network in October. The idea behind the network is simple – to create a fully programmed video network that makes ACC games and other shows available online and on mobile devices. Can’t be at the stadium or in front of a TV to catch your favorite ACC team? No problem. You can still watch on your smart phone or your tablet. That’s the concept behind creating the most widely distributed ACC programming as possible. The ACC Digital Network has its own programming, its own studio based in Charlotte, and its own talent. Kyle Montgomery was hired from NBA-TV to host studio programming, while former Georgia Tech running back Dorsey Levens is one of the football analysts and former Wake Forest quarterback Riley Skinner contributes as well. The long-term goal for the ACC is that fans will eventually tune in to the ACC Digital Network’s own gameday each Saturday morning to prepare for a full day of college football. Importantly to fans, access to the ACC Digital Network is free. The online strategy serves as a complement to what Swofford and the ACC’s partners have created on TV. theACC.com

23


making multimedia waves The branding that comes with the ACC Digital Network gives the league an even stronger presence online and follows its overall branding strategy that first began in 2010. That’s when Raycom Sports, which produces and syndicates an ACC football game of the week and multiple basketball games per week, began referring to the “ACC Network” as opposed to ACC games on Raycom Sports. ESPN also puts the ACC name and logo out front of the conference games that it broadcasts by calling it the “ACC on ESPN.” It might be a subtle thing, but it’s an angle all college conferences and professional leagues have pursued to give their own brand more visibility on those broadcasts. While ESPN’s broad distribution on TV and online gives the conference maximum exposure, Raycom has also driven the ACC games it produces to a wider audience than ever before. In the old media contract, Raycom could not distribute games outside of the ACC’s current seven-state footprint (Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland and Massachusetts). That limited the ACC’s syndicated package of games to a regional audience. The new TV contract enables the ACC’s syndicated games to go anywhere in the country. The 13-week package of football games can now be found in 40 new markets and stretches from California to New York and most markets throughout the Southeast. Those telecasts are now in six of the top 10 TV markets, 13 of the top 25, and 25 of the top 50. The broadcasts were in 14 of the top 50 markets last year. Overall, the network coverage has nearly doubled from 28 million households to 53 million in the last year, or about 46 percent of the U.S. TV households. “We’re going into markets now that we never dreamed of and that’s all new exposure for the ACC,” said Ken Haines, the CEO at Raycom Sports. “It certainly has taken the ACC to a wider audience.” Raycom has enhanced its offering this season with a new studio

24 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

show called “ACC Blitz” that features Danielle Trotta and former Clemson coach Tommy Bowden talking ACC football pregame and halftime. Those shows originate out of the NASCAR Media Group’s studio in Charlotte. In keeping with the ACC’s “TV Everywhere” approach, that studio and game programming can be found on the digital network, as well as the mobile applications that the league has launched in the last year. The iPhone and iPad apps, sponsored by Havoline, hit the market in the fall of 2010. Then the conference came back this fall with enhanced apps that work on the Android market as well. Silver Chalice has been a partner on those technology initiatives as well. “We saw tremendous success with the app last year and it’s exciting to launch a new app for the Apple and Android markets,” Swofford said. “These platforms represent an important opportunity for the ACC to reach its fans and to continue our conference initiative to offer more conference content than ever before.” Being at the forefront of landscapechanging media initiatives is nothing new for Swofford. He was the commissioner in charge of the BCS when it negotiated a new four-year media contract with ESPN, which is in its second year. That was a game-changing deal because it brought the BCS conferences a 50-percent raise over its previous contract and it took the games exclusively to cable TV, something that had never been done before. At the time, it was seen as something as a risk, but it eventually became part of a trend that has seen more big events move to cable, largely because of cable’s ever-growing distribution and the ability to drive more revenue to the college game. Through the ACC’s own deal with ESPN, Raycom and new technology partners like Silver Chalice, Thought Equity Motion and NASCAR Media Group, Swofford has again positioned the ACC as a leader in the media space, providing the conference with greater exposure than it’s ever enjoyed before.


ACC Network Vault

By David Droschak

R

ecent technological advances in sports have been truly amazing. There are instant replay challenges in football, HD scoreboards in virtually every stadium or arena, whistle-clock synchronization in hoops and lines on our TVs to let us know how far a team has to go for a first down. And now there is more ... With the help of Raycom Sports, Atlantic Coast Conference fans can take a trip back in time and watch entire games, their favorite teams or players, even the best dunks or greatest comebacks from decades ago – all online and for free. ’’It’s pretty fascinating stuff, and when you can get it into an HD-like experience, watching it right there on your laptop or your iPad, it’s a pretty powerful experience,” said Colin Smith, Vice President of New Media and Distribution for Raycom Sports. Just log on to theACC.com and click the video tab and ACC Video Vault to unlock more than 150 classic ACC Basketball and Football games, key moments and player highlights dating to 1983, and every ACC Tournament

26 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

Championship Game from that year to the present. The ACC and Raycom Sports, a key TV partner of the league for decades and a leading independent sports sales and marketing, syndication and production firm, partnered on the idea and launched the ACC Video Vault in mid-December 2010. Smith says sifting through Raycom’s 30-year-old library of ACC Basketball and Football telecasts, then archiving and digitizing the key games and moments, took about four years, or close to 12,000 man hours. After posting 100 basketball games in late 2010, Raycom concentrated in 2011 on adding about 50 football games to the vault, along with additional games aired on other networks such as ESPN, ABC, CBS and Fox Sports. Smith says no other conference in the nation has as an extensive and free video library online as the ACC. “In terms of awareness and history of the conference it’s pretty spectacular,” Smith said. “There are very few people who would argue that the ACC has the richest historical significance of any other basketball conference out there. And being able to preserve that and having people go back and browse through those moments in time, it’s


very powerful. I don’t think anyone realized that you could even do something like this four or five years ago. Not only are we doing it, but we’re making it all free and we’re making it so easy to consume. The first game of the basketball vault features two of the ACC’s biggest stars in action as Ralph Sampson takes on Michael Jordan. If you missed it more than 28 years ago, the end of the Feb. 10, 1983, game features Jordan stealing the ball from Rick Carlisle and flying through the air for a game-winning dunk as North Carolina defeated No. 2 Virginia 64-63 in Chapel Hill. Smith said that game is in the top five in terms of “hits” in the ACC Video Vault, as are some of the DukeNorth Carolina basketball games, of which there are

now close to 20 of those rivalry games to choose from. Phase III of the project may entail contacting ACC schools directly to see what games or moments can be saved from previous decades, dating to the 1950s. “We would love to keep going back in time,” Smith said. “It’s almost like the further back you go the more interest there is because it is such a rarity.” “We’re pleased to give fans a new way to experience our rich ACC history,” said ACC Commissioner John Swofford. “The ACC Vault ties our rich collection of great games to the current season’s action and presents our tradition of excellence in an innovative way that will be a resource for fans, media, bloggers and our member institutions.”

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home COURTS of the atla boston college

CLEMSON

Opened: 1988 / Capacity: 8.606 / Chestnut Hill, MA On February 1, 1992, Malcolm Huckaby led BC to an 88-86 double-overtime win over Georgetown in a sold-out arena.

Opened: 1968 / Capacity: 10,000 / Clemson, SC On January 9, 1980, Clemson defeated No. 1 Duke in overtime 87-82.

DUKE

FLORIDA STATE

Opened: 1940 / Capacity: 9,314 / Durham, NC On Feb. 28, 1998, Duke rallied from a 17-point second half deficit against UNC to secure Mike Krzyzewski’s 500th career coaching victory.

Opened: 1981 / Capacity: 12, 100 / Tallahassee, FL Florida State has defeated No. 1 Duke on Jan. 6, 2002, March 1, 2006 and Jan. 12, 2011 at home at the Donald L. Tucker Center.

Silvio O. Conte Forum

Cameron Indoor Stadium

Littlejohn Coliseum

Donald L. Tucker Center

georgia tech

maryland

Opened: October 2012 (estimated) / Capacity: 8,900 (approximate) / Atlanta, GA The state-of-the-art McCamish Pavilion will open in time for the 2012-13 season and will be the Yellow Jackets’ brand new home.

Opened: 2002 / Capacity: 17,950 / College Park, MD On February 17, 2003, a blizzard delay led to a largely student crowd, which enjoyed a snow-day win over Wake Forest. The floor was dedicated as Gary Williams Court in a ceremony on Jan. 25, 2012.

McCamish Pavilion

28 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

Comcast Center


ntic coast conference miami

north carolina

Opened: 2003 / Capacity: 7,200 / Coral Gables, FL On January 4, 2003, Miami christened its new arena with a victory in an overtime thriller against North Carolina.

Opened: 1986 / Capacity: 21,750 / Chapel Hill, NC On March 6, 2005, the center hosted its largest crowd ever, as UNC edges Duke in the final seconds.

BankUnited Center

DEAN E. SMITH CENTER

nc state

virginia

Opened: 1999 / Capacity: 19,700 / Raleigh, NC The Wolfpack, ranked No. 21, snaps No. 1 Duke’s 18-game winning streak with a 78-74 victory on February 15, 2004.

Opened: 2006 / Capacity: 14,593 / Charlottesville, VA On November 12, 2006, Virginia opened its new arena with a tough come-from-behind win over No. 10 Arizona.

RBC Center

John Paul Jones Arena

virginia tech

wake forest

Opened: 1962 / Capacity: 9,847 / Blacksburg, VA 94-88 win over #1 UNC on Jan. 13, 2007. Celebrated 50 years and 500th game in the Coliseum with a win over FSU on January 8, 2011. A few weeks later, the Hokies upset #1 Duke 64-60 on February 26.

Opened: 1989 / Capacity: 14,665 / Winston-Salem, NC On February 23, 1992, the Deacs handed the soon-to-be NCAA champion Duke a loss in a 72-68 shootout.

Cassell Coliseum

Lawrence Joel Veterans Memorial Coliseum

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boston college

A D M I N I S TRAT I ON

Rev. William P. Leahy S.J. President

Robert Taggart Jr. Faculty Representative

Gene DeFilippo Athletics Director

Founded 1863 | Enrollment 14,500 | Home Chestnut Hill, Mass. | Home CourtSilvio O. Conte Forum | Nickname Eagles | ACC Titles 0

Boston College was founded in 1863 by the Society of Jesus to serve the sons of Boston’s Irish immigrants and was the first institution of higher education to be founded in the city of Boston. Originally located on Harrison Avenue in the South End of Boston, the College outgrew its urban setting toward the end of its first 50 years. A new location was selected in Chestnut Hill and ground for the new campus was broken on June 19, 1909. During the 1940s, new purchases doubled the size of the main campus. In 1974, Boston College acquired Newton College of the Sacred Heart, 1.5 miles away. With 15 buildings on 40 acres, it is now the site of the Law School and residence halls. In 2004, Boston College purchased 43 acres of land from the archdiocese of Boston; this now forms the Brighton campus.

Dennis Clifford C OA C H I N G S TA F F

Head Coach Steve Donahue

Assistant Head Coach Nat Graham

30 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

Assistant Coach woody Kampmann

Assistant Coach Akbar Waheed


1

0 Salah

GS/G/6-2/188

Abdo

5 FR/C/6-10/279

Caudill

13 FR/F/6-7/218

25 Rehnquist

Jordan

Daniels

Matt

Humphrey

FR/G/5-8/153

Danny

Rubin

Visockas

GS/G/6-4/192

Ryan

Kilcullen

JR/G/6-5/192

Lonnie

Jackson

Eddie

Odio

FR/F/6-7/195

12 FR/F/6-7/214

20

31 SR/G-F/6-4/220

Deirunas

4

11

14

Cain Carney

Peter

Moton

SO/G/6-1/177

10

KC

John

Gabe

2

Ryan

Anderson

FR/F/6-8/217

24 FR/G/6-3/170

Dennis

Clifford

FR/C/7-0/241

33 SO/G/6-5/181

Patrick

Heckmann

FR/G/6-5/196

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CLEMSON

A D M I N I S TRAT I ON

James F. Barker President

Janie Hodge Faculty Representative

Terry Don Phillips Athletics Director

Founded 1889 | Enrollment 19,453 | Home Clemson, SC | Home Court Littlejohn Coliseum | Nickname Tigers | ACC Titles 0

Clemson University is nestled in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains in South Carolina near the Georgia border, and the tiger paws painted on the roads make the return to I-85 easier. The school is built around Fort Hill, the plantation home of John C. Calhoun, Vice President to Andrew Jackson. His son-in-law, Thomas Clemson, left the land to be used as an agricultural school, and in 1893 Clemson opened its doors as a land grant school, thanks to the efforts of Ben Tillman.

Tanner Smith C OA C H I N G S TA F F

Head Coach Brad Brownell

Associate Head Coach Rick Ray

32 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

Assistant Coach Earl Grant

Assistant Coach Mike Winiecki


1 T.J.

Sapp

2 FR/G/6-2/180

10 Catalin

Baciu

Sullivan

Fields

FR/G/6-4/190

11 SR/C/7-2/255

22 Bernard

Carson

4

Andre

Young

Milton

Jennings

Hall

FR/G/6-1/210

15 SR/G/5-9/170

24 FR/F/6-7/225

Rod

5

Devin

Coleman

Devin

Booker

SR/G/6-5/210

Smith

21 FR/G/6-2/200

31 JR/F/6-9/225

Tanner

Bryan

SR/F/6-6/225

Narcisse

32 JR/F-C/6-8/245

K.J.

McDaniels

FR/F/6-6/190

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DUKE

A D M I N I S TRAT I ON

Richard Brodhead President

Martha Putallaz Faculty Representative

Kevin White Athletics Director

Founded 1838 | Enrollment 6,504 | Home Durham, NC | Home Court Cameron Indoor Stadium | Nickname Blue Devils | ACC Titles 19

Duke University was founded in 1924 by tobacco magnate James B. Duke as a memorial to his father, Washington Duke. Originally the school was called Trinity College, a Methodist institution, started in 1859. In 1892, Trinity moved to west Durham where the east campus with its Georgian architecture now stands. Nearby are Sarah P. Duke gardens, and further west the Gothic spires of Duke chapel overlook the west campus.

Mason Plumlee C OA C H I N G S TA F F

Head Coach Mike Krzyzewski

Associate Head Coach Chris Collins

34 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

Associate Head Coach Steve Wojciechowski

Assistant Coach Jeff Capel


2

0 Austin

Rivers

FR/G/6-4/200

12 Alex

Murphy

Plumlee

Cook

FR/G/6-0/175

13 FR/F/6-8/220

21 Miles

Quinn

3

Michael

Gbinije

Seth

Curry

Thornton

SO/G/6-1/195

15 FR/G-F/6-7/205

Josh

Hairston

JR/G/6-2/180

Ryan

Kelly

Mason

Plumlee

JR/F/6-10/235

20 SO/F/6-7/235

34

30 SR/F/6-10/245

Tyler

5

Andre

Dawkins

JR/G/6-4/200

40 JR/F/6-11/230

Marshall

Plumlee

FR/F/6-11/225

52 Todd

Zafirovski

JR/F/6-9/240

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FLORIDA STATE

A D M I N I S TRAT I ON

Eric J. Barron President

Pam Perrewe Faculty Representative

Randy Spetman Athletics Director

Founded 1851 | Enrollment 40,838 | Home Tallahassee, FL | Home Court Donald L. Tucker Center | Nickname Seminoles | ACC Titles 0

Florida State University is one of 11 universities of the State University System of Florida. It was established as the Seminary West of the Suwannee by an act of the Florida Legislature in 1851, and first offered instruction at the post-secondary level in 1857. Its Tallahassee campus has been the site of an institution of higher education longer than any other site in the state. In 1905, the Buckman Act reorganized higher education in the state and designated the Tallahassee school as the Florida Female College. In 1909, it was renamed Florida State College for Women. In 1947, the school returned to a co-educational status, and the name was changed to Florida State University.

Bernard James C OA C H I N G S TA F F

Head Coach Leonard Hamilton

Associate Head Coach Stan jones

36 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

Assistant Coach Corey williams

Assistant Coach Dennis Gates


1 Xavier

Gibson

3 SR/F-C/6-11/248

10 Okaro

White

Portuondo

SO/F/6-8/204

Whisnant

Kiel

Turpin

JR/G/5-11/165

Michael

Snaer

JR/C/6-11/225

Joey

Moreau

Dulkys

SR/G/6-5/196

Jeff

Peterson

JR/G/6-5/202

Antwan

Space

Bernard

James

SR/F/6-10/240

15 GS/PG/6-1/195

24

33 Fr/G/6-3/185

Deividas

5

12

21

31 Terry

Loucks

GS/G/6-5/201

11

20 Rafael

Luke

4

Terrance

Shannon

JR/F/6-8/240

30 Fr/F /6-8/218

Ian So/G/6-3/186

Miller

50 /Jr/G/6-2/179

Jon

Kreft

Sr/F-C/7-0/262

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GEORGIA TECH

A D M I N I S TRAT I ON

Dr. G.P. Bud Peterson President

Sue Ann Allen Faculty Representative

Dan Radakovich Athletics Director

Founded 1885 | Enrollment 19,393 | Home Atlanta, GA | Home Court McCamish Pavilion | Nickname Yellow Jackets | ACC Titles 3

Next to I-85 in downtown Atlanta stands the Georgia Institute of Technology, founded in 1885. Its first students came to pursue a degree in mechanical engineering, the only one offered at the time. Tech’s strength is not only the red clay of Georgia, but a restored gold and white 1930 model A Ford Cabriolet, the official mascot. The old Ford was first used in 1961, but a Ramblin’ Wreck had been around for over three decades. The Ramblin’ Wreck fight song appeared almost as soon as the school opened, and it is not only American boys that grow up singing its rollicking tune, for Richard Nixon and Nikita Khrushchev sang it when they met in Moscow in 1959.

Mfon Udofia C OA C H I N G S TA F F

Head coach Brian Gregory

38 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

Assistant Coach Chad Dollar

Assistant Coach Josh Postorino

Assistant Coach Billy Schmidt


1

0 Mfon

Udofia

Jr/G/6-2/193

5 Daniel

Miller

Holsey

Royal

Fr/F/6-7/230

13 So/C/6-11/258

24 Kammeon

Julian

2

McPherson

Moore

Derek

Craig

Jordan

GS/G/6-0/170

14 So/G/6-3/200

33 So/F/6-8/226

Pierre

4

Jason

Morris

Glen

Rice, Jr.

Foreman

Sr/G/6-3/210

23 So/G/6-5/210

41 Sr/G/6-4/205

Nick

Brandon

Reed

So/G/6-3/180

42 Jr/G/6-5/206

Nate

Hicks

So/C/6-10/218

theACC.com

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A D M I N I S TRAT I ON

MARYLAND

Wallace D. Loh President

Nicholas Hadley Faculty Representative

Kevin Anderson Athletics Director

Founded 1856 | Enrollment 37,195 | Home College Park, MD | Home Court Comcast Center | Nickname Terrapins | ACC Titles 3

The University of Maryland opened in 1856 as an agricultural school nine miles north of Washington, D.C., on land belonging to Charles Calvert, a descendant of Lord Baltimore, the state’s founding father. The school colors are the same as the state flag: black and gold for George Calvert (Lord Baltimore) and red and white for his mother, Alice Crossland. Maryland has been called the school that Curley Byrd built, for he was its quarterback, then football coach, athletic director, assistant to the president, vice-president, and finally its president. Byrd also designed the football stadium and the campus layout, and suggested the nickname Terrapin, a local turtle known for its bite, when students wanted to replace the nickname Old Liners with a new one for the school.

Sean Mosley C OA C H I N G S TA F F

Head coach Mark Turgeon

40 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

Assistant Coach Dalonte Hill

Assistant Coach Bino Ranson

Assistant Coach scott spinelli


4 Jacob

Susskind

5 Fr/G/6-5/180

12 Terrell

Stoglin

Howard

So/G/6-1/185

Len

Arnold

Richmond

So/G/6-3/195

Jon

Dillard

Fr/G/5-11/175

Ashton

Pankey

Weijs

Sr/C/6-10/200

Sean

Mosley

Sr/G/5-11/165

John

Auslander

Mychal

Parker

So/G/6-5/195

15 Sr/G/6-4/210

23

30 Fr/C/7-1/225

Berend

11

14

22

25 Alex

Faust

Fr/G/6-6/175

13

21 Pe’Shon

Nick

10

Spencer

Barks

Fr/F/6-9/225

24 So/F/6-7/225

Jonathan

Thomas

Jr/G/6-2/190

35 Fr/F/6-9/220

James

Padgett

Jr/F/6-8/225

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MIAMI

A D M I N I S TRAT I ON

Donna E. Shalala President

Clyde McCoy Faculty Representative

Shawn Eichorst Athletics Director

Founded 1925 | Enrollment 15,629 | Home Coral Gables, FL | Home Court BankUnited Center | Nickname Hurricanes | ACC Titles 0

The University of Miami was chartered in 1925 by a group of citizens who felt an institution of higher learning was needed for the development of their young and growing community. Since the first class of 560 students enrolled in the fall of 1926, the University has expanded to more than 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from every state and more than 114 nations from around the world. The school’s colors, representative of the Florida orange tree, were selected in 1926. Orange symbolizes the fruit of the tree, green represents the leaves and white, the blossoms.

Durand Scott C OA C H I N G S TA F F

Head coach Jim Larranaga

42 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

Assistant Coach Chris Caputo

Assistant Coach Eric Konkol

Assistant Coach Michael Huger


1

0 Shane

Larkin

Fr/G/5-11/160

4 Trey

Jr/G/6-5/216

12 Heller

Kadji

DeQuan

Jones

So/G/6-2/185

Rion

Brown

Sr/G-F/6-8/221

Reggie

Johnson

Daniels

Fr/G/6-3/175

Raphael

Akpejiori

So/G/6-6/194

Erik

Swoope

Malcolm

Grant

Sr/G/6-1/188

11 So/F/6-10/230

21

42 Jr/F-C/6-11/251

Bishop

3

10

15

35 Kenny

Scott

Jr/G/6-5/202

5

McKinney Jones

Justin

Durand

2

Ryan

Quigtar

Sr/G/5-11/180

25 So/F/6-6/230

Garrius

Adams

Jr/G/6-6/200

45 Jr/C/6-10/284

Julian

Gamble

Sr/F-C/6-10/265

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NORTH CAROLINA

A D M I N I S TRAT I ON

Holden Thorp Chancellor

Lissa Broome Faculty Representative

Bubba Cunningham Athletics Director

Founded 1789 | Enrollment 17,895 | Home Chapel Hill, NC | Home court Dean E. Smith Center | Nickname Tar Heels | Acc titles 17

The University of North Carolina, located in Chapel Hill, has been called “the perfect college town,” making its tree-lined streets and balmy atmosphere what a college should look and feel like. Its inception in 1795 makes it one of the oldest schools in the nation, and its nickname of Tar Heels stems from the tar pitch and turpentine that were the state’s principal industry. The nickname is as old as the school, for it was born during the Revolutionary War when tar was dumped into the streams to impede the advance of British forces.

John Henson C OA C H I N G S TA F F

head coach Roy Williams

44 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

Assistant Coach Steve Robinson

Assistant Coach Jerod Haase

Assistant Coach C.B. McGrath


2

1 Dexter

Strickland

Jr/G/6-3/180

11 Stilman

White

Dupont

Fr/G/6-0/160

Cooper

Desmond

Hubert

Sr/F/6-5/190

Justin

Watts

Fr/F/6-9.5/205

Reggie

Bullock

Davis

So/G/6-0/172

P.J.

Hairston

Sr/G/6-5/210

Patrick

Crouch

Fr/G/6-5.5/220

Harrison

Barnes

Marshall

So/G/6-4/195

Jackson

Simmons

Fr/F/6-7/205

31 Sr/G/5-11/180

40 So/G/6-7/205

Kendall

21

30

35 Sr/F/6-5/202

Luke

5

15

24

34 Stewart

McDonald

Jr/G/6-5/210

14

22 David

Leslie

4

John Jr/F/6-11/220

Henson

43 So/F/6-8/215

James Michael

McAdoo

Fr/F/6-9/220

44 Tyler

Zeller

Sr/F/7-0/250 theACC.com

45


NC STATE

A D M I N I S TRAT I ON

Randy Woodson Chancellor

Sam Pardue Faculty Representative

Deborah A. Yow Athletics Director

Founded 1887 | Enrollment 34,376 | Home Raleigh, NC | Home court RBC Center | Nickname wolfpack | acc titles 10

More than a century after its establishment as a land-grant institution in 1887, North Carolina State University continues to follow the mission upon which it was founded — to provide teaching, research, and extension services to the people of North Carolina. NC State—formerly known as the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts—has over 34,376 students and is the largest institution of higher learning in the state.   The university and its alumni provide $7.3 billion in economic impact for North Carolina. The athletic programs were called the Aggies or Farmers until in 1922, a fan compared State’s football players to a ‘pack of wolves,’ - the nickname stuck and now all 22 varsity teams are known as the Wolfpack.

Lorenzo Brown C OA C H I N G S TA F F

Head Coach mark gottfried

46 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

Assistant Coach Orlando Early

Assistant Coach Bobby Lutz

Assistant Coach Rob Moxley


1

0 DeShawn

Painter

Jr/C/6-9/231

10 Jaqawn

Raymond

Lewis

Howell

Jr/F/6-8/250

13 Fr/G/6-4/195

20 Jay

Richard

2

Thomas

de Thaey

Brown

So/G/6-5/186

14 Fr/F/6-8/239

21

Jordan

Vandenberg

C.J.

Sr/G/6-5/224

Fr/F/6-8/203

C.J.

SO/F/6-2

Kendall

Smith

Alex

Johnson

GS/G/5-10/176

15 Jr/C/7-1/258

25

Jr/G/6-2/186

Williams

Lorenzo

3

Scott

Wood

Jr/F/6-6/175

30 Sr/F/6-8/235

Staats

Battle

Fr/G/6-5/192

34 Tyler

Harris

Leslie

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A D M I N I S TRAT I ON

VIRGINIA

Teresa Sullivan President

Carolyn Callahan Faculty Representative

Craig Littlepage Athletics Director

Founded 1819 | Enrollment 21,049 | Home Charlottesville, VA | Home court John Paul Jones Arena | Nickname Cavaliers | acc titles 1

The University of Virginia was founded in 1819 by Thomas Jefferson and is one of three things on his tombstone for which he wanted to be remembered. James Madison and James Monroe were on the board of governors in the early years. The Rotunda, a half-scale version of the Pantheon which faces the Lawn, is the focal point of “the Grounds,� as the campus is called. Jefferson wanted his school to educate leaders in practical affairs and public service, not just to train teachers.

Mike Scott C OA C H I N G S TA F F

head coach Tony Bennett

Associate Head Coach Ritchie McKay

48 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

Assistant Coach Ron Sanchez

Assistant Coach Jason Williford


1

0 Doug

Browman

Jr/G/5-11/176

11 Rob

Vozenilek

Brogdon

Evans

Jr/G/5-11/188

12 Fr/G/6-2/185

22 Malcolm

Jontel

2

Joe

Harris

Mike

Scott

Jesperson

Fr/G/6-6/197

13 So/G/6-6/211

23 Fr/G/6-5/215

Paul

5

Sammy

Zeglinski

Akil

Mitchell

Sene

Sr/C/7-0/239

21 Sr/G/6-1/184

25 Sr/F/6-8/237

Assane

Angus

Mitchell

Jr/F/6-6/205

30 So/F/6-8/234

Thomas

Rogers

So/G/6-6/209

32 Darion

Atkins

Fr/F/6-8/222

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VIRGINIA TECH

A D M I N I S TRAT I ON

Charles Steger President

Larry Killough Faculty Representative

Jim Weaver Athletics Director

Founded 1872 | Enrollment 31,000 | Home Blacksburg, VA | Home court Cassell Coliseum | Nickname Hokies | acc titles 0

Founded in 1872 as a land-grant institution named Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College, Virginia Tech is now a comprehensive, innovative research university with the largest number of degree offerings in Virginia, more than 125 campus buildings, a 2,600-acre main campus, off-campus educational facilities in six regions, a study-abroad site in Switzerland, and a 1,700-acre agriculture research farm near the main campus. The campus proper is located in the Town of Blacksburg in Montgomery County and is 38 miles southwest of Roanoke, in the New River Valley. Through a combination of its three missions of teaching and learning, research and discovery, and outreach and engagement, Virginia Tech continually strives to accomplish the charge of its motto: Ut Prosim (That I May Serve). Total enrollment on and off campus is slightly over 31,000.

Erick Green C OA C H I N G S TA F F

head coach Seth Greenberg

Associate Head Coach James Johnson

50 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

Assistant Coach Robert Ehsan

Assistant Coach John Richardson


1

2

Robert

Fr/G/6-5/190

Brown

5 Dorenzo

Hudson

Sr/G/6-5/220

Finney-Smith

Thompson

Marquis

Rankin

Fr/F/6-8/192

Joey

Racer

Allan

Chaney

4 Jr/F/6-9/235

11 Fr/ G/ 6-1/ 165

24

33 JT

van Zegeren

Fr/F/6-10/220

10

15 Dorian

Joey

3

Erick

Green

Will

Johnston

Raines

So/F/6-9/238

14 Jr/G/6-3/185

25 Sr/G/6-1/165

Cadarian

Victor

Davila

Sr/F/6-8/242

31 Fr/G/6-3/185

Jarell

Eddie

So/G-F/6-7/218

42 Sr/F/6-6/225

C.J.

Barksdale

Fr/F/6-8/232

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WAKE FOREST

A D M I N I S TRAT I ON

Nathan O. Hatch President

Richard Carmichael Faculty Representative

Ron Wellman Athletics Director

Founded 1834 | Enrollment 4,657 | Home Winston-Salem, NC | Home Court Lawrence Joel Veterans Memorial Coliseum | Nickname Demon Deacons | acc titles 4

Wake Forest University was started on Calvin Jones’ plantation amid the stately pine forest of Wake County in 1834. The Baptist seminary is still there, but the school was moved to WinstonSalem in 1956 on a site donated by Charles H. and Mary Reynolds Babcock. President Harry S. Truman attended the ground-breaking ceremonies that brought a picturesque campus of Georgian architecture and painted roofs. Wake’s colors have been black and gold since 1895, thanks to a badge designed by student John Heck, who died before he graduated.

Travis McKie C OA C H I N G S TA F F

head coach Jeff Bzdelik

Associate HeaD Coach Jeff Battle

52 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

Assistant Coach Walt Corbean

Assistant Coach Rusty LaRue


2

1 Tony

Chennault

So/G/6-2/195

11 C.J.

Harris

Walker

Anthony

Fr/G/6-0/170

Fields

25 Jr/G/6-3/190

40 Ty

4

Nikita

Sr/F/6-8/220

Mescheriakov

Brooks

Godwin

Green

Fr/F/6-10/210

30

41 Sr/C/7-0/230

Daniel

10

Travis

McKie

Spencer

Jennings

Fr/G/6-3/180

Fischer

33 So/F/6-7/210

42 Sr/F/6-5/215

Chase

Carson

Desrosiers

So/C/7-0/240

43 Jr G 6-0 170

Aaron

Ingle

Sr/G/6-0/175

45 Ryan

Keenan

Sr/F/6-5/195

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theACC.com

55


SEASON RESULTS

FINAL 2011-12 REGULAR SEASON STANDINGS

Team

#1 NORTH CAROLINA #2 DUKE #3 FLORIDA STATE #4 VIRGINIA #5 NC STATE #6 MIAMI #7 CLEMSON #8 MARYLAND #9 WAKE FOREST #10 VIRGINIA TECH #11 GEORGIA TECH #12 BOSTON COLLEGE 56 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

Conference overall

14-2 13-3 12-4 9-7 9-7 9-7 8-8 6-10 4-12 4-12 4-12 4-12

27-4 26-5 21-9 22-8 20-11 18-11 16-14 16-14 13-17 15-16 11-19 9-21


2012 ACC Basketball Tournament 1st Round Ouarterfinals Semifinals Finals Thursday, March 8

Friday, Saturday, Sunday, March 9 March 10 March 11

(1) NORTH CAROLINA (8) MARYLAND Game 1 - 12:00 noon ESPNU/ACC Network

(9) WAKE FOREST (5) NC STATE Game 2 - 2:00 p.m. ESPNU/ACC Network

Game 5 - 12:00 noon ESPN2/ACC Network

(4) VIRGINIA

Game 9 - 1:00 p.m. ESPN/ACC Network

Game 6 - 2:00 p.m. ESPN2/ACC Network Game 11 - 1:00 p.m. ESPN/ACC Network

(12) BOSTON COLLEGE (2) DUKE (7) CLEMSON Game 3 - 7:00 p.m. ESPNU/ACC Network

(10) Virginia Tech (6) MIAMI Game 4 - 9:00 p.m. ESPNU/ACC Network

Game 7 - 7:00 p.m. ESPN2/ACC Network

(3) FLORIDA STATE

Game 10 - 3:00 p.m. ESPN/ACC Network

Game 8 - 9:00 p.m. ESPN2/ACC Network

(11) GEORGIA TECH

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57


ACC Players Week 1

John Henson, North Carolina Rookie – Austin Rivers, Duke

Week 2

Bernard James, Florida State & Dorenzo Hudson, Virginia Tech Rookie – Chase Fischer, Wake Forest

Week 3

Ryan Kelly, Duke Rookie – Austin Rivers, Duke

Week 4

Terrell Stoglin, Maryland Rookie – Shane Larkin, Miami

Week 5

John Henson, North Carolina Rookie – Austin Rivers, Duke

Week 6

Mike Scott, Virginia Rookie – Lonnie Jackson, Boston College

Week 7

Mike Scott, Virginia Rookie – Quinn Cook, Duke

Week 8

Lorenzo Brown, NC State Rookie – Quinn Cook, Duke

58 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament


of the week Week 9

Mike Scott, Virginia Rookie – Alex Len, Maryland

Week 10

Deividas Dulkys, Florida State Rookie – Dennis Clifford, Boston College

Week 11

Michael Snaer, Florida State Rookie – Austin Rivers, Duke

Week 12

Mason Plumlee, Duke Rookie – Austin Rivers, Duke

Week 13

Reggie Johnson, Miami Rookie – Austin Rivers, Duke

Week 14

Tyler Zeller, North Carolina Rookie – Austin Rivers, Duke

Week 15

Harrison Barnes, North Carolina Rookie – Ryan Anderson, Boston College

Week 16

John Henson, North Carolina Rookie – Austin Rivers, Duke

Week 17

Mike Scott, Virginia Rookie – Austin Rivers, Duke

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59


Individual Statistics Scoring

Player-Team 1. Terrell Stoglin-MD 2. Mike Scott-VA 3. Harrison Barnes-NC 4. C.J. Harris-WF 5. Tyler Zeller-NC 6. Travis McKie-WF 7. Austin Rivers-DU 8. Erick Green-VT 9. C.J. Leslie-ST 10. John Henson-NC 11. Michael Snaer-FS 12. Seth Curry-DU 13. Andre Young-CU 14. Durand Scott-UM 15. Kenny Kadji-UM 16. Scott Wood-ST 17. Lorenzo Brown-ST 18. Ryan Kelly-DU 19. Malcolm Grant-UM 20. Joe Harris-VA 21. C.J. Williams-ST 22. Tanner Smith-CU 23. Mason Plumlee-DU 24. Ryan Anderson-BC 25. Richard Howell-ST

rebounding

Player-Team 1. John Henson-NC 2. Tyler Zeller-NC 3. Richard Howell-ST 4. Mason Plumlee-DU 5. Mike Scott-VA 6. Bernard James-FS 7. Ryan Anderson-BC 8. Miles Plumlee-DU 9. C.J. Leslie-ST 10. Devin Booker-CU 11. Travis McKie-WF 12. Dorian Finney-Smith-VT 13. Daniel Miller-GT 14. James Padgett-MD 15. Milton Jennings-CU 16. Kenny Kadji-UM 17. Ryan Kelly-DU 18. Durand Scott-UM 19. Harrison Barnes-NC 20. Jarell Eddie-VT 21. Tanner Smith-CU 22. Sean Mosley-MD 23. Ashton Pankey-MD 24. Reggie Bullock-NC 25. Kammeon Holsey-GT

Cl G SO 30 SR 30 SO 31 JR 29 SR 31 SO 30 FR 31 JR 29 SO 28 JR 31 JR 30 JR 31 SR 30 JR 29 SO 28 JR 30 SO 31 JR 31 SR 27 SO 30 SR 31 SR 30 JR 31 FR 30 JR 31

FG 201 200 191 148 179 167 159 160 152 188 144 134 133 132 132 112 139 107 96 115 140 117 128 116 131

3FG 83 6 40 48 0 31 54 39 4 0 55 59 63 19 28 81 19 40 61 47 29 39 0 21 0

FT 150 131 116 143 147 111 102 84 93 63 81 93 70 94 68 74 91 113 53 60 39 61 84 72 73

Cl G JR 31 SR 31 JR 31 JR 31 SR 30 SR 30 FR 30 SR 31 SO 28 JR 30 SO 30 FR 31 SO 30 JR 30 JR 27 SO 28 JR 31 JR 29 SO 31 SO 31 SR 30 SR 30 FR 30 SO 31 SO 30

FG 84 120 108 87 66 93 47 93 59 81 69 82 57 103 47 53 56 48 64 17 20 36 54 54 69

3FG 236 168 179 199 183 156 170 129 141 128 139 130 136 77 105 104 111 107 94 140 131 112 92 96 76

FT Avg/G 320 10.3 288 9.3 287 9.3 286 9.2 249 8.3 249 8.3 217 7.2 222 7.2 200 7.1 209 7.0 208 6.9 212 6.8 193 6.4 180 6.0 152 5.6 157 5.6 167 5.4 155 5.3 158 5.1 157 5.1 151 5.0 148 4.9 146 4.9 150 4.8 145 4.8

60 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

Pts Avg/G 635 21.2 537 17.9 538 17.4 487 16.8 505 16.3 476 15.9 474 15.3 443 15.3 401 14.3 439 14.2 424 14.1 420 13.5 399 13.3 377 13.0 360 12.9 379 12.6 388 12.5 367 11.8 306 11.3 337 11.2 348 11.2 334 11.1 340 11.0 325 10.8 335 10.8

Field Goal PCT (Min. 5.0 made per game)

Player-Team 1. Mike Scott-VA 2. Tyler Zeller-NC 3. C.J. Leslie-ST 4. John Henson-NC 5. C.J. Harris-WF 6. Travis McKie-WF 7. Harrison Barnes-NC 8. Erick Green-VT 9. Austin Rivers-DU 10. Terrell Stoglin-MD

Assists

Player-Team 1. Kendall Marshall-NC 2. Lorenzo Brown-ST 3. Tanner Smith-CU 4. Luke Loucks-FS 5. Jontel Evans-VA 6. Durand Scott-UM 7. Andre Young-CU 8. Alex Johnson-ST 9. Mfon Udofia-GT 10. Tony Chennault-WF

Cl G FG FGA Pct SR 30 200 349 .573 SR 31 179 326 .549 SO 28 152 296 .514 JR 31 188 371 .507 JR 29 148 309 .479 SO 30 167 354 .472 SO 31 191 417 .458 JR 29 160 361 .443 FR 31 159 360 .442 SO 30 201 498 .404

Cl G Assists Avg/G SO 31 299 9.65 SO 31 194 6.26 SR 30 122 4.07 SR 30 120 4.00 JR 30 115 3.83 JR 29 92 3.17 SR 30 95 3.17 SR 31 96 3.10 JR 30 87 2.90 SO 30 85 2.83

Free throw (Min. 2.5 made per game) Player-Team Cl G FTM 1. Seth Curry-DU JR 31 93 JR 29 143 2. C.J. Harris-WF 3. Michael Snaer-FS JR 30 81 SR 30 85 4. Sean Mosley-MD 5. Mike Scott-VA SR 30 131 6. Dorenzo Hudson-VT SR 31 84 JR 31 113 7. Ryan Kelly-DU 8. Tyler Zeller-NC SR 31 147 JR 29 84 9. Erick Green-VT 10. Durand Scott-UM JR 29 94 steals

Player-Team 1. Andre Young-CU 2. Tanner Smith-CU 3. Lorenzo Brown-ST 4. Jontel Evans-VA 5. Shane Larkin-UM 6. Sammy Zeglinski-VA 7. Erick Green-VT 8. Deividas Dulkys-FS 9. Kendall Marshall-NC 10. Seth Curry-DU

FTA Pct 107 .869 167 .856 96 .844 101 .842 161 .814 104 .808 140 .807 183 .803 105 .800 118 .797

Cl G Steals Avg/G SR 30 52 1.73 SR 30 51 1.70 SO 31 52 1.68 JR 30 48 1.60 FR 28 44 1.57 SR 28 43 1.54 JR 29 40 1.38 SR 30 41 1.37 SO 31 40 1.29 JR 31 39 1.26


3-point FG PCT (Min. 1.0 made per game) Player-Team 1. Scott Wood-ST 2. Andre Dawkins-DU 3. Terrell Stoglin-MD 4. Sammy Zeglinski-VA 5. Andre Young-CU 6. Malcolm Grant-UM

3-point FG made Player-Team 1. Terrell Stoglin-MD 2. Scott Wood-ST 3. Malcolm Grant-UM 4. Andre Dawkins-DU 5. Andre Young-CU 6. Sammy Zeglinski-VA 7. Seth Curry-DU 8. Lonnie Jackson-BC 9. Matt Humphrey-BC 10. Michael Snaer-FS

bloked shots

Player-Team 1. John Henson-NC 2. Daniel Miller-GT 3. Bernard James-FS 4. Carson Desrosiers-WF 5. C.J. Leslie-ST 6. Kenny Kadji-UM 7. Mason Plumlee-DU 8. Tyler Zeller-NC 9. Xavier Gibson-FS 10. Ryan Kelly-DU

Cl G JR 30 JR 31 SO 30 SR 28 SR 30 SR 27

3FG 81 66 83 57 63 61

Cl G SO 30 JR 30 SR 27 JR 31 SR 30 SR 28 JR 31 FR 30 JR 30 JR 30

FGA Pct 195 .415 161 .410 220 .377 162 .352 184 .342 187 .326

3FG Avg/G 83 2.77 81 2.70 61 2.26 66 2.13 63 2.10 57 2.04 59 1.90 55 1.83 55 1.83 55 1.83

Cl G Blocks Avg/G JR 31 93 3.00 SO 30 70 2.33 SR 30 69 2.30 SO 30 59 1.97 SO 28 48 1.71 SO 28 48 1.71 JR 31 48 1.55 SR 31 44 1.42 SR 30 36 1.20 JR 31 31 1.00

ASSIST/TURNOVER RATIO (Min. 3.0 assists/game)

## 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Player-Team Kendall Marshall-NC Andre Young-CU Alex Johnson-ST Lorenzo Brown-ST Tanner Smith-CU Durand Scott-UM Luke Loucks-FS Jontel Evans-VA

Cl SO SR SR SO SR JR SR JR

OFFENSIVE REBOUNDS

## 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

Player-Team Tyler Zeller-NC Richard Howell-ST James Padgett-MD Bernard James-FS Miles Plumlee-DU Mason Plumlee-DU John Henson-NC Devin Booker-CU Dorian Finney-Smith-VT Kammeon Holsey-GT Travis McKie-WF

DEFENSIVE REBOUNDS ## 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Player-Team John Henson-NC Mason Plumlee-DU Mike Scott-VA Richard Howell-ST Ryan Anderson-BC Tyler Zeller-NC Bernard James-FS C.J. Leslie-ST Travis McKie-WF Daniel Miller-GT

MINUTES PLAYED ## 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Player-Team C.J. Harris-WF Travis McKie-WF Erick Green-VT Andre Young-CU Lorenzo Brown-ST Durand Scott-UM Austin Rivers-DU Kendall Marshall-NC Scott Wood-ST Terrell Stoglin-MD

G 31 30 31 31 30 29 30 30

Cl SR JR JR SR SR JR JR JR FR SO SO

Cl JR JR SR JR FR SR SR SO SO SO

Cl JR SO JR SR SO JR FR SO JR SO

Asst Avg Turn Avg Ratio 299 9.6 83 2.7 3.60 95 3.2 40 1.3 2.38 96 3.1 46 1.5 2.09 194 6.3 101 3.3 1.92 122 4.1 64 2.1 1.91 92 3.2 52 1.8 1.77 120 4.0 70 2.3 1.71 115 3.8 72 2.4 1.60

G 31 31 30 30 31 31 31 30 31 30 30

No. 120 108 103 93 93 87 84 81 82 69 69

Avg/G 3.87 3.48 3.43 3.10 3.00 2.81 2.71 2.70 2.65 2.30 2.30

G 31 31 30 31 30 31 30 28 30 30

No. 236 199 183 179 170 168 156 141 139 136

Avg/G 7.61 6.42 6.10 5.77 5.67 5.42 5.20 5.04 4.63 4.53

G 29 30 29 30 31 29 31 31 30 30

Minutes Avg/G 1018 35.10 1034 34.47 998 34.41 1032 34.40 1043 33.65 969 33.41 1021 32.94 1018 32.84 981 32.70 981 32.70

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conference only Statistics Scoring

Player-Team 1. Terrell Stoglin-MD 2. Mike Scott-VA 3. Tyler Zeller-NC 4. Harrison Barnes-NC 5. Austin Rivers-DU 6. Erick Green-VT 7. C.J. Leslie-ST 8. C.J. Harris-WF 9. Kenny Kadji-UM 10. Seth Curry-DU 11. Michael Snaer-FS 12. Travis McKie-WF 13. Andre Young-CU 14. John Henson-NC 15. Scott Wood-ST 16. Durand Scott-UM 17. Lorenzo Brown-ST 18. Ryan Anderson-BC 19. Tanner Smith-CU 20. Ryan Kelly-DU 21. Matt Humphrey-BC 22. Bernard James-FS 23. Sean Mosley-MD 24. Milton Jennings-CU 25. Reggie Johnson-UM

rebounding

Cl G SO 16 SR 16 SR 16 SO 16 FR 16 JR 15 SO 16 JR 16 SO 15 JR 16 JR 16 SO 16 SR 16 JR 16 JR 16 JR 16 SO 16 FR 16 SR 16 JR 16 JR 16 SR 16 SR 16 JR 14 JR 15

## Player-Team 1. John Henson-NC 2. Tyler Zeller-NC 3. Richard Howell-ST Miles Plumlee-DU 4. 5. Mason Plumlee-DU 6. Bernard James-FS 7. Ryan Anderson-BC 8. Travis McKie-WF 9. C.J. Leslie-ST 10. Mike Scott-VA 11. Reggie Johnson-UM 12. Devin Booker-CU 13. Milton Jennings-CU 14. Durand Scott-UM 15. James Padgett-MD 16. Kenny Kadji-UM 17. Dorian Finney-Smith-VT 18. Daniel Miller-GT 19. Reggie Bullock-NC 20. Ryan Kelly-DU 21. Harrison Barnes-NC 22. Alex Len-MD 23. Kammeon Holsey-GT 24. Ashton Pankey-MD 25. Akil Mitchell-VA

FG 108 122 103 98 86 86 92 74 81 75 83 80 77 90 60 80 73 69 64 56 63 70 51 60 64

3FG 50 3 0 21 31 20 2 24 20 32 31 15 34 0 41 10 12 7 22 21 31 0 20 11 4

FT 74 66 90 64 47 39 59 72 40 51 36 50 31 34 43 34 42 48 35 50 22 36 53 21 25

Pts Avg/G 340 21.3 313 19.6 296 18.5 281 17.6 250 15.6 231 15.4 245 15.3 244 15.3 222 14.8 233 14.6 233 14.6 225 14.1 219 13.7 214 13.4 204 12.8 204 12.8 200 12.5 193 12.1 185 11.6 183 11.4 179 11.2 176 11.0 175 10.9 152 10.9 157 10.5

Cl G OFF DEF TOT Avg/G JR 16 42 128 170 10.6 SR 16 64 91 155 9.7 JR 16 58 81 139 8.7 SR 16 57 73 130 8.1 JR 16 42 88 130 8.1 SR 16 51 76 127 7.9 FR 16 30 97 127 7.9 SO 16 42 84 126 7.9 SO 16 38 88 126 7.9 SR 16 25 98 123 7.7 JR 15 40 67 107 7.1 JR 16 42 70 112 7.0 JR 14 27 59 86 6.1 JR 16 32 64 96 6.0 JR 16 49 46 95 5.9 SO 15 32 56 88 5.9 FR 16 34 59 93 5.8 SO 16 27 63 90 5.6 SO 16 37 51 88 5.5 JR 16 30 58 88 5.5 SO 16 33 53 86 5.4 FR 16 24 62 86 5.4 SO 16 38 44 82 5.1 FR 16 36 40 76 4.8 SO 16 22 52 74 4.6

62 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

3-POINT FG MADE

BLOCKED SHOTS

Free throw PCT

Player-Team 1. C.J. Harris-WF 2. Lonnie Jackson-BC 3. Sean Mosley-MD 4. Scott Wood-ST 5. Seth Curry-DU 6. Tyler Zeller-NC 7. Mike Scott-VA 8. Ryan Kelly-DU 9. Terrell Stoglin-MD 10. Erick Green-VT

steals

Player-Team 1. Tanner Smith-CU 2. Andre Young-CU 3. Jontel Evans-VA 4. Lorenzo Brown-ST 5. Shane Larkin-UM 6. Matt Humphrey-BC 7. Ian Miller-FS 8. Erick Green-VT 9. Kendall Marshall-NC 10. Sammy Zeglinski-VA 11. Durand Scott-UM

Cl G FTM JR 16 72 FR 16 43 SR 16 53 JR 16 43 JR 16 51 SR 16 90 SR 16 66 JR 16 50 SO 16 74 JR 15 39

FTA 76 48 60 49 61 108 80 61 94 52

## Player-Team 1. Terrell Stoglin-MD 2. Scott Wood-ST 3. Andre Dawkins-DU 4. Andre Young-CU 5. Seth Curry-DU 6. Malcolm Grant-UM 7. Austin Rivers-DU 8. Michael Snaer-FS 9. Matt Humphrey-BC 10. Lonnie Jackson-BC

Pct .947 .896 .883 .878 .836 .833 .825 .820 .787 .750

Cl G Steals Avg/G SR 16 30 1.88 SR 16 29 1.81 JR 16 24 1.50 SO 16 23 1.44 FR 16 23 1.44 JR 16 22 1.38 SO 16 22 1.38 JR 15 20 1.33 SO 16 21 1.31 SR 16 21 1.31 JR 16 21 1.31

## Player-Team 1. Ty Walker-WF 2. John Henson-NC 3. Alex Len-MD 4. Bernard James-FS 5. Daniel Miller-GT 6. Tyler Zeller-NC 7. Kenny Kadji-UM 8. Carson Desrosiers-WF 9. Mason Plumlee-DU 10. C.J. Leslie-ST

Field Goal PCT

## Player-Team 1. Tyler Zeller-NC 2. Mike Scott-VA 3. Kenny Kadji-UM 4. C.J. Leslie-ST 5. Durand Scott-UM 6. John Henson-NC 7. Michael Snaer-FS 8. Austin Rivers-DU 9. Travis McKie-WF 10. Harrison Barnes-NC

Cl G SO 16 JR 16 JR 16 SR 16 JR 16 SR 16 FR 16 JR 16 JR 16 FR 16

Cl G Blocks Avg/G SR 15 45 3.00 JR 16 45 2.81 FR 16 35 2.19 SR 16 33 2.06 SO 16 31 1.94 SR 16 30 1.88 SO 15 25 1.67 SO 16 23 1.44 JR 16 21 1.31 SO 16 20 1.25

Cl G SR 16 SR 16 SO 15 SO 16 JR 16 JR 16 JR 16 FR 16 SO 16 SO 16

FG 103 122 81 92 80 90 83 86 80 98

Assists

Player-Team 1. Kendall Marshall-NC 2. Lorenzo Brown-ST 3. Jontel Evans-VA 4. Luke Loucks-FS 5. Tanner Smith-CU 6. Mfon Udofia-GT 7. Alex Johnson-ST 8. Tony Chennault-WF 9. Durand Scott-UM 10. Andre Young-CU

3FG Avg/G 50 3.13 41 2.56 36 2.25 34 2.13 32 2.00 32 2.00 31 1.94 31 1.94 31 1.94 29 1.81

FGA 181 223 159 183 168 196 184 193 183 227

Pct .569 .547 .509 .503 .476 .459 .451 .446 .437 .432

Cl G Assists Avg/G SO 16 149 9.31 SO 16 94 5.88 JR 16 67 4.19 SR 16 66 4.13 SR 16 63 3.94 JR 16 54 3.38 SR 16 48 3.00 SO 16 46 2.88 JR 16 46 2.88 SR 16 44 2.75


ALL-Acc Team First Team School

Name School Austin Rivers Duke Harrison Barnes North Carolina John Henson North Carolina Tyler Zeller North Carolina Mike Scott Virginia

second Team School Name School Michael Snaer Floirda State Terrell Stoglin Maryland Kendall Marshall North Carolina C.J. Leslie NC State Erick Green Virginia Tech THird Team

Name School Seth Curry Duke Duke Mason Plumlee Kenny Kadji Miami Lorenzo Brown NC State C.J. Harris Wake Forest

all-defensive Team

Name School Andre Young Clemson Bernard James Florida State Michael Snaer Florida State John Henson North Carolina Jontel Evans Virginia

all-freshman Team

Name School Ryan Anderson Boston College Austin Rivers Duke Nick Faust Maryland Shane Larkin Miami Dorian Finney-Smith Virginia Tech

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ACC player of the year

Tyler Zeller

north carolina Previous Winners

1954 Dickie Hemric Wake Forest 1955 Dickie Hemric Wake Forest 1956 Ronnie Shavlik NC State 1957 Len Rosenbluth North Carolina 1958 Pete Brennan North Carolina 1959 Lou Pucillo NC State 1960 Lee Shaffer North Carolina 1961 Len Chappell Wake Forest 1962 Len Chappell Wake Forest 1963 Art Heyman Duke 1964 Jeff Mullins Duke 1965 Billy Cunningham North Carolina 1966 Steve Vacendak Duke 1967 Larry Miller North Carolina

64 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

1968 Larry Miller North Carolina 1969 John Roche South Carolina 1970 John Roche South Carolina 1971 Charlie Davis Wake Forest 1972 Barry Parkhill Virginia 1973 David Thompson NC State 1974 David Thompson NC State 1975 David Thompson NC State 1976 Mitch Kupchak North Carolina 1977 Rod Griffin Wake Forest 1978 Phil Ford North Carolina 1979 Mike Gminski Duke 1980 Albert King Maryland 1981 Ralph Sampson Virginia 1982 Ralph Sampson Virginia

1983 Ralph Sampson Virginia 1984 Michael Jordan North Carolina 1985 Len Bias Maryland 1986 Len Bias Maryland 1987 Horace Grant Clemson 1988 Danny Ferry Duke 1989 Danny Ferry Duke 1990 Dennis Scott Georgia Tech 1991 Rodney Monroe NC State 1992 Christian Laettner Duke 1993 Rodney Rogers Wake Forest 1994 Grant Hill Duke 1995 Joe Smith Maryland 1996 Tim Duncan Wake Forest 1997 Tim Duncan Wake Forest

1998 Antawn Jamison North Carolina 1999 Elton Brand Duke Duke 2000 Chris Carrawell 2001 Shane Battier Duke Joseph Forte North Carolina 2002 Juan Dixon Maryland 2003 Josh Howard Wake Forest 2004 Julius Hodge NC State Duke 2005 J.J. Redick 2006 J.J. Redick Duke 2007 Jared Dudley Boston College 2008 Tyler Hansbrough North Carolina 2009 Ty Lawson North Carolina 2010 Greivis Vasquez Maryland 2011 Nolan Smith Duke


ACC rookie of the year

Austin Rivers

duke Previous Winners

1976 Jim Spanarkel Duke 1977 Mike Gminski Duke Hawkeye Whitney NC State 1978 Gene Banks Duke 1979 Buck Williams Maryland 1980 Ralph Sampson Virginia 1981 Sam Perkins North Carolina 1982 Michael Jordan North Carolina 1983 Mark Price Georgia Tech

1984 Bruce Dalrymple Georgia Tech 1985 Duane Ferrell Georgia Tech 1986 Tom Hammonds Georgia Tech 1987 J.R. Reid North Carolina 1988 Dennis Scott Georgia Tech 1989 Bryant Stith Virginia 1990 Kenny Anderson Georgia Tech 1991 Rodney Monroe NC State 1992 Bob Sura Florida State 1993 Rodney Rogers Wake Forest

1994 Joe Smith Maryland 1995 Greg Buckner Clemson 1996 Stephon Marbury Georgia Tech 1997 Ed Cota North Carolina 1998 Robert O’Kelley Wake Forest 1999 Chris Williams Virginia 2000 Joseph Forte North Carolina 2001 Chris Duhon Duke 2002 Ed Nelson Georgia Tech 2003 Chris Bosh Georgia Tech

2004 Chris Paul Wake Forest 2005 J.J. Redick Duke 2006 Tyler Hansbrough North Carolina 2007 Brandon Wright North Carolina 2008 Kyle Singler Duke 2009 Ty Lawson North Carolina 2010 Derrick Favors Georgia Tech 2011 Harrison Barnes North Carolina

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ACC defensive player of the year

John Henson north carolina Previous Winners

2005 Shelden Williams 2006 Shelden Williams 2007 Jamon Gordon

Duke Duke Virginia Tech

66 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

2008 DeMarcus Nelson Duke 2009 Toney Douglas Florida State 2010 Chris Singleton Florida State 2011 John Henson North Carolina


Skip Prosser scholar-athlete of the year

tyler zeller

north carolina Wake Forest head basketball coach George Edward “Skip” Prosser passed away on July 26, 2007. Prosser compiled a 291-146 career record in 14 seasons as a head coach, including a 126-68 mark in his six years with the Demon Deacons. The 2003 ACC Coach of the Year, Prosser won 20 plus games and led Wake Forest to the NCAA Tournament in each of his first four seasons in Winston-Salem and brought the school its first outright ACC regular season title in 2003. Every Wake Forest senior he coached graduated and the Deacons placed nine players on the annual All-ACC Academic Basketball Team during his tenure. In order to be nominated for the award, a student-athlete must be an upperclassman with a grade-point average of 3.0 or better – both in his career and in the previous two semesters. Sixty percent of the award is based on academic achievement and 40 percent on athletic accomplishments.

Previous Winners

2008 Cliff Hammonds Clemson 2009 Jack McClinton Miami 2010 Jerome Meyinsse Virginia 2011 Tyler Zeller North Carolina

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Bob Bradley Award

Bernard James Florida State In conjunction with Atlantic Coast Conference, ACSMA has presented the Bradley citation since 2006 to a male or female basketball player, coach or team administrator who has overcome significant injury, illness or other adversity to become a valuable contributor to his or her program and institution. The award is named for the Clemson University sports information director who died in 2000 after a three-year battle with bone cancer.

68 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

Previous Winners

2006 Tony Bethel NC State 2007 Debbie Ryan Virginia Kay Yow NC State 2008 Matt Zitani Florida State

2009 Adrian Thomas Miami 2010 D’Andre Bell Georgia Tech 2011 Jessica Breland North Carolina


ACC coach of the year

Leonard Hamilton Florida State Previous Winners

1954 Everett Case NC State 1955 Everett Case NC State 1956 Murray Greason Wake Forest 1957 Frank McGuire North Carolina 1958 Everett Case NC State 1959 Harold Bradley Duke 1960 Bones McKinney Wake Forest 1961 Bones McKinney Wake Forest 1962 Bob Stevens South Carolina 1963 Vic Bubas Duke 1964 Vic Bubas Duke 1965 Press Maravich NC State 1966 Vic Bubas Duke 1967 Dean Smith North Carolina

1968 Dean Smith North Carolina 1969 Frank McGuire South Carolina 1970 Norm Sloan NC State 1971 Dean Smith North Carolina 1972 Bill Gibson Virginia 1973 Norm Sloan NC State 1974 Norm Sloan NC State 1975 Lefty Driesell Maryland 1976 Dean Smith North Carolina 1977 Dean Smith North Carolina 1978 Bill Foster Duke 1979 Dean Smith North Carolina 1980 Lefty Driesell Maryland 1981 Terry Holland Virginia 1982 Terry Holland Virginia

1983 Bobby Cremins Georgia Tech 1984 Mike Krzyzewski Duke 1985 Bobby Cremins Georgia Tech 1986 Mike Krzyzewski Duke 1987 Cliff Ellis Clemson 1988 Dean Smith North Carolina 1989 Jim Valvano NC State 1990 Cliff Ellis Clemson 1991 Dave Odom Wake Forest 1992 Pat Kennedy Florida State 1993 Dean Smith North Carolina 1994 Dave Odom Wake Forest 1995 Dave Odom Wake Forest 1996 Bobby Cremins Georgia Tech 1997 Mike Krzyzewski Duke

1998 Bill Guthridge North Carolina 1999 Mike Krzyzewski Duke 2000 Mike Krzyzewski Duke 2001 Paul Hewitt Georgia Tech 2002 Gary Williams Maryland 2003 Skip Prosser Wake Forest 2004 Herb Sendek NC State 2005 Seth Greenberg Virginia Tech 2006 Roy Williams North Carolina 2007 Dave Leitao Virginia 2008 Seth Greenberg Virginia Tech 2009 Leonard Hamilton Florida State 2010 Gary Williams Maryland 2011 Roy Williams North Carolina

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ACC Regular Season Results CLEMSON

BOSTON COLLEGE DATE OPPONENT 11/14/11 NEW HAMPSHIRE 11/18/11 AT HOLY CROSS 11/21/11 MASSACHUSETTS VS Saint Louis 11/24/11 11/25/11 VS UC Riverside 11/27/11 VS NEW MEXICO 11/30/11 PENN STATE 12/03/11 BOSTON UNIVERSITY AT PROVIDENCE 12/08/11 12/11/11 STONY BROOK 12/18/11 BRYANT 12/21/11 SACRED HEART 12/29/11 HARVARD 01/02/12 RHODE ISLAND 01/07/12 AT NORTH CAROLINA 01/12/12 CLEMSON VIRGINIA TECH 01/14/12 AT NC STATE 01/19/12 01/21/12 WAKE FOREST 01/26/12 AT VIRGINIA 01/29/12 MIAMI 02/01/12 NC STATE 02/04/12 AT GEORGIA TECH 02/08/12 FLORIDA STATE 02/12/12 AT VIRGINIA TECH 02/16/12 AT MARYLAND 02/19/12 DUKE 02/25/12 AT WAKE FOREST 02/29/12 GEORGIA TECH 03/03/12 AT MIAMI

SCORE W/L 67-64 W 64-86 L 46-82 L 51-62 L 66-62 (OT) W 57-75 L 54-62 L 61-75 L 57-64 L 66-51 W 75-55 W 83-73 W 46-67 L 72-78 (2OT) L 60-83 L 59-57 W 61-59 W 62-76 W 56-71 L 49-66 L 54-76 L 51-56 L 47-51 L 64-60 W 65-66 L 65-81 L 50-75 L 56-85 L 56-52 W 56-77 L

FLORIDA STATE

DATE OPPONENT 11/11/11 GARDNER-WEBB 11/16/11 AT THE CITADEL 11/19/11 COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON COASTAL CAROLINA 11/22/11 11/25/11 FURMAN 11/29/11 AT IOWA 12/04/11 SOUTH CAROLINA 12/10/11 AT ARIZONA WINTHROP 12/17/11 12/19/11 ALABAMA STATE 12/22/11 VS TEXAS-EL PASO 12/23/11 VS SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 12/25/11 AT HAWAII 01/01/12 EAST TENNESSEE STATE 01/07/12 FLORIDA STATE 01/12/12 AT BOSTON COLLEGE DUKE 01/15/12 AT MIAMI 01/18/12 01/21/12 GEORGIA TECH 01/28/12 WAKE FOREST 01/31/12 AT VIRGINIA 02/04/12 AT VIRGINIA TECH 02/07/12 MARYLAND 02/11/12 AT WAKE FOREST 02/14/12 VIRGINIA 02/18/12 AT NORTH CAROLINA 02/21/12 AT GEORGIA TECH 02/25/12 NC STATE 03/01/12 VIRGINIA TECH 03/04/12 AT FLORIDA STATE

26-5 Overall, 13-3 ACC SCORE W/L 65-44 W 73-50 W 69-72 L 59-60 L 59-49 W 71-55 W 55-58 L 47-63 L 60-40 W 70-45 W 48-61 L 83-75 (OT) W 68-75 L 65-58 W 79-59 W 57-59 L 66-73 L 73-76 L 64-62 W 71-60 W 61-65 L 65-67 L 62-64 L 78-58 W 60-48 W 52-74 L 56-37 W 72-69 (OT) W 58-56 W 72-80 L

70 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

DATE OPPONENT 11/11/11 FLORIDA A&M 11/14/11 DELAWARE STATE VS SAINT JOSEPH’S 11/17/11 11/18/11 VS VCU 11/20/11 VS LSU SIENA 11/23/11 11/29/11 NORTHWESTERN 12/03/11 AT TULANE 12/07/11 AT GEORGIA 12/10/11 AT SAVANNAH STATE 12/19/11 ALABAMA A&M 12/22/11 MERCER 12/29/11 AT FORDHAM 01/03/12 ALABAMA 01/07/12 DUKE 01/11/12 AT NC STATE 01/15/12 AT MARYLAND 01/19/12 VIRGINIA 01/21/12 AT CLEMSON 01/24/12 MIAMI 01/29/12 AT NORTH CAROLINA 02/01/12 AT FLORIDA STATE 02/04/12 BOSTON COLLEGE 02/09/12 NC STATE 02/15/12 AT WAKE FOREST 02/18/12 AT VIRGINIA TECH 02/21/12 CLEMSON 02/25/12 MARYLAND 02/29/12 AT BOSTON COLLEGE 03/03/12 WAKE FOREST

SCORE W/L 77-76 W 96-55 W 74-69 W 82-69 W 77-67 W 82-75 W 68-61 W 63-85 L 87-64 W 86-80 W 90-63 W 110-70 W 85-55 W 73-78 L 81-74 W 61-58 W 73-66 W 91-73 W 73-76 L 74-61 W 83-76 W 75-60 W 74-78 (OT) L 85-84 W 73-55 W 78-73 W 75-50 W 74-66 W 70-65 W 79-71 W 70-88 L

16-14 Overall, 6-10 ACC

11-19 Overall, 4-12 ACC SCORE W/L 79-67 W 73-50 W 79-66 W 80-39 W 73-53 W 41-46 L 76-78 (OT) L 49-65 L 76-51 W 75-60 W 77-61 W 64-82 L 73-75 L 85-56 W 59-79 L 63-59 W 90-57 W 84-70 W 76-73 W 75-52 W 68-54 W 58-55 W 60-64 L 64-59 W 48-47 W 76-62 W 66-74 L 62-78 L 63-60 W 80-72 W

DATE OPPONENT 11/11/11 BELMONT PRESBYTERIAN 11/12/11 11/15/11 VS MICHIGAN STATE 11/18/11 DAVIDSON 11/21/11 VS TENNESSEE 11/22/11 VS MICHIGAN 11/23/11 VS KANSAS AT OHIO STATE 11/29/11 12/07/11 COLORADO STATE VS WASHINGTON 12/10/11 12/19/11 UNC GREENSBORO WESTERN MICHIGAN 12/30/11 01/01/12 PENNSYLVANIA 01/04/12 VS TEMPLE 01/07/12 AT GEORGIA TECH 01/12/12 VIRGINIA 01/15/12 AT CLEMSON 01/19/12 WAKE FOREST 01/21/12 FLORIDA STATE 01/25/12 AT MARYLAND 01/28/12 ST. JOHN’S 02/02/12 AT VIRGINIA TECH 02/05/12 MIAMI 02/08/12 AT NORTH CAROLINA MARYLAND 02/11/12 02/16/12 NC STATE 02/19/12 AT BOSTON COLLEGE 02/23/12 AT FLORIDA STATE 02/25/12 VIRGINIA TECH 02/28/12 AT WAKE FOREST 03/03/12 NORTH CAROLINA

MARYLAND

GEORGIA TECH

21-9 Overall, 12-4 ACC

DATE OPPONENT 11/11/11 JACKSONVILLE 11/14/11 CENTRAL FLORIDA STETSON 11/16/11 11/20/11 SOUTH ALABAMA 11/24/11 VS MASSACHUSETTS VS HARVARD 11/25/11 11/26/11 VS CONNECTICUT 11/30/11 AT MICHIGAN STATE 12/05/11 CHARLESTON SOUTHERN 12/11/11 UNC GREENSBORO 12/18/11 LOYOLA MARYMOUNT 12/22/11 AT FLORIDA 12/30/11 PRINCETON 01/04/12 AUBURN 01/07/12 AT CLEMSON 01/10/12 AT VIRGINIA TECH 01/14/12 NORTH CAROLINA 01/17/12 MARYLAND 01/21/12 AT DUKE 01/25/12 AT WAKE FOREST 02/01/12 GEORGIA TECH 02/04/12 VIRGINIA 02/08/12 AT BOSTON COLLEGE 02/11/12 MIAMI 02/16/12 VIRGINIA TECH 02/18/12 AT NC STATE 02/23/12 DUKE 02/26/12 AT MIAMI 03/01/12 AT VIRGINIA 03/04/12 CLEMSON

DUKE

16-14 Overall, 8-8 ACC

9-21 Overall, 4-12 ACC

SCORE W/L 92-59 W 70-52 W 53-66 L 73-60 W 50-59 L 72-44 W 60-76 L 52-57 L 68-56 W 65-45 W 65-54 W 59-65 L 66-72 L 48-73 L 74-81 L 82-71 W 50-61 L 38-70 L 62-64 L 49-64 L 81-93 L 54-68 L 51-47 W 52-61 L 50-59 L 73-74 (OT) L 37-56 L 63-61 W 52-56 L 69-62 W

DATE OPPONENT 11/13/11 UNC WILMINGTON 11/17/11 VS ALABAMA 11/18/11 VS COLORADO 11/20/11 VS IONA FLORIDA GULF COAST 11/25/11 11/29/11 ILLINOIS 12/04/11 VS NOTRE DAME 12/07/11 MOUNT ST. MARY’S 12/14/11 FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL 12/23/11 RADFORD 12/28/11 ALBANY 12/31/11 SAMFORD 01/03/12 CORNELL 01/08/12 AT NC STATE 01/11/12 WAKE FOREST 01/15/12 GEORGIA TECH 01/17/12 AT FLORIDA STATE 01/21/12 AT TEMPLE 01/25/12 DUKE 01/28/12 VIRGINIA TECH 02/01/12 AT MIAMI 02/04/12 NORTH CAROLINA 02/07/12 AT CLEMSON 02/11/12 AT DUKE 02/16/12 BOSTON COLLEGE 02/18/12 AT VIRGINIA 02/21/12 MIAMI 02/25/12 AT GEORGIA TECH 02/29/12 AT NORTH CAROLINA 03/04/12 VIRGINIA

SCORE W/L 71-62 W 42-62 L 78-71 W 63-89 L 73-67 W 62-71 L 78-71 W 77-74 W 65-61 W 65-60 W 83-72 W 75-63 W 70-62 W 74-79 L 70-64 W 61-50 W 70-84 L 60-73 L 61-74 L 73-69 W 86-90 (2OT) L 74-83 L 64-62 W 55-73 L 81-65 W 44-71 L 75-70 W 61-63 L 64-88 L 72-75 (OT) L


ACC Regular Season Results NORTH CAROLINA

MIAMI

DATE OPPONENT 11/11/11 TENNESSEE TECH 11/15/11 RUTGERS NORTH FLORIDA 11/19/11 11/22/11 FLORIDA GULF COAST 11/25/11 AT OLE MISS 11/29/11 AT PURDUE 12/03/11 MASSACHUSETTS MEMPHIS 12/06/11 12/10/11 AT WEST VIRGINIA 12/17/11 VS FLORIDA ATLANTIC 12/22/12 AT CHARLOTTE 12/30/11 APPALACHIAN STATE 01/02/12 UNC GREENSBORO 01/07/12 AT VIRGINIA 01/10/12 AT NORTH CAROLINA 01/18/12 CLEMSON 01/22/12 NC STATE 01/24/12 AT GEORGIA TECH 01/29/12 AT BOSTON COLLEGE 02/01/12 MARYLAND 02/05/12 AT DUKE 02/09/12 VIRGINIA TECH 02/11/12 AT FLORIDA STATE 02/15/12 NORTH CAROLINA 02/18/12 WAKE FOREST 02/21/12 AT MARYLAND 02/26/12 FLORIDA STATE 02/29/12 AT NC STATE 03/03/12 BOSTON COLLEGE

SCORE W/L 69-58 W 72-57 W 75-62 W 60-50 W 61-64 (OT) L 65-76 L 83-75 W 54-71 L 66-77 L 93-90 (OT) W 76-61 W 84-54 W 99-89 W 51-52 L 56-73 L 76-73 W 73-78 L 64-49 W 76-54 W 90-86 (2OT) W 78-74 (OT) W 65-49 W 59-64 L 64-73 L 74-56 W 70-75 L 78-62 W 73-77 L 77-56 W

VIRGINIA

DATE OPPONENT 11/11/11 MICHIGAN STATE 11/13/11 AT UNC ASHEVILLE 11/20/11 MISSISSIPPI VALLEY STATE 11/22/11 TENNESSEE STATE 11/25/11 VS SOUTH CAROLINA 11/26/11 VS UNLV 11/30/11 WISCONSIN 12/03/11 AT KENTUCKY 12/06/11 EVANSVILLE 12/10/11 LONG BEACH STATE APPALACHIAN STATE 12/17/11 12/19/11 NICHOLLS 12/21/11 TEXAS 12/29/11 ELON 01/01/12 MONMOUTH 01/07/12 BOSTON COLLEGE 01/10/12 MIAMI 01/14/12 AT FLORIDA STATE 01/19/12 AT VIRGINIA TECH 01/26/12 NC STATE 01/29/12 GEORGIA TECH AT WAKE FOREST 01/31/12 02/04/12 AT MARYLAND 02/08/12 DUKE 02/11/12 VIRGINIA 02/15/12 AT MIAMI 02/18/12 CLEMSON 02/21/12 AT NC STATE 02/25/12 AT VIRGINIA 02/29/12 MARYLAND 03/03/12 AT DUKE

20-11 Overall, 9-7 ACC SCORE W/L 67-55 W 91-75 W 101-75 W 102-69 W 87-62 W 80-90 L 60-57 W 72-73 L 97-48 W 84-78 W 97-82 W 99-49 W 82-63 W 100-62 W 102-65 W 83-60 W 73-56 W 57-90 L 82-68 W 74-55 W 93-81 W 68-53 W 83-74 W 84-85 L 70-52 W 73-64 W 74-52 W 86-74 W 54-51 W 88-64 W 88-70 W

DATE OPPONENT 11/12/11 EAST TENNESSEE STATE MONMOUTH 11/14/11 11/15/11 FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL VS SYRACUSE 11/23/11 11/25/11 VS OKLAHOMA STATE 11/27/11 ST. BONAVENTURE 11/30/11 AT MINNESOTA 12/04/11 KANSAS STATE 12/07/11 AT RHODE ISLAND 12/11/11 NORFOLK STATE CAMPBELL 12/17/11 12/19/11 NORTH FLORIDA 12/22/11 EASTERN MICHIGAN 12/31/11 AT OKLAHOMA STATE 01/07/12 AT WAKE FOREST 01/10/12 FLORIDA STATE 01/14/12 AT BOSTON COLLEGE 01/19/12 NORTH CAROLINA 01/22/12 AT VIRGINIA 01/25/12 BRIGHAM YOUNG 01/28/12 AT MARYLAND 02/02/12 DUKE 02/04/12 CLEMSON 02/09/12 AT MIAMI 02/12/12 BOSTON COLLEGE 02/16/12 AT FLORIDA STATE 02/18/12 GEORGIA TECH 02/21/12 VIRGINIA 02/25/12 AT DUKE 03/01/12 AT CLEMSON 03/04/12 NC STATE

SCORE W/L 84-75 W 91-61 W 60-58 W 79-86 L 77-74 W 82-67 W 75-86 L 72-76 W 65-60 W 72-88 L 67-65 W 88-59 W 87-81 W 82-55 W 78-44 W 79-74 W 71-82 L 76-40 W 76-62 W 78-73 W 55-74 L 60-61 L 56-51 W 87-76 W 61-52 W 73-78 L 62-76 L 74-86 L 69-72 (OT) L 77-73 W 70-58 W

13-17 Overall, 4-12 ACC

15-16 Overall, 4-12 ACC SCORE W/L 75-38 W 69-48 W 55-57 L 49-35 W 60-52 W 68-42 W 70-58 W 86-53 W 68-48 W 67-54 W 83-77 W 69-42 W 57-50 W 57-52 W 52-51 W 58-61 L 70-38 W 45-47 L 66-49 W 61-60 W 65-61 W 55-58 L 68-44 W 52-70 L 48-60 L 71-44 W 61-59 W 51-54 L 60-63 L 75-72 (OT) W

DATE OPPONENT 11/11/11 UNC ASHEVILLE 11/13/11 MOREHEAD STATE 11/16/11 PRINCETON 11/19/11 VS VANDERBILT 11/21/11 VS TEXAS 11/25/11 ELON 11/30/11 INDIANA 12/04/11 AT STANFORD 12/11/11 NORTH CAROLINA CENTRAL 12/17/11 SYRACUSE 12/20/11 AT ST. BONAVENTURE 12/22/11 NORTHEASTERN 12/29/11 CAMPBELL 12/31/11 WESTERN CAROLINA 01/04/12 DELAWARE STATE 01/08/12 MARYLAND 01/11/12 GEORGIA TECH 01/14/12 AT WAKE FOREST 01/19/12 BOSTON COLLEGE 01/22/12 AT MIAMI 01/26/12 AT NORTH CAROLINA 01/28/12 VIRGINIA 02/01/12 AT BOSTON COLLEGE 02/04/12 WAKE FOREST 02/09/12 AT GEORGIA TECH 02/16/12 AT DUKE 02/18/12 FLORIDA STATE 02/21/12 NORTH CAROLINA 02/25/12 AT CLEMSON 02/29/12 MIAMI 03/04/12 AT VIRGINIA TECH

WAKE FOREST

VIRGINIA TECH

22-8 Overall, 9-7 ACC DATE OPPONENT 11/13/11 SOUTH CAROLINA STATE WINTHROP 11/15/11 11/18/11 VS TCU VS DREXEL 11/19/11 11/21/11 VS DRAKE 11/25/11 GREEN BAY 11/29/11 MICHIGAN 12/03/11 LONGWOOD 12/06/11 GEORGE MASON 12/18/11 AT OREGON 12/21/11 AT SEATTLE 12/27/11 MD-EASTERN SHORE 12/30/11 TOWSON 01/02/12 AT LSU 01/07/12 MIAMI 01/12/12 AT DUKE 01/19/12 AT GEORGIA TECH 01/22/12 VIRGINIA TECH 01/26/12 BOSTON COLLEGE 01/28/12 AT NC STATE 01/31/12 CLEMSON 02/04/12 AT FLORIDA STATE 02/08/12 WAKE FOREST 02/11/12 AT NORTH CAROLINA 02/14/12 AT CLEMSON 02/18/12 MARYLAND 02/21/12 AT VIRGINIA TECH 02/25/12 NORTH CAROLINA 03/01/12 FLORIDA STATE 03/04/12 AT MARYLAND

NC STATE

27-4 Overall, 14-2 ACC

18-11 Overall, 9-7 ACC

SCORE W/L 64-53 W 91-46 W 78-63 W 58-69 L 59-57 W 73-64 W 55-58 L 61-69 L 78-67 W 73-60 W 85-60 W 84-55 W 71-50 W 67-61 W 55-58 L 59-63 L 59-61 L 68-82 L 47-45 W 68-70 L 69-73 L 60-75 L 67-65 W 49-65 L 66-65 W 47-48 L 74-73 (OT) W 59-61 L 65-70 (OT) L 56-58 L 58-70 L

DATE OPPONENT 11/11/11 LOYOLA (MD) 11/16/11 GEORGIA SOUTHERN NORTH CAROLINA CENTRAL 11/20/11 11/24/11 VS DAYTON 11/25/11 VS ARIZONA STATE VS TEXAS TECH 11/27/11 11/30/11 AT NEBRASKA 12/03/11 RICHMOND 12/07/11 AT HIGH POINT 12/10/11 AT SETON HALL 12/18/11 GARDNER-WEBB 12/21/11 UNC WILMINGTON 12/29/11 YALE 01/02/12 WOFFORD 01/07/12 VIRGINIA TECH 01/11/12 AT MARYLAND 01/14/12 NC STATE 01/19/12 AT DUKE 01/21/12 AT BOSTON COLLEGE 01/25/12 FLORIDA STATE 01/28/12 AT CLEMSON 01/31/12 NORTH CAROLINA 02/04/12 AT NC STATE 02/08/12 AT VIRGINIA CLEMSON 02/11/12 02/15/12 GEORGIA TECH 02/18/12 AT MIAMI 02/25/12 BOSTON COLLEGE 02/28/12 DUKE 03/03/12 AT GEORGIA TECH

SCORE W/L 75-63 W 81-72 W 93-79 W 76-80 L 56-84 L 70-61 W 55-53 W 62-70 L 87-83 W 54-68 L 67-59 W 87-78 W 72-71 W 52-56 L 58-55 W 64-70 L 40-76 L 73-91 L 71-56 W 52-75 L 60-71 L 53-68 L 76-87 L 44-68 L 58-78 L 59-50 W 56-74 L 85-56 W 71-79 L 62-69 L

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2011-12 Regular season box scores minutes total 3-pts f-throws rebounds scoring ## Player GP GS Min Avg FG FGA Pct 3FG FGA Pct FT FTA Pct Off Def Tot Avg PF FO A TO Blk Stl Pts Avg 12 Ryan Anderson 30 27 892 29.7 116 274 .423 21 82 .256 72 106 .679 47 170 217 7.2 45 0 30 45 17 14 325 10.8 14 Matt Humphrey 30 28 910 30.3 105 296 .355 55 170 .324 49 80 .613 20 82 102 3.4 53 0 48 59 10 33 314 10.5 24 Dennis Clifford 30 24 802 26.7 105 203 .517 2 10 .200 59 89 .663 35 109 144 4.8 82 2 34 77 26 11 271 9.0 33 Patrick Heckmann 21 9 467 22.2 55 118 .466 14 42 .333 55 75 .733 13 45 58 2.8 38 0 34 63 3 10 179 8.5 20 Lonnie Jackson 30 23 819 27.3 71 178 .399 55 136 .404 50 64 .781 15 61 76 2.5 71 1 50 48 9 28 247 8.2 10 Jordan Daniels 30 24 736 24.5 67 194 .345 35 105 .333 21 28 .750 10 38 48 1.6 49 1 73 58 4 22 190 6.3 01 Gabe Moton 28 5 448 16.0 31 75 .413 13 34 .382 8 16 .500 6 40 46 1.6 43 0 30 28 4 12 83 3.0 02 John Cahill 26 2 372 14.3 19 44 .432 16 37 .432 6 7 .857 5 30 35 1.3 18 0 11 7 4 12 60 2.3 05 Kc Caudill 27 6 268 9.9 23 48 .479 0 1 .000 14 23 .609 5 25 30 1.1 43 0 13 25 5 1 60 2.2 31 Danny Rubin 19 1 129 6.8 7 25 .280 7 18 .389 0 0 .000 2 11 13 0.7 7 0 7 7 1 0 21 1.1 04 Eddie Odio 24 0 142 5.9 8 20 .400 0 3 .000 5 13 .385 12 13 25 1.0 12 0 4 5 3 4 21 0.9 02 Visockas, Deirunas 7 0 40 5.7 0 6 .000 0 3 .000 3 4 .750 0 3 3 0.4 4 0 3 3 0 1 3 0.4 11 Ryan Kilcullen 7 0 8 1.1 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 2 2 1.000 0 2 2 0.3 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 0.3 25 Peter Rehnquist 7 1 9 1.3 0 1 .000 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 1 0 1 0.1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 John Cain Carney 2 0 2 1.0 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 13 .000 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 4 1 5 0.7 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0.0 13 Cain Carney, John 7 0 20 2.9 0 4 00 Salah Abdo 5 0 11 2.2 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 0 2 .000 0 0 0 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 TEAM 38 46 84 2.8 0 8 0 TM 30 607 1486 .408 218 641 .340 344 509 .676 213 676 889 29.6 469 4 339 435 86 148 1776 59.2 Total 30 746 1710 .436 203 585 .347 352 485 .726 326 742 1068 35.6 487 - 394 354 105 220 2047 68.2 Opponents minutes total 3-pts f-throws rebounds scoring ## Player GP GS Min Avg FG FGA Pct 3FG FGA Pct FT FTA Pct Off Def Tot Avg PF FO A TO Blk Stl Pts Avg 30 30 1032 34.4 133 319 .417 63 184 .342 70 85 .824 16 66 82 2.7 38 0 95 40 1 52 399 13.3 11 Andre Young 05 Tanner Smith 30 30 976 32.5 117 255 .459 39 109 .358 61 83 .735 20 131 151 5.0 63 0 122 64 7 51 334 11.1 31 Devin Booker 30 28 871 29.0 122 266 .459 5 22 .227 71 100 .710 81 128 209 7.0 77 2 39 53 29 27 320 10.7 24 Milton Jennings 27 22 704 26.1 102 232 .440 13 43 .302 42 71 .592 47 105 152 5.6 75 2 29 63 23 24 259 9.6 10 Catalin Baciu 30 5 324 10.8 53 92 .576 0 0 .000 18 31 .581 36 29 65 2.2 38 0 1 26 17 7 124 4.1 32 K.J. McDaniels 29 1 297 10.2 44 96 .458 7 24 .292 22 38 .579 34 21 55 1.9 24 0 7 12 20 10 117 4.0 04 Rod Hall 30 9 515 17.2 41 93 .441 4 5 .800 31 52 .596 12 26 38 1.3 36 1 34 28 0 14 117 3.9 01 T.J. Sapp 30 9 482 16.1 38 122 .311 24 76 .316 7 16 .438 14 34 48 1.6 37 1 22 27 0 22 107 3.6 21 Bryan Narcisse 30 16 439 14.6 29 77 .377 6 26 .231 15 21 .714 25 38 63 2.1 62 2 18 16 14 14 79 2.6 15 Devin Coleman 21 0 193 9.2 17 54 .315 2 17 .118 6 9 .667 3 22 25 1.2 12 0 9 10 1 8 42 2.0 22 Bernard Sullivan 27 0 208 7.7 16 43 .372 0 4 .000 6 13 .462 8 22 30 1.1 24 0 3 14 3 0 38 1.4 02 Carson Fields 8 0 9 1.1 1 2 .500 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 0 1 1 0.1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0.3 TM TEAM 40 30 70 2.3 0 10 0 TotaL 30 713 1651 .432 163 510 .320 349 519 .672 336 653 989 33.0 486 8 380 363 115 229 1938 64.6 Opponents 30 661 1532 .431 171 472 .362 319 458 .697 282 681 963 32.1 493 - 342 440 83 179 1812 60.4

minutes total 3-pts f-throws rebounds scoring ## Player GP GS Min Avg FG FGA Pct 3FG FGA Pct FT FTA Pct Off Def Tot Avg PF FO A TO Blk Stl Pts Avg 00 Austin Rivers 31 30 1021 32.9 159 360 .442 54 141 .383 102 159 .642 16 84 100 3.2 65 2 67 73 1 29 474 15.3 30 Seth Curry 31 29 933 30.1 134 308 .435 59 148 .399 93 107 .869 23 55 78 2.5 66 1 75 63 7 39 420 13.5 34 Ryan Kelly 31 19 803 25.9 107 241 .444 40 98 .408 113 140 .807 56 111 167 5.4 71 1 35 43 31 24 367 11.8 05 Mason Plumlee 31 28 870 28.1 128 231 .554 0 0 .000 84 164 .512 87 199 286 9.2 74 0 54 64 48 26 340 11.0 20 Andre Dawkins 31 14 703 22.7 90 214 .421 66 161 .410 34 46 .739 10 54 64 2.1 57 0 19 25 2 14 280 9.0 21 Miles Plumlee 31 13 614 19.8 83 134 .619 0 0 .000 44 70 .629 93 129 222 7.2 71 3 17 39 28 17 210 6.8 02 Quinn Cook 30 4 364 12.1 43 106 .406 13 51 .255 35 46 .761 6 24 30 1.0 25 0 60 17 2 12 134 4.5 03 Tyler Thornton 31 16 623 20.1 31 79 .392 22 57 .386 31 42 .738 12 40 52 1.7 85 3 61 30 0 25 115 3.7 15 Josh Hairston 26 2 198 7.6 25 57 .439 0 1 .000 16 24 .667 22 14 36 1.4 33 1 2 11 3 4 66 2.5 13 Michael Gbinije 18 0 111 6.2 11 20 .550 4 10 .400 7 7 1.000 5 11 16 0.9 17 0 3 8 1 3 33 1.8 52 Todd Zafirovski 5 0 10 2.0 0 2 .000 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 0 2 2 0.4 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0.0 TM TEAM 39 48 87 2.8 0 4 0 Total 31 811 1752 .463 258 667 .387 559 805 .694 369 771 1140 36.8 565 11 394 378 124 193 2439 78.7 Opponents 31 802 1834 .437 138 441 .313 399 584 .683 357 696 1053 34.0 650 - 348 402 83 181 2141 69.1

72 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament


2011-12 Regular season box scores minutes total 3-pts f-throws rebounds scoring ## Player GP GS Min Avg FG FGA Pct 3FG FGA Pct FT FTA Pct Off Def Tot Avg PF FO A TO Blk Stl Pts Avg 21 Michael Snaer 30 29 915 30.5 144 333 .432 55 140 .393 81 96 .844 30 88 118 3.9 59 1 56 69 10 35 424 14.1 30 Ian Miller 19 0 456 24.0 68 172 .395 29 81 .358 40 50 .800 9 29 38 2.0 39 1 21 23 2 28 205 10.8 05 Bernard James 30 30 830 27.7 128 210 .610 0 0 .000 55 101 .545 93 156 249 8.3 57 0 14 62 69 23 311 10.4 15 Terrance Shannon 7 0 122 17.4 19 35 .543 0 0 .000 20 33 .606 11 20 31 4.4 11 0 5 9 4 5 58 8.3 10 Okaro White 30 12 667 22.2 78 163 .479 9 28 .321 63 83 .759 49 82 131 4.4 95 6 18 46 11 18 228 7.6 01 Xavier Gibson 30 30 572 19.1 84 169 .497 5 18 .278 50 74 .676 52 91 143 4.8 84 2 12 61 36 16 223 7.4 04 Deividas Dulkys 30 18 716 23.9 70 160 .438 41 106 .387 27 33 .818 18 58 76 2.5 57 2 34 53 18 41 208 6.9 03 Luke Loucks 30 30 791 26.4 67 179 .374 23 80 .288 30 50 .600 13 77 90 3.0 60 0 120 70 8 37 187 6.2 12 Jeff Peterson 29 1 487 16.8 41 94 .436 6 26 .231 15 29 .517 4 44 48 1.7 43 0 56 54 1 20 103 3.6 50 Jon Kreft 30 0 313 10.4 31 72 .431 0 0 .000 18 25 .720 26 44 70 2.3 44 0 8 36 17 8 80 2.7 31 Terry Whisnant 23 0 188 8.2 19 55 .345 11 40 .275 4 6 .667 10 15 25 1.1 12 0 12 6 0 6 53 2.3 20 Rafael Portuondo 5 0 5 1.0 1 1 1.000 1 1 1.000 2 2 1.000 0 0 0 0.0 2 0 0 4 0 0 5 1.0 24 Antwan Space 10 0 30 3.0 3 11 .273 0 3 .000 1 1 1.000 2 5 7 0.7 5 0 0 1 1 0 7 0.7 33 Joey Moreau 8 0 8 1.0 0 3 .000 0 3 .000 0 0 .000 0 1 1 0.1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0.0 TEAM 40 49 89 3.0 0 2 0 TM 30 753 1657 .454 180 526 .342 406 583 .696 357 759 1116 37.2 568 12 356 497 177 237 2092 69.7 Total Opponents 30 634 1672 .379 189 621 .304 407 583 .698 360 631 991 33.0 555 - 309 469 96 231 1864 62.1

minutes total 3-pts f-throws rebounds scoring ## Player GP GS Min Avg FG FGA Pct 3FG FGA Pct FT FTA Pct Off Def Tot Avg PF FO A TO Blk Stl Pts Avg 21 10 628 29.9 102 223 .457 30 90 .333 40 66 .606 41 100 141 6.7 50 1 48 48 18 28 274 13.0 41 Glen Rice 00 Mfon Udofia 30 29 949 31.6 97 255 .380 33 105 .314 66 100 .660 26 79 105 3.5 72 0 87 80 3 16 293 9.8 24 Kammeon Holsey 30 30 726 24.2 119 200 .595 0 0 .000 48 89 .539 69 76 145 4.8 86 2 26 66 12 19 286 9.5 05 Daniel Miller 30 30 895 29.8 109 217 .502 0 0 .000 31 40 .775 57 136 193 6.4 50 1 44 48 70 29 249 8.3 14 Jason Morris 30 19 733 24.4 83 234 .355 28 91 .308 42 59 .712 22 76 98 3.3 54 1 35 55 15 14 236 7.9 23 Brandon Reed 30 27 761 25.4 74 221 .335 33 117 .282 42 58 .724 12 88 100 3.3 31 0 37 57 1 24 223 7.4 01 Julian Royal 29 0 462 15.9 50 112 .446 11 27 .407 21 29 .724 34 36 70 2.4 41 0 17 26 8 8 132 4.6 04 Nick Foreman 29 3 311 10.7 16 39 .410 10 26 .385 4 7 .571 9 24 33 1.1 53 0 8 9 5 8 46 1.6 02 Pierre Jordan 27 1 319 11.8 17 47 .362 5 18 .278 3 4 .750 1 25 26 1.0 34 0 24 20 2 10 42 1.6 33 Derek Craig 10 1 46 4.6 5 18 .278 3 13 .231 2 2 1.000 1 4 5 0.5 4 0 4 0 0 1 15 1.5 13 McPherson Moore 5 0 12 2.4 2 4 .500 2 3 .667 0 0 .000 0 0 0 0.0 2 0 0 1 2 0 6 1.2 42 Nate Hicks 23 0 177 7.7 11 21 .524 0 0 .000 4 8 .500 14 34 48 2.1 21 0 3 11 11 1 26 1.1 Aaron Peek 2 0 3 1.5 1 2 .500 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 1 0 1 0.5 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 1.0 12 11 David Spain 4 0 3 0.8 0 2 .000 0 1 .000 0 0 .000 0 1 1 0.3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 TM TEAM 47 43 90 3.0 0 6 0 Total 30 686 1595 .430 155 491 .316 303 462 .656 334 722 1056 35.2 498 5 334 428 147 158 1830 61.0 Opponents 30 651 1604 .406 196 555 .353 388 541 .717 293 650 943 31.4 482 - 371 336 101 200 1886 62.9

minutes total 3-pts f-throws rebounds scoring ## Player GP GS Min Avg FG FGA Pct 3FG FGA Pct FT FTA Pct Off Def Tot Avg PF FO A TO Blk Stl Pts Avg 12 Terrell Stoglin 30 28 981 32.7 201 498 .404 83 220 .377 150 193 .777 16 86 102 3.4 64 0 56 68 3 19 635 21.2 14 Sean Mosley 30 30 974 32.5 95 241 .394 36 93 .387 85 101 .842 36 112 148 4.9 73 4 61 51 16 29 311 10.4 35 James Padgett 30 25 715 23.8 97 189 .513 0 0 .000 79 138 .572 103 77 180 6.0 56 0 17 44 10 3 273 9.1 05 Nick Faust 30 19 824 27.5 86 234 .368 21 77 .273 62 99 .626 24 96 120 4.0 66 3 63 75 8 30 255 8.5 21 Pe’Shon Howard 14 12 461 32.9 31 84 .369 10 37 .270 19 29 .655 1 51 52 3.7 25 0 52 45 2 12 91 6.5 25 Alex Len 20 9 428 21.4 49 84 .583 0 1 .000 26 45 .578 35 75 110 5.5 51 1 10 32 42 4 124 6.2 30 Ashton Pankey 30 17 606 20.2 51 119 .429 0 0 .000 36 65 .554 54 92 146 4.9 78 3 12 15 17 6 138 4.6 11 Mychal Parker 30 3 533 17.8 41 92 .446 7 28 .250 38 62 .613 26 64 90 3.0 46 1 26 39 8 14 127 4.2 10 Berend Weijs 30 7 343 11.4 26 53 .491 0 1 .000 7 20 .350 26 29 55 1.8 45 0 8 12 21 7 59 2.0 23 John Auslander 12 0 86 7.2 5 13 .385 1 4 .250 3 7 .429 1 5 6 0.5 14 0 2 5 0 0 14 1.2 24 Jonathan Thomas 16 0 80 5.0 5 16 .313 2 10 .200 3 5 .600 1 1 2 0.1 6 0 3 7 1 0 15 0.9 22 Jon Dillard 5 0 6 1.2 1 1 1.000 0 0 .000 0 1 .000 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0.4 13 Arnold Richmond 7 0 17 2.4 0 2 .000 0 0 .000 2 4 .500 0 3 3 0.4 1 0 1 2 0 0 2 0.3 15 Spencer Barks 7 0 12 1.7 0 2 .000 0 0 .000 1 2 .500 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.1 04 Jacob Susskind 5 0 9 1.8 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 0 2 2 0.4 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0.0 TM TEAM 43 41 84 2.8 2 4 0 Total 30 688 1628 .423 160 471 .340 511 771 .663 366 734 1100 36.7 528 12 311 400 128 124 2047 68.2 Opponents 30 755 1773 .426 183 555 .330 425 583 .729 352 695 1047 34.9 607 - 390 327 126 172 2118 70.6

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2011-12 Regular season box scores minutes total 3-pts f-throws rebounds scoring ## Player GP GS Min Avg FG FGA Pct 3FG FGA Pct FT FTA Pct Off Def Tot Avg PF FO A TO Blk Stl Pts Avg 29 29 969 33.4 132 296 .446 19 61 .311 94 118 .797 48 107 155 5.3 66 4 92 52 5 29 377 13.0 01 Durand Scott 35 Kenny Kadji 28 24 790 28.2 132 253 .522 28 60 .467 68 106 .642 53 104 157 5.6 64 4 20 45 48 16 360 12.9 03 Malcolm Grant 27 27 808 29.9 96 285 .337 61 187 .326 53 67 .791 3 60 63 2.3 32 0 54 48 0 21 306 11.3 42 Reggie Johnson 19 18 501 26.4 77 150 .513 4 9 .444 42 60 .700 46 87 133 7.0 60 1 30 31 18 12 200 10.5 04 Trey McKinney Jones 29 12 697 24.0 75 162 .463 36 96 .375 18 25 .720 17 89 106 3.7 62 1 40 39 2 20 204 7.0 Shane Larkin 28 15 694 24.8 55 159 .346 28 83 .337 52 60 .867 14 51 65 2.3 45 1 70 53 2 44 190 6.8 00 05 DeQuan Jones 19 2 337 17.7 46 95 .484 2 7 .286 26 41 .634 24 48 72 3.8 32 0 7 17 11 9 120 6.3 15 Rion Brown 27 0 496 18.4 53 129 .411 30 78 .385 30 40 .750 21 43 64 2.4 35 0 15 19 1 11 166 6.1 25 Garrius Adams 15 6 245 16.3 22 55 .400 15 39 .385 10 18 .556 9 27 36 2.4 17 1 13 13 1 9 69 4.6 21 Erik Swoope 20 8 260 13.0 22 45 .489 0 2 .000 8 16 .500 19 20 39 2.0 43 2 7 7 10 9 52 2.6 10 Raphael Akpejiori 19 3 139 7.3 13 25 .520 0 0 .000 10 17 .588 21 10 31 1.6 27 0 2 6 11 3 36 1.9 11 Ryan Quigtar 7 1 11 1.6 0 2 .000 0 1 .000 1 2 .500 1 0 1 0.1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.1 12 Justin Heller 6 0 3 0.5 0 2 .000 0 1 .000 0 0 .000 0 2 2 0.3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0.0 TM TEAM 45 45 90 3.1 0 13 0 Total 29 723 1658 .436 223 624 .357 412 570 .723 321 693 1014 35.0 483 14 351 344 109 183 2081 71.8 29 693 1652 .419 186 569 .327 363 540 .672 346 671 1017 35.1 513 - 368 377 105 184 1935 66.7 Opponents

minutes total 3-pts f-throws rebounds scoring ## Player GP GS Min Avg FG FGA Pct 3FG FGA Pct FT FTA Pct Off Def Tot Avg PF FO A TO Blk Stl Pts Avg 31 30 871 28.1 191 417 .458 40 101 .396 116 159 .730 64 94 158 5.1 54 0 32 56 11 33 538 17.4 40 Harrison Barnes 31 31 845 27.3 179 326 .549 0 0 .000 147 183 .803 120 168 288 9.3 81 1 30 58 44 33 505 16.3 44 Tyler Zeller 31 John Henson 31 30 921 29.7 188 371 .507 0 0 .000 63 124 .508 84 236 320 10.3 52 0 41 40 93 19 439 14.2 31 11 737 23.8 100 229 .437 56 145 .386 10 12 .833 54 96 150 4.8 35 0 33 31 6 20 266 8.6 35 Reggie Bullock 01 Dexter Strickland 19 19 461 24.3 57 100 .570 0 1 .000 28 42 .667 10 29 39 2.1 29 0 39 26 3 25 142 7.5 31 30 1018 32.8 77 180 .428 20 64 .313 50 70 .714 4 75 79 2.5 48 1 299 83 5 40 224 7.2 05 Kendall Marshall P.J. Hairston 30 0 382 12.7 48 157 .306 32 114 .281 44 51 .863 23 47 70 2.3 47 0 24 22 6 12 172 5.7 15 43 James Michael McAdoo 31 0 433 14.0 56 140 .400 0 0 .000 44 73 .603 37 76 113 3.6 46 0 8 22 8 18 156 5.0 31 1 192 6.2 15 34 .441 0 2 .000 6 15 .400 17 20 37 1.2 18 0 3 3 3 4 36 1.2 24 Justin Watts 20 0 99 5.0 8 17 .471 0 0 .000 1 11 .091 18 16 34 1.7 12 0 6 7 7 2 17 0.9 14 Desmond Hubert 27 0 111 4.1 4 18 .222 3 13 .231 8 18 .444 1 9 10 0.4 23 0 18 3 0 3 19 0.7 11 Stilman White Jackson Simmons 20 0 38 1.9 6 15 .400 0 0 .000 1 4 .250 6 10 16 0.8 1 0 1 2 1 1 13 0.7 21 22 David Dupont 19 1 28 1.5 3 10 .300 3 6 .500 1 2 .500 1 2 3 0.2 2 0 1 0 0 0 10 0.5 30 Patrick Crouch 20 1 35 1.8 3 10 .300 1 5 .200 2 4 .500 0 6 6 0.3 3 0 6 9 0 1 9 0.5 Stewart Cooper 19 1 29 1.5 2 4 .500 0 0 .000 1 3 .333 1 0 1 0.1 4 0 0 3 0 1 5 0.3 34 TEAM 57 37 94 3.0 1 3 0 TM Total 31 937 2028 .462 155 451 .344 522 771 .677 497 921 1418 45.7 456 2 541 368 187 212 2551 82.3 Opponents 31 769 1990 .386 226 721 .313 288 427 .674 357 711 1068 34.5 649 - 354 413 105 187 2052 66.2

minutes total 3-pts f-throws rebounds scoring ## Player GP GS Min Avg FG FGA Pct 3FG FGA Pct FT FTA Pct Off Def Tot Avg PF FO A TO Blk Stl Pts Avg 05 C.J. Leslie 28 23 798 28.5 152 296 .514 4 12 .333 93 150 .620 59 141 200 7.1 70 3 29 64 48 31 401 14.3 15 Scott Wood 30 28 981 32.7 112 263 .426 81 195 .415 74 80 .925 9 60 69 2.3 68 2 52 32 20 21 379 12.6 02 Lorenzo Brown 31 31 1043 33.6 139 310 .448 19 63 .302 91 122 .746 26 109 135 4.4 45 1 194 101 15 52 388 12.5 21 C.J. Williams 31 31 967 31.2 140 267 .524 29 83 .349 39 48 .813 53 65 118 3.8 76 2 56 42 13 35 348 11.2 01 Richard Howell 31 31 834 26.9 131 259 .506 0 1 .000 73 113 .646 108 179 287 9.3 102 5 37 60 9 30 335 10.8 00 DeShawn Painter 31 7 622 20.1 72 170 .424 0 1 .000 53 74 .716 51 88 139 4.5 72 1 11 29 21 7 197 6.4 03 Alex Johnson 31 0 614 19.8 45 128 .352 25 79 .316 30 39 .769 7 46 53 1.7 40 0 96 46 0 29 145 4.7 Tyler Harris 15 3 123 8.2 13 33 .394 2 5 .400 7 10 .700 5 14 19 1.3 18 0 8 11 0 2 35 2.3 34 14 Jordan Vandenberg 7 1 83 11.9 7 8 .875 0 0 .000 0 1 .000 7 12 19 2.7 14 0 6 4 5 0 14 2.0 25 Kendall Smith 5 0 11 2.2 2 3 .667 0 0 .000 4 6 .667 2 5 7 1.4 0 0 1 0 0 0 8 1.6 13 Thomas de Thaey 17 0 106 6.2 8 32 .250 2 13 .154 3 4 .750 9 10 19 1.1 10 0 7 6 1 2 21 1.2 30 Staats Battle 5 0 10 2.0 2 6 .333 2 6 .333 0 2 .000 1 2 3 0.6 1 0 1 0 0 0 6 1.2 10 Jaqawn Raymond 10 0 28 2.8 2 9 .222 2 9 .222 0 0 .000 1 3 4 0.4 4 0 0 1 0 0 6 0.6 20 Jay Lewis 2 0 3 1.5 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 0 0 0 0.0 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0.0 11 Patrick Johnson 1 0 2 2.0 0 1 .000 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 TM TEAM 46 42 88 2.8 2 1 0 Total 31 825 1785 .462 166 467 .355 467 649 .720 384 776 1160 37.4 524 14 499 398 132 209 2283 73.6 31 752 1800 .418 205 593 .346 414 583 .710 353 663 1016 32.8 546 - 346 381 110 203 2123 68.5 Opponents

74 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament


2011-12 Regular season box scores minutes total 3-pts f-throws rebounds scoring ## Player GP GS Min Avg FG FGA Pct 3FG FGA Pct FT FTA Pct Off Def Tot Avg PF FO A TO Blk Stl Pts Avg 30 30 930 31.0 200 349 .573 6 19 .316 131 161 .814 66 183 249 8.3 51 0 36 60 14 17 537 17.9 23 Mike Scott 12 Joe Harris 30 29 900 30.0 115 256 .449 47 119 .395 60 78 .769 29 89 118 3.9 61 1 53 44 11 22 337 11.2 13 Sammy Zeglinski 28 25 894 31.9 80 217 .369 57 162 .352 30 39 .769 6 88 94 3.4 51 1 73 48 3 43 247 8.8 01 Jontel Evans 30 30 907 30.2 89 189 .471 5 12 .417 35 57 .614 7 53 60 2.0 63 1 115 72 5 48 218 7.3 22 Malcolm Brogdon 28 1 626 22.4 63 159 .396 22 68 .324 40 50 .800 14 64 78 2.8 38 0 38 44 3 14 188 6.7 17 17 355 20.9 30 59 .508 0 0 .000 24 35 .686 21 42 63 3.7 51 0 6 18 15 6 84 4.9 05 Assane Sene 24 KT Harrell 11 5 208 18.9 17 54 .315 4 21 .190 14 20 .700 0 11 11 1.0 10 0 10 13 4 6 52 4.7 25 Akil Mitchell 30 13 635 21.2 46 94 .489 0 0 .000 25 49 .510 33 91 124 4.1 70 1 25 25 9 19 117 3.9 32 Darion Atkins 25 0 268 10.7 25 42 .595 0 0 .000 11 19 .579 23 39 62 2.5 45 1 3 4 19 12 61 2.4 34 James Johnson 6 0 37 6.2 0 3 .000 0 0 .000 9 16 .563 2 6 8 1.3 8 0 2 3 0 0 9 1.5 02 Paul Jesperson 19 0 190 10.0 11 37 .297 6 27 .222 0 0 .000 1 15 16 0.8 17 0 5 8 1 3 28 1.5 00 Doug Browman 10 0 33 3.3 4 6 .667 3 5 .600 1 2 .500 1 3 4 0.4 6 0 5 1 0 3 12 1.2 11 Rob Vozenilek 7 0 17 2.4 0 5 .000 0 0 .000 1 2 .500 0 0 0 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0.1 21 Angus Mitchell 4 0 6 1.5 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0.0 30 Thomas Rogers 7 0 19 2.7 0 6 .000 0 6 .000 0 0 .000 0 3 3 0.4 3 0 1 1 0 0 0 0.0 TEAM 38 44 82 2.7 0 2 0 TM Total 30 680 1476 .461 150 439 .342 381 528 .722 241 731 972 32.4 475 5 372 343 85 194 1891 63.0 Opponents 30 581 1486 .391 140 477 .294 295 460 .641 251 628 879 29.3 501 - 241 390 73 178 1597 53.2

minutes total 3-pts f-throws rebounds scoring ## Player GP GS Min Avg FG FGA Pct 3FG FGA Pct FT FTA Pct Off Def Tot Avg PF FO A TO Blk Stl Pts Avg 29 28 998 34.4 160 361 .443 39 104 .375 84 105 .800 18 75 93 3.2 50 0 82 44 4 40 443 15.3 11 Erick Green 05 Dorenzo Hudson 31 24 904 29.2 109 275 .396 32 98 .327 84 104 .808 26 60 86 2.8 43 0 50 60 3 22 334 10.8 31 Jarell Eddie 31 30 853 27.5 91 209 .435 52 116 .448 55 64 .859 17 140 157 5.1 98 4 44 45 14 16 289 9.3 Victor Davila 25 25 572 22.9 74 130 .569 0 0 .000 40 62 .645 36 70 106 4.2 66 2 16 36 15 10 188 7.5 14 01 Robert Brown 31 4 684 22.1 73 206 .354 33 105 .314 26 42 .619 12 46 58 1.9 59 0 60 43 11 24 205 6.6 15 Dorian Finney-Smith 31 28 885 28.5 64 191 .335 24 66 .364 42 71 .592 82 130 212 6.8 86 2 57 55 23 21 194 6.3 .000 24 48 .500 57 64 121 3.9 76 3 13 24 24 22 180 5.8 04 Cadarian Raines 31 7 560 18.1 78 149 .523 0 0 21 Tyrone Garland 8 1 86 10.8 13 26 .500 2 9 .222 9 12 .750 3 1 4 0.5 8 0 10 10 0 3 37 4.6 1 356 11.9 30 68 .441 0 0 .000 27 36 .750 37 44 81 2.7 28 0 9 12 8 8 87 2.9 42 C.J. Barksdale 30 10 Marquis Rankin 23 6 317 13.8 22 65 .338 9 23 .391 8 13 .615 7 19 26 1.1 32 1 26 27 3 10 61 2.7 Will Johnston 3 0 8 2.7 1 3 .333 1 3 .333 0 0 .000 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1.0 25 Joey Racer 6 1 17 2.8 1 8 .125 0 3 .000 0 0 .000 2 2 4 0.7 1 0 0 4 0 0 2 0.3 24 02 Joey van Zegeren 3 0 10 3.3 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 0 0 0 0.0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0.0 TEAM 47 47 94 3.0 0 10 0 TM 31 716 1691 .423 192 527 .364 399 557 .716 344 698 1042 33.6 549 12 367 370 106 176 2023 65.3 Total 31 690 1653 .417 142 506 .281 412 594 .694 360 699 1059 34.2 514 - 317 395 124 161 1934 62.4 Opponents

minutes total 3-pts f-throws rebounds scoring ## Player GP GS Min Avg FG FGA Pct 3FG FGA Pct FT FTA Pct Off Def Tot Avg PF FO A TO Blk Stl Pts Avg 11 C.J. Harris 29 29 1018 35.1 148 309 .479 48 111 .432 143 167 .856 15 75 90 3.1 70 1 72 71 2 31 487 16.8 30 Travis McKie 30 30 1034 34.5 167 354 .472 31 83 .373 111 152 .730 69 139 208 6.9 70 1 33 71 18 25 476 15.9 01 Tony Chennault 30 30 905 30.2 99 241 .411 12 46 .261 68 105 .648 26 72 98 3.3 83 2 85 66 1 30 278 9.3 25 Nikita Mescheriakov 30 30 768 25.6 78 212 .368 16 74 .216 60 82 .732 21 95 116 3.9 96 3 51 54 5 15 232 7.7 10 Chase Fischer 30 3 795 26.5 62 176 .352 39 122 .320 32 39 .821 10 56 66 2.2 37 1 46 31 1 23 195 6.5 33 Carson Desrosiers 30 15 636 21.2 55 120 .458 12 31 .387 26 43 .605 22 112 134 4.5 75 4 23 23 59 12 148 4.9 40 Ty Walker 20 13 398 19.9 38 79 .481 0 0 .000 8 10 .800 27 64 91 4.6 21 0 12 23 52 7 84 4.2 Daniel Green 26 0 183 7.0 9 26 .346 0 0 .000 16 28 .571 11 32 43 1.7 31 0 4 13 3 3 34 1.3 04 02 Anthony Fields 23 0 210 9.1 8 32 .250 1 11 .091 7 12 .583 1 12 13 0.6 13 0 24 19 0 7 24 1.0 45 Ryan Keenan 13 0 19 1.5 2 5 .400 2 3 .667 0 0 .000 1 4 5 0.4 1 0 1 1 0 0 6 0.5 41 Brooks Godwin 10 0 16 1.6 1 5 .200 0 0 .000 2 4 .500 2 5 7 0.7 1 0 0 0 0 1 4 0.4 43 Aaron Ingle 9 0 13 1.4 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 1 2 .500 0 1 1 0.1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0.1 52 Doug Niedrich 1 0 1 1.0 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 0 0 0 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 42 Spencer Jennings 3 0 4 1.3 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 0 1 1 0.3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0.0 TM TEAM 51 46 97 3.2 0 9 0 Total 30 667 1559 .428 161 481 .335 474 644 .736 256 714 970 32.3 499 12 352 383 141 155 1969 65.6 Opponents 30 760 1738 .437 214 602 .355 366 532 .688 360 726 1086 36.2 575 - 399 363 139 193 2100 70.0

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Acc Tourna

Single Game - One Team Most Points

114 112 109 109

Wake Forest vs. Georgia Tech (112) Georgia Tech vs. Wake Forest (114) Maryland vs. NC State (108) Virginia vs. Duke (66)

Most Field Goals Made 47 45 45 45 44 44

(att. 77) (att. 80) (att. 86) (att. 102) (att. 88) (att. 80)

Maryland vs. NC State NC State vs. Virginia Wake Forest vs. North Carolina NC State vs. Maryland Duke vs. Wake Forest NC State vs. Maryland

Highest Free Throw Percentage

2OT 2007 FR 2OT 2007 FR 3OT 1978 QF 1983 QF

OT 1974 F 1965 QF OT 1975 QF 3OT 1978 QF 1966 QF OT 1974 F

1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 .958 .957 .957

(22-22) NC State vs. Maryland 1965 SF (14-14) NC State vs. North Carolina 1987 F (12-12) North Carolina vs. Georgia Tech 1985 F (11-11) Wake Forest vs. Maryland 2001 QF (11-11) Florida State vs. Wake Forest 2003 QF (23-24) North Carolina vs. NC State 2007 F (22-23) Maryland vs. Wake Forest OT 1954 SF (22-23) North Carolina vs. Maryland 1989 SF

Most Rebounds

73 Duke vs. South Carolina 68 Wake Forest vs. Virginia 67 NC State vs. Clemson 67 Duke vs. South Carolina

Most Blocked Shots

Highest Field Goal Percentage .717 .700 .667

(33-46) Duke vs. North Carolina (14-20) Clemson vs. South Carolina (22-33) Virginia vs. North Carolina

1980 SF 1970 QF 1982 F

Most Assists

Most 3-Point Field Goals Made 17 16 16 15

(att. 29) (att. 27) (att. 23) (att. 34)

Duke vs. Clemson 2000 FR Wake Forest vs. Duke 1995 QF Wake Forest vs. Georgia Tech 2OT 2007 FR Wake Forest vs. North Carolina OT 1995 F

Highest 3-Point Field Goal Percentage

1.000 .722 .696

(5-5) Virginia vs. Georgia Tech (13-18) NC State vs. Virginia (16-23) Wake Forest vs. Georgia Tech

13 Georgia Tech vs. Virginia 12 Duke vs. Virginia 1999 FR (104-67) 11 Clemson vs. Maryland 11 Duke vs. Clemson 11 Duke vs. Virginia 2004 QF (84-74)

26 North Carolina vs. Clemson 25 Maryland vs. Florida State 24 Wake Forest vs. North Carolina 24 Clemson vs. Maryland 24 Wake Forest vs. Duke 24 Clemson vs. North Carolina 24 North Carolina vs. Duke 24 North Carolina vs. Maryland 24 Duke vs. NC State 2002 F (91-61)

40 37 37 37 35 35

(att. 52) Maryland vs. North Carolina (att. 42) NC State vs. Duke (att. 47) Wake Forest vs. NC State (att. 47) North Carolina vs. Clemson (att. 44) North Carolina vs. Virginia (att. 47) Virginia vs. Clemson

76 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

1992 QF (68-56) 1992 FR (75-81) 1994 QF (77-64)

2001 QF (99-81) 2000 QF (82-61) 1955 QF (95-82) 1980 SF (85-91) 1982 QF (88-53) 1984 QF (66-78) 1992 F (74-94) 1993 QF (102-66)

1983 SF 2002 QF 2OT 2007 FR

Most Steals

Most Free Throws Made

1955 QF (83-67) 1962 QF (81-58) 1955 QF (101-76) 1961 SF (92-75)

1958 F 1956 SF 1960 SF 2005 QF 1956 QF 1989 QF

17 Wake Forest vs. Virginia 16 Virginia vs. Georgia Tech 16 Florida State vs. NC State 16 Maryland vs. North Carolina 16 Maryland vs. Georgia Tech 15 Clemson vs. Duke 1977 QF (82-74) 15 Maryland vs. Florida State 15 Duke vs. Clemson 2000 FR (94-63) 15 Boston College vs. Maryland

1984 QF (63-51) 1981 QF (76-47) 1992 QF (93-80) 2003 QF (72-84) 2010 QF (64-69) 1999 QF (93-69) 2008 FR (71-68)


ment records Individual - Single Game Most Points - Any Game 45 42 41 41

Lennie Rosenbluth, North Carolina vs. Clemson Buzz Wilkinson, Virginia vs. Duke Grady Wallace, South Carolina vs. Duke Charles Scott, North Carolina vs. Virginia

Most Field Goals Made

19 18 17 17

(att. 31) (att. 25) (att. 23) (att. 25)

Lennie Rosenbluth, North Carolina vs. Clemson Tommy Burleson, NC State vs. Maryland Charles Scott, North Carolina vs. Duke Albert King, Maryland vs. Clemson

Most 3-Point Field Goals Made

9 8 8 7

(att. 17) (att. 11) (att. 12) (att. 13)

Randolph Childress, Wake Forest vs. No. Carolina Mark Price, Georgia Tech vs. Virginia Randolph Childress, Wake Forest vs. Duke Will Solomon, Clemson vs. North Carolina

Most Free Throws Made 17 16 15 15 15

(att. 21) (att. 22) (att. 18) (att. 17) (att. 18)

Charles Scott, North Carolina vs. Virginia Buzz Wilkinson, Virginia vs. Duke Dickie Hemric, Wake Forest vs. North Carolina Grady Wallace, South Carolina vs. Duke Phil Ford, North Carolina vs. Clemson

Most Rebounds - Any Game

23 22 21 21 21

John Richter, NC State vs. South Carolina Tim Duncan, Wake Forest vs. Georgia Tech Ronnie Shavlik, NC State vs. Duke Lee Shaffer, North Carolina vs. Clemson Kenny Carr, NC State vs. Maryland

Most Blocked Shots

10 8 7

Cherokee Parks, Duke vs. Clemson Sharone Wright, Clemson vs. Maryland Matt Geiger, Georgia Tech vs. Virginia

1957 QF 1954 QF 1957 QF 1970 QF

1957 QF OT 1974 F 1969 F 1980 SF

OT 1995 F 1983 SF 1995 QF 2001 QF

Most Assists

15 13 13 13 12

Ishmael Smith, Wake Forest vs. Georgia Tech Larry Brown, North Carolina vs. South Carolina Bobby Hurley, Duke vs. Maryland Drew Barry, Georgia Tech vs. Clemson John Johnson, Virginia vs. North Carolina

Most Steals

9 7 7 7 7 7 7 6

Justin Gainey, NC State vs. Virginia Dudley Bradley, North Carolina vs. Duke Othell Wilson, Virginia vs. Wake Forest Walt Williams, Maryland vs. North Carolina Christian Laettner, Duke vs. North Caroilna Jarrett Jack, Georgia Tech vs. NC State Jamon Gordon, Virginia Tech vs. Wake Forest Eight players

2OT 2007 FR 1963 QF 1992 SF 1993 SF 2OT 1987 SF

2000 QF 1979 F 1984 SF 1989 SF 1992 F 2003 QF 2007 QF

1970 QF 1954 QF 1955 QF 1957 QF OT 1975 SF

OT 1959 QF (75-72) 1996 F (75-74) 1955 F (87-77) 1959 QF (93-69) 1977 QF (82-72)

1994 QF 1992 FR 1992 QF

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Acc

Hall of Champions

L

ocated in the western portion of the Greensboro Coliseum Complex’s Special Events Center, the ACC Hall of Champions opened on March 3, 2011. The ACC Hall of Champions celebrates past, present and future conference success through the design and use of interactive displays, unique institutional exhibits and multipurpose program space that showcases the league’s 58 years. The Hall features a combination of content that honors the academic and athletic accomplishments and highlights the ACC’s continuing promise of a “Tradition of Excellence…Then, Now and Always”. Highlights include: • Four-foot, 360-degree, state-of-the-art video globe that will amaze and delight guests with a unique, multi-media display of conference highlights • Historical timeline of the ACC’s founding in Greensboro, NC in 1953 through today that highlight the early years, media, integration, academics, ACC Championships , women’s sports and expansion • Historical memorabilia cases that highlight Football, Men’s Basketball, Women’s Basketball and the 2009-10 NCAA Championships • Individual member school kiosks including historical artifacts • Photos of all current ACC Champions and interactive video display with highlight videos • Life-size ACC school mascot exhibits • A “You Call the Play” interactive broadcasting booth • Interactive multi-player ACC trivia and take down your ACC rival • And much more memorabilia, trophies and historical event photos.

For more information, visit ACCHallofChampions.net theACC.com

79


The ACC

Lights Up Atlanta

By Matt Winkeljohn

As lessons go, this one was instructional without being particularly painful. After two numerically impressive ventures into the Georgia Dome, the ACC Tournament’s Atlanta edition returns to a conventional basketball facility in 2012. Philips Arena sits on the footprint of the old Omni and promises to heed core supporters’ suggestions that while big is cool, it isn’t always obligatory. The ACC Tournament averaged 36,505 fans per session with a total of 182,525 attendees in 2001, setting NCAA records in the process. The second-highest totals in NCAA history came when the ACC was in the Dome in ’09 (26,352 and 158,112). “The feedback that we have continued to get from our fans, our donors, people associated with the tournament ... has been that having our tournament in a traditional-size arena was the best thing for us in terms of protecting the

80 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

tournament brand and having the kind of atmosphere and environment that we want to have,” ACC Commissioner John Swofford said when announcing that Philips would be home to this year’s tournament. The Dome, which played host to the 2002 and 2007 Final Fours and will play host to the Big Dance again next year, can be grand, but when the ACC last visited something was missing: the warm and fuzzy feelings. So when Atlanta officials bid in 2009 to host the event again, their bid substituted Philips for the Dome. Philips may not be the ACC’s most common home, as the Greensboro Coliseum played host to the past two conference tournaments and will host the next three, but when Swofford announced the decision, he said the conference had a more homey feel in mind. “This was a visceral kind of decision,” he explained. “Playing in Philips Arena provides our teams and fans with


Record-setting crowd at 2001 ACC Tournament a more traditional and intimate environment. That’s an important market for us, an important city for us.” The ACC’s five previous tournament stops in Atlanta (the first three were staged in the old Omni, precursor to Philips) have been good to the conference. In three of those seasons, the eventual NCAA champion came from the ACC. NC State won the conference tournament in the Omni in 1983 before its storybook ride to the title. Duke won both championships in 2001. Eight years later, Duke claimed the conference crown and North Carolina seized the NCAA championship. Georgia Tech won the ‘85 ACC tournament in the Omni, and North Carolina won it there in ‘89. “The [conference] tournament [champion], that’s really who’s recognized as the ACC champ,” said Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski. “In the last 20 years or so, I think I’ve put a little more emphasis on the tournament. The tournament . . . is like the showcase event.” Atlanta is certainly not new to the big time. The city has played host to two Super Bowls, an Olympiad, several World Series, three men’s Final Fours, one women’s Final Four and more. “We’ve got over 10,000 hotel rooms within eight blocks [of Philips],” said Atlanta Sports Council vice president Ken Chin. “When you look at shopping, hotels, restaurants and other attractions within walking distance . . . and given the number of ACC alums in metro Atlanta, and the access that Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport gives, we’re we think we’re well positioned to host this event. “We know that the ACC has a great home in Greensboro, but when they decide to go on the road, we’d love for them to come to Atlanta.”

Only Krzyzewski (32 years as an ACC head coach), Florida State’s Leonard Hamilton (10), North Carolina’s Roy Williams (nine) and Virginia Tech’s Seth Greenberg (eight) have been to Atlanta as head coaches for ACC Tournaments. The rest of the league’s coaches are fairly (or very) new to the league. Eight of 12 coaches have arrived since the tournament last came to town. Georgia Tech (Brian Gregory), Miami (Jim Larranaga), NC State (Mark Gottfried) and Maryland (Mark Turgeon) have new coaches this season. Last season, Boston College’s Steve Donahue, Wake Forest’s Jeff Bzdelik and Clemson’s Brad Brownell debuted in the ACC. Virginia’s Tony Bennett is in his third campaign. They’ll all be new to Philips, which opened in 1999 with a basketball seating capacity of 18,729. “I think it’s good to move it around to expose our product to different parts of the country,” Hamilton said. “I think it’s nothing but good.” No newcomer will more welcome the opportunity to play in Philips than Tech’s Gregory. The Yellow Jackets’ campus is a mile from the Arena, and Tech played many of its “home” games there this season while the Jackets’ place is being renovated. “Atlanta’s a world-class city,” Gregory said. “The more people that come to Atlanta, and the more people who talk about the ACC, the better.”

2002 NCAA Champions Maryland

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Acc Scores With Service

League’s Players and Teams Lend Helping Hands

Tanner’s Greatest Assists are All for Kids By Will Vandervort The cameras were not even on, but fortunately for the kids at the Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Scottish Rite Hospital, Tanner Smith was on. Though he was handing out his now famous Tanner’s Totes in front of the glitz and glamour of a Koops Production crew shooting for ABC, Smith, a starting guard on the Clemson men’s basketball team, took extra time to visit with each child whether the cameras were rolling or not. Smith talked to the patients at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta as if they were his own family or dearest friend. He listened to them as he shared a few laughs and hugs along the way. “The emotion you get in a place like that is unmatched,” Smith said. “I don’t think you can compare it to anything else. You get swarmed by every possible emotion. You are feeling for these kids that are going through a tough time, but at the same time you’re happy that they are excited they got a Tanner’s Tote. “You can see hope in their eyes. You can see it in the family. They are so appreciative. You can see how much the kids are fighting to live, so the emotions are all over the place. It is amazing. To be there, to help out and make them smile for at least a little while is exactly why we do Tanner’s Totes.” And that’s why Koops Production chose Smith, Tanner’s Totes and his story for a television show called Everyday Health. Mark Koops, the creator and executive producer of the hit television series The Biggest Loser, is the executive producer of Everyday Health TV series. Everyday Health, Inc. co-founders, Ben Wolin, CEO, and Mike Keriakos, President, are co-producing. Everyday Health is one of six original, HD programs comprising Litton’s Weekend Adventure premiering Saturday mornings in most markets following Good Morning America. The show is hosted by Laila Ali, a world-class, elite athlete, Ethan Zohn, a former professional soccer player and humanitarian, and Jenna Morasca, champion of Survivor: The Amazon. “I have the best job in the world. I get to travel the country and find the most inspirational people and help share their story with the world,” said Zohn, who hung out with Smith and his family in his hometown of Alpharetta. “Tanner and his story with Tanner’s Totes is a slam dunk.” The show’s altruistic message hits close to home for Zohn, the former champion of Survivor: Africa, who used his million dollar prize money to co-found a non-profit organization in 2002. Zohn was then diagnosed with CD 20+ Hodgkin’s Lymphoma in 2009, and Jenna Morasca, his long-time girlfriend, was thrust into the position of being his caregiver. “I know if I got one of Tanner’s Totes, things would have been a little bit different,” Zohn said. “There are days when you just want to give up.

82 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

You feel miserable. You can’t eat, you can’t sleep and your hair is falling out. You are tired, but if I got one of those tote bags, it would have changed things. “I really respect what he is doing.” Smith used the three days of filming with ABC as another opportunity to raise money for Tanner’s Totes. According to his parents, Craig and Kathy Smith, more than $6,500 was raised for Tanner’s Totes during the time in which the production crew was in the Atlanta area. “It has been just amazing,” said Kathy Smith, Tanner’s mother. During their time at the Smith household in Alpharetta, the crew captured Smith telling the story of how Tanner’s Totes began, showed him filling tote bags, showed a fund raising event at his old high school, and then showed him handing out totes to the patients at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. “The show is looking for exactly the title, `Everyday Health Heroes.’ We are looking for people who have noticed something in their community that needed to be done, and then went out and made a difference,” said Kristen Alexander, one of the show’s producers. “When we found out about Tanner and what he was doing, his social consciousness was so impressive, so we had to come here and meet him.” Though the extra media coverage is good for Smith, his family and the Clemson men’s basketball team, Smith appreciates what the show is doing because it gives Tanner’s Totes a chance to expand its horizons. And that means it gives a sick little boy or girl, who is in desperate need of cheer, a reason to smile. “That’s why we do it,” Smith said. “It is really a special moment.”


Leadership Runs Deep By Ira Schoffel His garnet-and-gold uniform keeps Bernard James awash in cheers during Florida State home games. But it’s the camouflage uniform he hung up four years ago that keeps him in good standing when the Seminoles go on the road. James, who served six years in the U.S. Air Force before pursuing a college basketball career, sounds almost surprised when asked about the kind treatment he has received on campuses around the ACC. “I think they must know my story,” James said. “It seems like I get heckled the least out of anybody. There’s plenty of ammo, especially with me being older. There’s a lot of grandpa jokes to go around. And they really don’t heckle me very much. I think that might be a product of my background.” James is indeed older. After his years in the Air Force and two more at Tallahassee (Fla.) Community College, the 6-10 power forward now is a 27-year-old senior. And while he admits he still has plenty to learn about the game – he didn’t even play in high school and was only noticed by college recruiters after he excelled on an armed-forces all-star team – James has blossomed into a star for the Seminoles. He is Florida State’s top scoring option in the paint, one of the ACC’s top rebounders, and he also is among the ACC’s leaders in blocked shots. “What he brings to the court is maturity, first of all,” Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski said. “He’s a man. He’s 27 years old, has been through quite a bit. There’s nobody in our league who brings more maturity to the court than he does – physical, mental, emotional. “Then his skill set. He’s a tremendous shot-blocker and offensive rebounder and a very unselfish, outstanding player. In other words, he’s all about what the team is doing. Everybody in our league would want him on their team.’’ James also is, of course, a media darling. During his two years in the league, James has been profiled by countless newspapers, magazines, websites and television stations. And he said it never gets old. “I feel like I’m bringing some honor and recognition to the Air Force,” said James, who served stints in Iraq and Qatar. “I’m proud of the fact that I served, and I’m proud of the other men and women that are still in the armed services. I really enjoy the fact that people and the media are so interested in my military history.” Given his success at the ACC level, James now has his sights set on a professional basketball career. But if that doesn’t pan out, he will finish his degree and consider returning to the Air Force as an officer. “It made me the man I am today,” he said.

Cane Nation – Everybody Needs a Hero In Coach Jim Larranaga’s first year with the University of Miami men’s basketball team, his players began to build lasting relationships with the Coral Gables community. Through the 2011 Cane Nation Basketball Shootout, the UM basketball team offered individual hoops instruction and heroes all at once to boys in grades K-6. For four weeks throughout the fall, Cane Nation provided boys the unique opportunity to interact with the University of Miami basketball players in a true basketball setting during pre-season workouts. This once-in-a-lifetime experience offered youngsters the thrill of spending quality time with their basketball heroes. After the Miami players-turned-coaches drafted their teams, the UM guys taught the young Canes the fundamentals of individual and team basketball and guided their teams through three games each weekend. “When I was a youngster, I loved following college basketball,” said Larranaga. “It was a real thrill for me to meet college players. They were my heroes.”

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Deacons Build Foundations in the Community Giving back to the community through Habitat for Humanity means a little more to Wake Forest guard C.J. Harris. Harris, who also grew up in Winston-Salem, says that helping build houses this past fall was something very worthwhile. “It felt good to do something like that and truly give back to the community,” Harris said. “And it’s in my hometown so helping with Habitat was nice.” Harris said it was exciting work and he spent a lot of time on a roof. The Deacons, along with the coaching staff, spent about six hours one afternoon helping to build a house. “It was exciting and we’ve done this every year and I look forward to it because it gets you out of your element,” Harris said. “I’m not used to building houses but it was a satisfying experience. It was a great experience and we got to bond with the team.” It wasn’t just the basketball teams at Wake Forest that helped work on several houses near the Wake Forest campus. Five more teams have been donating their time throughout the year to helped build houses for lowincome families. Habitat for Humanity in Forsyth County brings together community partners and volunteers to help qualified families construct and buy wellbuilt homes and helps them become successful homeowners. The women’s volleyball team, the men’s soccer team, the women’s tennis team as well as the baseball team and the track and field athletes have all given their time. What made the work more enjoyable for Wake Forest center Carson Desrosiers was he got to meet one of the families. He said he made sure teammates didn’t slack off in their work. “Meeting the family that was actually going to live in the house was kind of a cool experience,” he said. “It made us think that we can’t sit around or goof around. We’re building this for that family. It made us work that much harder.” Desrosiers said he’ll remember helping out a family for a long time. “We literally just impacted somebody’s life and you can’t say that with too many things nowadays,” he said.

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Pack Helps Heal Homeless By John Dell Before the season started the NC State Wolfpack had a life lesson that was very worthwhile, according to guard Scott Wood. After a September intra-squad scrimmage, Coach Mark Gottfried took the entire team about three miles from campus to The Healing Place, a non-profit alcohol and drug rehabilitation facility for the homeless. “We were shown around and talked to some of the people that were there and they shared some of their stories,” Wood said. “A lot of them are trying to turn their lives around and it really kind of puts some perspective out there to what we are doing. We are playing basketball and going to a major university, but these people are trying to get back on their feet.” This was the second-straight year the Wolfpack visited The Healing Place, a 279-bed facility. Two years ago Chris Corchiani, a former Wolfpack All-America, got involved in the facility and wanted to get the current Wolfpack team involved as well. The Wolfpack spent nearly an hour at the facility getting a tour. Gottfried told those at the facility: “It’s a privilege for our players to be here. Just like you root for us, we’re pulling for you and you have our support.” For those are treated at The Healing Place, 70 percent of them leave

clean and sober and will hopefully go on to lead productive lives. “It was inspiring to meet those people and to hear their stories whether it was drug addiction or alcohol abuse,” Wood said. “They are trying to pull themselves up and you can’t help but hope they all make it.” Corchiani, a 1991 graduate of NC State, said the visit by the Wolfpack was beneficial. “We put on this event to raise awareness,” he said. “Having the NC State men’s basketball team here is a boost for it.”

Heels Provide Special Experience By John Dell Taking time out to work with Special Olympics athletes during the heart of the ACC season wasn’t hard at all for the North Carolina Tar Heels. For the ninth straight year, since Roy Williams was hired as head coach, the Tar Heels put in a clinic for the athletes. It’s something Williams loves doing and the players are also glad to give back. “People look up to us as Carolina basketball players and it feels good to be able to give something back,” said forward John Henson. “We know we’re more fortunate than some and it’s good to keep that in mind.” During the middle of January the Tar Heels put on the two-hour clinic at the Dean E. Smith Center. There were more than 100 Special Olympics athletes who took part in the clinic. “Seeing the smiles on the faces of the Special Olympians when we’re out there teaching them and having fun is a special feeling,” Henson said. “The Special Olympics clinic is one of my favorite things about being a Tar Heel player.” Other athletic teams at North Carolina have also put on clinics for the Special Olympics through the years. Williams, who has won two national championships since returning to North Carolina as head coach, says reaching out to the community is an important part of his program. “One thing I’ve told my players ever since returning to Carolina was that we want to build not just a team, but a program,” Williams said. “Part of building a program is reaching out to the community off the court. “I want our players to realize there is more than basketball in the world and our Special Olympics clinic is one good way to do that.”

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Upholding A Tradition of Excellence ACC Coaches Continue a Heritage of Success

By Patrick Stevens

F

Eight of the league’s 12 coaches were hired within the last three years, including four who will make their ACC Tournament debuts at Philips Arena in Atlanta. One brings Final Four experience with him, the first coach to join the league with a trip to college basketball’s final weekend since Roy Williams. Miami’s Jim Larranaga guided George Mason to the 2006 Final Four and is closing in on 500 career victories in his 28-year career. But don’t think Larranaga is entirely new to the ACC Tournament; he was an assistant at Virginia from 1979 to 1986 and coached in the championship game in 1982 and 1983 the latter trip the first time the event was held in Atlanta.

or decades, ACC basketball has been defined not only by its success but also by the coaches who helped engineer those triumphs. None was anonymous. All had incomparable styles. Most could be easily identified by first name or, barring that, a simplistic nickname. Dean. Norm. Lefty. Jimmy V. Coach K. Gary. Roy. All have left an indelible mark on the conference, as have the likes of Everett Case, Terry Holland and Bobby Cremins. But nothing entirely remains the same. With Gary Williams retiring last year after 22 seasons, two Final Fours and a national championship at Maryland, the conference is left with only one coach 2011-12 ACC Coaches and ACC Commissioner John Swofford (Duke’s Mike Krzyzewski) who has been on the job in the ACC for more than 10 years. Krzyzewski, of course, has four national championships and 13 ACC Tournament titles to his name. North Carolina’s Roy Williams has two NCAA Tournament titles and a pair of ACC Tournament crowns during his time in Chapel Hill. Those are the mainstays, of course, but his year’s ACC Tournament will showcase some fresh faces among the conference’s coaching ranks.

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The other newcomers have enjoyed postseason success as well. NC State’s Mark Gottfried has reinvigorated the Wolfpack in his first season and has the team in contention for an NCAA bid. That’s nothing new for the former UCLA assistant, who took Murray State (two) and Alabama (five) to a combined seven NCAA Tournaments --- including the 2004 Elite Eight with the Crimson Tide. Meanwhile, Maryland coach Mark Turgeon is no stranger to advancing in the NCAA Tournament, either. He led Wichita State to the Sweet 16 in 2006 --- where the Shockers met Larranaga’s Mason team and collected 97 victories in four years at Texas A&M. There’s also a pre-coaching pedigree; he played on the Kansas team that Krzyzewski defeated in his first Final Four appearance in 1986. Georgia Tech’s Brian Gregory also

has a postseason tie to a current ACC coaching legend. One of his highlights at Dayton during an eight-season stint was the 2010 NIT title. The team the Flyers beat to cap the run? Roy Williams-led North Carolina. For now, all four newcomers are still establishing themselves as newcomers. But it’s possible any of them will emerge as coaches fans will know on a first-name basis. An impressive showing in the ACC Tournament would certainly be a good start for making that happen.

Celebrating Williams’ Championship Career By Patrick Stevens

The career of one of the ACC’s greatest coaches ended last year. His legacy, though, will remain visible for some time to come. Maryland’s Gary Williams retired in May after 22 seasons in College Park and 33 overall. On Jan. 25, the school publicly dedicated Gary Williams Court before the Terrapins’ game against Duke at Comcast Center. “I think it’s something you never thought would happen,” Williams said. “You just coach. You don’t think of things like that. The idea that the board of regents and people like that gave it the OK certainly means a lot.” Williams completed his career with

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a 668-380 record, including a 461252 mark at Maryland. His crowning achievement was the 2002 national championship, though he also reached the 2001 Final Four, won the 2004 ACC tournament, was twice the ACC coach of the year (2002 and 2010), is the ACC’s third-winning coach (behind Dean Smith and Mike Krzyzewski) and built the Terps back from the program’s darkest days. “Gary has been an iconic figure in the ACC,” ACC Commissioner John Swofford said. “His resurrection of the Maryland program to national championship status was huge, not only for the University of Maryland, but the Atlantic Coast Conference as well.”


By John Dell It seems as if Coach Mike Krzyzewski of Duke reaches another milestone after every victory, but when you have as many wins as he does, it shouldn’t be a surprise. Coach K was at it again this season as he became the all-time NCAA Division I leader in victories among men’s coaches. It was rather appropriate that Krzyzewski broke his mentor Bob Knight’s mark for most victories in New York City’s Madison Square Garden, where Krzyzewski played several games for Knight while at Army. With the record-breaker early in the season and with Knight doing the broadcast on ESPN, the accomplishment took on even greater significance. Countless former Krzyzewski players also made the game. After shaking hands with Coach Tom Izzo of Michigan State after the 74-69 victory Krzyzewski, went to press row and embraced Knight. He also made sure to find his wife of 42 years, Mickie, and he shared in the moment with her and the rest of his family. Krzyzewski, who has four national championships, tried to downplay the significance of passing Knight with victory 903, but that wasn’t going to happen. “Maybe now they’ll take specials of me off TV,” he said after the milestone win. “I’m getting tired of watching me

on TV. But the kids see that and they put some pressure on them.” Krzyzewski was aware that there was plenty of pressure to win in front of his mentor. “I want to thank the basketball gods for allowing Coach (Knight) to be here, you know, for this moment,” Krzyzewski said. “To have the two of us together because you don’t know this would happen. That was really a good thing for the two of us to be together tonight.” In more than three decades as a coach at both Army and Duke, perhaps Coach K’s biggest quality is his ability to adapt to the changing generation of players. With the pressure of coaching making it harder and harder to sustain excellence Krzyzewski’s accomplishments and greatness will likely not seen for a long time. Thanks to the NBA strike, several of his former players made it to Madison Square Garden. Shane Battier said: “It’s just amazing to be here on this night to see the culmination of this work ... He’s ageless. He looks great, and he looks the same as when I was a freshman.” Krzyzewski has become an expert at keeping things fresh in his coaching style and his commitment to Duke. “There’s no reason to think he won’t be around for many years to come,” Battier said.

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Mason Plumlee

A tradition of By David Teel

T

yler Zeller knows balance sheets as well as stat sheets. Mason Plumlee added a second major after visiting the Great Wall. Tanner Smith chose his academic path to enhance his charitable foundation. Say hello to three of ACC Basketball’s academic beacons and the latest examples of the conference’s time-honored commitment to the student-athlete. Last month, North Carolina’s Zeller, Duke’s Plumlee and Clemson’s Smith earned Academic All-District honors from the College Sports Information Directors of America. Zeller and Plumlee then made CoSIDA’s first-team Academic All-America, with Zeller named the Academic All-American of the Year. A 2011 selection as well, Zeller is the seventh ACC basketball player to earn multiple first-team honors. The others are three-time honorees Mike Gminski (Duke) and Tom McMillen (Maryland) and two-time recipients Shane Battier (Duke), Todd Fuller (NC State), Terry Gannon (NC State) and Jim Spanarkel (Duke). “It definitely is challenging,” said Zeller, a senior business adminis-

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tration major who last semester narrowly missed a 4.0 GPA – he received an A-minus in financial statement analysis. “Sometimes you’d rather go home after practice and hang out with friends, or you’re tired and just want to lay around and watch a movie or something. Instead you have to go home and study, get your homework done and try to compete at a high level rather than just trying to get it done.” The ACC’s classroom excellence hardly is limited to basketball. The NCAA’s most recent Graduation Success Rates, for athletes who enrolled from 2001-04, show Duke and Boston College at 97 percent, second nationally behind Notre Dame. Ten of the ACC’s 12 schools exceed the national Division I average of 80 percent. Seven ACC schools rank among U.S. News and World Report’s top 38 universities, three more than any other conference. Moreover, the ACC and Big Ten are the only leagues to have each of its members among the top 101. “Tomorrow, God forbid, I could get hurt in practice, and basketball could be done for me for the rest of my life,” Smith said. “But I graduated in December, and that’s something nobody can ever take away from me.” Smith’s degree is in marketing, a pursuit rooted in Tanner’s Totes, the foundation he created to provide bags of toys and toiletries for children hospitalized long-term. Motivated by

his father’s battles with cancer and complications from a bonemarrow transplant, Smith estimates Tanner’s Totes has helped more than 3,000 patients at more than 40 hospitals. “This is something I’m going to continue until there is no Tanner,” Smith said. “Hopefully whenever that happens, someone will want to pick it up after me. … There’s no reason not to continue. We’re in a great place right now. … We’ll see how big it gets. Who knows?” Plumlee, a junior and the grandson of a long-time Purdue University professor, knew little of China before learning that Duke’s team was traveling there, and to Dubai, last summer. A psychology major like his father and older brother, teammate Miles, Plumlee immediately enrolled in a class on China. Upon the Blue Devils’ return, Plumlee took additional China-related classes, leading to a second major in cultural anthropology. “Whether you want to or not,” Plumlee said, “as a student-athlete you stick out in class because you’re physically bigger, so you want to show the other students that you respect the teacher, respect the class, by paying attention, participating, being engaged in the class. “A lot of people say school’s not fun, but it’s fun here. You can make it fun.”

Seven ACC schools rank among U.S. News and World Report’s top 38 universities, three more than any other conference.

Tyler Zeller

Tanner Smith

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30th Anniversary Remembered

Tar Heels Claim 1982 NCAA Championship By Nolan Hayes

O

ne shot marked the birth of a superstar. One win cemented the reputation of a coach. One championship helped build a new home for a program. One weekend provided a glimpse into the future of a sport. What a weekend it was for North Carolina and the ACC. On March 29, 1982, the Tar Heels beat Georgetown 63-62 at the Superdome in New Orleans for their second NCAA championship. It is one of 10 NCAA crowns the ACC has claimed in the past 30 years; no other conference has won more than six national titles in that span. That NCAA championship was UNC’s first since 1957. Although Coach Dean Smith had guided the Tar Heels to the Final Four six times in a 15-year span leading up to 1982, each time they went home without cutting down the nets. But after freshman Michael Jordan made a jumper from the left wing with 17 seconds remaining and James Worthy intercepted an errant pass from Georgetown’s Fred Brown, Smith and the Tar Heels had their elusive title. “The program had so much success, but the one thing that had been lacking during that time was a national championship,” said ACC Commissioner John Swofford, UNC’s athletics director at the time. “As unfair as it was, a lot of people — media, fans and so forth — had that whole thing with Dean that he ‘can’t win the big one.’ My biggest feeling at the time was

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how terrific that was for Coach Smith because he deserved it.” The timing of the title was fortuitous. Swofford had been chosen to guide the UNC program in May 1980, when he was 31 years old and only five years removed from his first job in college athletics, ticket manager at Virginia. Upon taking the reins, he faced the daunting challenge of building an on-campus basketball arena and funding it exclusively with private donations. The project would cost $34 million, and no single gift would exceed $1 million. Smith and the Tar Heels gave plenty of help. They advanced to the NCAA title game in 1981, losing to Indiana 63-60, before coming back the next season to win the national championship. With good feelings abounding after the title run, donors were enthusiastic about making contributions to the cause. Smith kept winning after the Tar Heels moved into the new arena, which carries his name. He guided UNC to another NCAA crown in 1993, again in New Orleans. The Tar Heels added national titles in 2005 and 2009 under Roy Williams, who was a 31-year-old assistant on Smith’s staff in 1982. All of those NCAA championships were special, but the 1982 Final Four has become a historical treasure. The three games that UNC, Georgetown, Houston and Louisville played that weekend haven’t just passed the test of time; they’ve aced it. The games were decided by a total of 10 points, tied for the


smallest combined margin at a Final Four. The championship game, one of six in history decided by a single point, took place in front of a then-record crowd of 61,612. The previous record had been just 31,765, set at the Houston Astrodome in 1971. And the talent on the floor in 1982? Put it this way: The key players remain easily identifiable, 30 years later, by just a first name or a nickname. There’s Patrick and Akeem (now Hakeem), Clyde the Glide and Big Game James. Then there’s the guy who needs no name at all. Throw out some initials (MJ) or a number (23), and everyone knows who you mean. “That Final Four may have had more pure individual talent than any Final Four ever,” Swofford said. Second place isn’t even close. Georgetown’s Patrick Ewing, Houston’s Hakeem Olajuwon and Clyde Drexler, and UNC’s Jordan and Worthy all are members of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. All five were named among the 50 Greatest Players in NBA history. Worthy was the 1982 Final Four’s Most Outstanding Player, scoring 28 points on 13-of-17 shooting against the Hoyas in the title game. But it was Jordan who — boosted by the confidence he gained from making the game-winning shot — went on to become a player whom many consider the greatest of all time. The memorable players and competitive games at the 1982 Final Four have led to a lasting legacy for the event as we near its 30th anniversary — appropriately with another Final Four in New Orleans. But one theme stands out above the rest for fans of UNC and the ACC who look back at that super weekend at the Superdome. “My strongest feeling was just for Dean and the fact that he achieved the one thing that his teams hadn’t quite been able to achieve, even though they had had so much success,” Swofford said. “I was happy for the university and happy for the program and happy for those players, but I was happiest for Dean.”

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lege John Bagley

boston college

Sharone Wright clemson

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Kenny Dennard duke

james Collins florida state

Malcolm Mackey georgia tech

Johnny Rhodes maryland


ends of the Atlantic Coast Conference

Ron Godfrey Miami

Kenny Smith

north carolina

Todd fuller nc state

Lee Raker virginia

Dale Solomon virginia tech

Randolph childress wake forest

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Legends of the Atlantic Coast Conference

John Bagley D

uring his sophomore season at Boston College, John Bagley moved from a nominal forward spot to point guard. The fact that he barely stood 6 feet tall and would benefit from the backcourt was a good part of it. And then there was something even more practical. “Every time I looked up,” Wake Forest guard Frank Johnson marveled after the Eagle landed with 35 points on the Demon Deacons, “Bagley had the ball.” Whether creating for others or keeping it himself and working his way through people who were supposed to swat his shots into the arms of the popcorn vendors, Bagley made BC a viable power in the early years of the Big East Conference. His time came nearly three decades before the Eagles migrated to the their new conference home, but you can safely assume he’d have made his mark in today’s ACC, which is 50 percent larger than the league of his college era. “I was at the FSU-BC game and had a really good feeling,” the Eagles’ 2012 ACC Legend said. “It felt like something big – bigger than what I had ever known because there are a lot of schools in the ACC now, and to me, that means major competition and visibility.” The versatile player from Connecticut led the Eagles to the NCAA Tournament’s Sweet 16 in his sophomore season of 1980-81 and a round farther the following year. He averaged 19.6 points a game in those seven contests, one of which stands among the best any ACC team has faced. The Demon Deacons were ranked 11th in the country in that season’s final Associated Press poll and were presumed headed for the regional semifinals. But this was the same quadrant of the draw in which St. Joseph’s had shocked No. 1 DePaul, and Bagley ensured the upsets didn’t stop there. His 10-for-16 performance included the game’s biggest shot, a 10-footer from the left baseline with 54 seconds left that put Boston College ahead for good at 63-62 in an eventual 67-64 triumph. His total of 35 points remains the highest by an Eagle in NCAA Tournament play. “We had a system that worked and had proven to be successful for us,” Bagley said. “Going into the NCAA tournament and playing against Wake Forest, which had a national reputation and players with All-American honors, we were excited to see how we measured up.” BC would lose to St. Joe’s in a slowdown game that predated the shot clock. By modern standards, the 4241 final score seems like an unreasonable facsimile of basketball, but in the early 1980s, Bagley said teams didn’t feel deprived. “Everybody had to play under the same rules,” he said. “If you could dictate the tempo, you could dictate

the game. There were always strategies going on in an era when you didn’t have the mechanisms to speed things up.” The Eagles got back at their earliest opportunity. In March of 1982, Bagley-led clubs dispatched 40 percent of the consensus first-team All-Americans, edging Quintin Dailey’s San Francisco team in the first round and Terry Cummings and DePaul in the second. Bagley went 10-for-18 in a 26-point effort against the Blue Demons. “Having had success the year before, we knew we were capable of playing on a national level,” he recalled. “Without being cocky, we liked our chances.” Bagley produced similar stats in the regional final, going 11-of-18 in scoring 26 against Houston. BC dropped that one, but the run to the national quarterfinals is tied for the best in Eagle history, matching the 1967 and 1994 teams’ showings. Bagley declared for the NBA Draft after that season and went on to a 13-year career in which he continually elevated his play to match the occasion. Primarily a distributor in the pros, he averaged six assists a game in the regular season but 8.4 per playoff contest. “It becomes a pride thing,” he said. “You want to be able to brand yourself, put your name out there and let everybody know what you’re capable of doing.” These days, Bagley brands himself by teaching the game and life skills to the youth of Bridgeport, Conn., and he’ll return to the most frequent site of his NBA playing days when he sets foot in Philips Arena, which was once home to The Omni. Bagley played several seasons for the Hawks. “I’m just excited about having an opportunity to be in that atmosphere,” he said

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Legends of the Atlantic Coast Conference

Sharone Wright S

harone Wright will stick to basketball, thank you very much. But with his reputation, shouldn’t somebody draft him for politics? Cynics might say he’d make a fine obstructionist legislator. Clemson’s ACC Legend could reject attempts with the best in Washington in a career that took from Macon, Ga., to Tigertown and the NBA. He still stands 10th in ACC history in total blocks (288) and blocks per game (3.13) some 18 years after his final Tiger contest. His timing and work ethic made him the sixth overall pick of the 1994 NBA draft. “I think it comes back to when I was a younger kid,” he said. “I worked out with a former Laker, Myles Patrick, who was a really big influence on me. He would lean on me every time I jumped. I learned the rules of shot-blocking and positioning really early.” One of the first McDonald’s All-Americans to sign with Clemson, Wright became an unmistakable presence on both ends of the court, earning third-team AllACC honors in 1993 and a second-team selection in his final campaign. He rejected 10 shots in two games of a two-week stretch in his sophomore season and had a six-game run as a junior that featured averages of 17.7 points, 12 rebounds and 4.2 blocks per contest. “I was going to go to Duke, but my father said he wanted me to go to a place where it would be my team,” Wright said. “And (coach) Cliff Ellis made it my team. Everything he said he’d do, he did it.” In the process, Wright competed favorably against a group of other ACC big men that includes another 2012 Legend, Malcolm Mackey of Georgia Tech, in addition to Duke’s Christian Laettner, North Carolina’s Eric Montross, and Joe Smith of Maryland, who became the No. 1 overall pick in 1995. Wright went to the Philadelphia 76ers, who, curiously enough, released former Duke star Johnny Dawkins to make room for him on the 1994-95 roster. Earning playing time right away, Wright evoked comparisons to Moses Malone, the former Sixers legend. Although not the dominant offensive player that Malone was, Wright once paid tribute to him in a Sports Illustrated article in which he said he sought to emulate everything about the guy – including mannerism such as walking hunched over to give the opponent the impression he was fatigued when he was still full of energy. Wright was a second-team All-Rookie selection that season, and it’s bittersweet to wonder what he might have done if not for a car accident in July 1997. Wright was doing volunteer work in his hometown for the Harriet Tubman Museum, the largest center devoted to African American art, history and culture in

the South, when he lost control of his vehicle. The car flipped over four times and Wright suffered a shattered elbow, fractures in both arms and other injuries. He was only a little more than one year removed from the best individual season of his life. After being traded from Philadelphia to Toronto, he averaged 16.5 points in 11 games for the Raptors. The following season, 1996-97, Wright’s effectiveness was mitigated by a shoulder ailment that hadn’t fully healed when the accident amplified the problems. Working on the mechanics of his game was out of the question. Wright was in a cast until February of 1998, and when he did make it back, he logged only 44 minutes in seven contests. His NBA days were over. His career was not. Wright kept working out and ultimately carved out a career overseas, helping teams to championships in Poland and The Netherlands. He also played in South Korea, China, Greece and Spain in a tenure that lasted until 2007. “I found out that basketball is everywhere and not just in the NBA,” he said. “I met a lot of good people. It worked out. I’m happy about it.” Here’s some context: The first ACC player chosen in that 1994 draft was Duke’s Grant Hill, the third selection. He’s still playing in the NBA. Wright, a 6-11 center, is of a different body type than Hill, and that makes comparisons less than perfect. But it is fair to presume the accident trimmed at least a few seasons off his NBA career. While Wright does wonder about that, he is concentrating these days on a variety of basketball-related ventures in and around Rancho Cucamonga, Calif., where he resides with his wife and four children. “I was going to go back and coach in Europe this year, but the money was not correct,” he said. “And I decided to stay home and try to nourish my family the way I should.”

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Legends of the Atlantic Coast Conference

Kenny Dennard T

he announcement that he’s an ACC Legend reduced elbow-swinging, joke-cracking, cancer-beating Kenny Dennard to tears. And it gave his wife a perfect rhetorical opening. “Well now,” Nadine Dennard said, “it’s not just in your own mind.” Seriously, folks, the former Duke forward is a selfeffacing link to two eras in Blue Devil history and a guy with a lot of tales to tell. And you’d better believe he enjoys the opportunity. Having shot 51 percent from the floor and scored more than 1,000 points over his career, he could make a case for his newfound status on numbers alone. But it’s more fun to quip than to quote stats. So much fun, in fact, that Dennard’s writing a book, tentatively titled “Back Stories From the Front Lines,” that has a projected publishing date of Dec. 12, 2012. “That way, I get it out there nine days before the world ends,” he deadpanned, referring to the ancient Mayan calendar that allegedly foretells man’s doom. “I think you can read it in nine days.” The book itself has a backstory. Eighteen months ago, Dennard met Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito, whose son attends Duke, at a football game tailgate party. Alito was the guy who encouraged the project. Dennard came to Duke from a relatively unlikely place, King, N.C. And if not king of the hoops universe, he was at least a prince and a jester. As a freshman, he helped the Blue Devils to the NCAA championship game. After Dennard’s junior season, coach Bill Foster surprised the masses by taking the job at South Carolina. In came this 33-year-old guy from Chicago with the challenging last name. By timing, seniority and leadership, Dennard and Gene Banks became the captains of Mike Krzyzewski’s first Duke team. “Gene and I had more dog years together than he did as far as experience at Duke was concerned,” Dennard said. “It was an interesting time. It was a risk for everybody. It could have gone either way.” The Coach K era began with a 17-13 record that was followed by consecutive losing campaigns. But while some may have wondered, Dennard was a believer, having seen the coach’s adaptability. “I had a great year with him,” the player said. “He didn’t come in like some heavy-handed guy, and I give him a lot of credit for that.” Dennard averaged seven rebounds and 10.6 points a game as a senior and was often able to step into passing lanes and disrupt opposing offenses. His total of 11 steals against Maryland on Feb. 3, 1979 set an ACC single-game record that still stands.

He went on to the NBA and just as his season with the Kansas City Kings was about to start, he was diagnosed with testicular cancer. “Back then, they didn’t want to say the word testicle,” he said. “The Kings released that I had cancer ‘of the lower abdomen,’ which is a death sentence. Everybody thought, ‘Well, he’s gone.’ “I woke up from surgery and there were these flowers everywhere. The kind of arrangements you might see at a gravesite. I thought, ‘Well, am I dead?’ “ Far from it. Dennard fought the disease the way he confronted opponents like fellow ACC Legend Lee Raker of Virginia, among others: straight ahead. As of this year, he’s a 30-year survivor and an eloquent fund-raiser for the American Cancer Society’s Coaches vs. Cancer program. He’ll donate 33 percent of his profits to the cause, a joint venture with the National Association of Basketball Coaches that has brought in more than $70 million. “I tell people that cancer saved my life because it sensitized me and changed the way I viewed the world,” he said. “I was pretty singular and focused and I don’t know if that would have been healthy for longevity in this life.” For the past 15 years, Dennard has run his own investment consulting business in Houston. He stays in contact with the Blue Devil program and has become a good friend of his former coach, the guy the outside world once doubted. And every Oct. 18, he collects birthday checks from friends who at least pretended to bet him he’d never see his 30th birthday let alone the 30th anniversary of his diagnosis. They suspected they’d have to pay up, of course. “And I always demand interest,” Dennard said.

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Legends of the Atlantic Coast Conference

James Collins P

roximity to home guided James Collins to Florida State, and Florida State gave him the skills to take an opposite and longer path thereafter. The Seminoles’ Legend for 2012 helped the Seminoles to the finals of the NIT in his senior season of 1997 and embarked on a long career in professional basketball overseas that included a championship and a variety of experiences off the court. These days, he has completed the arc, returning to coach his alma mater, Jackson High School in Jacksonville, Fla. So for Collins, the Legend honor offers a chance to do something rare: pause and reflect. Collins contemplated Big Ten schools out of high school, but a couple of factors worked in FSU’s favor. “I’m a Florida kid, and it was cold in Minnesota,” he said. “That, you might say, was a deterrent.” Another factor was imminent fatherhood, which Collins embraced three weeks before he graduated from high school. Being a time zone away from his son would be untenable. FSU, located less than three hours from Jacksonville, offered the perfect situation. “It meant playing in the most prestigious conference in basketball,” he said. “I loved the visit. I had been familiar with the schools because I had friends who had played football. And I liked the direction the program was going at that time.” Pat Kennedy’s first two teams took the ACC by surprise, immediately earning seats at a table populated by bluebloods of different hues. Collins arrived after the second of those campaigns, and while the Noles didn’t keep the momentum going entirely, his shooting skills and defensive tenacity ensured FSU would still be a tough out. Before Florida State joined the ACC, many presumed the program would need several years to get above water, but the recruitment of Collins and others suggested otherwise. The Noles indicated the move to a higher league doesn’t have to be perpetually arduous, and the tectonic shifts in college sports in recent years have given many programs reason to examine stories such as FSU’s. Collins, who hit 37 percent of his 3-point field-goal attempts, still ranks among the program’s Top 10 in several offensive categories. The Seminoles missed out on postseason in Collins’ first three seasons but were rewarded for their patience

with an NIT bid of which they took full advantage. The senior guard led FSU to wins over four marquee programs, Syracuse, Michigan State, West Virginia and Connecticut, as the Noles advanced to the title game. In the semifinals at famed Madison Square Garden, he went 8-for-12 from the 3-point line as the Seminoles edged the Huskies 71-65. “We were always on the (NCAA) bubble,” Collins said. “My biggest moment at the school was being able to go to the NIT championship game.” Collins, a third-team All-ACC player in 1995 and 1996, earned a promotion to second team in 1997. (The competition for the first five was pretty substantial: Tim Duncan, Antawn Jamison were among that group.) A few months later, he was a second-round NBA draft pick, and he played 23 games for the Los Angeles Clippers in 1998. He learned the opportunities on the biggest stage are rare; he also figured out the world’s a stage. With a family to take care of, he ventured far and wide to apply his skills. Collins played one season in Italy and helped one of his Spanish clubs to a league title in a seven-year stint. He looked into situations in France and Russia but got out in one case when payment appeared unlikely and in another when the city was literally being demolished block by block in the early days of post-Soviet Russia. The schedule, which includes three practices on some days and only one game in most weeks, was a bit of a grind. “The season in European leagues drags on too long,” he said. “You’re away from your family. “You do earn that money. And you have to get used to the customs, the food and an entirely different lifestyle.” When Collins returned to these shores on a fulltime basis, he knew he wanted to get into developing the youth of his hometown. In the recently completed season, Collins’ team started four underclassmen. “I’m not radical with throwing chairs or anything, but I do light into the kids a lot,” he admitted. And he has plenty of stories to tell them.

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Legends of the Atlantic Coast Conference

Malcolm Mackey W

hether in youth or adulthood, in vehicles or choice of college, Malcolm Mackey knows a good sales pitch when he hears one. And Georgia Tech is especially pleased he recognized one more than 20 years ago. The seeds for the Yellow Jackets’ first Final Four appearance were planted in the summer of 1988, when Mackey, a well built player from Chattanooga, Tenn., and Kenny Anderson, one of the most acclaimed New York playmakers outside of Broadway, met at a summer all-star camp. They clicked. If cell phones had been invented, they’d have burned minutes as they ultimately burned overmatched opponents. These days, Mackey remains the Jackets’ career rebounding leader, and he’s the institute’s ACC Legend as the conference tournament returns to Atlanta. The only Jacket to start on two ACC championship teams, he has a resume that stands on its own. But he is aware and happy that he’s often linked to the guy who often got him the ball. “We hit it off and exchanged phone numbers and addresses,” Mackey said. “We would talk to each other during the recruiting process. Our two schools in common were Georgia Tech and North Carolina. I think Kenny signed first and then he called me and said he would love to play with me. He was definitely part of my decision-making because I knew the impact of playing with a good point guard.” He also knew the value of the total experience at Tech, which was developing along with the city that would host the 1996 Olympics. “Atlanta is a great city where a lot of people are successful and where you can grow,” Mackey said. “I felt Bobby Cremins had the coaching style that fit my game. With the players I would be playing with, I knew right away we would have a nationally ranked team.” These relationships are common these days, but they were in their relative infancy in the late 1980s, when the summer basketball circuit was starting to take off. This one would prove to be especially important to ACC hoops history. The 1989-90 Tech team is best known for Lethal Weapon 3, the nickname given to the triumvirate of Anderson and wing men Brian Oliver and Dennis Scott. But the point guard and the diligent big man, Mackey, were another solid team within a team. It often worked like this: Mackey would claim a defensive rebound and fire a crisp outlet pass to Anderson, who’d bolt upcourt and have options on either side. In the 1990 NCAA Tournament, the Jackets met LSU and a center named Shaquille O’Neal. Shaq got his 14 rebounds, but Mackey matched him. Breaking even on

the glass meant a general advantage to the Jackets, who prevailed for a trip to the Sweet 16. “I remember the whole week of the tournament in New Orleans,” Mackey said. “That was some of the most fun I’ve had in my life.” Having already won the ACC Tournament, Tech had enjoyed a successful season. But the program had never been to the Final Four until the Jackets dispatched two Big Ten foes, Michigan State and Minnesota, for the right to play in Denver. Neither altitude nor the prospect of playing the eventual champion, UNLV, bugged this bunch. “When you’re playing in that type of game, when you know the whole world is watching, you feel like you’re walking on air anyway,” Mackey said. Anderson would go on to the NBA after his sophomore season, but Mackey hung around to add to his personal legacy. In 1992, the Jackets pulled off one of the great last-second wins in NCAA Tournament history when James Forrest threw in a buzzer-beater to beat Southern California and ran into Mackey’s arms. “It taught me something I use in my professional career: The game is never over until you see all zeroes up there on the scoreboard,” Mackey said. “I remember the other team celebrating like they had won and not realizing that the game wasn’t over. When we hit that shot, it was a tribute to not giving up.” As a senior in 1993, Mackey helped the Jackets defeat that season’s eventual NCAA titleist, North Carolina, in the ACC Tournament finals. A few months later, he became a first-round NBA draftee. He played one season for the Phoenix Suns and for more than a decade overseas. “When I came to Tech, I was listed as a good player, but I don’t know if anybody expected me to achieve the things I achieved at Tech,” he said. These days, Mackey is the Internet sales manager of a Georgia car dealership, which means he still fields offers and still recognizes the value of teamwork. “I remember being a young guy at Georgia Tech when guys would receive awards at half court,” he said, reflecting on his imminent ACC Legends honor. “It’s funny how things turn. Now I’m that guy.”

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Legends of the Atlantic Coast Conference

Johnny Rhodes E

xcuse Johnny Rhodes for a moment. He has to take this call. Gary Williams waits on the alternate line. “To this day, we are still in contact,” the former guard says of his former coach a minute later. “We support each other. It’s amazing to have a coach who is also your friend.” The bond is easily understandable. Williams helped Rhodes fulfill a childhood dream that once seemed iffy. Rhodes helped build the Maryland program from the residue of punishment to the realization of promise. As a result, he is the Terrapins’ ACC Legend for 2012. Known as one of the best defensive guards of the past 20 years, Rhodes is appreciated almost as much for his original decision to attend the school as for his oncourt achievements. “My freshman year was the first year we had gotten off probation,” he said, referring to NCAA-imposed sanctions for rules violations under a previous administration. “I am part of the class that changed the program.” Rhodes, point guard Duane Simpkins and forward Exree Hipp, all of whom hailed from within a decent chest pass of Cole Field House, were the core of Williams’ first fully loaded group of recruits. They all grew up watching Maryland basketball, dreaming of wearing the uniform and pausing while collateral damage from various events imposed harsh penalties on the program. But as they were getting ready to make college choices, they knew things would work out. “We had seen talent go elsewhere,” the Washington, D.C., native said. “And we said, ‘We’ll be able to put Maryland back on the map.’ Being area guys, we saw Len Bias and Walt Williams and other guys. Growing up, that was the school you always wanted to go to anyway. Then the circumstances weren’t the best, but when our time came and the sanctions were lifted, it was perfect.” In his sophomore year, Rhodes was joined by Joe Smith, a forward from Virginia who had somehow been under-recruited. And off they went, making the NCAA Tournament’s regional semifinals. Once banned from the postseason, Maryland was a player again. Rhodes’ role was to agitate and initiate. A gym rat with a sharp memory, he earned the respect of coaches and teammates for an ability to see something on tape -- and we are talking tape rather than modern video technology -- and put it to practical use. “I was one of those guys who had a pretty good basketball IQ,” Rhodes said. “Along with understanding the game, we watched a lot of film. I knew if they weren’t able to swing the ball to this particular side, that

would disrupt their offense. And I would try to disrupt the offense. A lot of times, they would make that pass and I’d be a step ahead.” Whether swiping passes or dribbles, Rhodes set a standard for laudable kleptomania. He holds ACC records for steals per game in a career (2.82) and a season (3.7 in 1996). In so doing, he became the only player in league history to surpass 1,700 points, 700 rebounds, 400 assists and 300 steals. If Simpkins was the playmaker and Smith the finisher, Rhodes was the generalist who blended it all. The Terps made the NCAA Tournament in his sophomore, junior and senior seasons, and that success helped make it cool for local prospects to look at Maryland again. Among Rhodes’ successors were two Baltimore guys, forward Keith Booth and undersized guard Juan Dixon. In 2002, Dixon led the Terrapins to the NCAA title. When not messing with opponents’ work, Rhodes created his own work as an art major. He transforms images these days as owner of a construction company. “It’s all in the same chapter,” he said. “I’m able to visualize something when it comes to construction.” Like many others close to the program, Rhodes was shocked when Williams retired after last season, but he has maintained his ties to all parties. “I’ve been on that campus from when I was a student to the present day,” he said. “I’m always around and trying to be helpful and to be somewhat of a mentor to current players.” And as far as ACC Legend status is concerned, Rhodes will connect with his contemporaries in the group, including Randolph Childress of Wake Forest, Sharone Wright of Clemson and James Collins of Florida State. “The talent throughout the ACC was incredible,” he said. “Every game, you had to bring it.”

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Legends of the Atlantic Coast Conference

Ron Godfrey I

f you think of University of Miami basketball figures from a couple of generations back, you start with Rick Barry. That’s universally understood. Just don’t go too long before you get to Ron Godfrey. Godfrey arrived in Coral Gables more than a halfcentury ago as an acclaimed high school player and helped the program to its first NCAA Tournament bid as a junior. A decade later, he was a young head coach in a tough spot, and his alma mater has never forgotten his work. Inducted into the school’s Hall of Fame in 1998, he’s an ACC Legend in 2012. “I have a pretty good life,” he said from his Coral Springs, Fla., home. In his high school days, Godfrey was a contemporary of three Ohio kids who went on to fairly distinguished careers in the sport: Jerry Lucas (Middletown), Bob Knight (Orrville) and John Havlicek (Bridgeport.) Godfrey and Havlicek were both born in Martins Ferry, a steel-producing town on the West Viginia border. Godfrey’s father worked for the Wheeling Pittsburgh Steel Corporation and wanted his son to see life beyond the steel mills. So while the more famous Ohio triumvirate assembled at Ohio State, Godfrey made a geographically different choice, ultimately selecting Miami over Georgia Tech and Duke. And his reputation as a peer of the three Buckeyes worked its way to south Florida. “The first time we went to practice,” teammate Dick Hickox said, “we knew Ron Godfrey could flat-out play.” Over his career, Godfrey averaged 17.5 points a game and was a key factor in a Hurricane first. The 1959-60 team made the NCAA Tournament, and that was no easy task. Miami lacked conference affiliation, an on-campus venue for home games and even a fulltime athletics department facility for practice. The Canes practiced in the university’s armory. They overcame all those obstacles and, in an era before Bracketology, learned of their postseason gig when coach Bruce Hale beckoned them to his office. They were 23-4 and rewarded for it. “We were all ecstatic,” Godfrey recalled. “We played to go to the NIT or the NCAAs, and we just figured if we were good enough, one of them would invite us.” The Canes went 20-7 the following season, and after graduation, Godfrey fielded an offer from Hale to stick around and serve as his assistant coach. He hasn’t left the area since. Hale did depart, however, heading to the new and highly experimental territory of the ABA in 1967. Godfrey, not yet out of his 20s, was promoted to the top job. The Canes still lacked the amenities of their oppo-

nents, and they were trying to make a go of it in what was becoming a pro town and a football town. They played home games at the Miami Beach Convention Hall North, on which they once shared the marquee with Tarzan Tyler and The Great Beauregard. You remmeber them, right? Pro wrestling legends. Season-ticket holders numbered 100. Even in the Barry days, they never got more than 150 fans to sign up. Shortly before practice was set to convene in 1970, the university announced its intention to disband the team after the season. Godfrey was in California attending a wedding at the time. His players vowed to boycott, a threat on which they didn’t follow through. History, therefore, recalls Godfrey as the coach who was on board when the plug was pulled. If fair, history should also note that there wasn’t a causal link between the coach and the end. His first two teams had winning seasons. After the third year, which resulted in a losing record, the bad news came. Godfrey kept the team together and managed to coax nine wins out of a group of players who knew they’d soon have no basketball home. The Hurricanes went out with dignity. Current Florida State coach Leonard Hamilton is widely credited with the program’s renaissance after its restoration in the mid-1980s, and the future looks bright with Jim Larranaga on board. Godfrey, for his part, fondly remembers his playing days and is appreciative of the Legend status because it shines a light on an otherwise overlooked era in the school’s history. “We were like a big family. It was hard to describe. We played together. We ate together. Went to the movies together. There wasn’t one (singular) star.”

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Legends of the Atlantic Coast Conference

Kenny smith T

his Jet seldom experienced delays or required more than routine maintenance, and he’s still in service in a slightly different capacity. He’ll barely have to scoot off the runway to appear as North Carolina’s ACC Legend for 2012. Kenny “The Jet” Smith, former point guard and current television broadcaster, is a popular and practical choice. He was a consensus first-team All-American as a Tar Heel senior, and his work as a studio analyst on NBA telecasts has him based about a bounce pass away from the site of this year’s ACC Tournament. From 1983-87, Smith doled out 768 assists, the second-highest career total in ACC history at the time. His leadership and precise guidance helped UNC post an average record of 29-5 in his four seasons, and he’s still prominent on an impressive list of great Tar Heel point guards. He is further buffered from obscurity by virtue of his TV career, in which he is a foil for the comical, offthe-wall declarations of his Turner Sports comrade, Charles Barkley. Their on-air chemistry is the sort of thing Smith developed on the floor with the legion of future pros along the UNC front line. In that role, he has the liberty to reference one of the best games of his college career, a 22-point, six-assist performance against Barkley’s former club, Auburn, in the 1985 NCAA Tournament. That result put the Tar Heels into a regional final against Villanova. The Wildcats prevailed and continued in winning an improbable NCAA championship. As a senior, Smith averaged 16.5 points and 9.0 assists over four NCAA games as the Tar Heels again made the Elite Eight and fell just short, 79-75. He recorded 25 points and seven assists in that final game, played against Syracuse. One source named him national Player of the Year. He came to Carolina as another of UNC’s several outstanding recruits from in and around New York City. Five of those have been highly decorated point guards, and that sub-category includes Larry Brown (1960-63), Jimmy Black (1978-82) and two of Smith’s successors, Derrick Phelps (1990-94) and Ed Cota (1996-2000). In other words, Smith arrived in the middle of a stretch in which Big Apple point guards were in charge for 16 of 22 seasons. Smith brought the confidence and grit of his home turf to the ACC, and he had another undeniable element: speed. A head-and-shoulders fake followed by a devastating first dribble often left opponents compelled to help from the wings or the post. Smith then had the touch to make pull-up intermediate shots or find

a cadre of teammates that included Sam Perkins, Brad Daugherty and Michael Jordan. Such are the options every point guard dreams of, and Smith generally made the right choice. Along with a two-to-one assist-turnover ratio, he shot better than 50 percent from the floor in all four seasons. That’s exceptionally uncommon for a guard and is even more rare these days, when the allure of the 3-point shot can become an unwise distraction. Smith only earned first-team All-ACC honors once, as a senior in 1987, but that’s a testament to the depth of talent in the league over anything else. He smoothly proceeded to a successful, 11-year NBA career that featured a leading role on two championship teams in Houston. He averaged a shade under 13 points and 5.5 assists per game in the pros and was an All-Rookie selection in 1988. He became a broadcaster in 1998 and immediately found the TNT studio gig to be another solid fit. Quick witted and subtle, he is essentially the straight man to Barkley’s comedy. The repartee is often every bit as entertaining as the games it describes. Smith, who played for the Hawks on the site of the current Philips Arena, is probably the most recognizable of this year’s legends and can reasonably anticipate a warm welcome in his current hometown.

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Legends of the Atlantic Coast Conference

Todd Fuller A

nybody who followed the ACC two decades ago could tell you Todd Fuller was an outstanding player, and if given a couple of hours, the former NC State center could probably quantify the extent of his success by empirical means. The number-crunching would be the easy part. Convincing him to cast aside his inherent humility might be the real obstacle. While Fuller’s Wolfpack squads didn’t win the ACC title, his personal story was pretty compelling. He went from lightly recruited prospect to first-round NBA draftee and did it all while earning recognition as college basketball’s finest scholar-athlete in his senior season of 1995-96. “A culmination of a lot of hard work and a dream come true,” the Pack’s 2012 ACC Legend said. “There are thousands of players who dream of getting to that point. I was fortunate to be blessed to reach it.” Wake Forest and NC State were intrigued with the 6-foot-10 kid from Charlotte, who hadn’t done the whole AAU circuit and lacked a national profile as a result. Davidson and the U.S. Naval Academy, only a few years from successfully juggling its mission and the unique size of 7-1 David Robinson, was on board, too. Fuller liked the fact that Les Robinson, State’s coach at the time, was a former high school teacher who wanted his players back on campus and in class the morning after every road game. These things get noticed, he said. And Fuller helped with that in many ways. On the court, he worked his way from the middle of the rotation to a succession of All-ACC honors: third-team status as a sophomore, second-team acclaim as a junior and first-team selection in 1996. One of the ACC’s best rebounders, he developed a quick release on intermediate shots and was tough tough to stop once he flashed to the post and got a touch on an entry pass. Generally speaking, his career highlight was the chance to play in front of his fellow students at Reynolds Coliseum. Specifically, that included upset wins over North Carolina in consecutive seasons. The Tar Heels were ranked No. 1 in the land in one game and seventh in the other. “Playing in Reynolds had a feeling to it that I’ve never seen in all my years playing professionally in different countries,” Fuller said. “Our fans made it something truly special.” Meanwhile, he was on his way to graduating from State Summa Cum Laude in Applied Mathematics. Academic All-America of the Year was among his senior season’s awards, and a chance at the Rhodes Scholar-

ship was another. “I felt like I approached basketball and academics with a similar mindset, which was to work as hard as I could and get the most out of it,” he said. “I felt blessed to get those awards. Felt like I got too many, actually. I’ve never viewed myself as some kind of Einstein.” Fuller had to decline the Rhodes opportunity because he was being projected as a high NBA draft pick, and that came to pass when the Golden State Warriors took him 11th overall in 1996. He walked across the stage at the Meadowlands Arena across the river from Manhattan and became a part of Pack history. “I got the full experience, including the bus driver cursing out other drivers,” he said. “Unforgettable. I can remember everything from the suit I wore to the other people who were seated at my table.” Fuller played parts of five seasons in the NBA, including a playoff run with the 1999 Utah Jazz, before his game took him to three seasons in Spain, a couple in Australia, a year in Poland and a month in Greece. “If, for some reason, they told me I had to leave the U.S. and could never return, I would live in Melbourne or Barcelona,” he said. As for the Greek league? “There are three clubs in all of Greece that are known to pay well, to pay consistently and to pay on time,” he said. “I was not on one of them.” He returned to these shores with no regrets but with a college degree and a desire to help young people. With a former professor of his at State, he created a competition in Wake County, N.C., that he hopes to spread across the state and eventually to Charlotte, where he is a math teacher at a charter school.

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Legends of the Atlantic Coast Conference

Lee raker N

o, Lee Raker won’t recognize the place. Atlanta’s Philips Arena is far flashier than The Omni aspired to be. But when Virginia’s ACC Legend walks onto the floor to be recognized, he might feel some good vibes anyway. The home of the 2012 ACC Tournament sits on the same spot where Raker and his Cavalier teammates earned one of the most significant victories in the program’s history, a 74-60 win over BYU in the 1981 NCAA Tournament’s East regional final. The result made UVa the first ACC team outside of North Carolina to make a Final Four, and it’s a memory the forward carries with him. “When you were a kid, that’s what you were gonna do someday. No matter who you were,” said Raker, who works for a hedge fund in Boston these days. “Then we finally got there and it was a surreal thing. You can’t appreciate what it is in the moment. You’re focused on trying to get done what needs to be done. But in looking back, I think it was pretty enormous.” Raker and his high school teammate Jeff Lamp were the first elements of a package that coach Terry Holland, not all that removed from his playing and coaching days at Davidson College, assembled in his early years in Charlottesville. The Cavaliers later added Terry Gates, a third alumnus of Ballard High School in Louisville, Ky., to provide bulk up front. “And it didn’t hurt to have Ralph come along,” Raker said. That would be Ralph Sampson, a 7-foot-4, oncein-a-lifetime prospect from Harrisonburg, Va., who became a three-time consensus national Player of the Year. “That was the missing piece, and it propelled things at that point,” Raker remembered. It propelled a cultural revolution at an institution that only a few years earlier had debated whether to become a viable player in ACC sports or remain content with less than mediocrity. Soon, the Cavaliers were No. 1 in the land, bound for the cover of Sports Illustrated and feted around town. A local sandwich shop named its largest item for Sampson. Everybody was a rock star. “One of the nicer things about my whole time there was that my parents could walk into town and everyone knew who they were,” Raker said. “I just tried not to embarrass them. That was my goal in life.” He succeeded, averaging 13.3 points a game as a junior and helping the Cavs win the NIT championship in 1980, when the event still resonated fully with fans. “That day, five or six busloads of people had come up from Charlottesville,” he said. “They were all up in

the cheap seats and making more noise than you can imagine.” The following year, the Cavaliers began 23-0 and occupied No. 1 before a one-point loss at Notre Dame on that rare (at that time) bird known as national television. A month later, fans and media anticipated a regional final rematch in Atlanta until BYU’s Danny Ainge dribbled through the Fighting Irish defense and made a buzzer-beating layup to dispatch Notre Dame and pair the Cavs and Cougars for a trip to the Final Four. In the regional final, Raker contributed his usual, steady 12 points and was one of four Cavs in double figures as the program moved on to Philadelphia. They mounted ladders and cut down the Omni’s nets, snipping souvenirs for a second straight year. (They had done the same at Madison Square Garden after the NIT.) An academic All-American as an economics major in 1981, Raker moved into the business world and has been in the high-pressure hedge-fund world for several years. “Every day is exciting,” Raker said. “It’s a lot easier on my body these days. But it involves a lot of the same attributes. You try to focus, do things the right away and know the other things will take care of themselves.”

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Dale Solomon Legends of the Atlantic Coast Conference

D

ale Solomon cannot reveal the identity of the people he guards these days. That’s classified. His previous work in guarding and manning a post has always been public, and for fans of the Virginia Tech Hokies, it’s a great story. Solomon, a first-team All-Metro Conference player in all four of his seasons, is his alma mater’s ACC Legend for 2012. “I couldn’t have imagined this,” he said. That’s chiefly because the Hokies were several years from joining the ACC in Solomon’s era (1978-82). The Metro served them well, however, as they enjoyed rivalries with Louisville and Memphis State and made two NCAA Tournaments and an NIT in his four years. In fact, Virginia Tech won the league in its first season of membership, 1978-79, behind the play of the 6-foot-9 freshman, who was named the conference tournament’s Most Outstanding Player and the league’s Freshman of the Year. “Just like any basketball player, I thought the Metro Conference would go on forever,” he said. “The Metro faded away, and by entering the ACC, Virginia Tech helped its recruiting.” The ACC of Solomon’s day was undeniably rugged, but competing in the Metro, from which Louisville won the 1980 NCAA title, suggests the Hokies wouldn’t have been overwhelmed in any league. Solomon wouldn’t have allowed it. He averaged 18.4 points a game over his career, and his total of 2,136 points is still good for fourth on the school’s all-time list. “Winning the Metro in our first year in the conference was a big achievement for everybody,” he said. “And then playing in the NCAA Tournament against some of the greatest players out there was exciting.” In 1979, that meant facing Larry Bird and Indiana State, which defeated the Hokies and ultimately played for the national title. Solomon scored 12 points that day – Bird finished with 22 points, 13 rebounds and seven assists – and had a taste of higher competition. He’d get other chances. In 1982, the Philadelphia 76ers selected Solomon in the third round, and he had a chance at a lifetime dream. He also had foresight, a trait that not everybody possesses when presented a chance at an NBA roster spot. “I went to rookie camp and did pretty well and they did invite me back to veterans camp,” he said. “But there wasn’t enough of a guarantee. They had just signed Moses Malone. And then I saw a great opportunity to play overseas.” Solomon took that deal, going to Italy for 12 seasons and to Spain for one. He arrived in Italy in the summer of 1982 when the country was in delirium over its soc-

cer team’s World Cup triumph. “Everything shut down,” he recalled. “Nobody was moving. Here I am, a kid from America. Didn’t know anything about Italy or speak the language. The only thing I could understand to order at a restaurant was vegetable soup. I think I ate vegetable soup for almost a month.” But Solomon picked up enough Italian to get around, and his gregarious nature helped him make friends and remain in his professional league for a dozen years. And that also became important when, upon retirement from basketball, Solomon sought to enter law enforcement. Living abroad, experiencing customs and interacting with the locals made Solomon a guy the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to hire. He’s based in Washington, D.C., where he has protected foreign visitors and screened the vehicles and employees of government contractors. He aspires to move from wearing a uniform to a suit, the sort of progress you make if you move into direct personal protection full-time. “It’s something I hadn’t thought of it,” Solomon said of his current career. “When I was growing up, there weren’t too many officers of color around, and nobody pushed their kids to it. Today, we can see many opportunities for people like myself in law enforcement.” Solomon’s protection of the lane in Hokie basketball days included 856 rebounds, a total that stands seventh in Tech records books. His tenacity in the paint and good sense of shot-selection gave him a career fieldgoal percentage (.567) that is second on that list. Solomon says the hardest thing about his work these days is just showing up. He elected to live near where he grew up, on the outskirts of a state park near Annapolis, Md. The drive to and from work lasts two hours each way. But it’s worth it. As an athlete, Solomon saw the world. He sees it these days in a different way. And if his fellow Legends need personal-protection services, he’ll probably be happy to provide them.

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Legends of the Atlantic Coast Conference

Randolph Childress O

ne of the most important events in Wake Forest basketball history went almost entirely unseen. For Randolph Childress, the equal and opposite precursor to 82-80 and March of 1995 was a knee injury in a June 1991 pickup game. The torn ligament knocked him out of action for a year but ultimately extended his career beyond its originally presumed expiration date. Had he stayed healthy, he would have been in the NBA in March of 1995 rather than putting on one of the greatest performances in ACC Tournament history. Childress would have been fine, of course, but Wake would probably be one banner and untold memories short. And so Childress had a fifth year of eligibility, and it would coincide with the maturation of a former swimmer named Tim Duncan, who had arrived in the fall of 1993 to negligible attention but was on his way to stardom. Together, the two formed an outsideinside combination that put the Demon Deacons into the mix of what became one of the greatest seasons in ACC history. Wake, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia all tied for first at 12-4 in regular-season conference play, and the ACC Tournament pared the field to the Tar Heels and Deacons for the championship. Seven individuals – four Tar Heels, three Deacs – ultimately played in the NBA. They put on an amazing show in the Greensboro Coliseum. Childress, who had dropped 40 points on Duke in the quarterfinals and 30 more on Virginia in the semis, wasn’t done. His 37-point showing against UNC included nine 3-pointers and the decisive shot. With the clock ticking under 10 seconds left in overtime, he dribbled twice to get a step on the Tar Heels’ Jeff McInnis, pulled up at the foul-line extended and connected to give his team an 82-80 win and take his three-day total to a tournament-record 107 points. “I congratulate him,” UNC coach Dean Smith said after the senior’s final ACC game. I’m glad he’s gone.” Childress finished with 2,208 points, a figure still good for second in Wake history and 18th on the ACC chart. A long professional career followed, but its fame was limited by another series of injuries. It included two teams in the NBA, seven in Italy, two in Turkey, two more in France and one in Australia. “I dream,” he said, “but under no circumstances did I think I’d play that long. It took me around the world, and for that, I’m grateful.” Childress clearly has more stories to tell than the average pro player, but around the Wake campus, to

which he has returned as a special assistant to athletics director Ron Wellman, they always want to talk about that afternoon 17 years ago. About the last shot. About the maneuver in the first half in which he faked McInnis to the ground with a crossover move, then subtly gestured at his opponent to get up before making another shot from the left wing. “Those were obviously great times and special moments,” Childress said. “There are certain things I remember, but certain other times are a blur. I try not to focus on it too much and to focus on what I’m doing now.” That began in August, when Wellman hired him as a general-assignment administrator whose duties will focus heavily on mentoring student-athletes. Curiously, three hours after he accepted the gig, the phone rang. Another European team wanted him to come back. This time, there were no detours. “When this opportunity presented itself,” he said, “there was nothing that could get me to change my mind.”

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All-Time legends of the 2001 Legends

2007 Legends

2008 Legends

2009 Legends

Dana Barros

2006

Bobby Conrad 1999, 2005

Steve Wojciechowski 1999

Brad Johnson 2001, 2004

Craig Neal

1999

Tom McMillen

2000

Jay Murphy

2007

Mike Eppley

2000

Tate Armstrong

2000

Mitchell Wiggins

2002

Duane Ferrell

2000

Albert King

2001

Bill Curley

2008

Larry Nance

2001

Bobby Hurley

2001

Brad Johnson

2004

Roger Kaiser

2001

Coach Gene Shue

2002

Danya Abrams

2009

Jim Brennan

2002

Jeff Mullins

2002

Dave Cowens

2005

Rick Yunkus

2002

Adrian Branch

2004

Terry Driscoll

2010

Vince Hamilton

2004

Coach Vic Bubas

2004

George McCloud

2006

Tom Hammonds

2004

Walt Williams

2005

Michael Adams

2011

Chris Whitney

2006

Danny Ferry

2005

Bob Sura

2007

Dennis Scott

2005

Buck Williams

2006

Murray Jarman

2007

Mark Alarie

2006

Charlie Ward

2008

Drew Barry

2006

Bill Jones

2007

Elden Campbell

2008

Christian Laettner

2007

Ron King

2009

James Forrest

2007

Coach Lefty Driesell 2008

Randy Mahaffey

2009

Mike Gminski

2008

Otto Petty

2010

Kenny Anderson

2008

Al Bunge

2009

Dale Davis

2010

Jim Spanarkel

2009

Coach Hugh Durham

2011

Brian Oliver

2009

Keith Booth

2010

Greg Buckner

2011

Jack Marin

2010

Bruce Dalrymple

2010

Len Elmore

2011

Steve Vacendak

2011

John Salley

2011

120 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament


atlantic coast conference 2010 Legends

50th Anniversary Legends 2003

2004 Legends

2006 Legends

Rick Barry

2005

Bobby Jones

1999

David Thompson

1999

Ralph Sampson 1999, 2002

Allan Bristow

2005

Charlie Davis

1999

Dick Hickox

2006

Mitch Kupchak

2000

Tommy Burleson

2000

Barry Parkhill

2000

Dell Curry

2006

Anthony Teachey

2000

Don Curnett

2007

Walter Davis

2001

Coach Norman Sloan 2001

Jeff Lamp

2001

Bimbo Coles

2007

Dickie Hemric

2001

Tim James

2008

Phil Ford

2002

Lou Pucillo

2002

Bryant Stith

2004

Glen Combs

2008

Tyrone “Muggsy” Bogues 2002

Bill Foster

2009

Lennie Rosenbluth

2004

Chris Corchiani

2004

Wally Walker

2005

John Wetzel

2009

Jack Murdock

2004

Will Allen

2010

Bobby Lewis 2

005

Kenny Carr

2005

Curtis Staples

2006

Chris Smith

2010

Skip Brown

2005

Eric Brown

2011

Bill Cunningham

2006

Bob Speight

2006

Buzzy Wilkinson

2007

Wayne Robinson

2011

Rusty LaRue

2006

Tommy Kearns

2007

Tom Gugliotta

2007

John Crotty

2008

Rodney Rogers

2007

Coach Dean Smith

2008

Lorenzo Charles

2008

Richard Morgan

2009

Len Chappell

2008

Charles Scott

2009

Monte Towe

2009

Harold Deane

2010

Frank Johnson

2009

Sam Perkins

2010

Rodney Monroe

2010

Chris Williams

2011

Dave Wiedeman

2010

Coach Bill Guthridge

2011

Thurl Bailey

2011

Robert O’Kelley

2011

theACC.com

121


Year

ACC Champion Champion

Runner-Up

Score

Most Valuable Player

Coach of Year

Location

1954

NC State

Wake Forest

82-80 (OT)

Dickie Hemric (WF)

Everett Case (ST)

Raleigh, NC

1955

NC State

Duke

87-77

Ronnie Shavlik (ST)

Everett Case (ST)

Raleigh, NC

1956

NC State

Wake Forest

76-64

Vic Molodet (ST)

Murray Greason (WF)

Raleigh, NC

1957

North Carolina

South Carolina

95-75

Len Rosenbluth (NC)

Frank McGuire (NC)

Raleigh, NC

1958

Maryland

North Carolina

86-74

Nick Davis (MD)

Everett Case (ST)

Raleigh, NC

1959

NC State

North Carolina

80-56

Lou Pucillo ST)

Harold Bradley (DU)

Raleigh, NC

1960

Duke

Wake Forest

63-59

Doug Kistler (DU)

Bones McKinney (WF)

Raleigh, NC

1961

Wake Forest

Duke

96-81

Len Chappell (WF)

Bones McKinney (WF)

Raleigh, NC

1962

Wake Forest

Clemson

77-66

Len Chappell (WF)

Bob Stevens (SC)

Raleigh, NC

1963

Duke

Wake Forest

68-57

Art Heyman (DU)

Vic Bubas (DU)

Raleigh, NC

1964

Duke

Wake Forest

80-59

Jeff Mullins (DU)

Vic Bubas (DU)

Raleigh, NC

1965

NC State

Duke

91-85

Larry Worsley (ST)

Press Maravich (ST)

Raleigh, NC

1966

Duke

NC State

71-66

Steve Vacendak (DU)

Vic Bubas (DU)

Raleigh, NC

1967

North Carolina

Duke

82-73

Larry Miller (NC)

Dean Smith (NC)

Greensboro, NC

1968

North Carolina

NC State

87-50

Larry Miller (NC)

Dean Smith (NC)

Charlotte, NC

1969

North Carolina

Duke

85-74

Charlie Scott (NC)

Frank McGuire (SC)

Charlotte, NC

1970

NC State

South Carolina

42-39 (2OT)

Vann Williford (ST)

Norm Sloan (ST)

Charlotte, NC

1971 South Carolina North Carolina 52-51

Lee Dedmon (NC) John Roche (SC)

Dean Smith (NC)

Greensboro, NC

1972

North Carolina

Maryland

73-64

Robert McAdoo (NC)

Bill Gibson (VA)

Greensboro, NC

1973

NC State

Maryland

76-74

Tommy Burleson (ST)

Norm Sloan (ST)

Greensboro, NC

1974

NC State

Maryland

103-100 (OT)

Tommy Burleson (ST)

Norm Sloan (ST)

Greensboro, NC

1975

North Carolina

NC State

70-66

Phil Ford (NC)

Lefty Driesell (MD)

Greensboro, NC

1976

Virginia

North Carolina

67-62

Wally Walker (VA)

Dean Smith (NC)

Landover, MD

1977

North Carolina

Virginia

75-69

John Kuester (NC)

Dean Smith (NC)

Greensboro, NC

1978

Duke

Wake Forest

85-77

Jim Spanarkel (DU)

Bill Foster (DU)

Greensboro, NC

1979

North Carolina

Duke

71-63

Dudley Bradley (NC)

Dean Smith (NC)

Greensboro, NC

1980

Duke

Maryland

73-72

Albert King (MD)

Lefty Driesell (MD)

Greensboro, NC

1981

North Carolina

Maryland

61-60

Sam Perkins (NC)

Terry Holland (VA)

Landover, MD

122 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament


ships 1954 to 2011 Year

Champion

Runner-Up

Score

Most Valuable Player

Coach of Year

Location

1982

North Carolina

Virginia

47-45

James Worthy (NC)

Terry Holland (VA)

Greensboro, NC

1983

NC State

Virginia

81-78

Sidney Lowe (ST)

Bobby Cremins (GT)

Atlanta, GA

1984

Maryland

Duke

74-62

Len Bias (MD)

Mike Krzyzewski (DU)

Greensboro, NC

1985

Georgia Tech

North Carolina

57-54

Mark Price (GT)

Bobby Cremins (GT)

Atlanta, GA

1986

Duke

Georgia Tech

68-67

Johnny Dawkins (DU)

Mike Krzyzewski (DU)

Greensboro, NC

1987

NC State

North Carolina

68-67

Vinny Del Negro (ST)

Cliff Ellis (CU)

Landover, MD

1988

Duke

North Carolina

65-61

Danny Ferry (DU)

Dean Smith (NC)

Greensboro, NC

1989

North Carolina

Duke

77-74

J.R. Reid (NC)

Jim Valvano (ST)

Atlanta, GA

1990

Georgia Tech

Virginia

70-61

Brian Oliver (GT)

Cliff Ellis (CU)

Charlotte, NC

1991

North Carolina

Duke

96-74

Rick Fox (NC)

Dave Odom (WF)

Charlotte, NC

1992

Duke

North Carolina

94-74

Christian Laettner (DU)

Pat Kennedy (FS)

Charlotte, NC

1993

Georgia Tech

North Carolina

77-75

James Forrest (GT)

Dean Smith (NC)

Charlotte, NC

1994

North Carolina

Virginia

73-66

Jerry Stackhouse (NC)

Dave Odom (WF)

Charlotte, NC

1995

Wake Forest

North Carolina

82-80 (OT)

Randolph Childress (WF)

Dave Odom (WF)

Greensboro, NC

1996

Wake Forest

Georgia Tech

75-74

Tim Duncan (WF)

Bobby Cremins (GT)

Greensboro, NC

1997

North Carolina

NC State

64-54

Shammond Williams (NC)

Mike Krzyzewski (DU)

Greensboro, NC

1998

North Carolina

Duke

83-68

Antawn Jamison (NC)

Bill Guthridge (NC)

Greensboro, NC

1999

Duke

North Carolina

96-73

Elton Brand (DU)

Mike Krzyzewski (DU)

Charlotte, NC

2000

Duke

Maryland

81-68

Jason Williams (DU)

Mike Krzyzewski (DU)

Charlotte, NC

2001

Duke

North Carolina

79-53

Shane Battier (DU)

Paul Hewitt (GT)

Atlanta, GA

2002

Duke

NC State

91-61

Carlos Boozer (DU)

Gary Williams (MD)

Charlotte, NC

2003

Duke

NC State

84-77

Daniel Ewing (DU)

Skip Prosser (WF)

Greensboro, NC

2004

Maryland

Duke

95-87 (OT)

John Gilchrist (MD)

Herb Sendek (ST)

Greensboro, NC

2005

Duke

Georgia Tech

69-64

J.J. Redick (DU)

Seth Greenberg (VT)

Washington, DC

2006

Duke

Boston College

78-76

J.J. Redick (DU)

Roy Williams (NC)

Greensboro, NC

2007

North Carolina

NC State

89-80

Brandan Wright (NC)

Dave Leitao (VA)

Tampa Bay, FL

2008

North Carolina

Clemson

86-81

Tyler Hansbrough (NC)

Seth Greenberg (VT)

Charlotte, NC

2009

Duke

Florida State

79-69

Jon Scheyer (DU)

Leonard Hamilton (FS)

Atlanta, GA

2010

Duke

Georgia Tech

65-61

Kyle Singler (DU)

Gary Williams (MD)

Greensboro, NC

2011

Duke

North Carolina

75-58

Nolan Smith (DU)

Roy Williams (NC)

Greensboro, NC

theACC.com

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The Acc Tournament 1954-2011 Year by year results

1954 Raleigh, N.C.

1955 Raleigh, N.C.

(March 3-4-5)

1956 Raleigh, N.C.

(March 1-2-3)

1957 Raleigh, N.C.

1958 Raleigh, N.C.

Quarterfinals - #3 Wake Forest d. #6 South Carolina 58-57 (OT); #2 Maryland d. #7 Clemson 75-59; #1 Duke d. #8 Virginia 96-68; #4 NC State d. #5 North Carolina 52-51.

Quarterfinals - #6 Virginia d. #3 Maryland 68-67 (OT); #2 Duke d. #7 South Carolina 83-67; #1 NC State d. #8 Clemson 101-76; #4 Wake Forest d. #5 North Carolina 95-82.

Quarterfinals - #3 Wake Forest d. #6 South Carolina 79-64; #2 North Carolina d. #7 Virginia 81-77; #1 NC State d. #8 Clemson 88-84; #4 Duke d. #5 Maryland 94-69.

Quarterfinals - #6 South Carolina d. #3 Duke 84-81; #2 Maryland d. #7 Virginia 71-68; #1 North Carolina d. #8 Clemson 81-61; #4 Wake Forest d. #5 NC State 66-57.

Quarterfinals - #3 North Carolina d. #6 Clemson 62-51; #2 NC State d. #7 South Carolina 66-61; #1 Duke d. #8 Wake Forest 51-44; #4 Maryland d. #5 Virginia 70-66.

Semifinals - NC State d. Duke 79-75; Wake Forest d. Maryland 64-56 (OT).

Semifinals - NC State d. Wake Forest 85-70; Duke d. Virginia 90-77 (OT).

Semifinals - Maryland d. Duke 71-65 (OT); North Carolina d. NC State 64-58.

Finals - NC State d. Wake Forest 82-80 (OT).

Finals - NC State d. Duke 87-77.

Finals - NC State d. Wake Forest 76-64.

Semifinals - North Carolina d. Wake Forest 61-59; South Carolina d. Maryland 74-64.

All-Tournament - First Team First Team ; Buzz Wilkinson, UVa; Ronnie Shavlik, NCS; Ronnie Mayer, Duke; Dickie Hemric, WF; Lowell Davis, WF. Second Team - Bill Miller, UVa; Bill Yarborough, Clem.; Vic Molodet, NCS; Joe Belmont, Duke; Phil DiNardo, NCS.

All-Tournament - First Team - Vic Molodet, NCS; Lennie Rosenbluth, UNC; Jack Murdock, WF; Jack Williams, WF; John Maglio, NCS. Second Team - Ronnie Shavlik, NCS; Ronnie Mayer, Duke; Bob Kessler, Md.; Bill Miller, UVa; Bob McCarty, UVa.

Finals - North Carolina d. South Carolina 95-75.

Finals - Maryland d. North Carolina 86-74.

Tournament MVP -Ronnie Shavlik, NC State (23.3 points, 18.0 rebounds)

Tournament MVP - Vic Modolet, NC State (26.3 points, 14.7 rebounds)

All-Tournament - First Team Lennie Rosenbluth, UNC; Grady Wallace, USC; Jack Williams, WF; Pete Brennan, UNC; Jack Murdock, WF. Second Team -Tommy Kearns, UNC; John Nacincik, Md.; Ray Pericola, USC; Joe Quigg, UNC; Bob Cunningham, UNC.

All-Tournament - First Team Pete Brennan, UNC; Nick Davis, Md.; Lou Pucillo, NCS; Charles McNeil, Md.; Tommy Kearns, UNC. Second Team - Bucky Allen, Duke; Bob Vernon, Duke; Ray Stanley, UNC; Al Bunge, Md.; Bobby Joe Harris, Duke.

Tournament MVP -Len Rosenbluth, N. Carolina (35.3 points; 11.0 rebounds)

Tournament MVP - Nick Davis, Maryland (19.7 points, 2.3 assists)

(March 4-5-6)

All-Tournament - First Team - Dickie Hemric, WF; Gene Shue, Md.; Mel Thompson, NCS; Ronnie Shavlik, NCS; Skippy Winstead, UNC. Second Team - Buzz Wilkinson, UVa; Bernie Janicki, Duke; Rudy D’Emilio, Duke; Herb Appelbaum, NCS; Lefty Davis, WF. Tournament MVP - Dickie Hemric, Wake Forest (23.4 points, 14.7 rebounds)

124 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

Semifinals - NC State d. Duke 9179; Wake Forest d. North Carolina 77-56.

(March 7-8-9)

(March 6-7-8)


1959 Raleigh, N.C.

(March 5-6-7)

1960 Raleigh, N.C.

(March 3-4-5)

1961 Raleigh, N.C.

1962 Raleigh, N.C.

1963 Raleigh, N.C.

Quarterfinals - #3 Duke d. #6 Wake Forest 78-71; #2 North Carolina d. #7 Clemson 93-69; #1 NC State d. #8 So. Carolina 75-72 (OT) #5 Virginia d. #4 Maryland 66-65.

Quarterfinals - #6 NC State d. #3 Maryland 74-58; #2 Wake Forest d. #7 Clemson 74-59; #1 North Carolina d. Virginia 84-63; #4 Duke d. #5 South Carolina 82-69.

Quarterfinals - #1 Wake Forest, bye; #4 Maryland d. #5 Clemson 91-75; #6 South Carolina d. #3 NC State 80-78; #2 Duke d. #7 Virginia 89-54.

Quarterfinals - #6 Clemson d. #3 NC State 67-46; #2 Duke d. #7 Maryland 71-58; #1 Wake Forest d. #8 Virginia 81-58; #5 South Carolina d. #4 North Carolina 57-55.

Quarterfinals - #3 North Carolina d. #6 South Carolina 9376; #2 Wake Forest d. #7 Maryland 80-41; #1 Duke d. #8 Virginia 89-70; #5 NC State d. #4 Clemson 79-78.

Semifinals - NC State d. Virginia 66-63; North Carolina d. Duke 74-71.

Semifinals - Duke d. North Carolina 71-69; Wake Forest 71 d. NC State 66.

Semifinals - Wake Forest d. South Carolina 88-75; Clemson d. Duke 77-72.

Semifinals - Duke d. NC State 8265; Wake Forest d. North Carolina 56-55.

Finals - NC State d. North Carolina 80-56.

Finals - Duke d. Wake Forest 63-59.

Finals - Wake Forest d. Clemson 77-66.

Finals - Duke d. Wake Forest 68-57.

All-Tournament - First Team Lou Pucillo, NCS; John Richter, NCS; Lee Shaffer, UNC; Paul Adkins, UVa; George Stepanovich, NCS. Second Team - Bob MacGillivray, NCS; Doug Moe, UNC; York Larese, UNC; Howard Hurt, Duke; Carroll Youngkin, Duke.

All-Tournament - First Team Len Chappell, WF; Doug Kistler, Duke; Howard Hurt, Duke; Lee Shaffer, UNC; York Larese, UNC. Second Team - Carroll Youngkin, Duke; David Budd, WF; John Frye, Duke; Bob DiStefano, NCS; Paul Adkins, UVa.

All-Tournament - First Team Len Chappell, WF; Jim Brennan, Clem.; Art Heyman, Duke; Jeff Mullins, Duke; Billy Packer, WF. Second Team - Dave Wiedeman, WF; Jerry Greenspan, Md.; Bob Robinson, USC; Ronnie Collins, USC; Art Whisnant, USC.

All-Tournament - First Team Art Heyman, Duke; Jeff Mullins, Duke; Dave Wiedeman, WF; Billy Cunningham, UNC; Ken Rohloff, NCS. Second Team - Jay Buckley, Duke; Larry Brown, UNC; Bob Woolalard, WF; Frank Christie, WF; Buzzy Harrison, Duke.

Tournament MVP -Lou Pucillo, NC State (13.7 points, 3.0 rebounds)

Tournament MVP - Doug Kistler, Duke (17.3 points, 9.0 rebounds)

Tournament MVP - Len Chappell, Wake Forest (29.0 points, 9.3 rebounds)

Tournament MVP - Art Heyman, Duke (21.3 points, 12.7 rebounds, 5.3 assists)

(March 2-3-4)

Semifinals - Wake Forest d. Maryland 98-76; Duke d. South Carolina 92-75. Finals - Wake Forest d. Duke 96-81. All-Tournament - First Team - Len Chappell, WF; Art Heyman, Duke; Billy Packer, WF; John Frye, Duke; Art Whisnant, USC. Second Team - Bill Stasiulatis, Md.; Scotti Ward, USC; Dave Wiedeman, WF; Carroll Youngkin, Duke; Choppy Patterson, Clem. Tournament MVP - Len Chappell, Wake Forest (33.5 points, 15.0 rebounds)

(March 1-2-3)

(Feb 28; March 1-2)

theACC.com

125


The Acc Tournament 1954-2011

Year by year results

1964 Raleigh, N.C.

1965 Raleigh, N.C.

1966 Raleigh, N.C.

Quarterfinals - #3 Clemson d. #6 Maryland 81-67; #2 Wake Forest d. #7 Virginia 79-60; #1 Duke d. #8 N.C. State 75-44; #5 North Carolina d. #4 South Carolina 80-63.

Quarterfinals - #3 Maryland d. #6 Clemson 61-50; #2 NC State d. #7 Virginia 106-69; #1 Duke d. #8 South Carolina 62-60; #5 Wake Forest d. #4 North Carolina 92-76.

(March 5-6-7)

Semifinals - Duke d. North Carolina 65-49; Wake Forest d. Clemson 86-64. Finals - Duke d. Wake Forest 80-59. All-Tournament - First Team Jeff Mullins, Duke; Jay Buckley, Duke; Billy Cunningham, UNC; Frank Christie, WF; Bob Leonard, WF. Second Team - Hack Tison, Duke; Butch Hassell, WF; Ronny Watts, WF; Denny Ferguson, Duke; Nick Milasnovich, Clem.

(March 4-5-6)

Semifinals - Duke d. Wake Forest 101-81; NC State 76 d. Maryland 76-67. Finals - NC State d. Duke 91-85. All-Tournament - First Team Bob Leonard, WF; Larry Worsley, NCS; Bob Verga, Duke; Steve Vacendak, Duke; Larry Larkins, NCS. Second Team - Tommy Mattocks, NCS; Gary Ward, Md.; Ronny Watts, WF; Jay McMillen, Md.; Jack Marin, Duke.

(March 3-4-5)

1967 Greensboro, N.C.

(March 9-10-11)

1968 Charlotte, N.C.

Quarterfinals - #6 South Carolina d. #3 Clemson 60-52; #2 NC State d. #7 Virginia 86-77; #1 Duke d. #8 Wake Forest 103-73; #4 North Carolina d. #5 Maryland 77-70.

Quarterfinals - #3 South Carolina d. #6 Maryland 57-54; #2 Duke #7 Virginia 99-78; #1 North Carolina d. #8 NC State 56-53; #5 Wake Forest d. #4 Clemson 63-61 (2ot).

Quarterfinals - #3 NC State d. #6 Maryland 63-54; #2 Duke d. #7 Clemson 43-40; #1 North Carolina d. #8 Wake Forest 83-70; #4 South Carolina d. #5 Virginia 101-78.

Semifinals - North Carolina d. Wake Forest 89-79; Duke d. South Carolina 69-66.

Semifinals - North Carolina d. South Carolina 82-79 (OT); NC State d. Duke 12-10.

Finals - North Carolina d. Duke 82-73.

Finals - North Carolina d. NC State 87-50.

All-Tournament - First Team Larry Miller, UNC; Bob Verga, Duke; Al Salvadori, USC; Bob Lewis, UNC; Paul Long, WF.

All-Tournament - First Team - Larry Miller, UNC; Gary Gregor, USC; Dick Grubar, UNC; Jack Thompson, USC; Skip Harlicka, USC. Second Team - Charles Scott, UNC; Rusty Clark, UNC; Eddie Biedenbach, NCS; Vann Williford, NCS; Mike Lewis, Duke.

Semifinals - Duke d. North Carolina 21-20; NC State d. South Carolina 75-62. Finals - Duke d. NC State 71-66. All-Tournament - First Team - Eddie Biedenbach, NCS; Steve Vacendak, Duke; Tommy Mattocks, NCS; Bob Verga, Duke; Mike Lewis, Duke. Second Team - Skip Harlicka, USC; Larry Miller, UNC; Jack Marin, Duke; Bob Riedy, Duke; Bob Lewis,

Second Team - Mike Lewis, Duke; Rusty Clark, UNC; Jack Thompson, USC; Jerry Montgomery, WF; Randy Mahaffey, Clem.; Dick Grubar, UNC.

(March 7-8-9)

Everett Case Award - Larry Worsley, NC State (19.0 points, 5.0 rebounds)

Everett Case Award - Steve Vacendak, Duke (10.0 points, 2.0 rebounds)

1969 Charlotte, N.C.

1970 Charlotte, N.C.

(March 5-6-7)

1971 Greensboro, N.C.

(March 11-12-13)

(March 7-8-9)

(March 8-9-10)

Quarterfinals - #3 Duke d. #6 Virginia 99-86; #2 South Carolina d. #7 Maryland 92-71; #1 North Carolina d. #8 Clemson 94-70; #5 Wake Forest d. #4 NC State 81-73.

Quarterfinals - #1 South Carolina d. #8 Clemson 34-33; #7 Virginia d. #2 North Carolina 95-93; #3 NC State d. #6 Maryland 67-57; #5 Wake Forest d. #4 Duke 81-73.

Quarterfinals -#1 North Carolina, bye; #2 Maryland 54 d. #7 Clemson 54-52; #3 Virginia d. #6 Wake Forest 74-65; #4 Duke d. #5 NC State 73-60.

Quarterfinals - #1 NC State, bye; #7 Wake Forest d. #2 North Carolina 54-52 (OT); #3 Maryland d. #6 Clemson 77-61; #5 Virginia d. #4 Duke 59-55.

Semifinals - North Carolina d. Wake Forest 80-72; Duke d. South Carolina 68-59.

Semifinals - South Carolina d. Wake Forest 79-63. NC State d. Virginia 67-66.

Quarterfinals - #1 North Carolina d. #8 Clemson 76-41; #2 South Carolina d. #7 Maryland 71-63; #6 NC State d. #3 Duke 68-61; #5 Virginia d. #4 Wake Forest 85-84.

Semifinals - North Carolina d. Duke 63-48; Maryland d. Virginia 62-57.

Semifinals - NC State d. Virginia 63-51; Maryland d. Wake Forest 73-65.

Finals - North Carolina d. Duke 85-74.

Finals - NC State d. South Carolina 42-39 (2 ot).

Finals - North Carolina d. Maryland 73-64.

Finals - NC State d. Maryland 76-74.

All-Tournament - First Team - Charles Scott, UNC; Charlie Davis, WF; Dick DeVenzio, Duke; Steve Vanderberg, Duke; John Roche, USC. Second Team - Jerry Montgomery, WF; Bill Bunting, UNC; Dave Golden, Duke; Dick Grubar, UNC; Vann Williford, NCS.

All-Tournament - First Team Vann Williford, NCS; Charlie Davis, WF; Tom Owens, USC; Chip Case, UVa; Tom Riker, USC. Second Team - Charles Scott, UNC; John Roche, USC; Bill Gerry, UVa; Ed Leftwich, NCS; Joe Dunning, NCS.

All-Tournament - First Team - Barry Parkhill, UVa; Dennis Wuycik, UNC; Robert McAdoo, UNC; George Karl, UNC; Tom McMillen, Md. Second Team - Jim O’Brien, Md.; Scott McCandlish, UVa; Gary Melchionni, Duke; Len Elmore, Md.; Steve Previs, UNC.

All-Tournament - First Team - Tommy Burleson, NCS; David Thompson, NCS; Tom McMillen, Md.; John Lucas, Md.; Eddie Payne, WF. Second Team - Bobby Jones, UNC; Jim O’Brien, Md.; Gus Gerard, UVa; Barry Parkhill, UVa; Tony Byers, WF.

Everett Case Award - Bob McAdoo, North Carolina (15.0 points; 7.5 rebounds)

Everett Case Award - Tom Burleson, NC State (14.0 points, 12.5 rebounds)

Tournament MVP - Jeff Mullins, Duke (19.3 points, 6.7 rebounds)

(March 6-7-8)

Everett Case Award - Charlie Scott, North Carolina (24.7 points; 5.7 rebounds)

Everett Case Award - Vann Williford, NC State (24.3 points; 9.3 rebounds)

126 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

Semifinals - North Carolina d. Virginia 78-68; South Carolina d. NC State 69-56. Finals - South Carolina d. North Carolina 52-51. All-Tournament - First Team Barry Parkhill, UVa; Tom Owens, USC; John Roche, USC; Lee Dedmon, UNC; Paul Coder, NCS. Second Team - Al Heartley, NCS; George Karl, UNC; Bill Chamberlain, UNC; Tom Riker, USC; Charlie Davis, WF. Everett Case Award - John Roche, South Carolina & Lee Dedmon, North Carolina

Tournament MVP - Larry Miller, North Carolina (25.7 points, 8.3 rebounds)

1972 Greensboro, N.C.

Everett Case Award - Larry Miller, North Carolina (25.3 points,; 8.3 rebounds)

1973 Greensboro, N.C.


1974 Greensboro, N.C.

1975 Greensboro, N.C.

1976 Landover, Md.

1977 Greensboro, N.C. (March 3-4-5)

(March 1-2, 4)

Quarterfinals - #1 NC State, bye; #2 Maryland d. #7 Duke 85-66; #3 North Carolina d. #6 Wake Forest 76-62; #4 Virginia d. #5 Clemson 68-63.

Quarterfinals - #1 Maryland, bye; #2 North Carolina d. #7 Wake Forest 101-100 (OT); #3 Clemson d. #6 Duke 78-76; #4 NC State d. #5 Virginia 91-85.

Quarterfinals -#1 North Carolina, bye; #2 Maryland d. #7 Duke 80-78 (OT); #6 Virginia d. #3 NC State 75-63; #4 Clemson d. #5 Wake Forest 76-63.

Quarterfinals - #1 North Carolina, bye; #7 Virginia d. #2 Wake Forest 59-57; #3 Clemson d. #6 Duke 82-74; #5 NC State d. #4 Maryland 82-72.

Quarterfinals - #1 North Carolina, bye; #2 Duke d. #7 Clemson 83-72; #6 Maryland d. #3 NC State 109-108 (3ot); #5 Wake Forest d. #4 72-61.

Semifinals - NC State d. Virginia 87-66; Maryland d. North Carolina 105-85.

Semifinals - NC State d. Maryland 87-85; North Carolina d. Clemson 76-71 (OT).

Semifinals - North Carolina d. Clemson 82-74; Virginia d. Maryland 73-65.

Semifinals - North Carolina d. NC State 70-56; Virginia d. Clemson 72-60.

Semifinals - Duke d. Maryland 8169; Wake Forest d. North Carolina 82-77.

Finals - NC State d. Maryland 103-100 (OT).

Finals - North Carolina d. NC State 70-66.

Finals - Virginia d. North Carolina 67-62.

Finals - North Carolina d. Virginia 75-69.

Finals - Duke d. Wake Forest 85-77.

All-Tournament - First Team -David Thompson, NCS; Tommy Burleson, NCS; Tom McMillen, Md.; John Lucas, Md.; Maurice Howard, Md. Second Team - Len Elmore, Md.; Owen Brown, Md.; Gus Gerard, UVa; Monte Towe, NCS; Billy Langloh, UVa.

All-Tournament - First Team - David Thompson, NCS; Mitch Kupchak, UNC; Kenny Carr, NCS; Phil Ford, UNC; Skip Wise, Clem. Second Team - John Lucas, Md.; Wally Walker, UVa; Walter Davis, UNC; Skip Brown, WF; Monte Towe, NCS.

All-Tournament - First Team Phil Ford, UNC; Mike O’Koren, UNC; Bobby Stokes, UVa; Marc Iavaroni, UVa; John Kuester, UNC; Kenny Carr, NCS. Second Team - Steve Castellan, UVa; Billy Langloh, UVa; Walter Davis, UNC; Jim Spanarkel, Duke; Mike Gminski, Duke.

All-Tournament - First Team - Mike Gminski, Duke; Leroy McDonald, WF; Rod Griffi n, WF; Jim Spanarkel, Duke; Gene Banks, Duke. Second Team - Phil Ford, UNC; Frank Johnson, WF; Kenny Dennard, Duke; Lawrence Boston, Md.; Larry Gibson, Md.

Everett Case Award - Tom Burleson, NC State (26.5 points, 12.0 rebounds)

Everett Case Award - Phil Ford, North Carolina (26.0 points, 3.3 assists)

All-Tournament - First Team Wally Walker, UVa; Billy Langloh, UVa; Marc Iavaroni, UVa; Mitch Kupchak, UNC; Tate Armstrong, Duke; Phil Ford, UNC. Second Team - Maurice Howard, Md.; Steve Sheppard, Md.; Bobby Stokes, UVa; Stan Rome, Clem.; Walter Davis, UNC.

Everett Case Award - John Kuester, North Carolina (13.5 points, 4.0 assists)

Everett Case Award - Jim Spanarkel, Duke (17.7 points, 4.3 rebounds)

1979 Greensboro, N.C.

1980 Greensboro, N.C.

1981 Landover, Md.

1982 Greensboro, N.C.

1983 Atlanta, Ga.

Quarterfinals - #1 North Carolina, bye; #2 Duke d. #7 Wake Forest 58-56; #6 NC State d. #3 Virginia 82-78; #4 Maryland d. #5 Clemson 75-67.

Quarterfinals -#2 North Carolina d. #7 Wake Forest 75-62; #1 Maryland d. #8 Georgia Tech 51-49 (OT); #6 Duke d. #3 NC State 68-62; #4 Clemson d. #5 Virginia 57-49.

Quarterfinals - #3 Wake Forest d. #6 Clemson 80-71; #1 Virginia d. #8 Georgia Tech 76-47; #2 North Carolina d. #7 NC State 69-54; #4 Maryland d. #5 Duke 56-53.

Quarterfinals - #1 North Carolina d. #8 Georgia Tech 55-39; #4 N.C. State d. #5 Maryland 40-28; #2 Virginia d. #7 Clemson 56-54; #3 Wake Forest d. #6 Duke 88-53.

Semifinals - Maryland d. Virginia 85-62; North Carolina d. Wake Forest 58-57.

Semifinals - North Carolina d. N.C. State 58-46; Virginia d. Wake Forest 51-49 (OT).

Quarterfinals - #1 North Carolina d. #8 Clemson 105-79; #4 N.C. State d. #5 Wake Forest 71-70; #2 Virginia d. #7 Duke 109-66; #6 Georgia Tech d. #3 Maryland 64-58 (OT).

Finals - North Carolina d. Maryland 61-60.

Finals - North Carolina d. Virginia 47-45.

All-Tournament - First Team -Sam Perkins, UNC; Frank Johnson, WF; Albert King, Md.; James Worthy, UNC; Buck Williams, Md. Second Team - Ernest Graham, Md.; Jeff Lamp, UVa; Al Wood, UNC; Larry Nance, Clem.; Jimmy Black, UNC.

All-Tournament - First Team -James Worthy, UNC; Ralph Sampson, UVa; Michael Jordan, UNC; Sam Perkins, UNC; Mike Helms, WF. Second Team - Vince Hamilton, Clem.; Ricky Stokes, UVa; Jim Johnstone, WF; Dereck Whittenburg, NCS; Matt Doherty, UNC.

(March 7-8-9)

(March 1-2-3)

Semifinals - North Carolina d. Maryland 102-79; Duke d. NC State 62-59. Finals - North Carolina d. Duke 71-63. All-Tournament - First Team Jim Spanarkel, Duke; Mike O’Koren, UNC; Dudley Bradley, UNC; Mike Gminski, Duke; Dave Colescott, UNC. Second Team - Charles Whitney, NCS; Al Wood, UNC; Larry Gibson, Md.; Jeff Lamp, UVa; Clyde Austin, NCS. Everett Case Award - Dudley Bradley, North Carolina (12.5 points, 4.0 rebounds)

(March 6-7-8)

(Feb 28-29, March 1)

Semifinals - Maryland d. Clemson 91-85; Duke d. North Carolina 75-61. Finals - Duke d. Maryland 73-72. All-Tournament - First Team Albert King, Md.; Gene Banks, Duke; Mike Gminski, Duke; Al Wood, UNC; Greg Manning, Md. Second Team Vince Taylor, Duke; Billy Williams, Clem.; Brook Steppe, GT; Buck Williams, Md.; Ernest Graham, Md. Everett Case Award - Albert King, Maryland (27.0 points; 6.3 rebounds)

(March 4-5-6)

Everett Case Award - Wally Walker, Virginia (24.3 points, 7.0 rebounds)

(March 5-6-7)

Everett Case Award - Sam Perkins, North Carolina (17.7 points; 8.3 rebounds)

(March 5-6-7)

Everett Case Award - James Worthy, North Carolina (13.3 points; 8.7 rebounds)

1978 Greensboro, N.C.

(March 11-12-13)

Semifinals - N.C. State d. North Carolina 91-84 (OT); Virginia d. Georgia Tech 96-67. Finals - N.C. State d. Virginia 81-78. All-Tournament - First Team Thurl Bailey, NCS; Ralph Sampson, UVa; Sidney Lowe, NCS; Othell Wilson, UVa; Dereck Whittenburg, NCS. Second Team - Mark Price, GT; Michael Jordan, UNC; Matt Doherty, UNC; Lorenzo Charles, NCS; Sam Perkins, UNC. Everett Case Award - Sidney Lowe, NC State (18.3 points; 4.3 assists) theACC.com

127


The Acc Tournament 1954-2011

1984 Greensboro, N.C.

1985 Atlanta, Ga.

Year by year results

(March 8-9-10)

1986 Greensboro, N.C.

(March 7-8-9)

1987 Landover, Md.

(March 6-7-8)

(March 11-12-13)

Quarterfinals - #1 North Carolina d. #8 Clemson 78-66; #4 Duke d. #5 Georgia Tech 67-63 (OT); #2 Maryland d. #7 N.C. State 69-63; #3 Wake Forest d. #6 Virginia 63-51.

Quarterfinals - #1 Georgia Tech d. #8 Virginia 55-48; #4 Duke d. #5 Maryland 86-73; #2 North Carolina d. #7 Wake Forest 72-61 (OT); #3 N.C. State d. #6 Clemson 70-63.

Quarterfinals - #1 Duke d. #8 Wake Forest 68-60; #5 Virginia d. #4 N.C. State 64-62; #2 Georgia Tech d. #7 Clemson 79-61; #6 Maryland d. #3 North Carolina 85-75.

Quarterfinals - #1 North Carolina d. #8 Maryland 82-63; #4 Virginia d. #5 Georgia Tech 55-54; #7 Wake Forest d. #2 Clemson 69-62; #6 N.C. State d. #3 Duke 71-64 (OT).

Quarterfinals - #1 North Carolina d. #8 Wake Forest 8362; #5 Maryland d. #4 Georgia Tech 84-67; #2 N.C. State d. #7 Clemson 79-77; #3 Duke d. #6 Virginia 60-48.

Semifinals - Duke d. North Carolina 77-75; Maryland d. Wake Forest 66-64.

Semifinals - Georgia Tech d. Duke 75-64; North Carolina d. N.C. State 57-51.

Semifinals - Duke d. Virginia 75-70; Georgia Tech d. Maryland 64-62.

Semifinals - North Carolina d. Virginia 84-82 (2ot); N.C. State d. Wake Forest 77-73 (2ot)

Semifinals - North Carolina d. Maryland 74-64; Duke d. N.C. State 73-71.

Finals - Maryla3nd d. Duke 74-62.

Finals - Georgia Tech d. North Carolina 57-54.

Finals - Duke d. Georgia Tech 68-67.

Finals - N.C. State d. North Carolina 68-67.

Finals - Duke d. North Carolina 65-61.

All-Tournament - First Team -Mark Price, GT; Brad Daugherty, UNC; Bruce Dalrymple, GT; Kenny Smith, UNC; Johnny Dawkins, Duke. Second Team - John Salley, GT; Anthony “Spud� Webb, NCS; Jay Bilas, Duke; Delaney Rudd, WF; Yvon Joseph, GT.

All-Tournament - First Team - Johnny Dawkins, Duke; Duane Ferrell, GT; Len Bias, Md.; Mark Alarie, Duke; David Henderson, Duke. Second Team - John Salley, GT; Mark Price, GT; Tom Hammonds, GT; Tom Sheehey, UVa; Olden Polynice, UVa.

All-Tournament - First Team - Tyrone Bogues, WF; Vinny Del Negro, NCS; Andrew Kennedy, UVa; Jeff Lebo, UNC; Joe Wolf, UNC. Second Team - Bennie Bolton, NCS; Chucky Brown, NCS; J.R. Reid, UNC; Charles Shackleford, NCS; Kenny Smith, UNC.

All-Tournament - First Team - Danny Ferry, Duke; J.R. Reid, UNC; Robert Brickey, Duke; Scott Williams, UNC; Charles Shackleford, NCS. Second Team - Jeff Lebo, UNC; Quinn Snyder, Duke; Keith Gatlin, Md.; Vinny Del Negro, NCS; Rodney Monroe, NCS.

Everett Case Award - Mark Price, Georgia Tech (16.7 points, 5.3 assists)

Everett Case Award - Johnny Dawkins, Duke (20.0 points, 4.7 rebounds, 4.3 assists)

Everett Case Award -Vinny Del Negro, NC State (14.0 points, 7.7 rebounds)

Everett Case Award - Danny Ferry, Duke (18.0 points, 8.0 rebounds)

1989 Atlanta, Ga.

1990 Charlotte, N.C.

1991 Charlotte, N.C.

1992 Charlotte, N.C.

1993 Charlotte, N.C.

Quarterfinals - #8 Maryland d. #1 NC State 71-49; #4 North Carolina d. #5 Georgia Tech 77-62; #2 Duke d. #7 Wake Forest 88-64; #3 Virginia d. #6 Clemson 90-73.

Quarterfinals -#1 Clemson d. #8 Wake Forest 79-70; #5 Virginia d. #4 North Carolina 92-85 (OT); #2 Duke d. #7 Maryland 104-84; #3 Georgia Tech d. #6 NC State 76-67.

Quarterfinals - #1 Duke bye; #4 NC State d. #5 Georgia Tech 82-68; #2 North Carolina d. #7 Clemson 67-59; #6 Virginia d. #3 Wake Forest 70-66.

First Round - #8 Maryland d. #9 Clemson 81-75.

First Round - #8 Maryland d. #9 NC State 76-55.

Semifinals - North Carolina d. Maryland 88-58; Duke d. Virginia 69-58.

Semifinals - Virginia d. Clemson 69-66; Georgia Tech d. Duke 83-72.

Semifinals - Duke d. NC State 9372; North Carolina d. Virginia 76-71.

Quarterfinals - #4 Georgia Tech d. #5 Virginia 68-56; #1 Duke d. #8 Maryland 94-87; #2 Florida State d. #7 NC State 93-80; #3 North Carolina d. #6 Wake Forest 80-65.

Quarterfinals - #7 Clemson d. #2 Florida State 87-75; #6 Georgia Tech d. #3 Duke 69-66; #5 Virginia d. #4 Wake Forest 61-57; #1 North Carolina d. #8 Maryland 102-66.

Finals - Georgia Tech d. Virginia 70-61.

Finals - North Carolina d. Duke 96-74.

All-Tournament - First Team Dennis Scott, GT; Bryant Stith, UVa; Brian Oliver, GT; Kenny Anderson, GT; Phil Henderson, Duke. Second Team - Anthony Oliver, UVa; Christian Laettner, Duke; Kenny Turner, UVa; Dale Davis, Clem.; John Crotty, UVa.

All-Tournament - First Team Christian Laettner, Duke; Rick Fox, UNC; John Crotty, UVa; Hubert Davis, UNC; Rodney Monroe, NCS. Second Team - Pete Chilcutt, UNC; King Rice, UNC; Greg Koubek, Duke; Chris Corchiani, NCS; Grant Hill, Duke.

Semifinals - Duke d. Georgia Tech 89-76; North Carolina d. Florida State 80-76.

Semifinals - North Carolina d. Virginia 74-56; Georgia Tech d. Clemson 69-61.

Finals - Duke d. North Carolina 94-74

Finals - Georgia Tech d. North Carolina 77-75.

Tournament MVP - Brain Oliver, Georgia Tech (23.3 points, 5.0 rebounds)

Tournament MVP - Rick Fox, North Carolina (17.3 points, 9.0 rebounds)

(March 9-10-11)

All-Tournament - First Team Len Bias, Md.; Mark Alarie, Duke; Johnny Dawkins, Duke; Matt Doherty, UNC; Ben Coleman, Md. Second Team - Adrian Branch, Md.; Michael Jordan, UNC; Murray Jarman, Clem.; Anthony Teachey, WF; Mark Price, GT. Everett Case Award - Len Bias, Maryland (18.7 points, 6.0 rebounds)

(March 10-11-12)

Finals - North Carolina d. Duke 77-74. All-Tournament - First Team -Danny Ferry, Duke; J.R. Reid, UNC; Jeff Lebo, UNC; Tony Massenburg, Md.; Phil Henderson, Duke. Second Team - Rick Fox, UNC; Steve Bucknall, UNC; Christian Laettner, Duke; Chris King, WF; Bryant Stith, UVa. Everett Case Award - J.R. Reid, North Carolina (16.0 points, 8.0 rebounds)

(March 9-10-11)

128 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

(March 8-9-10)

(March 12-13-14-15)

All-Tournament - First Team Christian Laettner, Duke; Hubert Davis, UNC; Bobby Hurley, Duke; George Lynch, UNC; Brian Davis, Duke. Second Team - Walt Williams, Md.; Grant Hill, Duke; Rodney Rogers, WF; Charlie Ward, FSU; Malcolm Mackey, GT. Everett Case Award - Christian Laettner, Duke (24.3 points, 10.3 rebounds)

1988 Greensboro, N.C.

(March 11-12-13-14)

All-Tournament - First Team James Forrest, GT; Eric Montross, UNC; Brian Reese, UNC; Drew Barry, GT; Cory Alexander, UVa. Second Team - Chris Whitney, Clem.; Sharone Wright, Clem.; Travis Best, GT; George Lynch, UNC; Donald Williams, UNC. Everett Case Award - James Forrest, GT (26.7 points, 8.7 rebounds)


1994 Charlotte, N.C.

1995 Charlotte, N.C.

1996 Greensboro, N.C.

(March 7-8-9-10)

1997 Greensboro, N.C.

(March 6-7-8-9)

1998 Greensboro, N.C.

First Round - #8 Clemson d. #9 NC State 76-63.

First Round - #9 Duke d. #8 NC State 83-70.

First Round - #9 NC State d. #8 Florida State 80-65.

First Round - #8 NC State d. #9 Georgia Tech 60-46.

Quarterfinals - #4 Virginia d. #5 Maryland 69-63; #1 Duke d. #8 Clemson 77-64; #2 North Carolina d. #7 Florida State 83-69; #3 Wake Forest d. #6 Georgia Tech 74-49.

Quarterfinals - #4 Virginia d. #5 Georgia Tech 77-67; #1 Wake Forest d. #9 Duke 87-70; #2 North Carolina d. #7 Clemson 78-62; #3 Maryland d. #6 Florida State 71-64.

Quarterfinals - #5 Maryland d. #4 Clemson 76-61; #8 NC State d. #1 Duke 66-60; #2 Wake Forest d. Florida State 66-65; #3 North Carolina d. #6 Virginia 78-68.

Semifinals - Virginia d. Duke 6661; North Carolina d. Wake Forest 86-84.

Semifinals - Wake Forest d. Virginia 77-68; North Carolina d. Maryland 97-92 (OT).

Quarterfinals - #5 Maryland d. #4 Duke 82-69; #1 Georgia Tech d. #9 NC State 88-73; #2 Wake Forest d. #7 Virginia 70-60; #6 Clemson d. #3 North Carolina 75-73.

First Round - #8 NC State d. #7 Florida State 65-63; #1 Duke d. #9 Virginia 63-41.

Finals - North Carolina d. Virginia 73-66.

Finals - Wake Forest d. North Carolina 82-80 (OT).

All-Tournament - First Team Jerry Stackhouse, UNC; Harold Deane, UVa; Derrick Phelps, UNC; Jamal Robinson, UVa; Randolph Childress, WF. Second Team - Grant Hill, Duke; Rasheed Wallace, UNC; Trelonnie Owens, WF; Cherokee Parks, Duke; Eric Montross, UNC.

All-Tournament - First Team - Randolph Childress, WF; Tim Duncan, WF; Jerry Stackhouse, UNC; Rasheed Wallace, UNC; Junior Burrough, UVa. Second Team - Joe Smith, Md.; Donald Williams, UNC; Exree Hipp, Md.; Dante Calabria, UNC; Jeff McInnis, UNC.

Everett Case Award - Jerry Stackhouse, North Carolina (15.7 points, 6.7 rebounds)

Everett Case Award - Randolph Childress, Wake Forest (35.7 points, 7.0 assists)

(March 10-11-12-13)

(March 9-10-11-12)

Semifinals - Georgia Tech d. Maryland 84-79; Wake Forest d. Clemson 68-60. Finals - Wake Forest d. Georgia Tech 75-74. All-Tournament - First Team Tim Duncan, WF; Tony Rutland, WF; Matt Harpring, GT; Stephon Marbury, GT; Greg Buckner, Clem. Second Team - no second team chosen Everett Case Award - Tim Duncan, Wake Forest (22.7 points, 18.7 rebounds)

(March 5-6-7-8)

Quarterfinals - #5 Clemson d. #4 Wake Forest 75-56; #2 North Carolina d. #8 NC State 73-46; #3 Maryland d. #6 Georgia Tech 83-65

Semifinals - NC State d. Maryland 65-58; North Carolina d. Wake Forest 86-73

Semifinals - North Carolina d. Maryland 83-73 OT; Duke d. Clemson 66-64,

Finals - North Carolina d. NC State 64-54.

Finals - North Carolina d. Duke 83-68.

All-Tournament - First Team Shammond Williams, UNC; Justin Gainey, NCS; Antawn Jamison, UNC; C.C. Harrison, NCS; Tim Duncan, WF. Second Team - Keith Booth, Md.; Jeremy Hyatt, NCS; Ed Cota, UNC; Serge Zwikker, UNC; Danny Strong, NCS.

All-Tournament - First Team Shammond Williams, UNC; Antawn Jamison, UNC; Roshown McLeod, Duke; Trajan Langdon, Duke; Terrell McIntyre, Clem. Second Team Chris Carrawell, Duke; Ademola Okulaja, UNC; Vince Carter, UNC; Ed Cota, UNC; Rodney Elliott, Md.

Everett Case Award - Shammond Williams, North Carolina (20.0 points, 5.0 assists)

Everett Case Award - Antawn Jamison, North Carolina (20.7 points, 11.3 rebounds) theACC.com

129


The Acc Tournament 1954-2011

Year by year results

1999 Charlotte, N.C.

2000 Charlotte, N.C.

2001 Atlanta, Ga.

2002 Charlotte, N.C.

(March 7-8-9-10)

(March 13-14-15-16)

First Round - #8 Florida State d. #7 Clemson 87-85 (OT); #1 Duke d. #9 Virginia 104-67.

First Round - #7 Florida State d. #8 Georgia Tech 63-62; #1 Duke d. #9 Clemson 94-63.

First Round - #9 Clemson d. #8 Florida State 66-64.

First Round - #9 Florida State d. #8 Clemson 91-84.

First Round - #9 Florida State d. #8 Clemson 72-61

Quarterfinals - #5 NC State d. #4 Wake Forest 66-52; #2 Maryland d. #8 Florida State 93-69; #3 North Carolina d. #6 Georgia Tech 78-49.

Quarterfinals - #Wake Forest d. #4 North Carolina 58-52; #2 Maryland d. #7 Florida State 82-61; #6 NC State d. #3 Virginia 76-65.

Quarterfinals - #1 N. Carolina d. #9 Clemson 99-81; #5 Georgia Tech d. #4 Virginia 74-69; #2 Duke d. #7 NC State 76-61; #3 Maryland d. #6 Wake Forest 71-53.

Quarterfinals - #1 Wake Forest d. #9 Florida State 69-61; #4 NC State d. #5 Georgia Tech 71-65; #7 North Carolina d. #2 Maryland 8472; #3 Duke d. #6 Virginia 83-76.

Semifinals - Duke d. Wake Forest 82-73; Maryland d. N.C. State 64-61.

Semifinals - North Carolina d. Georgia Tech 70-63; Duke d. Maryland 84-82.

Quarterfinals - #1 Maryland d. #9 Florida State 85-59; #4 NC State d. #5 Virginia 92-72; #2 Duke d. #7 North Carolina 60-48; #3 Wake Forest d. #6 Georgia Tech 92-83.

Finals - Duke d. Maryland 81-68.

Finals - Duke d. North Carolina 79-53.

(March 4-5-6-7)

Semifinals - Duke d. NC State 83-68; North Carolina d. Maryland 86-79. Finals - Duke d. North Carolina 96-73. All-Tournament - First Team -William Avery, Duke; Max Owens, UNC; Steve Francis, Md.; Ademola Okulaja, UNC; Elton Brand, Duke. Second Team - Corey Maggette, Duke; Shane Battier, Duke; Ed Cota, UNC; Anthony Grundy, NCS; Kris Lang, UNC. Everett Case Award - Elton Brand, Duke (19.3 points, 10.3 rebounds)

(March 9-10-11-12)

All-Tournament - First Team Jason Williams, Duke; Juan Dixon, Md.; Shane Battier, Duke; Lonny Baxter, Md.; Chris Carrawell, Duke. Second Team - Terence Morris, Md.; Carlos Boozer, Duke; Mike Dunleavy, Duke; Damien Wilkins, NCS; Nate James, Duke. Everett Case Award - Jason Williams, Duke (17.7 points; 9.0 assists)

130 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

(March 8-9-10-11)

All-Tournament - First Team - Shane Battier, Duke; Jason Williams, Duke; Joseph Forte, UNC; Mike Dunleavy, Duke; Juan Dixon, Md. Second Team - Brendan Haywood, UNC; Lonny Baxter, Md.; Alvin Jones, GT; Nate James, Duke; Jason Capel, UNC Everett Case Award - Shane Battier, Duke (18.7 points; 8.3 rebounds)

2003 Greensboro, N.C.

Semifinals - NC State d. Maryland 82-86; Duke d. Wake Forest 79-64.

Semifinals - NC State d. Wake Forest 87-83; Duke d. North Carolina 75-63.

Finals - Duke d. NC State 91-61.

Finals - Duke d. NC State 84-77.

All-Tournament - First Team - Carlos Boozer, Duke; Jason Williams, Duke; Anthony Grundy, NCS; Mike Dunleavy, Duke; Archie Miller, NCS. Second Team - Steve Blake, Md.; Julius Hodge, NCS; Darius Songaila, WF; Chris Duhon, Duke; Marcus Melvin, NCS.

All-Tournament - First Team -Daniel Ewing, Duke; Marcus Melvin, NCS; Josh Powell, NCS; Julius Hodge, NCS; Raymond Felton, UNC. Second Team - J.J. Redick, Duke; Jawad Williams, UNC; Scooter Sherrill, NCS; Josh Howard, WF; Dahntay Jones, Duke.

Everett Case Award - Carlos Boozer, Duke (18.0 points,; 9.3 rebounds)

Everett Case Award - Daniel Ewing, Duke (20.7 points; 3.0 rebounds).


2004 Greensboro, N.C.

2005 Washington, D.C.

First Round - #8 Virginia d. #9 Clemson 83-79.

(March 11-12-13-14)

Quarterfinals - #1 Duke d. #8 Virginia 84-74; #4 Georgia Tech d. #5 North Carolina 83-82; #2 NC State d. #7 Florida State 78-71; #6 Maryland d. #3 Wake Forest 87-86. Semifinals - Duke d. Georgia Tech 85-71; Maryland d. NC State 85-82. Finals - Maryland d. Duke 95-87 ot. All-Tournament - First Team - John Gilchrist, Md.; Shelden Williams, Duke; Chris Duhon, Duke; Jamar Smith, Md.; Daniel Ewing, Duke. Second Team - Julius Hodge, NCS; Luol Deng, Duke; Travis Garrison, Md.; B.J. Elder, GT; Chris Paul, WF. Everett Case Award - John Gilchrist, Maryland (24.0 points, 6.3 assists)

(March 10-11-12-13)

2006 Greensboro, N.C.

(March 9-10-11-12)

2007 Tampa, Fla.

2008 Charlotte, N.C.

First Round - #9 Clemson d. #8 Maryland 84-72; #7 NC State d. #10 Florida State 70-54; #11 Virginia d. #6 Miami 66-65.

First Round - #8 Miami d. #9 Clemson 66-63; #12 Wake Forest d. #5 Florida State 78-66; #7 Virginia d. #10 Virginia Tech 60-56; #6 Maryland d. #11 Georgia Tech 82-64.

First Round - #9 Florida State d. #8 Clemson 67-66; #12 Miami d. #5 Maryland 67-62; #10 NC State d. #7 Duke 85-80 ot; #11 Wake Forest d. #6 Georgia Tech 114-112 2ot.

First Round - #9 Florida State d. #8 Wake Forest 70-60; #5 Miami d. #12 NC State 63-50; #7 Georgia Tech d. #10 Virginia 94-76; #11 Boston College d. #6 Maryland 71-68.

Quarterfinals - #1 Duke d. #8 Miami 80-76; #12 Wake Forest d. #4 NC State 82-71; #2 North Carolina 79 d. #7 Virginia 79-67; #3 Boston College d. #6 Maryland 80-66.

Quarterfinals - #1 N. Carolina d. #9 Florida State 73-58; #4 Boston College d. #12 Miami 74-71 ot; #10 NC State d. #2 Virginia 79-71; #3 Virginia Tech d. #11 Wake Forest 71-52.

Quarterfinals - #1 N. Carolina d. #9 Florida State 82-70; #4 Virginia Tech d. #5 Miami 63-49; #2 Duke d. #7 Georgia Tech 82-70; #3 Clemson d. #11 Boston College 82-48.

Semifinals - Duke d. Wake Forest 78-66; Boston College d. North Carolina 85-82.

Semifinals - North Carolina d. Boston College 71-56; NC State d. Virginia Tech 72-64.

Semifinals - North Carolina d. Virginia Tech 68-66; Clemson d. Duke 78-74.

Finals - Duke d. Boston College 78-76.

Finals - North Carolina d. NC State 89-80.

Finals - North Carolina d. Clemson 86-81.

All-Tournament - First Team - .J. Redick, Duke; Craig Smith, BC; Jared Dudley, BC; Shelden Williams, Duke; Tyler Hansbrough, UNC. Second Team - Greg Paulus, Duke; Louis Hinnant, BC; Josh McRoberts, Duke; Reyshawn Terry, UNC; Eric Williams, WF.

All-Tournament - First Team - Brandan Wright, UNC; Wayne Ellington, UNC; Ty Lawson, UNC; Brandon Costner, NCS; Gavin Grant, NCS. Second Team - Courtney Fells, NCS; Ben McCauley, NCS; Engin Atsur, NCS; Al Thornton, FSU; Tyrese Rice, BC.

Everett Case Award - J.J. Redick, Duke (23.7 points; 2.0 assists)

Everett Case Award - Brandan Wright, North Carolina (15.7 points; 3.7 rebounds)

All-Tournament - First Team Tyler Hansbrough, UNC; Wayne Ellington, UNC; Marcus Ginyard, UNC; K.C. Rivers, Clem.; Trevor Booker, Clem. Second Team - James Mays, Clem.; Cliff Hammonds, Clem.; DeMarcus Nelson, Duke; Malcolm Delaney, VT; A.D. Vassallo, VT.

Quarterfinals - #1 North Carolina d. #9 Clemson 88-81; #5 Georgia Tech d. #4 Virginia Tech 73-54; #7 NC State d. #2 Wake Forest 81-65; #3 Duke d. #11 Virginia 76-64. Semifinals - Georgia Tech d. North Carolina 78-75; Duke d. NC State 76-69. Finals - Duke d. Georgia Tech 69-64. All-Tournament - First Team - J.J. Redick, Duke; Shelden Williams, Duke; Daniel Ewing, Duke; Will Bynum, GT; Raymond Felton, UNC Second Team - Jarrett Jack, GT; Elian Evtimov, NCS; Julius Hodge, NCS; Shawan Robinson, Clem.; J.R. Reynolds, UVa. Everett Case Award - J.J. Redick, Duke (25.3 points; 4.3 rebounds)

(March 8-9-10-11)

(March 13-14-15-16)

Everett Case Award - Tyler Hansbrough, North Carolina (22.8 points; 8.7 rebounds) theACC.com

131


The Acc Tournament 1954-2011

Year by year results

2009 Atlanta, Ga.

2010 Greensboro, N.C.

(March 11-12-13-14)

(March 10-11-12-13)

First Round - #8 Virginia Tech d. #9 Miami 65-47; #12 Georgia Tech d. #5 Clemson 86-81; #7 Maryland d. #10 NC State 74-69; #6 Boston College d. #11 Virginia 76-63.

First Round - #9 Virginia d. #8 Boston College 68-62; #12 Miami d. #5 Wake Forest 83-62; #7 Georgia Tech d. #10 North Carolina 62-58; #11 NC State d. #6 Clemson 59-57.

First Round - #9 Miami d. #8 Virginia 69-62 OT; #5 Boston College d. #12 81-67; #7 Maryland d. #10 NC State 75-67; #6 Virginia Tech d. #11 Georgia Tech 59-43.

Quarterfinals - #1 N. Carolina d. #8 Virginia Tech 79-76; #4 Florida State d. #12 Georgia Tech 64-62; #7 Maryland d. #2 Wake Forest 75-64; #3 Duke d. #6 Boston College 66-65.

Quarterfinals - #1 Duke d. #9 Virginia 57-46; #12 Miami d. #4 Virginia Tech 70-65; #7 Georgia Tech d. #2 Maryland 69-64; #11 NC State d. #3 Florida State 58-52.

Quarterfinals - #1 North Carolina d. #9 Miami 61-59; #4 Clemson d. #5 Boston College 70-47; #2 Duke d. #7 Maryland 87-71; #6 Virginia Tech d. #3 Florida State 52-51.

Semifinals - #1 Duke d. #12 Miami 77-74; #7 Georgia Tech d. #11 NC State 57-54.

Semifinals - #1 North Carolina d. #4 Clemson 92-87 OT; #2 Duke d. #6 Virginia Tech 77-63.

Finals - #1 Duke d. #7 Georgia Tech 65-61.

Finals - #2 Duke d. #1 North Carolina 75-58.

All-Tournament - First Team Kyle Singler, Duke; Nolan Smith, Duke; Jon Scheyer, Duke; Derrick Favors, GT; Durand Scott, Miami. Second Team: Gani Lawal, GT; Iman Shumpert, GT; Reggie Johnson, Miami; Tracy Smith, NCS; Scott Wood, NCS.

All-Tournament – First Team – Nolan Smith, Duke; Kyle Singler, Duke; Harrison Barnes, North Carolina; Tyler Zeller, North Carolina; Demontez Stitt, Clemson. Second Team – Miles Plumlee, Duke; Seth Curry, Duke; John Henson, North Carolina; Kendall Marshall, North Carolina; Malcolm Delaney, Virginia Tech.

(March 12-13-14-15)

Semifinals - Florida State d. North Carolina 73-70; Duke d. Maryland 67-61. Finals - Duke d. Florida State 79-69. All-Tournament - First Team - Toney Douglas, FSU; Jon Scheyer, Duke; Kyle Singler, Duke; Tyler Hansbrough, UNC; Gerald Henderson, Duke. Second Team Greivis Vasquez, Md.;Lewis Clinch, GT; Wayne Ellington, UNC; Solomon Alabi, FSU; Eric Hayes, Md. Everett Case Award - Jon Scheyer, Duke (21.7 points; 4.0 rebounds)

132 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament

Everett Case Award - Kyle Singler, Duke (21.7 points, 8.3 rebounds)

2011 Greensboro, N.C.

Everett Case Award – Nolan Smith, Duke (18 points, 6 assists)


fsu & acc Celebrate 20th anniversary

By Ira Schoffel

W

hen he was inducted into the Florida State University Athletics Hall of Fame in 1991, Dr. Bernard Sliger was honored as an effective leader and a “universally popular” human being. But his lasting legacy as Florida State’s 10th president, the university proclaimed at the time, was that he helped FSU shed “its independent status and aligned itself with the nation’s most highly regarded academic and athletic conference, the ACC.” Twenty years later, Sliger’s efforts are still paying dividends for the Seminoles and the entire conference. “I don’t think there is any question that the addition of Florida State to the ACC 20 years ago was extremely beneficial to both parties,” FSU athletics director Randy Spetman said. “The ACC has provided Florida State with absolute top-notch competition in every single sport, and I truly believe that our most recent across-the-board success in terms of overall program excellence can be attributed to some degree to the conference. “By the same token, the ACC has benefitted from the national brand of Florida State and probably grown further and faster in both prestige and influence than it would have without the expansion.” Before it joined the ACC in 1991, Florida State operated as an independent in football while participating in other sports through the now-defunct Metro Conference. Through its 1991 marriage with the Atlantic Coast Conference, the Seminoles’ athletic program was able to attain the financial stability that comes with competing in a premier basketball and football league, while also benefitting from the ACC’s superior academic reputation. Though he wasn’t part of the program at the time, Florida State men’s basketball coach Leonard Hamilton appreciates what being in the tradition-rich conference has meant for the Seminoles. It opens doors in recruiting, because many top prospects want the opportunity to play on college basketball’s biggest stage. It provides instant credibility. And, he said, the depth of quality programs in the conference prepares its teams for the postseason. Hamilton is even more excited about what the future might hold, with the recent additions of national basketball powers Pittsburgh and Syracuse to the ACC family. The Panthers finished first or second in the Big East Conference each of the past three seasons, and the Orange are

expected to be a No. 1 national seed in the 2012 NCAA Tournament. “I think you have to give the commissioner and presidents a lot of credit to have vision and be proactive in trying to look toward the future,” Hamilton said. “And for trying to build a conference based on the footprints of the Atlantic Coast.” While Florida State is perhaps best known for its football program, which won national championships in 1993 and 1999, the Seminoles have emerged as a basketball force as well. They are expected to make their fourth consecutive NCAA Tournament appearance this month after advancing to the Sweet 16 last year. And through its marriage with the ACC, Florida State also has been able to make giant leaps in the breadth of its entire athletic program. During these past 20 years, the Seminoles have blossomed into national contenders in golf, tennis, cross country, swimming, volleyball and other sports. That success , which serves to complement their already successful baseball, track and field, basketball and softball programs. FSU added women’s soccer as its 17th varsity sport in 1998, and the Seminoles have only added strength to the nation’s top conference for that sport. So it is no coincidence that as Florida State approached its 20th anniversary in the ACC, the Seminoles enjoyed their best two finishes in the Directors Cup standings, which measure the overall success of collegiate athletic programs. They finished fifth nationally following the 2009-10 academic year and ninth in 2010-11. And this year may mark Florida State’s best finish yet. In the final rankings for the fall of 2011, the Seminoles were ranked second nationally, behind only Stanford. “Florida State is woven into the fabric of the Atlantic Coast Conference both academically and athletically,” said ACC Commissioner John Swofford. “They continue to garner national prominence year in and year out” Added Spetman: “It has been a great 20 years, and the future for both us and the ACC seems as bright as ever.” theACC.com

133


2012 Acc

2012 Dr Pepper ACC Football Championship December 1, 2012 Charlotte, NC ACCFootballCharlotte.com

BOSTON COLLEGE Sept. 1

MIAMI

CLEMSON

duke

FLORIDA STATE

GEORGIA TECH

MARYLAND

Sept. 1 vs. Auburn

Sept. 1 FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL

Sept. 1 MURRAY STATE

Sept. 3 at Virginia Tech

Sept. 1 WILLIAM & MARY

Sept. 8 MAINE

Sept. 8 BALL STATE

Sept. 8 at Stanford

Sept. 8 SAVANNAH STATE

Sept. 8 PRESBYTERIAN

Sept. 8 at Temple

Sept. 15 at Northwestern

Sept. 15 FURMAN

Sept. 15 NORTH CAROLINA Central

Sept. 15 WAKE FOREST

Sept. 15 VIRGINIA

Sept. 15 CONNECTICUT

Sept. 22 OPEN

Sept. 22 at Florida State

Sept. 22 MEMPHIS

Sept. 22 CLEMSON

Sept. 22 MIAMI

Sept. 22 at West Virginia

Sept. 29 CLEMSON

Sept. 29 at Boston College

Sept. 29 at Wake Forest

Sept. 29 at South Florida

Sept. 29 MIDDLE TENNESSEE

Sept. 29 OPEN

Oct. 6

Oct. 6

Oct. 6

Oct. 6

Oct. 6

Oct. 6

at Army

GEORGIA TECH

VIRGINIA

at NC State

at Clemson

WAKE FOREST

Oct. 13 at Florida State

Oct. 13 OPEN

Oct. 13 at Virginia Tech

Oct. 13 BOSTON COLLEGE

Oct. 13 OPEN

Oct. 13 at Virginia

Oct. 20 at Georgia Tech

Oct. 20 VIRGINIA TECH

Oct. 20 NORTH CAROLINA

Oct. 20 at Miami

Oct. 20 BOSTON COLLEGE

Oct. 20 NC STATE

Oct. 27 MARYLAND

Oct. 25 at Wake Forest

Oct. 27 at Florida State

Oct. 27 DUKE

Oct. 27 BYU

Oct. 27 at Boston College

Nov. 3

Nov. 3

Nov. 3

Nov. 3

OPEN

Nov. 3

Nov. 3

at Virginia Tech

Nov. 10 at North Carolina

Nov. 10 at Clemson

at Wake Forest

at Duke

CLEMSON

at Maryland

GEORGIA TECH

Nov. 10 NOTRE DAME

Nov. 10 MARYLAND

Nov. 10 OPEN

Nov. 8

Nov. 17 VIRGINIA TECH

Nov. 17 NC STATE

Nov. 17 at Georgia Tech

Nov. 17 at Maryland

Nov. 17 DUKE

Nov. 17 FLORIDA STATE

Nov. 24 at NC State

Nov. 24 SOUTH CAROLINA

Nov. 24 MIAMI

Nov. 24 FLORIDA

Nov. 24 at Georgia

Nov. 24 at North Carolina

134 2012 ACC Basketball Tournament


Football Season MIAMI

NORTH CAROLINA

NC STATE

VIRGINIA

VIRGINIA TECH

WAKE FOREST

Sept. 1 at Boston College

Sept. 1 ELON

Aug. 31 vs. Tennessee

Sept. 1 RICHMOND

Sept. 3 GEORGIA TECH

Sept. 1 LIBERTY

Sept. 8 at Kansas State

Sept. 8 at Wake Forest

Sept. 8 at Connecticut

Sept. 8 PENN STATE

Sept. 8 AUSTIN PEAY

Sept. 8 NORTH CAROLINA

Sept. 15 BETHUNE-COOKMAN

Sept. 15 at Louisville

Sept. 15 SOUTH ALABAMA

Sept. 15 at Georgia Tech

Sept. 15 at Pittsburgh

Sept. 15 at Florida State

Sept. 22 at Georgia Tech

Sept. 22 EAST CAROLINA

Sept. 22 THE CITADEL

Sept. 22 at TCU

Sept. 22 BOWLING GREEN

Sept. 22 ARMY

Sept. 29 NC STATE

Sept. 29 IDAHO

Sept. 29 at Miami

Sept. 29 LOUISIANA TECH

Sept. 29 vs. Cincinnati

Sept. 29 DUKE

Oct. 6

Oct. 6

Oct. 6

Oct. 6

Oct. 6

Oct. 6

vs. Notre Dame

VIRGINIA TECH

FLORIDA STATE

at Duke

at North Carolina

at Maryland

Oct. 13 NORTH CAROLINA

Oct. 13 at Miami

Oct. 13 OPEN

Oct. 13 MARYLAND

Oct. 13 DUKE

Oct. 13 OPEN

Oct. 20 FLORIDA STATE

Oct. 20 at Duke

Oct. 20 at Maryland

Oct. 20 WAKE FOREST

Oct. 20 at Clemson

Oct. 20 at Virginia

Oct. 27 OPEN

Oct. 27 NC STATE

Oct. 27 at North Carolina

Oct. 27 OPEN

Oct. 27 OPEN

Oct. 25 CLEMSON

Nov. 1

Nov. 3

Nov. 3

Nov. 3

Nov. 1

at Miami

Nov. 3

FLORIDA STATE

Nov. 10 at NC State

VIRGINIA TECH

OPEN

VIRGINIA

at NC State

BOSTON COLLEGE

Nov. 10 at Virginia

Nov. 10 GEORGIA TECH

Nov. 10 WAKE FOREST

Nov. 10 MIAMI

Nov. 8

Nov. 17 SOUTH FLORIDA

Nov. 15 at Virginia

Nov. 17 at Clemson

Nov. 15 NORTH CAROLINA

Nov. 17 at Boston College

Nov. 17 at Notre Dame

Nov. 24 at Duke

Nov. 24 MARYLAND

Nov. 24 BOSTON COLLEGE

Nov. 24 at Virginia Tech

Nov. 24 VIRGINIA

Nov. 24 VANDERBILT

theACC.com

135


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Great Service You Can Count On!

B.B. LEE ELECTRIC CO. 8014 Bill Poole Road • Rougemont, NC 27572 Phone: 919-732-5095 • Cell Phone: 919-632-0918

ASPHALT PAVING CONCRETE PAVING SEAL COATING STRIPING SIGNAGE THERMOPLASTIC DOT CERTIFIED

Whatever size project you have in mind, we can provide a beautiful, budget-friendly solution that fits your precise needs. Visit our website for current project photos, videos & customer testimonials!

www.poolepaving.com • poolestriping@yahoo.com

Charlie Burk

Territory Sales Representative A Dean Foods Company 8816 Midway West Road Raleigh, NC 27617

Business Direct: (919w) 783-0246 Fax: (919) 783-0575 Cell: (919) 608-5514 charlie_burk@deanfoods.com

12591 Hwy 50 • Willow Springs, NC 27592 (office) 919-779-5712 (cell) 919-669-9939 104 Spartanburg • Carolina Beach, NC 28428 (office) 910-707-0314

Jimmy Lewis & Sons Grading & Septic, Inc. 336-599-9890 Office 336-599-1806 Fax

Carter Lewis President

1024 Henry Street Roxboro, NC 27573 carter@esinc.net www.gradingcontractornc.com


CONTRACTORS BUILDING FOR THE FUTURE OF DUKE Go Devils!

Residential / Commercial Interior / Exterior

for all your emergency supply and training needs

ALANIS PAINTING CO., INC Fully Insured Licensed

Jaime A. Alanis

919-225-2936 Free Estimates

Southeastern EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT

800-334-6656 WWW.SEEQUIP.COM Wake Forest, NC

ClEvE WagstaFF stonE

Masonry l.l.C.

Specializing in Stone Since 1975

SOUTHERN PAN SERVICES CO 2385 LITHONIA INDUSTRIAL BLVD LITHONIA, GA 30058 678-301-2400 WWW.SOUTHERNPAN.COM

Cleve Wagstaff 309 Wagstaff-Carver Rd. Roxboro, NC 27574

Phone/Fax: (336) 597-5757 Mobile: (336) 597-1393

1301 Suite 100 27703


ARCHITECTS, ENGINEERS & BUSINESS FRIENDS WORKING FOR THE FUTURE OF GEORGIA TECH

Compliments of a Friend

World Leader in SBS Roofing Technology Southeast Regional Office: 770.792.0302

CONTRACTORS BUILDING FOR THE FUTURE OF MARYLAND Building Systems and Services

Go Terps!

Division of Carrier Corporation 21750 Red Rum Drive Suite 192 Ashburn, VA 20147 703-834-3900

Washer & Sterilizer Sales & Service

(301) 414-0100


GOOD LUCK UNC CHAPEL HILL FROM YOUR FRIENDS IN BUSINESS

Compliments of a Friend Andre Laws Grading & Backhoe Service Inc. “We move dirt right on time...everytime” Phone (919) 641-5641 Fax (919) 416-1131 alawsjr1@aol.com

Andre Laws-President 1306 Broad Street Durham, NC 27705

Demolition - Grading - Paving - Asphalt Repair - Storm Draining

Jeff Scott Grading 919-795-1075 Pittsboro, NC

GOOD LUCK VIRGINIA TECH FROM YOUR FRIENDS IN BUSINESS Comfort Inn - BlaCksBurg 3705 south maIn street BlaCksBurg Va 24060 Phone: 540.951.1500 fax: 540.951.1530

BY CHOICE HOTELS

COMFORTINNBLACKSBURG.COM

DCI/SHIRES, INC.

RSC Equipment Rental 1570 Radford Rd Christiansburg, Virginia 24073 (540) 382-9036

Wishing you the best from your friends at RSC. 5350 Partners Court Frederick, MD 21703

General Contracting

www.acdi.com

Residential • Commercial • Industrial

www.dcishires.com

P.O. Box 1259 Bluefield, WV 24701 Tele: (304) 323-1996 Fax: (304) 323-3037

Baird drywall and acoustic, inc. commercial / industrial walls • ceilings • Floors

Jeff Dillon Owner

Phone: 540-890-0303 Fax: 540-890-0647

Drywall Metal Studs Plaster E.I.F.S. Acoustic

17599 Stewartsville Rd. Vinton, VA 24179

main: (301) 620-0900 fax: (301) 694-5152 in Touch

with Technology


ARCHITECTS, ENGINEERS & BUSINESS FRIENDS WORKING FOR THE FUTURE OF VIRGINIA TECH

ISO 9001: 2008 Certified

928 Bluefield Avenue • Bluefield, WV 24701

We do commercial printing Call for your next quote (304) 327-2816

thale@bdtonline.com

RSC

Equipment Rental Russ Dolgos General Manager



RSC Equipment Rental 1570 Radford Rd Christiansburg, VA 24073 P 540.382.9036 M 540.580.0575 Toll Free 800.222.7777 F 540.382.5396 russ.dolgos@RSCrental.com RSCrental.com

Schedule

Contract GS-21F-0036T

Gordon & Lisa Lyle First in textile services worldwide

PO BOX 13425 Roanoke, VA 24033 T 540.342.3158

5625 Fork Mountain Road Rocky Mount, VA 24151 Business 540-489-5279 Cell 540-493-5544 Visit our website at www.LylesPetCremations.com

Proud to Support VT! LANDMARK A V I A T I O N

www.landmarkaviation.com

John E. Wilson, Jr. General Manager

Roanoke Regional Airport - ROA 22 Waypoint Drive NW Roanoke, VA 24012 540.563.4401 p 540.563.9614 f 540.353.4244 m jewilson@landmarkaviation.com

ColonialWebb - One of the region’s premier mechanical contractors, providing installation, maintenance, and repair services.

We are proud to be a part of Virginia Tech’s efforts to build a better future. www.ColonialWebb.com


f acebook.com/UA baske t ball



2012 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament Program