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Inside this Issue: The ACA Marine & Coastal Corrosion Seminar Series: 2014 Review Technical Note: Ice and Snow, Away We Go! Painting Ships In Cold Winter Conditions Project Profile: Perth Arena Project Profile: Perfect Match – Laser Scanning and Fitness for Service University Profile: Deakin Corrosion Research Centre Research Paper: Corrosion on a Wrecked Colonial Warship: HMCS Protector 1882-1944


Cathodic Protection TRAINING

Cathodic Protection Advanced Brisbane July 21–25

Cathodic Protection Monitoring Brisbane July 14–16 Sydney October 21–23

Introduction to Cathodic Protection Brisbane July 11 Duration: 1 day This course covers the basic principles, design and monitoring methods used in Cathodic Protection (CP). Participants will gain an understanding of the reasons why CP is used, understand the basic operation of the equipment used in CP and be able to make interpretations of CP measurements.

Duration: 3 days This course covers background theory on corrosion, basic electricity and Cathodic Protection (CP), including such aspects as protection criteria and IR drop. Participants will be able to carry out CP measurements such as pipe-to-soil potential, line current, anode current output, electrical continuity, effectiveness of insulating joints, effectiveness of cable insulation, soil resistivity, and transformerrectifier operation. Course Highlights:

Sydney October 13–17 Duration: 5 days This course offers the opportunity for participants to understand the principles of corrosion, electricity and Cathodic Protection (CP) and the corrosion features of soils, water and concrete. The course will enable students to define the different protection criteria, interpret potential and current surveys, know how to troubleshoot CP problems and learn of the hardware used in CP such as anodes, backfill, transformers, rectifiers, test instrumentation, etc. The course continues to teach students of the factors which determine current requirements and design of impressed current and galvanic systems, the selection process of a galvanic or impressed current system and more.

Course Highlights:

Cathodic Protection History Corrosion Basics Cathodic Protection Coatings Cathodic Protection Equipment Measurement Equipment Field Measurement Techniques Interpretation of Field Data

Basic Electricity Corrosion Basics Cathodic Protection Coatings and Cathodic Protection Measuring Equipment Reference Electrode Potential Measurements Transformer-Rectifier Operation Current, Voltage and Resistance Measurements Soil Resistivity Measurements

Fundamentals of Corrosion Electrical Fundamentals Principles of Cathodic Protection Cathodic Protection Design Cathodic Protection Operation and Monitoring Coatings and Cathodic Protection Identifying Cathodic Protection Equipment Troubleshooting cathodic protection problems Cathodic Protection for Marine and Concrete structures

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for this course.

Prerequisites: Year 10 in science and maths.

Prerequisites: Year 12 chemistry and maths.

Cost: Members $605 Non-Members $740

Cost: Members $1485 Non-Members $1810

Cost: Members $2220 Non-Members $2600

Course Highlights:

Register now at www.corrosion.com.au p.2  CORROSION & MATERIALS


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June 2014  www.corrosion.com.au  p.3


CONTENTS

Corrosion & Materials Corrosion & Materials is the official publication of The Australasian Corrosion Association Inc (ACA). Published bi-monthly, Corrosion & Materials has a distribution of 2,500 to ACA members and other interested parties. Each issue features a range of news, information, articles, profiles and peer reviewed technical papers. Corrosion & Materials publishes original, previously unpublished papers under the categories ‘Research’ and ‘Professional Practice’. All papers are peer reviewed by at least two anonymous referees prior to publication and qualify for inclusion in the list which an author and his or her institution can submit for the ARC ‘Excellence in Research Australia’ list of recognised research publications. Please refer to the Author Guidelines at www.corrosion.com.au before you submit a paper to Brendan Pejkovic at bpejkovic@corrosion.com.au with a copy to bruce.hinton@monash.edu ACA also welcomes short articles (technical notes, practical pieces, project profiles, etc.) between 500 – 1,500 words with high resolution photos for editorial review. Please refer to the Article Guidelines at www.corrosion.com.au before you submit a paper to Brendan Pejkovic at bpejkovic@corrosion.com.au The Australasian Corrosion Association Inc The Australasian Corrosion Association Inc (ACA) is a nonprofit membership based organisation akin to a ‘learned society’. The ACA was established in 1955 to service the needs of Australian and New Zealand companies, organisations and individuals involved in the fight against corrosion. It is dedicated to ensuring all aspects of corrosion are responsibly managed, protecting the environment and ensuring public safety. ACA members are drawn from a wide cross section of industries united by their common interest – to reduce the impact of corrosion in Australasia. Front Cover Photo: The bow of HMCS Protector showing the three-metre tidal range and accelerated corrosion in the inter-tidal zone.

The ACA is a founder member of the World Corrosion Organization

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ISSN 1326 -1932 Published by The Australasian Corrosion Association Inc. ABN: 66 214 557 257 Editor Ian MacLeod – Western Australian Museum ian.macleod@museum.wa.gov.au Associate Editors Research: Bruce Hinton – Monash University bruce.hinton@monash.edu Professional Practice: Willie Mandeno – Opus International Consultants willie.mandeno@opus.co.nz News: Tracey Winn – The Australasian Corrosion Association Inc, twinn@corrosion.com.au Reviewers Andy Atrens – University of Queensland Nick Birbilis – Monash University Frederic Blin – AECOM Lex Edmond Harvey Flitt – Queensland University of Technology Maria Forsyth – Deakin University Rob Francis Warren Green – Vinsi Partners Graeme Kelly – Corrotec Services Grant McAdam – Defence Science & Technology Organisation David Nicholas – Nicholas Corrosion Graham Sussex – Sussex Material Solutions Tony Trueman – Defence Science & Technology Organisation Geoffrey Will – Queensland University of Technology David Young – University of New South Wales

Photo courtesy Ian D MacLeod.

Advertising Sales Tracey Winn – The Australasian Corrosion Association Inc, twinn@corrosion.com.au Ph: 61 3 9890 4833, Fax: 61 3 9890 7866 Subscriptions Print Version: ISSN 1326-1932 Subscription rates: Within Australia: AU$72.60, incl GST Outside Australia: AU$77, excl GST posted airmail The views expressed in Corrosion & Materials are those of the individual authors and are not necessarily those of the ACA. Publication of advertisements does not imply endorsement by the ACA. Copyright of all published materials is retained by the ACA but it may be quoted with due reference.

ACA Branches & Divisions Auckland Division: Grant Chamberlain

64 21 245 9038

Newcastle: Nathan Spencer

61 439 511 836

New South Wales: Jim Galanos

61 2 9763 5611

Queensland: Cathy Sterling

61 7 3821 0202

South Australia: Dennis Richards

61 0 419 860 514

Tasmania: Grant Weatherburn

61 0 418 120 550

Taranaki Division: Ron Berry

64 27 671 2278

Victoria: John Tanti

61 3 9885 5305

Wellington Division: Monika Ko

64 4 978 6630

Western Australia: Phil Schmidli

61 4 5148 0090

The Australasian Corrosion Association Inc PO Box 112, Kerrimuir, Victoria 3129, Australia Ph: 61 3 9890 4833, Fax: 61 3 9890 7866 Email: aca@corrosion.com.au | Internet: www.corrosion.com.au

ACA Technical Groups Cathodic Protection: Bruce Ackland

61 3 9890 3096

Coatings: Matthew O'Keeffe

61 437 935 969

ACA Operations Board President: Andrew Hargrave

Concrete Structures & Buildings: Frédéric Blin

61 3 9653 8406

Mining Industry: Ted Riding

61 3 9314 0722

Executive Officer: Wesley Fawaz

Petroleum & Chemical Processing Industry: Fikry Barouky

61 402 684 165

Operations Chairman: Paul Vince

Research: TBA

Senior Vice President: Mohammad Ali

Water & Water Teatment: Matthew Dafter

Junior Vice President: John Duncan

Young Corrosion Group: Dean Ferguson

Immediate Past President: Allan Sterling

*all the above information is accurate at the time of this issue going to press.

Directors: Kingsley Brown Graham Carlisle Matthew Dafter Peter Dove John Duncan Fred Salome Dean Wall

61 419 816 783 61 0 425 784 932


CONTENTS &

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Vol 39 No 3, June 2014

6 | President’s Message 7 | ACA Calendar of Events 2014 8 | Executive Officer’s Message 9 | ACA 2014 Training Calendar 10 | News 22 | Branch & YCG News 26 | Corrosion & Prevention 2014 Plenary Speaker Abstracts

22

30 | ACA Standards Update 36 | The ACA Marine & Coastal Corrosion Seminar Series 2014 Review

38 | ACA Certification Program 40 | Project Profile: Perth Arena

42 | Project Profile:

Perfect Match – Laser Scanning and Fitness for Service

40

45 | University Profile:

Deakin Corrosion Research Centre

46 | Technical Note:

Ice and Snow, Away We Go! Painting Ships In Cold Winter Conditions

50 | Coatings Group Member Profile 51 | New Product Showcase 52 | Research Paper:

Corrosion on a Wrecked Colonial Warship: HMCS Protector 1882-1944

58 | Suppliers and Consultants

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PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

Welcome to all ACA members including our national and international partners to this edition’s Corrosion & Materials magazine.

and I was impressed by the positive/can do attitude of the Auckland division in disseminating knowledge and planning for the 2016 ACA conference.

There is always a lot that goes on behind the scenes. For example, the ACA Melbourne team in conjunction with the local branches is rolling out the Marine and Coastal Corrosion Seminar Series. They are in full swing and preparation for the Corrosion and Prevention 2014 conference in Darwin is very much underway.

As President, I have accepted the draft strategic plan for Board approval and the next Board meeting is scheduled for mid June 2014. As a brief introduction to the draft plan the key strategies are to: Expand Training Offerings Enhance Governance Processes

During May I have had the pleasure of attending and presenting at the Auckland and Hobart Seminars and I am writing this message prior to attending the Darwin and Perth events which are scheduled in late May.

Andrew Hargrave President

 urther Develop and Service F Membership Market Segments I ncrease Awareness and Influence of the ACA

The feedback, so far has been very positive and I congratulate the Melbourne team in coordinating and managing these events. I am looking forward to meeting more members across Australia as they progress.

I look forward to the plan’s implementation after board approval.

While in New Zealand I was invited to attend the Auckland division meeting

Andrew Hargrave ACA President 2014

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ACA CALENDAR OF EVENTS

ACA Calendar of Events 2014 Part of the role of the ACA is to organise events that bring together industry experts to present on new technologies, updates to standards, and share knowledge and experiences via case studies on a variety of projects. 2014 will be no different, with the events listed below scheduled in our Calendar of Events.

Event

2014 Date

Location

Corrosion in the Mining Industry

3 July

Perth

Corrosion in the Oil & Gas Industries

24 July

Brisbane

Corrosion in the Oil & Gas Industries

7 August

New Plymouth, NZ

Corrosion & Prevention 2014 Conference

21-24 September

Darwin

Protective Coatings Preventing Corrosion

20 November

Brisbane

ACA members will receive further details on each event as appropriate throughout the year, but for now, please include these in your 2014 diary. For further information on these events for 2014 please don’t hesitate to contact Brendan Pejkovic (bpejkovic@corrosion.com.au) in the ACA office on +61 (0)3 9890 4833.

Branch Events

Each of the 8 ACA Branches will conduct regular technical events throughout 2014. To enquire, you may contact your local Branch at the following email addresses: New South Wales: nsw@corrosion.com.au New Zealand: nz@corrosion.com.au Newcastle: ncl@corrosion.com.au Queensland: qld@corrosion.com.au South Australia: sa@corrosion.com.au Tasmania: tas@corrosion.com.au Victoria: vic@corrosion.com.au Western Australia: wa@corrosion.com.au

YCG Events

Targeting individuals under 35, new to the corrosion industry and/or interested in the corrosion industry, the ACA Young Corrosion Professionals conduct regular events. For further details email ycg@corrosion.com.au or go to www.corrosion.com.au

Please refer to www.corrosion.com.au for up to date details on all ACA activities.

Expressions of interest sought – coating inspectors Since its establishment in 1985, Corrotek has developed a reputation as a competent and ethical specialist protective coating consultancy. Recently, we’ve added a comprehensive analytical capability through our involvement with Maatek Pty Ltd.  To serve existing clients, we intend to increase our coating inspection and corrosion survey capability across Australia and wish to speak to experienced and certified ACA, NACE, FROSIO or SSPC coating inspectors and ACA certified Corrosion Technicians or Technologists about potential collaboration opportunities. Interested individuals or organisations are invited to contact, in strict confidence, Corrotek’s principal, Mr Ian Glover by e-mail or mobile as per below.

®

C O N S U LTAN T S www.corrotek.com.au | Telephone 0415 872 994 | Email ian.glover@corrotek.com.au

June 2014  www.corrosion.com.au  p.7


EXECUTIVE OFFICER’S MESSAGE

Membership Growth & Event Activity ACA’s membership continues to grow. As I write this message, the ACA has reached 2,170 from 2,035 at the start of the year. As I look back at the membership report when I started some 7 years ago with the ACA, membership was then at 1,083.

next few months, the ACA Technical Groups are conducting events which this year include:

The ACA’s growing and diverse membership, which includes blasters/ painters, equipment suppliers, asset owners, manufacturers, academics etc. provides a great opportunity for members to meet a broader range of personnel in the many industries affected by corrosion.

 orrosion in the Mining Industry, C 3 July, Perth

We know that networking with those you already know is good business but meeting someone you haven’t met before and forging a new relationship is even better business. And so, the ACA conducts over 80 events a year which are designed to provide opportunities for members to enhance their business relationships. The Marine & Coastal Corrosion Seminar Series took place last month and covered 8 locations. Over the

 oncrete Performance for Coastal C Assets; 12 June, Melbourne

 orrosion in the Oil & Gas C Industries, 24 July, Brisbane  orrosion in the Oil & Gas C Industries, 7 August, New Plymouth (NZ)  rotective Coatings Preventing P Corrosion, 20 November, Brisbane Branches continue to conduct regular local events (last year over 60 events), with South Australia, Tasmania and Victoria Branches soon to hold the popular Trade Shows which allow ACA members and other industry representatives to discuss, touch and observe demonstrated products, technologies and services in the corrosion prevention industry.

And to the major event of the year which is now only 3 months away, to be held in Darwin. Get On Top Of Corrosion by attending the annual conference and exhibition in September. Register before June 20 to gain an entry into the early bird prize (comprising 2 return airfares, 4 night’s accommodation and 1 ‘Cage of Death’ experience). For more conference details, you can search ‘Corrosion and Prevention 2014’ on YouTube or you can visit www.acaconference.com.au. There are ample opportunities to meet new and existing members through these activities and I hope you all can make the most of them and your membership by attending. Wesley Fawaz Executive Officer wesley.fawaz@corrosion.com.au

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p.8  CORROSION & MATERIALS


ACA 2014 TRAINING CALENDAR

ACA 2014 Training Calendar Corrosion Technology Certificate

Sydney

Mbr Status

Fee

GST

Total Fee

AU Mbr

$2018.18

$201.82

$2220.00

AU Non Mbr

$2367.27

$236.37

$2600.00

NZ Mbr* Sydney Brisbane

$2020.00

NZ Non Mbr

July

$2370.00 21st - 25th

November

10th - 14th

Introduction to Protective Coatings

October

21st - 23rd

Cathodic Protection Advanced

NACE – Peer Review CIP Level 3 Mbr Status

Fee

GST

Total Fee

Mbr Status

Fee

GST

Total Fee

AU Mbr

$1336.36

$133.64

$1470.00

AU Mbr

$2018.18

$201.82

$2220.00

AU Non Mbr

$1568.18

$156.82

$1725.00

AU Non Mbr

$2367.27

$236.37

$2600.00

NZ Mbr*

$1335.00

NZ Non Mbr

$1568.00

NZ Mbr*

$2020.00

Darwin

September

Brisbane

July

21st - 25th

Sydney

October

13th - 17th

NZ Non Mbr

$2370.00

16th - 20th

Resits NACE – Coating Inspector Program Level 1 & 2

Mbr Status

Fee

GST

Total Fee

AU Mbr

$550.00

$55.00

$605.00

Corrosion & CP of Concrete Structures

AU Non Mbr

$672.73

$67.27

$740.00

Mbr Status

Fee

GST

Total Fee

AU Non Mbr

$1145.45

$114.55

$1260.00

Darwin

September

11th

AU Mbr

$963.64

$96.36

$1060.00

NZ Mbr*

$910.00

NZ Non Mbr

$1165.00

AU Non Mbr

$1209.09

$120.91

$1330.00

Examination Tests will be conducted to coincide with scheduled programs – contact ACA for details

NZ Mbr*

$965.00

NZ Non Mbr

$1210.00

Brisbane

August

Protective Coatings Quality Control Mbr Status

Fee

GST

Total Fee

AU Mbr

$1350.00

$135.00

$1485.00

AU Non Mbr

$1645.45

$164.55

$1810.00

NZ Mbr*

$1350.00

NZ Non Mbr

$1650.00

Perth

December

8th - 10th

Coatings Selection and Specifications Mbr Status

Fee

GST

Total Fee

7th - 8th

ACA/ACRA Corrosion & Protection of Concrete Structures Mbr Status

Fee

GST

Total Fee

AU Mbr

$963.64

$96.36

$1060.00

AU Non Mbr

$1209.09

$120.91

$1330.00

NZ Mbr*

$965.00

NZ Non Mbr

$1210.00

Sydney

June

19th - 20th

Brisbane

November

27th - 28th

AU Mbr

$1350.00

$135.00

$1485.00

AU Non Mbr

$1645.45

$164.55

$1810.00

NZ Mbr*

$1350.00

NZ Non Mbr

$1650.00

Perth

July

28th - 30th

New Zealand

October

13th - 15th

NACE - Coatings Inspection Program CIP Level 1

Coatings Inspection Refresher

Mbr Status

Fee

GST

Total Fee

Mbr Status

Fee

GST

Total Fee

AU Mbr

$3400.00

$340.00

$3740.00

AU Mbr

$550.00

$55.00

$605.00

AU Non Mbr

$3886.36

$388.64

$4275.00

AU Non Mbr

$672.73

$67.27

$740.00

NZ Mbr*

$3395.00

NZ Non Mbr

NZ Mbr*

$500.00

NZ Non Mbr

$680.00

Melbourne

June

Darwin

September

20th

Brisbane

June

23rd - 28th

New Zealand

November

28th

New Zealand

August

11th - 16th

Melbourne

October

20th - 25th

Perth

November

24th - 29th

Introduction to Cathodic Protection

$3900.00 16th - 21st

Mbr Status

Fee

GST

Total Fee

AU Mbr

$550.00

$55.00

$605.00

AU Non Mbr

$672.73

$67.27

$740.00

NACE - Coatings Inspection Program CIP Level 2

NZ Mbr*

$500.00

NZ Non Mbr

$680.00

Mbr Status

Fee

GST

Total Fee

Brisbane

July

11th

AU Mbr

$3400.00

$340.00

$3740.00

AU Non Mbr

$3886.36

$388.64

$4275.00

NZ Mbr*

$3395.00

NZ Non Mbr

$3900.00

Sydney

July

14th - 19th

New Zealand

August

18th - 23rd

Melbourne

October/November

Nov. 27th Oct. 1st

Perth

December

1st - 6th

Cathodic Protection Monitoring Mbr Status

Fee

GST

Total Fee

AU Mbr

$1704.55

$170.45

$1875.00

AU Non Mbr

$1868.18

$186.82

$2055.00

NZ Mbr*

$1685.00

NZ Non Mbr

$1865.00

Brisbane

July

14th - 16th

Mbr Status

Fee

GST

Total Fee

AU Mbr

$909.09

$90.91

$1000.00

All registration fees are payable in Australian Dollars. All registrations are subject to ACA’s published terms, conditions and policies. * All NZ courses are GST free For up-to-date course scheduling, please refer to www.corrosion.com.au

The ACA would like to thank and acknowledge the following for their continued support in the provision of equipment and services for our training courses:

Standard

Jotun blue

Black and white

June 2014  www.corrosion.com.au  p.9


NEWS

Omni Stop Provides Pedestrian Protection The Omni Stop Bollard is an Australian designed and developed energy absorption bollard system that can be installed to protect diners at alfresco cafés where they may be exposed to moving traffic. The bollards can be spaced so that they permit pedestrian access while at the same time preventing vehicle penetration. Designed, assembled and tested in Australia, the Omni Stop Bollard is available from Saferoads, an Australian company that has been supplying a

Omni Stop Bollards sited to protect commuters at a suburban bus stop.

broad range of products designed to direct, protect, inform and illuminate road users since 1992. Omni Stop is the only bollard of its type in Australia. It has been extensively crash-tested with impacts up to 60 kilometres per hour and complies with the requirements of AS/NZS3845:1999. The carbon steel bollard is supported by a unique energy absorbing cartridge that is encased in a concrete footing. When the bollard is impacted, the cartridge deforms and absorbs the

Vehicle travelling at 60 Km/hr safely stopped with minimal deflection of the Omni Stop Bollard.

kinetic energy of the vehicle. When a 1600 kilogram car at 60 kilometres per hour hits an Omni Stop, the bollard moves no more than 300 millimetres at the top preventing penetration and safely decelerating the vehicle. Councils across Australia recognise the effectiveness of the Omni Stop Bollard in protecting pedestrians and drivers in keeping them safely separated. Saferoads continues to research and develop innovative road safety solutions that are effective and easy to install.

Omni Stop Bollards installed at a Melbourne CBD construction site.

FAA Warned of 'Cracking and Corrosion' Problem on Boeing 777s

A worker stands near the front of a Boeing 777 jet under construction at the company's production plant in Everett, Wash., May 29, 2013. Photo: Elaine Thompson / AP, File

A cracking and corrosion problem on Boeing 777s that could lead to the midair break-up of the aircraft prompted a warning from air safety regulators weeks before the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, federal records show. The Federal Aviation Administration ordered checks on hundreds of U.S.registered 777s after reports of cracking in the fuselage skin underneath a satellite antenna. In an airworthiness directive, it said the extra checks were needed “to detect and correct cracking and corrosion in the fuselage skin, which could lead to rapid decompression and loss of structural integrity of the airplane.”

p.10  CORROSION & MATERIALS

The directive, first drawn up in September, was approved in February and was due to take effect on April 9. It warned that one operator of the jet “reported a 16-inch crack” in the skin of the fuselage on an airplane that was 14 years old with approximately 14,000 total flight cycles.” The missing Malaysia Airlines jet, registration 9M-MRO, was 12 years old and had completed 7,525 cycles, the airline said. It was not immediately clear if the airline had already begun to implement the extra checks as part of its maintenance routine. The airline

said the missing aircraft was serviced on February 23, with further maintenance scheduled for June 19. Story by Alastair Jamieson.


NEWS

A Drink for Harmony: the Visionary New Home for Olympus in Australia Olympus Australia have moved to a state-of-the-art facility in Melbourne that incorporates a fully operational Customer Experience Centre, comprehensive training facilities and the company’s National Service Centre. At the recent dedication of the new building, the celebrations included a traditional Japanese ceremony called “kagami-biraki.” The purpose of the ceremony is to encourage harmony, health and good fortune and on his first visit to Australia as Chairman of Olympus Group, Mr Yasuyuki Kimoto participated in the opening. Guests at the opening were given a tour of the new facility, experiencing

the various rooms dedicated to each of the company’s portfolios. Industrial Business Division customers will have hands-on access to products utilised in non-destructive testing, remote visual inspection, materials analysis by X-Ray fluorescence and highspeed imaging. Similar demonstration and training areas are available to digital photography and microscopy customers. For medical imaging customers, the Olympus headquarters building has multiple training rooms, including a fully equipped operating theatre and an endoscopy room. Australian Institute of Non-Destructive Testing CEO, Mr Les Dick, was one of the guests and said ”The building

is stunning and demonstrates a commitment to the company’s customers, many of whom are members of AINDT,” Mr Dick said. “In the past AINDT has collaborated with Olympus to present specialised training seminars and we look forward to bringing our members to this new facility and allowing them to gain hands-on experience of the latest technology.” The company is committed to the development of new technologies, products, and services that offer the best solutions to the needs of its customers.

Visitors in the fully equipped endoscopy room of the Olympus Customer Experience Centre in Melbourne.

The kagami-biraki ceremony at the dedication of the new Olympus HQ building.

The headquarters building for Olympus in Australia and New Zealand.

Inside the National Service Centre located in the Olympus ANZ headquarters.

June 2014  www.corrosion.com.au  p.11


NEWS

Inspection Success for Olympus at AOG 2014 The Olympus stand at the Australasian Oil and Gas Exhibition held in Perth was part of the new Nondestructive Testing (NDT) & Condition Monitoring Zone sponsored by the Australian Institute of Non-destructive Testing (AINDT). According to Graham Maxwell, National Key Accounts & Technical Manager at Olympus, the aim of the stand was to demonstrate the NDT, remote visual inspection (RVI) and X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) portfolios to attendees at the exhibition. NDT is any analysis technique used to evaluate the properties of materials or components without causing damage or permanently alter the article being inspected. “Attendees at AOG were very knowledgeable and knew what they were looking for,” Maxwell added. “For us it was the quality of potential customers that was important and our location near the lecture halls

meant that everyone attending seminars and presentations passed the Olympus stand.” Several of papers were presented at the conference were presented by local and international Olympus staff members. Olympus demonstrated the latest videoscopes ideally suited to the inspection of critical infrastructure, such as piping, gas turbines and engines. One model—the iPLEX YS—features a 30 metre probe and unique laser light source. The company has also developed methods of heat shielding that allow inspection of high temperature processes that are expensive to shut down.” ”We can supply equipment for a wide range of non-destructive applications within the oil and gas industry,” Maxwell concluded. “We are committed to the development of new technologies, products, and services that offer the best solutions to meet the needs of our customers.”

The Olympus iPLEX YS videoscope with laser light source and 30m probe.

The Olympus stand in the Non-destructive Testing & Condition Monitoring Zone at the 2014 Australasian Oil and Gas Exhibition.

Jetcut and Inovas are Joining Forces! The unique offering of the IAS Group The companies have worked successfully will be made up of three divisions and together on a number of projects over consist of: the past few years, and bringing these two businesses together under the same parent company is a natural next step to further unlock value for all of Jetcut Inovas our stakeholders, including our Specialised Services Engineered Solutions customers and our shareholders. Remediation (composite & other Low dust abrasive blasting The parent company will now be known as the Innovative Asset Solutions Group (IAS Group). However our Mission remains unchanged and is consistent with both businesses:

Hydrodemolition & excavation

Protective coatings

Composite design & build

Industrial vacuuming & waste filtration

Cutting, coring and drilling

Remotely operated tooling

“To provide innovative solutions with unmatched value to our client’s assets in the Oil & Gas, Mining and Industrial sectors. We achieve this through improved safety, life extension, cost effectiveness and reliability, whilst mitigating the need for production downtime”.

p.12  CORROSION & MATERIALS

innovative techniques)

High & Ultra high pressure water jetting

Remotely operated tooling

Profile Computer Numerical Control Ultra high pressure water jet cutting Laser cutting Bespoke end-to-end end component design & cutting Machining

Mike Mansell, the CEO of Inovas will now become CEO of the larger group. Mike commented that joining these businesses “will allow us to further broaden our turn-key offering and create additional value to our customers in the Oil & Gas, Mining and Industrial markets. We will continue to deliver our high quality solutions to the market place, through our strong service focus and the excellence of our people. The future is very exciting for all involved within and around our business”. This consolidation will be appropriately staged, with minimal disruption to our customers, suppliers and other stakeholders. All staff and operations will be consolidated at Jetcut’s current premises in Canning Vale in the coming weeks.


NEWS

Darwin's Gets its First Resident NACE CIP 3 Inspector The ‘Top End’ just got its first resident NACE CIP Peer Reviewed Coatings inspector recently. Darwin born and raised Leo Hatzismalis of Incospec & Associates successfully passed the rigorous 2 hour oral examination in front of a 3 member review board. The Peer Review tests its candidates by asking a series of questions on practical and theoretical knowledge of coatings and inspection and is a world recognised certification acknowledging the best and most experienced Coatings Inspectors. Suitably qualified NACE CIP 2 inspectors in the NT now have an opportunity to join Leo by attending the NACE Peer Review in Darwin from 16-20 September which will be held in conjunction with the ACA’s annual conference Corrosion & Prevention 2014. The ACA would like to congratulate Leo on this fantastic result which we hope

will soon be one of many ‘Top End’ CIP 3 Coatings Inspectors. Coating Inspectors Program For over 30 years, the NACE Coating Inspector Program has set the standard for inspections in the protective coatings industry and is the world’s most recognized coating inspector certification program. CIP is the first international certification program designed to improve the overall quality of inspections performed, and it continues to provide the most complete training curriculum, producing top-notch inspectors for the industry. ACA offers all 3 levels of the NACE Coatings Inspection program throughout Australasia. For further information please contact the ACA at aca@corrosion.com.au or by phone on +61 3 9890 4833.

ACA Member wins Prestigious NACE Award A.B. Campbell Award This award is presented for the most outstanding manuscript published in NACE's Materials Performance (MP) or CORROSION journal during the year by an author(s) who was no older than 35 years of age when the manuscript was submitted for publication consideration. If there are co-authors, then the amount of individual contribution must be indicated by the other authors.

The paper—in its field—is without equal, so it is not just an application of standard methods, it advances knowledge on the subject. Ko’s work with in situ synchrotron experiments fits well with the goals of Corrosion to publish cutting-edge scientific research.

Monika Ko is the NZ Branch Treasurer and Wellington Division Secretary. She is employed by the Quest Integrity Group in Lower Hutt. Monika Ko received her Award from ex NACE President Tushar Jhaveri.

Monika Ko, co-author of the paper entitled ‘In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction Studies of CO2 Corrosion of Carbon Steel with Scale Inhibitors ATMPA and PEI at 80 °C,’ is recognised for her outstanding manuscript as a young author. This paper tackles a practical and relevant problem providing context that is industrially important. The experimental effort in the paper is immense, including a massive characterisation endeavour that represents state-of-the-art research.

June 2014  www.corrosion.com.au  p.13


NEWS

Sensors Combat Corrosion The Energy Pipelines Cooperative Research Centre and Deakin University of Australia are working on an innovative sensor able to monitor corrosion-related pipeline damage. The degradation of materials' properties based on environmental interaction is inevitable as metals attempt to return to their native lowenergy oxide state. The best that can be done is not avoidance, but only control. Several industry studies over the past several decades place the direct cost of corrosion in the US at approximately $275 billion annually.

 hree accidents in March due to T oil and or gas pipeline leaks spilled substantial amounts of oil and caused gas explosions in Texas, New York, and Ohio. In Ohio, the oil spill affected animals in a nature preserve.

 n January 10, a 12-inch PSNC gas O transmission pipeline exploded in Asheville, N.C. Property damage was approximately $825,000.

Pipeline corrosion falls under the uniform or general corrosion category. This uniform corrosion also is seen in bridge rust, tarnished silver, and color changes of bronze statues. Some metals, including stainless steel, titanium, and even aluminium, form oxide film naturally, but the film can break down and cause cracking, pitting, and other forms of corrosion. Uniform corrosion can be accurately predicted, and the solution is to protect the metal by adding coatings or creating more resistant alloys. Organic coatings are often used to slow the process, inhibitors can be added, and with steel, adding chromium staves off corrosion.

I n February, gas pipelines exploded in North Dakota and Kentucky. While the North Dakota explosion caused no injuries, in Kentucky two people were hospitalised and homes were destroyed.

In underground situations, the challenges are obvious. It’s difficult to see the level of corrosion, impossible to add surface solutions on an ongoing basis, and inhibitors are often the solution of choice.

Accidents and explosions are normally the result of corrosion. In 2014 alone, they include:

Typically, coatings inside the pipes are used to prevent corrosion. However, over time the coatings cease to be effective, resulting in leaks or failure. Many major gas explosions are attributable to such corrosion and leaks. The current means of finding corrosion problems are only effective after damage is greater than 30% of the pipe’s wall thickness. Corrosion monitoring is also very expensive now, requiring manual ultrasonic measurements and often digging up pipe, removing coatings, etc. The new sensor technology is based on continuous monitoring of the protection used on the pipes. The sensor monitors and identifies corrosion well before it becomes a catastrophic event. So far, tests are lab-based, but they are expected to move into the field in a real underground pipeline yet this year. While the sensor is being designed specifically for oil and gas pipeline applications, it’s easy to imagine a broad range of industrial applications where corrosion occurs and testing is cumbersome or close to impossible, as with underground pipes. By Carolyn Mathas.

Wolfchester Outgrows its Home! Wolfchester Australia Pty. Ltd. has moved to new premises in Lillydale, Victoria. It was established in 2006 by Phil Chester to supply chemicals, tools and equipment to a range of industries including the petro-chemical, marine, power generation, telecommunications and gas production industries In relation to the corrosion mitigation industry Wolfchester - as the Australia New Zealand supplier of the ‘Bristle Blaster’, service many of the world renowned petro-chemical plants both on and off-shore: specifically in the

p.14  CORROSION & MATERIALS

area of corrosion and coating removal on pipelines. Wolfchester’s sales team services businesses ranging from; mechanical workshops, panel beaters, motorcycle shops, to new and used car dealerships. Their extensive range of chemicals, fasteners, abrasives and storage systems are used by an ever increasing number of automotive and marine businesses Australia-wide. Wolfchester is one of only a handful of Australian companies to display

the ‘OEM’ (Original Equipment Manufacturer) logo. Their OEM products are well suited to engineering and manufacturing businesses in a multitude of industries which creates certainty for manufacturers and engineering specifications. Wolfchester are exhibiting at this year’s C&P 2014 in Darwin. Pop in to see Phil at the Wolfchester stand or visit the new showroom at: 4/122 Beresford Road, Lilydale Vic 3140, Australia


NEWS

Report on the Interference Corrosion Forum and NZEC Establishment Meeting The identified requirement for a group to aid operators of pipelines and other buried and submerged structures to manage electrical interference and stray current issues in New Zealand, has culminated in a sub group of the Australasian Corrosion Association (ACA), the NZ Electrolysis Committee (NZEC), being established. On Wednesday 1 April 2014 approximately 20+ interested representatives of the cathodic protection (CP), pipeline and related industries attended the Interference Corrosion Forum and New Zealand Electrolysis Establishment Meeting in Auckland. Proceedings started with convenor Mark Sigley, Chairman of the electrolysis establishment committee, welcoming the delegates and introducing the MC for the Forum, Sean Ryder of Phoenix Solutions. Sean then introduced the first speakers, Andrew Deutschle from Watercare and Grant Chamberlain from Electrix. They outlined how their two companies (Electrix on behalf of Vector Gas) work together to manage CP interference between the very different water and gas pipeline CP systems around Auckland. Mark Sigley then presented an overview of pipelines and CP systems in Taranaki. He touched on how the varied ownership of gas and condensate pipelines present a major challenge for managing CP systems. Mark also presented photographs and GIS drawings to illustrate how congestion and multitude of crossings present this challenge. The pipeline operators work

Bruce Monk Powerco - Wellington Region Study.

together on an ad-hoc basis, however it is expected that the NZEC will be able to facilitate greater cooperation. Rodney Urban from AECOM talked about application of the 2012 revision of AS/NZS4853, which provides requirements and guidelines for managing electrical hazards on metallic pipelines. This revision provides for use of risk based assessment of hazards, and works in with existing standards for pipeline operation, NZ power industry guidelines and risk standards. For New Zealand conditions the standard establishes a two tiered approach to analysis and design. The first level is a straightforward method for determining the possibility of there being a risk, which may be applied by most pipeline operators. If this test is failed, it will normally be necessary to engage specialists to carry out detailed analysis of the hazards and associated risks. The specialist will normally require additional data such as soil resistivity, site audits and construction systems including locations and types of pipeline insulating joints. Rodney suggested that the NZ pipeline industry “embraces AS/NZS4853:2012 as an efficient method of protecting staff, public and assets.” After a lunch, Bruce Monk from Powerco joined the group, courtesy of a heavy fog earlier that morning at Auckland airport. Bruce gave a practical and informative talk on stray current issues from the dc powered railway system in Wellington. Once again the theme of co-operation was evident

Mark Sigley Vector - Taranaki Region Summary.

with Bruce describing how Powerco, Vector, Kiwirail and Greater Wellington Regional Council work together to mitigate these stray current issues. The talks were technically informative, contributions from the floor were equally competent and overall the delegates left understanding more about the complex electrolysis management requirements of the New Zealand underground asset industry. The presentations were followed up with the NZ electrolysis establishment meeting. The meeting was chaired by Mark Sigley. Several major issues were discussed, and decisions made by those in attendance. The most significant being that the group approved establishment of the NZ Electrolysis Committee (NZEC) and decided that is should operate as a part of the Australasian Corrosion Association. It was also decided to adopt the main recommendations of the report produced by the Interim Establishment Committee on the structure and operation of the NZEC, including implementing an Executive Committee, and three regional committees based in Auckland, Taranaki and Wellington. Thanks go to those delegates who travelled from around New Zealand to attend, and to the Interim Establishment Committee for producing the Establishment Report and organising the Forum and Establishment Meeting. Article by Wayne Thomson.

Rodney Urban AECOM - Pipeline Electrical Hazards.

June 2014  www.corrosion.com.au  p.15


NEWS

UQ Leads Sewer-Focussed Project to Sweet Smell of Success A University of Queensland-led research project that is fundamentally changing sewer corrosion and odour management in Australia has won the prestigious 2014 International Water Association Asia Pacific Regional Project Innovation Award for Applied Research. The project, ‘Sewer Corrosion and Odour Research Program: Putting Science in Sewers’, is believed to be the world’s largest sewer-related research project. The award, which will be presented in June in Singapore, recognises the substantial level of new knowledge, highly advantageous tools and innovative technologies that this research has uncovered to help water utilities across Australia deal with the huge problem of corrosion and odour in sewerage systems.

Research Project ‘Putting Science into Sewers’ will now represent the Asia Pacific region at the World Congress in Lisbon, Portugal, for the Global Award, to be awarded in September this year.

Program leader Professor Zhiguo Yuan, from UQ’s Advanced Water Management Centre, said the five-year research project brought together five research partners and 11 industry partners.

The project partners are The University of New South Wales, The University of Newcastle, The University of Sydney, Curtin University of Technology, Sydney Water Corporation, Barwon Region Water Corporation, CH2MHILL, City of Gold Coast, Hunter Water Corporation, Melbourne Water Corporation, South Australian Water Corporation, South East Water Limited, Veolia Water Australia and New Zealand, Water Research Australia Limited, and Water Corporation of Western Australia.

“The team of world-class engineers, microbiologists, materials scientists, analytical chemists and mathematical modellers have developed sustainable solutions to support the cost effective management of complex sewer corrosion and odour problems in the future,” Professor Yuan said. “Within the lifetime of this project, our clients and partners have already saved several hundred million dollars. “This project will have an enduring impact on the global water industry.” The Sewer Corrosion and Odour

The ACA Membership Hits 2,170 As of 16 May 2014, The ACA’s membership totalled 2,170. Since January 2008, the ACA has experienced a growth in membership of 92%. Membership of the ACA is available to anyone with an interest in corrosion and its control. Members are diverse and multi-disciplinary, including; engineers, technicians, consultants, managers,

coating specialists, contractors, researchers, suppliers, students and more. Members belong to a range of industries such as oil & gas, mining, water, government, defence, energy, building, manufacturing and others. For more information on Membership please contact Solange Brave on +61(0)3 9890 7866 or by email sbrave@corrosion.com.au

ACA Membership Growth 2500

2170 1845

2000 1377

1500 1069

1188

1530

1212

1000

500

0

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

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June 2014  www.corrosion.com.au  p.17


NEWS

Don’t Forget the Hidden Structure Freyssinet New Zealand business development manager Kane Miller, whose firm specialises in construction, repair and maintenance in the civil engineering sector, emphasises that corrosion suffered by structural elements at ports can have costly flowon effects. Noting that the main port areas where corrosion generally causes issue is with structural elements in tidal/ splash zones, he says the resultant strength reductions suffered causes limitations on operational usage - for example underneath mobile cranes or ship loaders. “The cost of installation and running of a corrosion protection system are generally low compared to the cost and logistics of providing access to the underside of a port/wharf structure, as well as the risk to the operations of the port facility if they need to reduce the efficiency of their operation because of structural deficiencies which can be exponentially more costly,” he says.

“Generally equipment which is located above the wharf slab will be protected by a painted system or similar. Often this is an appropriate measure depending on the use, visibility and access to repair the corrosion protection system (such as touch up paint).”

of cover concrete, temperature and so on. Therefore it is difficult to summarise corrosion rates of unprotected structures. However, it can take as little as five years for a reinforced concrete structure to be completely corroded in harsh environments.

Mr Miller makes an interesting observation on influences of corrosion on port infrastructure.

“With a working corrosion protection system however the protection to the structure can be anywhere from a minimum of ten-plus years, say for a sacrificial anode system, up to 50-plus for an impressed current system with zero corrosion.”

“The rate of corrosion is determined by many factors such as chloride or oxygen levels, concrete quality, depth

Exposure: the underside of port structures need careful attention. Credit: Ava Babili.

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Protective Coatings Training From basic concepts to carrying out quality control tests and producing specifications, these short ACA courses will improve your knowledge of protective coatings. Coatings Selection & Specification (3 days)

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This course aims to provide participants with the ability to produce a clear and technically correct protective coatings specification. The course provides theoretical and practical information on coatings selection for corrosion control, largely based on ‘AS/NZS 2312 Guide to the Protection of Iron and Steel against exterior Atmospheric Corrosion’.

This course aims to formalise or improve the skills of carrying out basic quality control tests associated with protective coatings projects. It uses formal lectures, demonstrations, and extensive practical exercises as teaching methods.

This course provides an introduction to basic concepts of protective coatings; including the various types of coatings, the inspection requirements and considerations when selecting such products.

Inspection is only one part of ensuring a quality coating job, and selecting the correct coating system and writing a good specification are just as important. This course has been developed to provide information to assist the specifier to select the best coating system and to write a specification.

Register now at www.corrosion.com.au June 2014  www.corrosion.com.au  p.19


NEWS

ACA Welcomes New Members Corporate Platinum Select Solutions www.select-solutions.com.au Select Solutions is the leading specialist provider of metering, data and asset management solutions in the electricity, gas, water and telecommunications industries in Australia. As a division of SP AusNet (an ASX 100 company); Select Solutions has over 20 years’ experience in providing specialist services to the utility industry, as well as clients from government, commercial and industrial sectors. This wealth of experience and expertise enables us to offer a range of proven and dynamic solutions to meet your company’s specific needs. Because Select Solutions specialises in delivering services across industries, they can mix, match and bundle these services to provide a unique total service solution to your organisation. Corporate Gold Murrumbeena Industrial Spray Painting www.misp.com.au Murrumbeena Industrial Spray Painting has provided professional industrial spray painting services in Australia since 1972. They provide a specialised spray painting service to all industries. They work closely with their customers and paint representatives to always deliver the best outcomes. Nordarcon www.nordarcon.com.au Nordarcon was established in Sydney during 2007 by Gavin Darke, Managing Director. Gavin began his building career in 1999 as a carpenter with an award winning builder. His trade background provided an uncompromising approach to quality as well as a unique understanding of complex building situations and finishes. Since its incorporation the company has grown with the assistance of their talented personnel and business partners. Nordarcon has developed a unique approach to systemising the building process, employees and subcontractors engage in a framework of process documents ensuring key standards are maintained. They have implemented quality project management software, providing more regulation of vital project variables of time, cost and quality.

p.20  CORROSION & MATERIALS

They engage a specialised team of project managers and tradesmen, utilising their craftsmanship, attention to detail and quality. They pride themselves on excellent communication throughout the entire project and encourage regular feedback throughout the length of the project. They only appoint partners who are industry professionals and share uncompromising principles of the finest quality and service. Corporate Bronze Murphy Pipe and Civil http://www.mpcgroup.com.au Murphy Pipe and Civil is a leading Australian pipeline construction company providing the energy, water and mining sectors with some of the world’s most innovative pipeline solutions. The pipeline company has a proven track-record for delivery of large-scale projects in Australia and internationally and lead the way in the pipeline construction industry, through technology and innovative solutions. Their world-class quality, safety and environmental systems and procedures have been fully accredited by Achilles and deliver clients a balance of safer, greener and more efficient project outcomes. Every project delivered is a combination of capability, technical expertise and confidence – from a company backed by 68 years of experience. Their modern fleet of plant and equipment ensures they are project ready to deliver on their client commitments and provide the very best project outcomes every time. Apart from a comprehensive inventory of machinery required for large-scale pipeline projects, the company has also invested significantly in the development of a range of specialized equipment that can address any infrastructure challenge. Their machinery is complemented by a highly experienced and mobile workforce of skilled tradespeople and plant operators and guided by an engineering and management team equipped with extensive experience on large-scale construction projects in Australia and other parts of the world.

Rolls-Royce www.rolls-royce.com Rolls-Royce offers world-leading capabilities in the marine industry, encompassing the design, supply and support of power and propulsion systems. They are leaders in the supply and integration of missioncritical systems for offshore oil and gas, merchant and naval surface and submarine vessels with through life support provided by their expanding global network of service facilities. They serve more than 4,000 customers with equipment installed on over 30,000 vessels, including those of 70 navies. Naval Over 50 years of experience in naval propulsion for surface ships and submarines. MT30 - world’s most powerful marine gas turbine, powers U.S. Navy’s monohull Freedom variant Littoral Combat Ship; also selected by Korea and UK for future naval programmes. Broad range of ship designs in the auxiliaries and offshore/coastal patrol vessel market segments. In Australia provides complex engineering maintenance support to the selected RAN Ships. Remedial Technologies Australia www.remtech.com.au Remedial Technologies Australia (Remtech) is an Australian owned, managed and operated provider of remedial and civil construction services. With operations across Australia, Remtech is proud of its heritage, knowledge and capabilities. Remtech’s business model offers an unparalleled solution to client criteria’s utilising their vast knowledge of the industry, coupled with their innovative practices that provide a cost efficient resolution. Their resourceful insight into construction projects, particularly when assessing their longevity, enables them to recommend key construction solutions that are vital for their preservation. In addition, their efficient delivery of projects ensures programmatic and financial conditions are reached successfully. The company employs highly skilled personnel across all facets of remediation works, and provides specialist services to industry sectors comprising;


NEWS

continual growth is a result of a strong belief in employing the best people and providing them with the opportunities, support and working platform to succeed- they hold them in great regard.

 overnmental G Resources (Oil & Gas) Heritage Private Real Estate Education Infrastructure Defence Health Their size and scale gives us the flexibility, resources and financial strength to successfully partner with clients on major and minor projects to deliver an integrated, high quality and bespoke service. The capability of their people is the root of their business performance model individually and collectively and their Type

Name

Surname

Rustproof Coatings Ltd www.rustproof.co.nz www.goldsealrustproofing.com Rustproof Coatings Ltd is a member of the Goldseal Group, holding the license for the North Island, New Zealand and Queensland, Australia. Their core business is the application of Goldseal Industrial Compound, a paste like formulation that has 40 years of providing spalling and corrosion control in harsh conditions.

Company

Goldseal Rustproofing Compound is considered by many as the premier Corrosion Control System on the Australasian market. Goldseal has been used by numerous District Councils, Ports, Fertiliser Stores, Tanneries and Galvanising Plants where standard coating systems fail prematurely. Sandblasting is not required and being a one coat system, downtime and secondary mess is greatly reduced.

Branch

Individual

Kris

Macklin

NCL

Scott

Maddocks

VIC

Individual

Michael

Adams

QLD

Individual

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Dean

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QLD

Individual

Craig

McLean

AA

Individual

Yasir

Ali

Clough Amec JV

WA

Australian Defence Force

Individual

Jay

Blacker

Kaefer Novacoat (WA) Pty Ltd

WA

Individual

Jason

Michieletto

Neptune Marine Services

WA

Individual

Greg

Bladowski

Chemco Australia Pty Ltd

NSW

Individual

Garry

Moon

JDP Applications Pty Ltd

QLD

Student

Alison

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Monash University

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Hamid

Moradi Fard

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Individual

Darren

Ness

Sergio

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KBR

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Lucre Australia Pty Ltd

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Individual Individual

Ryan

Corrigan

Graphene Industries Pty Ltd

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Individual

An

Nguyen

Sea Gas

SA

Individual

Sam

O'Neill

SA

Contract Resources

AA

Poly-Tech Industrial Services

Student

Mate

Ostojic

Curtin University

WA

Individual

Robert

Pearson

Department of Defence

NSW

Individual

George

Pind

Oil Search PNG Ltd

AA

Individual

Cliff

Rawlinson

HSEE Pty Ltd

WA

Individual

Tim

Schlebaum

Avopiling Australia Pty Ltd

NSW

Individual

Theo

Socratous

Woodside Energy Limited

WA

Student

Connor

Spalding

RMIT

VIC

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Julie

StarrThomas

Queensland Rail

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Peter

Steernber

Mobile Conveying Services

QLD

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Arturo

de Castro

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Naveen

D'Souza

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Martyn

Dunford

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Greg

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Matthew

Fox

VIC Solent Painting

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Defence Material Organisation

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Steve

Fraser

Laing O'Rourke

QLD

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Steven

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M&F Welding Inspections Pty Ltd

VIC

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Geordie

Grant

Department of Defence

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Deakin University

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Brendan

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Jae

Hancock

WA

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Jai

Hennessey

Vertech

WA

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Sean

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Illawarra Engineering

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Max

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Port Kembla Coal Terminal

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Jason

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Jason

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Nick

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Marek

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Michael

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Downer Engineering

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Shaun

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Blast Off Marine

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George

Wilson

QLD QLD

June 2014  www.corrosion.com.au  p.21


BRANCH & YCG EVENTS

SA Branch visit to Arcote On Tuesday 25 March, Arkote hosted an event presented by the Australasian Corrosion Association (ACA). The event, sponsored by Jotun Australia, was an insight into the manufacture and application of Powdercoat systems. Attendees included a variety of Engineers, Sales Representatives, University Students and other Business Associates. The evening commenced with a brief history and introduction of Arkote including an insightful factory tour lead by Arkote’s Operations Manager, Shaun Fergusson. A respected representative of Jotun then hosted a technical overview of the manufacture of Powdercoat products. Following the overview, attendees participated in a practical demonstration of applying powdercoat products, demonstrated by Arkote’s Technical Manager, Darren Melbourne. During this activity participants got to try their own hand at powdercoating simple test pieces.

BBPS Kids Have Potential! After the success of the first corrosion presentation to the Bucklands Beach Primary School, Wayne Thomson was asked back to talk to the senior school. The school’s theme of enquiry revolved around how humans use their understanding of science and technology to harness energy. On the first day, 2 classes crammed together in a classroom and on the second day the school hall was chosen and 3 classes, approximately 90 children and teachers, attended. Once again the NACE Foundation

p.22  CORROSION & MATERIALS

C-Kit was centre stage where the bright minds of the school kids answered questions related to energy and materials. The focus was on potential energy and even one of the kids’ got the term ‘electrolyte’ correct! Volunteers were called up to help measure the potential of a battery and compare it to the potential of copper and zinc electrodes in a salt water solution (electrolyte). There was not much difference. Once the kids had figured out that the latter was a power source they connected it to the corrosion clock. The hall was filled

with “oohs” and “aahs” as the clock started ticking. All the kids got to shuffle past the experiment afterwards and get a close up on the electrolysis experiment, with some lingering longer, future corrosion scientists perhaps? The children at BBPS learned a lot about various metals and electrolytes and the potential they have to derive a current. Concurrently Wayne learned a lot about the potential bright young minds that will have to drive the future in science and technology.


BRANCH & YCG EVENTS

ACA Auckland Division March Meeting Report 75kW solar power plant, heat treatment facilities, induction heating of materials, hot-forging machines and the forging hammers. The highlight of the SAFE tour was a live demonstration of the hot-forging of steel billets into specific shapes. Lastly, after over the two hours visit to SAFE, ACA Auckland Chairman Wayne Thomson thanked Barry very much for the excellent evening tour at the unique SAFE Ltd premises.

The April ACA Auckland Division meeting was a site visit to SAFE Ltd, NZ’s largest specialised hot-forging and heat treatment plant, located at Drury in rural South Auckland. The SAFE engineering plant has been operating for 44 years and it is 70% powered by SAFE’s own solar energy station located on-site. GM Barry Robinson commenced the meeting with an outline of the services that SAFE offer to NZ industry, which include: hot-forged engineering parts,

heat treatment of the parts, high strength stainless steel and titanium alloy customised products, titanium powder compaction and forging, and the amazing new 3D printing technology to manufacture complex titanium parts by laser-sintering. There is also a metallurgical laboratory on-site at SAFE operating as MetLab Ltd by Manager Andrew Ouwejan.

ACA Auckland Chair Wayne Thomson with Barry Robinson, GM SAFE.

Barry Robinson demonstrates products that SAFE manufacture by hot-forging.

SAFE’s 75kW solar power plant on the Drury site.

Young corrosionist Miss Thomson who attended the site visit at SAFE with her dad.

Andrew Ouwejan (MetLab manager - left) explains metallurgical testing of heattreated metal samples after hot-forging.

Barry Robinson demonstrates hot-forging of a steel billet with a 100-tonne forging hammer.

The attendees were then treated to a full site tour of SAFE premises, to view the

June 2014  www.corrosion.com.au  p.23


BRANCH & YCG EVENTS

Auckland Division site visit to CSP Coating Systems On April 10 2014, 20 members were entertained by Ash Arya and his team at their plant at Ellerslie. The tour first went through the galvanizing plant, where members were shown the pretreatment process through various chemicals to prepare the steel surfaces before immersion in the molten zinc bath. Items are then finished off by quenching in a chromate bath to provide some initial surface protection against ‘white rust’. Ash explained that the process is essentially the same as was used when it was first patented in Europe in 1837. The group then moved to the paint shop. Ash pointed out that this is the only facility in Auckland where both galvanizing and painting can be provided on the one site. They regard their most dependable treatment of galvanized surfaces as a physical abrasion of the surface (rather than the

p.24  CORROSION & MATERIALS

garnet blasting specified in AS2312), and then an etch primer and high-build epoxy, and a two-pack polyurethane topcoat the following day. Later, in answering questions, Ash expressed considerable confidence in this duplex system as providing a maintenance-free 10 years in almost all NZ exposures. The visitors were also shown some examples of a top-of-the line duplex system – admittedly quite expensive, but very good – using an 800 micron polyurea topcoat on the buried sections of lamp standards. The drawback of this Particular product is that it chalks under UV exposure. Other products are currently being investigated. Finally the visitors were taken to the meeting room on site where Ash showed some pictures of successful projects around Auckland and in Australia. He noted that the composition of the steel plays a major

role in the thickness of the coating developed, and emphasised the importance of early consultation with the galvanizer when designing steel structures which will use galvanizing, so that the ability to do a good galvanizing job is not compromised in the design process. The afternoon finished with Ash answering questions from the visitors about what had been discussed, and he was thanked by Wayne Thomson, the Division Chairman, for his very insightful tour and comments. Each attendee was given a small designer's guide for galvanized structures. Subsequently, Ash invited ACA to arrange a similar ACA site visit for interested persons in Christchurch to visit the CSP Coating Systems facility there, which has the largest galvanizing bath in NZ. The NZ Branch Committee will be following up on this idea.


Corrosion of Concrete Structures ACA/ACRA Corrosion & Protection of Concrete Structures

Corrosion & CP of Concrete Structures

Sydney 19-20 June 2014

This course covers the background theory on corrosion and cathodic protection.

Brisbane 7-8 August 2014

Brisbane 27-28 November 2014 This course will provide a solid foundation of knowledge about the corrosion of both reinforcement and concrete, so that those working in this field can reach more effective solutions in the prevention and remediation of this ever-growing problem. Course Highlights: • The Characteristics of Cement and Concrete • Concrete Deterioration Mechanisms • Corrosion of Reinforcement in Concrete • Survey and Diagnosis of Concrete • On-site Measurements • Laboratory Measurements • Repair and protection of Reinforced Concrete • Repair of Damaged concrete • Cathodic Protection • Further Electrochemical Methods • Preventive Measures for New Concrete

Course Highlights: • Modes of Concrete Deterioration • Assessment and Repair of Structures • Corrosion Fundamentals • Remediation Options • Selection and Design of Cathodic Protection Systems • Materials and Equipment • Installation of Cathodic Protection Systems • Control of Interference Currents • Commissioning of Systems • Criteria for Cathodic Protection • Operation and Maintenance of Systems • Problem Troubleshooting • System Records and Documentation Cost: • Members $1060 • Non Members $1330

Cost: • Members $1060 • Non Members $1330

Register now at www.corrosion.com.au June 2014  www.corrosion.com.au  p.25


Event No. 383.

Proudly presented by:

Major Sponsor:

CORROSION & PREVENTION 2014 – PLENARY SPEAKER ABSTRACTS The Corrosion & Prevention 2014 technical committee has reviewed and accepted 130 abstracts of which have been allocated either as an oral or poster presentation. All abstracts can be viewed at www.acaconference.com.au and below are the abstracts for the conference plenary speakers. P F Thompson Memorial Lecture – 2014 Percival Faraday Thompson (1885-1951) is recognised as Australasia’s pioneer in the science and technology of metallic corrosion and its mitigation. In recognition of this singular distinction the Australasian Corrosion Association inaugurated the P F Thompson Memorial Lecture in 1951. The Lecture is the Association’s premier dedicated Lecture and the Lecturer is encouraged to mark P F Thompson’s distinction by referring to or emulating the academic and technical qualities for which Thompson became known, particularly his prowess with practical demonstration. Warren Green has been selected to be the 2014 P F Thompson Memorial Lecturer.

Warren Green Vinsi Partners, Australia Electrochemistry and Its Relevance in Reinforced Concrete Durability, Repair and Protection This lecture celebrates Percival Faraday Thompson (P F Thompson, PFT), (1885-1951), a metallurgist and chemical analyst, generally considered a corrosion research pioneer in Australia. P F Thompson knew of electrochemistry, in fact he practiced at a time when there was still controversy as to whether corrosion of metals was electrochemical in nature. The second name of PFT is also important when it comes to electrochemistry. When his parents chose the name Faraday, were they wanting their son to be an experimentalist and corrosion scientist? Michael Faraday (1791-1867) was a most gifted

p.26  CORROSION & MATERIALS

experimentalist, best known for his work on electricity and magnetism but he also discovered the laws of electrolysis and defined words such as electrode, anode, cathode, electrolyte, anion and cation. So where would we be without electrochemistry? It resides, literally, within our DNA (genes, genomes, chromosomes). Electrochemistry forms the basis of batteries in their various forms in our day-to-day lives, their use in transportation, buildings, infrastructure, mining, etc. Cathodic protection relies on electrochemistry. Electrochemistry also forms a key part of aspects of the durability of steel reinforced concrete structures and buildings as well as in their repair and protection. Electrochemistry is relevant for the passive film that develops on steel reinforcement when it is placed in concrete. Much is expected of some of our reinforced concrete structures and buildings. Electrochemistry is again relevant here. Some concrete structures and buildings require repair and protection during their service lives and electrochemistry is relevant when it comes to aspects of some concrete repair and protection technologies including concrete patch repair, coatings, penetrants, corrosion inhibitors, cathodic protection, chloride extraction, realkalisation and cathodic prevention. It is proposed that the 2014 P F Thompson memorial lecture and paper be on some of the applications of electrochemistry in reinforced concrete durability, repair and protection.


PLENARY SPEAKERS - 2014 Scott Collins Santos Ltd, Australia Implementation of a Comprehensive Quantitative Risk Based Inspection (RBI) Program Across Santos’ Facilities Since 2012, Santos have been in the process of implementing an extensive update to their static pressure equipment inspection and integrity management programs, following formal API 581 Risk Based Inspection (RBI) principles. This is a significant multi-year project, covering the majority of Santos’ EABU assets and equipment, and requiring a substantial commitment in resources. Risk Based Inspection of ageing equipment places a high demand on the integrity of the underlying data, including collating, interpretation and analysis of results. Supported by Wood Group Integrity Management (WGIM), Santos have been able to implement a fully quantitative RBI program across multiple sites with speed and confidence, delivering significant risk and cost reductions to Santos. Santos elected to use a full financial RBI approach to manage all of their Static Pressure Equipment, including vessels, piping and PSVs. A fully financial quantitative risk assessment approach allows informed inspection and integrity management decisions to be taken, considering all of the potential risk impacts (safety, environmental and production and equipment costs). The RBI process is only one part of the integrity management approach used by Santos. Through the RBI process, Santos also enhanced their Integrity Management Plans (IMPs) and the definition of Integrity Operating Windows (IOWs). This paper addresses the business processes, software selection process, management of technical challenges (especially management of deficiencies in the API 581 RBI approach and software), data collection & validation, output review through workshops & specialist input, and the transferring of risk results into ‘on the ground’ execution. Specifically, the paper will outline the benefits and challenges of implementing a fully quantitative financial risk model, in comparison to a simpler qualitative approach. The findings are applicable to any oil & gas operator wishing to optimise their inspection programs and best manage their operational risks.

Jason Furrugia Dulux Protective Coatings, Australia A Review of Techniques for Protecting Assets in the Marine & Coastal Environments The protections of assets from corrosion in marine and coastal locations have unique challenges not only due to the environment but also in many cases the very limited site access. A specification isn’t just an explicit set of requirements for the completion of a project to a required standard of quality, but at its core it is a battle plan designed to inhibit and slow the inevitable march of the metal back to its oxidative form. The surface treatment technologies that underpin the specification must take into account the micro environment the substrate is to be protected from, the quality of the surface preparation that is possible, constraints around application, the project time constrictions and the expectations to first maintenance. Outside of corrosion resistance the surface treatment is also likely required to impart protection for one or more of the following exposures; chemical, abrasion, thermal and immersion. Given these various demands, no one surface treatment, sacrificial, inhibitive or barrier can offer a complete solution. Indeed it is only a combination of all of these technologies that will produce the best results.

Benjamin Fultz Bectel Corporation, USA The Challenges of LNG Materials Selection The challenges of selection of materials of construction (MOC) for natural gas liquefaction plants range from cryogenic exposures in the liquefaction process to the high temperatures of steam boilers. In this paper we will discuss the considerations that go into material selection of both metallic and non-metallic materials of construction. FEED gas composition dictates materials required for the front end of the plant. FEED gas can range from clean as in most Australian coal seam gas to high CO2 and H2S compositions in produced gas. The common material of construction for cryogenic applications is 304L stainless steel. This lower grade 300 series material offers excellent toughness at low temperatures but offers challenges with corrosion resistance to chloride pitting and CSCC in the marine environment since most LNG production facilities are necessarily located on the seacoast. Coating systems suitable for atmospheric service during fabrication, shipping and installation yet are able to withstand cryogenic cyclic service and be compatible with

June 2014  www.corrosion.com.au  p.27


stainless steel will be discussed. The pros and cons of the various insulation systems to include safety considerations will be presented. Module preservation issues and challenges and solutions will also be offered.

Harvey Hack Northrop Grumman Corp, USA Design of Small Structures to Control Marine Corrosion This presentation describes the important considerations for designing structures, especially small objects and mechanisms, which will be employed underwater for extended periods of time. Underwater environments are characterized into specific types and the affect of these environments on the various forms of corrosion are discussed. Methods of corrosion control for underwater systems are described, including specific details for those that are of most use underwater. These include maintenance and operation, materials selection, corrosion allowance, design considerations, environmental modification, cathodic protection, and coatings. The underwater performance of the major metal types and the major types of hardware are also described, as are brief descriptions of performance of specific non-metals. Theory and design issues for underwater ground return systems are covered. Finally, a series of underwater design rules of thumb are presented.

Richard Hays Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics, USA New Technologies and Future Challenges for the Prevention of Corrosion in US DoD Assets The direct cost of corrosion of United States Department of Defense (DoD) assets is approximately $22.5B annually. Corrosion also negatively impacts availability and safety of weapon systems and infrastructure. As a result, the DoD Corrosion Policy and Oversight Office is aggressively pursuing research programs and technology insertion projects focused on reducing these impacts. While significant progress has been made over the last 10 years, challenges to the development and implementation of new technologies remain. Recent technology implementation successes in the areas of conductive gaskets, non-chrome coatings, and dehumidification systems will be presented, among others. Research progress in the areas of accelerated testing, predictive modeling, and corrosion fatigue will also be presented.

p.28  CORROSION & MATERIALS

Technological challenges remain but are being incrementally overcome. However, some of the most daunting challenges in the area of corrosion control are non-technical in nature. These include defining performance requirements, securing sufficient and stable resources and funding, developing a culture of collaboration, and communicating results to name a few. These issues will be discussed and potential methods for overcoming them presented.

Prabhaker Singh University of Connecticut, USA Corrosion of Materials and Coatings in Advanced Energy Systems Energy sustainability is a binding discussion topic among scientists and engineers globally. Depletion of natural resources, national security, and climate change remain concern for policy makers as well as industry leaders working towards economic growth, job creation, productivity improvement, and overall societal wellbeing. Existing energy technologies as well as technology pipe line for “Carbon constrained” scenario will be presented. Challenges associated with meeting the “Quad” needs of developing and developed countries will be discussed. Role of fuels (Hydrogen to hydrocarbons to coal to bio), use/ reclamation of water (fracking to shale), and carbon footprint on ‘cradle to grave’ analysis will be examined and presented. Advanced energy systems with focus on Combined Heat and Power (CHP), electrical efficiency, emissions, fuel flexibility, hybridization and energy storage for distributed and centralized generation and integration in “Micro grid” will be described. Challenges associated with market acceptance will be analyzed and presented. Topic of materials reliability and cost effectiveness for long term reliable operation will be discussed with emphasis on corrosion in complex environment, surface and bulk degradation at elevated temperatures, hydrogen assisted degradation, along with acceleration in degradation in the presence of air and fuel borne contaminants will be discussed. Techno-economic barrier to large scale adoption of emerging energy technologies will be discussed. Underpinning role of materials reliability will be described.

Pat Teevens Broadsword Corrosion Engineering, Canada Petroleum Pipeline Integrity Under the Public “Microscope”: The Essential Role of Internal Corrosion Direct Assessment (ICDA) The pipeline industry in the developed world is increasingly realizing more intense and protracted regulatory, public


and environmental scrutiny than ever before. It has been likened to the intense public debate of the nuclear energy industry of the 1990’s. Pipeline failures, leaks, ruptures, environmental pollution from releases, greenhouse gas emissions and the unfortunate loss of human lives have all culminated in a growing and sensationalized, mediapromoted public distrust of pipeline operators in general. Focal to the argument against pipeline proliferation and associated system expansions, is the widening perception that pipeline operators have inconsistent and ineffective pipeline integrity management programs. Since most upstream production pipelines and a significant percentage of midstream transmission lines fail due to internal corrosion, it is absolutely necessary that technical competency in corrosion engineering and corrosion management systems including the personnel charged with implementing them, are non-negotiable attributes with respect to regulatory program expectations. This paper discusses the benefits and successes attained PROUDLY PRESENTED BY

MAJOR SPONSOR:

by methodically defining internal pipeline corrosion susceptibility through the 4-step internal corrosion direct assessment (ICDA) process for wet gas and multiphase fluids. The advantages gained from following the new and pending NACE International Standard Practices for DA, regardless of whether the line is piggable or not, result in the operator being confidently able to define the root-cause of their problem, the degradation rate or severity of internal corrosion and the implementation of an appropriate verifiable mitigation plan. This process results in elevating pipeline reliability, safety and operator confidence which can be translated into reducing public skepticism that pipeline operators are not proactively preventing corrosion-initiated releases.

EARLY BIRD REGISTRATIONS Register now for the discounted early bird registration rate by 20th June at www.acaconference.com.au

SUPPORTING SPONSORS: Standard

EVENT SPONSORS:

MEDIA PARTNER:

DENSO NORTH AMERICA INC.

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Black and white

ACA Coatings AWARDS

Rust Award

The ACA Coatings Technical Group are now calling for nominations for the annual Rust and Nightingall Awards.

The purpose of the Rust Award is to honour a protective coatings contractor for their meritorious and/or innovative performance in the field, or in recognition of their significant contribution to their industry. Nominations should be guided by the following criteria: • Outstanding achievement in commercial coatings work, demonstrating innovation, durability or utility. • Outstanding industrial or commercial coatings project demonstrating longevity of the original coating. • Outstanding achievement demonstrating aesthetic merit in industrial coatings work. • Outstanding achievement in the completion of a difficult or complex industrial coatings project.

Nightingall Award The Nightingall Award was established to recognise distinguished achievement in the development, manufacture or application of protective coatings or advancement of the protective coatings industry.

Full details and nomination forms can be found at www.corrosion.com.au. Nominations close 30 June 2014. Awards will be announced at Corrosion & Prevention 2014 in Darwin 21–24 September. June 2014  www.corrosion.com.au  p.29


ACA STANDARDS UPDATE

ACA Standards Update Welcome to the third corrosion related Standards Update for 2014. This Standards report focuses on corrosion issues related to the Petroleum & Chemical Processing Industries Technical Group. In this ‘Standards Update’, Focus 1 & 2 will, summarise all relevant standards to the technical group in question. Focus 1 As previously the focus will be a global standards and publication focus, searching through SAI Global Publications at https://infostore. saiglobal.com/store, for all current publications and standards relating to the ACA Technical Groups, with this edition's group focus being the ‘Petroleum & Chemical Processing Industries’ Technical Group. This proved to be quite difficult given the general title of the technical group. Different search strategies were used, as shown in the results. These results are shown in Focus 1 report below. Summary Through SAIGLOBAL Publications at https://infostore.saiglobal.com/store there were:

a. 114 Titles (9 more than this time last year), none from AS, AS/NZS; the 23 results for the Metallurgy filter are shown in Table 1 below. b. 176 Titles (10 more than this time last year); 2 from AS, AS/NZS; the 55 results for the Metallurgy filter are shown in Table 2 below. c. 125 Titles (8 more than this time last year); 1 from AS, AS/NZS; the 9 results for the Chemical Technology Filter are shown in Table 3 below. Focus 2 A SAI Global search, as previously, at http://www.saiglobal.com/online/ for new standards, amendments or drafts for AS, AS/NZS, EN, ANSI, ASTM, BSI, DIN, ETSI, JSA, NSAI and standards and amendments for ISO & IEC published from 13 March 2014 to 14 May 2014, using the key words and key word groups:

‘ durability’. ‘corrosion’ or ‘corrosivity’ or ‘corrosive’; but not ‘anodizing’ or ‘anodize(d)’. 'paint’ or ‘coating’; but not ‘anodizing’ or ‘anodize(d)’. 'galvanize' or ‘galvanized’ or galvanizing’. 'electrochemical' or ‘electrolysis’ or ‘electroplated’. ‘cathode’ or 'cathodic'. ‘anode’ or ‘anodic’. 'corrosion' and 'concrete' or ‘concrete’ and ‘coatings’. These results are shown in the Focus 2 report below. Summary Across SAIGLOBAL online Standards Publications there was a total of 52 listings of new Standards, Drafts and Amendments, found issued from to 13 March 2014 to 14 May 2014; with 0 from AS, AS/NZS; as shown in Table 4 below.

Focus 1 Report The Focus 1 Report on SAIGLOBAL Publications at https://infostore.saiglobal.com/store, for all current publications and standards relating to ‘petroleum or gas and corrosion’ for the ‘Petroleum & Chemical Processing Industries’ Technical Group. Table 1 For Titles search ‘Petroleum and Corrosion’; result 114 Titles (9 more than this time last year), none from AS, AS/NZS; the 23 results for the Metallurgy filter are shown below. Summary for the Metallurgy filter ASTM D1838-12a - Standard Test Method for Copper Strip Corrosion by Liquefied Petroleum (LP) Gases S S EN ISO 13680 Ed. 3 (2010) - Petroleum And Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions I .S. EN ISO 13680:2010 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions I SO 13680:2010 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions I .S. EN ISO 13680:2008 - Petroleum and Natural gas Industries - Corrosion-resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions  B/T 23802-2009 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, Tubing G and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions  OST R ISO 13680:2011 - Seamless Casing, Tubing and Coupling Stock from Corrosion-Resistant High-Alloy Steels and Alloys G for Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries – Specifications  N EN ISO 13680:2012 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, P Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions (ISO 13680:2010)  EN EN ISO 13680:2010 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, N Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions  NI EN ISO 13680:2010 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, U Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions  N ISO 13680:2010 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, E Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions

p.30  CORROSION & MATERIALS


ACA STANDARDS UPDATE

 BN EN ISO 13680:2010 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, N Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions ONORM EN ISO 13680:2010 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions  S EN ISO 13680 Ed. 1 (2010) - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use N as Casing, Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions I .S. EN ISO 13680:2002 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions  N ISO 13680:2001 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, E Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions  S EN ISO 15156-3:2009 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Materials for use in H2s-Containing Environments in Oil N and Gas Production - Part 3: Cracking-resistant Cras (corrosion-resistant Alloys) and Other Alloys I SO/DIS 13680 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions  S EN ISO 13680:2010 – Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, D Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions  S EN ISO 13680:2010 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries. Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, B Tubing and Coupling Stock Technical Delivery Conditions  IN EN ISO 13680 (2010-12) - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as D Casing, Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions (ISO 13680:2010); English Version EN ISO 13680:2010 DIN EN ISO 15156-3 (2010-12) - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Materials for use in H2S-Containing Environments in Oil and Gas Production - Part 3: Cracking-Resistant CRAs (Corrosion-Resistant Alloys) and Other Alloys (ISO 15156-3:2009)  F EN ISO 13680:2013 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, N Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions

Table 2 For Titles search ‘Gas and Corrosion’; result 176 Titles (10 more than this time last year); 2 from AS, AS/NZS; 55 results for the Metallurgy filter; Summary for the Metallurgy filter AS 60068.2.60-2003 - Environmental Testing - Tests - Test Ke: Flowing Mixed Gas Corrosion Test AS 4955.1-2003 - Transportable Gas Cylinders - Compatibility of Cylinder and Valve Materials with Gas Contents - Metallic Materials JIS Z 2291:2004 - Method for High-Temperature Gaseous Corrosion Test of Metallic Materials ASTM D1838-12a - Standard Test Method for Copper Strip Corrosion by Liquefied Petroleum (LP) Gases GB/T 19745-2005 - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmosphere at Very Low Concentrations of Polluting Gas(es) PN EN ISO 10062:2009 - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmosphere at Very Low Concentrations of Polluting Gas(es) UNI EN ISO 10062:2008 - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmosphere at Very Low Concentrations of Polluting Gas(es)  NI EN ISO 13680:2010 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, U Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions  S EN ISO 15156-3:2009 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Materials for use In H2S-containing Environments in Oil N and Gas Production - Part 3: Cracking-resistant Cras (Corrosion-Resistant Alloys) and Other Alloys  B/T 28416-2012 - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmospheres - Accelerated Corrosion Tests Involving Alternate Exposure to G Corrosion-Promoting Gases,Neutral Salt-Spray and Drying I SO 21207:2004/Cor 1:2008 - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmospheres - Accelerated Corrosion Tests Involving Alternate Exposure to Corrosion-Promoting Gases, Neutral Salt-Spray and Drying - Technical Corrigendum 1 DIN EN ISO 15156-3 (2010-12) - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Materials for use in H2S-Containing Environments in Oil and Gas Production - Part 3: Cracking-Resistant CRAs (Corrosion-Resistant Alloys) and Other Alloys (ISO 15156-3:2009) I.S. EN ISO 10062:2008 - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmosphere at Very low Concentrations of Polluting Gas(es) I SO 13680:2010 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions I .S. EN ISO 13680:2010 - Petroleum and Natural gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions

June 2014  www.corrosion.com.au  p.31


ACA STANDARDS UPDATE

I .S. EN ISO 13680:2008 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions  B/T 23802-2009 - Petroleum And Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing,Tubing G and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions  STM G186-05(2011) - Standard Test Method for Determining Whether Gas-Leak-Detector Fluid Solutions Can Cause Stress A Corrosion Cracking of Brass Alloys  N EN ISO 13680:2012 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, P Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions (Iso 13680:2010) S S ISO 21207:2005 - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmospheres - Accelerated Corrosion Tests Involving Alternate Exposure to Corrosion-promoting Gases, Neutral Salt-spray and Drying NEN ISO 21207:2004 - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmospheres - Accelerated Corrosion Tests Involving Alternate Exposure to Corrosion-promoting Gases, Neutral Salt-spray and Drying  S ISO 21207:2004 - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmospheres. Accelerated Corrosion Tests Involving Alternate Exposure to B Corrosion-Promoting Gases, Neutral Salt-Spray and Drying  IN EN ISO 10062 (2008-04) - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmosphere at Very Low Concentrations of Polluting Gas(es) (ISO D 10062:2006)  OST R ISO 13680:2011 - Seamless Casing, Tubing and Coupling Stock from Corrosion-Resistant High-Alloy Steels and Alloys G For Petroleum And Natural Gas Industries – Specifications  NI ENV 13797:2001 - Corrosion Protection - Carbon And Low Alloy Steels For Use In Hydrogen Sulfide Containing U Environments in Oil and Gas Production - Materials and Test Methods – Guidelines DS EN ISO 10062:2008 - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmosphere at Very Low Concentrations of Polluting Gas(Es) UNE EN ISO 10062:2009 - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmosphere at Very Low Concentrations of Polluting Gas(es) EN ISO 10062:2008 - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmosphere at Very Low Concentrations of Polluting Gas(es) BS EN ISO 10062:2008 - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmosphere at Very Low Concentrations of Polluting Gas(es) NBN EN ISO 10062:2008 - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmosphere at Very Low Concentrations of Polluting Gas(es) NEN EN ISO 10062:2008 - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmosphere at Very Low Concentrations of Polluting Gas(es) SN EN ISO 10062:2008 - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmosphere at Very Low Concentrations of Polluting Gas(es) NF EN ISO 10062:2008 - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmosphere at Very Low Concentrations of Polluting Gas(es) ONORM EN ISO 10062:2008 - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmosphere at Very Low Concentrations of Polluting Gas(es) SS EN ISO 10062 Ed. 2 (2008) - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmosphere at Very Low Concentrations of Polluting Gas(es) NS EN ISO 10062 Ed. 2 (2008) - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmosphere at Very Low Concentrations of Polluting Gas(es) I.S. EN ISO 10062:1995 - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmosphere at Very Low Concentrations of Polluting Gas(es)  N ISO 13680:2010 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, E Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions  BN EN ISO 13680:2010 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, N Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions  NORM EN ISO 13680:2010 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as O Casing, Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions  EN EN ISO 13680:2010 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, N Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions  S EN ISO 13680 Ed. 1 (2010) - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as N Casing, Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions S S EN ISO 13680 Ed. 3 (2010) - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions I .S. EN ISO 13680:2002 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions  N ISO 13680:2001 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, E Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions  F ENV 13797:2001 - Corrosion Protection - Carbon and Low Alloy Steels for use in Hydrogen Sulphide Containing N Environments in Oil and Gas Production - Materials and Test Methods – Guidelines  NORM ENV 13797:2001 - Corrosion Protection - Carbon and Low Alloy Steels for use in Hydrogen Sulfide Containing O Environments in Oil and Gas Production - Materials and Test Methods – Guidelines

p.32  CORROSION & MATERIALS


ACA STANDARDS UPDATE

 F EN ISO 13680:2013 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, N Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions S S ENV 13797 Ed. 1 (2001) - Corrosion Protection - Carbon and Low Alloy Steels for use in Hydrogen Sulfide Containing Environments in Oil and Gas Production - Materials and Test Methods – Guidelines  EN ENV 13797:2000 - Corrosion Protection - Carbon and Low Alloy Steels for use in Hydrogen Sulfide Containing N Environments in Oil and Gas Production - Materials and Test Methods – Guidelines I SO/DIS 13680 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions  NV 13797:2000 - Corrosion Protection - Carbon and Low Alloy Steels for use in Hydrogen Sulfide Containing Environments E in Oil and Gas Production - Materials and Test Methods – Guidelines BS EN ISO 10062:2008 - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmosphere at Very Low Concentrations of Polluting Gas(Es)  S EN ISO 13680:2010 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries. Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, B Tubing and Coupling Stock Technical Delivery Conditions  S EN ISO 13680:2010 - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as Casing, D Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions  IN EN ISO 13680 (2010-12) - Petroleum and Natural Gas Industries - Corrosion-Resistant Alloy Seamless Tubes for use as D Casing, Tubing and Coupling Stock - Technical Delivery Conditions (ISO 13680:2010); English Version EN ISO 13680:2010 ISO 10062:2006 - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmosphere at Very Low Concentrations of Polluting Gas(es) Table 3 For Titles search ‘Chemical and Corrosion’; result 125 Titles (8 more than this time last year); 1 from AS, AS/NZS; 9 for the Chemical Technology Filter. Summary for the Chemical Technology filter  B/T 25147-2010 - Test Method of Metal Corrosion Amount and Corrosion Rate of Chemical Cleaning for Industrial G Equipment - Gravimetric Method  STM G157-98(2013) - Standard Guide for Evaluating Corrosion Properties of Wrought Iron- and Nickel-Based Corrosion A Resistant Alloys for Chemical Process Industries  S 5117-1.1:1985 - Testing Corrosion Inhibiting, Engine Coolant Concentrate ('Antifreeze'). Methods of Test for B Determination of Physical and Chemical Properties. Ancillary Procedures  S 5117-1.2:1985 - Testing Corrosion Inhibiting, Engine Coolant Concentrate ('Antifreeze'). Methods of Test for B Determination of Physical and Chemical Properties. Determination of Boiling Point  S 5117-1.3:1985 - Testing Corrosion Inhibiting, Engine Coolant Concentrate ('Antifreeze'). Methods of Test for B Determination of Physical and Chemical Properties. Determination of Freezing Point  S 5117-1.4:1985 - Testing Corrosion Inhibiting, Engine Coolant Concentrate ('Antifreeze'). Methods of Test for B Determination of Physical and Chemical Properties. Determination of Foaming Characteristics  S 5117-1.5:1992 - Testing Corrosion Inhibiting, Engine Coolant Concentrate ('Antifreeze'). Methods of Test for B Determination of Physical and Chemical Properties. Coolant Hard Water Stability Test GB/T 20856-2012 - Aircraft De-Icing/Anti-Icing Newtonian Fluids – Type 1  S EN ISO 28721-2:2011 - Vitreous and Porcelain Enamels. Glass-Lined Apparatus for Process Plants. Designation and B Specification of Resistance to Chemical Attack and Thermal Shock To access these publications, go to https://infostore.saiglobal.com/store and type ‘coatings and corrosion’ into the search box and examine the search results. Focus 2 Report Table 4 Standards for AS, AS/NZS, EN, ANSI, ASTM, BSI, DIN, ETSI, JSA, NSAI and Standards and Amendments for ISO & IEC published from 13 March 2014 to 14 May 2014 for: New standards, amendments or drafts for AS, AS/NZS, EN, ANSI, ASTM, BSI, DIN, ETSI, JSA, NSAI and Standards or Amendments for ISO & IEC PUBLISHED between 13 March 2014 to 14 May 2014 Key word search on ‘durability’.- 4 citations found 0 from AS/NZS ISO 10300-2:2014

Calculation of Load Capacity of Bevel Gears - Part 2: Calculation of Surface Durability (Pitting)

DIN CEN/TR 16563*DIN SPEC 18097 (2014-04)

Principles of the Equivalent Durability Procedure; English Version CEN/TR 16563:2013

June 2014  www.corrosion.com.au  p.33


ACA STANDARDS UPDATE

BS ISO 10300-2:2014

Calculation of Load Capacity of Bevel Gears - Part 2: Calculation of Surface Durability (Pitting)

BS ISO/IEC 18745-1:2014

Information Technology - Test Methods for Machine Readable Travel Documents (Mrtd) and Associated Devices - Part 1: Physical Test Methods for Passport Books (Durability)

Key word search on ‘corrosion’ or ‘corrosivity’ or ‘corrosive’; but not ‘anodizing’ or ‘anodize(d)’- 16 citations in all – 0 from AS/NZS ISO/DIS 18070

Corrosion of Metals and Alloys - Crevice Corrosion Formers with Disc Springs for Flat Specimens or Tubes of Stainless Steels in Corrosive Solutions

14/30263831 DC BS ISO 180 70

Corrosion of Metals and Alloys - Crevice Corrosion Formers with Disc Springs for Flat Specimens or Tubes of Stainless Steels in Corrosive Solutions

BS W13:1973+A1:2014

Aerospace Series - Specification for Preformed Corrosion-Resisting Steel Wire Rope (ISO Diameters and Strengths)

ISO/TS 17988:2014

Dentistry - Corrosion Test Methods for Dental Amalgam

ISO/DIS 15106-7

Plastics - Film and Sheeting - Determination of Water Vapour Transmission Rate - Part 7: Calcium Corrosion Method

ISO/DIS 18069

Corrosion of Metals and Alloys - Method for Determination of the Uniform Corrosion Rate of Stainless Steels and Nickel Based Alloys in Aqueous Solutions

ISO/DIS 18089

Corrosion of Metals and Alloys - Determination of the Critical Crevice Temperature (CCT) for Stainless Steels Under Potentiostatic Control

ISO/DIS 2063-1

Thermal Spraying - Metallic and Other Inorganic Coatings - Zinc, Aluminium and Their Alloys - Part 1: Planning of The Corrosion Protection System - Component Design Considerations and Quality Requirements

ISO/DIS 2063-2

Thermal Spraying - Metallic and Other Inorganic Coatings - Zinc, Aluminium and Their Alloys Part 2: Conditions for Execution of Corrosion Protection Works by Thermal Spray Processes

ISO/DIS 6509-2

Corrosion of Metals and Alloys - Determination of Dezincification Resistance of Copper Alloys With Zinc - Part 2: Acceptance Criteria

I.S. EN ISO 11474:2014

Corrosion of Metals and Alloys - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmosphere - Accelerated Outdoor Test by Intermittent Spraying of a Salt Solution (scab Test) (ISO 11474:1998)

I.S. EN ISO 8407:2014

Corrosion on Metals and Alloys - Removal of Corrosion Products from Corrosion Test Specimens (ISO 8407:2009)

A A 59214:1998 Notice 3 Validation

Junction Box: Extension, Junction Box; Cover, Junction Box (Steel, Coated With CorrosionResistant Finish) - Notice 3 Validation

BS EN ISO 11474:2014

Corrosion of Metals and Alloys - Corrosion Tests in Artificial Atmosphere - Accelerated Outdoor Test by Intermittent Spraying of a Salt Solution (Scab Test) (ISO 11474:1998)

14/30263828 DC BS ISO 18069

Corrosion of Metals and Alloys - Method for Determination of The Uniform Corrosion Rate of Stainless Steels and Nickel Based Alloys in Aqueous Solutions

14/30300810 DC BS EN 2944

Aerospace Series - Inserts, Screw Thread, Helical Coil, Self-Locking, in Corrosion Resisting Steel Fe-Pa3004

Key word search on 'paint’ and or ‘coating’; but not ‘anodizing’ or ‘anodize(d)’ or corrosion– 22 Publications found; 0 from AS/NZS corrosion related; ISO 16145-5:2014

Ships and Marine Technology - Protective Coatings and Inspection Method - Part 5: Assessment Method for Coating Damages

ISO/DIS 18555

Metallic and Other Inorganic Coatings - Determination of Thermal Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings

ISO/DIS 2063-1

Thermal Spraying - Metallic and Other Inorganic Coatings - Zinc, Aluminium and their Alloys - Part 1: Planning of The Corrosion Protection System - Component Design Considerations and Quality Requirements

ISO/DIS 2063-2

Thermal Spraying - Metallic and Other Inorganic Coatings - Zinc, Aluminium and their Alloys Part 2: Conditions for Execution of Corrosion Protection Works by Thermal Spray Processes

I.S. EN ISO 12671:2014

Thermal Spraying - Thermally Sprayed Coatings - Symbolic Representation on Drawings (ISO 12671:2012)

TT P 595 Revision A Notice 1 Inactivation

Preservative Coating, Canvas - Revision a Notice 1 Inactivation

14/30279095 DC BS ISO 18555

Metallic and Other Inorganic Coatings - Determination of Thermal Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings

14/30299616 DC BS EN 4474

Aerospace Series - Aluminium Pigmented Coatings - Coating Methods

p.34  CORROSION & MATERIALS


ACA STANDARDS UPDATE

BS EN 50050-1:2013

Electrostatic Hand-Held Spraying Equipment - Safety Requirements - Part 1: Hand-Held Spraying Equipment for Ignitable Liquid Coating Materials

BS EN 50050-2:2013

Electrostatic Hand-Held Spraying Equipment - Safety Requirements - Part 2: Hand-Held Spraying Equipment for Ignitable Coating Powder

ISO/FDIS 13803

Paints and Varnishes - Determination of Haze on Paint Films at 20 Degrees

ISO/FDIS 2813

Paints and Varnishes - Determination of Gloss Value at 20 Degrees, 60 Degrees and 85 Degrees

ISO/DIS 3248

Paints and Varnishes - Determination of The Effect of Heat

ISO/DIS 3668

Paints and Varnishes - Visual Comparison of The Colour of Paints

ISO/DIS 4624

Paints and Varnishes - Pull-Off Test for Adhesion

ISO/DIS 7784-3

Paints and Varnishes - Determination of Resistance to Abrasion - Part 3: Method with AbrasivePaper Covered Wheel and Linearly Reciprocating Test Panel

ISO/DIS 8502-4

Preparation of Steel Substrates before Application of Paints and Related Products - Tests for the Assessment of Surface Cleanliness - Part 4: Guidance on the Estimation of the Probability of Condensation Prior to Paint Application

14/30266785 DC BS EN ISO 16773-4

Paints And Varnishes - Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) on High-Impedance Coated Specimens - Part 4: Examples of Spectra of Polymer-Coated Specimens

14/30266802 DC BS EN ISO 16773-3

Paints And Varnishes - Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) on High-Impedance Coated Specimens - Part 3: Processing and Analysis of Data from Dummy Cells

ISO/DIS 8124-7

Safety of Toys - Part 7: Finger Paints - Requirements and Test Methods

ISO/DIS 8502-3

Preparation of Steel Substrates Before Application of Paints and Related Products - Tests for the Assessment of Surface Cleanliness - Part 3: Assessment of Dust on Steel Surfaces Prepared for Painting (Pressure-Sensitive Tape Method)

14/30273446 DC BS ISO 8124-7

Safety of Toys - Part 7: Finger Paints - Requirements and Test Methods

Key word search on 'galvanize' or ‘galvanized’ or galvanizing’ – 0 Standard Publications found; Key word search on 'corrosion' and 'concrete' or ‘concrete’ and ‘coatings’ - 0 Standard Publications found Key word search on ‘cathode’ or 'cathodic' -1 corrosion related Standard Publications found; 0 AS/NZS Publications Key word search on 'anode' or ‘anodes’ or ‘anodic’ – 1 Standard Publications found – 0 from AS/ANZS Keyword Search on 'electrochemical' or ‘electrolysis’ or ‘electroplated’ - 10 Standard Publications found for ‘electrochemical’; zero for AS, AS/NZS ISO/DIS 16773-1

Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) on Coated and Uncoated Metallic Specimens Part 1: Terms and Definitions

ISO/DIS 16773-2

Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) on Coated and Uncoated Metallic Specimens Part 2: Collection of Data

ISO/DIS 16773-3

Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) on Coated and Uncoated Metallic Specimens Part 3: Processing and Analysis of Data from Dummy Cells

ISO/DIS 16773-4

Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) on Coated and Uncoated Metallic Specimens Part 4: Examples of Spectra of Polymer-Coated Specimens

IEC 60050-114 Ed. 1.0 (Bilingual 2014)

International Electrotechnical Vocabulary - Part 114: Electrochemistry

14/30266785 DC BS EN ISO 16773-4

Paints And Varnishes - Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) on High-Impedance Coated Specimens - Part 4: Examples of Spectra of Polymer-Coated Specimens

14/30266802 DC BS EN ISO 16773-3

Paints And Varnishes - Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) on High-Impedance Coated Specimens - Part 3: Processing and Analysis of Data from Dummy Cells

14/30296407 DC BS EN ISO 16773-1

Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) on Coated and Uncoated Specimens - Part 1: Terms and Definitions

14/30296410 DC BS EN ISO 16773-2

Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) on Coated and Uncoated Specimens - Part 2: Collection of Data

PD IEC TS 62607-4-1:2014

Nanomanufacturing - Key Control Characteristics - Part 4-1: Cathode Nanomaterials for Lithium Ion Batteries - Electrochemical Characterisation, 2-Electrode Cell Method

Keyword Search on 'anodize' or ‘anodized’ - 0 Publications found

Arthur Austin ACA Standards Officer

June 2014  www.corrosion.com.au  p.35


SEMINAR SERIES REVIEW

Marine & Coastal Corrosion The ACA Marine & Coastal Corrosion Seminar Series 2014 Review The ACA conducted its annual Seminar Series in May 2014 to discuss the impacts of corrosion in the Marine & Coastal environments. With over 350 delegates attending across Australasia the 2014 Seminar Series was a great success. The Seminar Series could not happen without the support of our industry sponsors; Galvanizers Association of Australia, Industrial Galvanizers and International Paint. Speakers and delegates travelled to Auckland, Hobart, Melbourne, Brisbane, Sydney, Newcastle, Darwin and Perth. A synopsis of a selection of the presentations covered throughout the technical programs is detailed below: Reinforcing the Protection of your Assets with Hot Dip Galvanizing Galvanizers Association of Australia The coastal region is generally defined as existing around sheltered bays, extending up to fifty metres inland from the shoreline; although in areas with rough seas and surf, it extends from about several hundred metres inland to about one kilometre inland. The marine environment is common offshore and on the beachfront in regions of rough seas and surf beaches and can extend inland for several hundred metres. The extent of each of these regions is highly dependent on winds, wave action and local topography. These coastal and marine regions are identified as C4 (high) and C5 (very high), respectively, in the local and international Standards. Hot dip galvanizing is widely recognised as a most cost effective method for the long term protection of steel assets in most environments. For a typical coating thickness of eighty-five microns, hot

p.36  CORROSION & MATERIALS

dip galvanizing is predicted to protect steel from corrosion anywhere from ten years in a severe marine environment to forty years in a mild coastal area. In some applications, the coating can add considerable time to the life of an asset well above the predicted durability; through educated design using steel chemistry, the use of additional coatings (so called duplex systems) or as a coating on steel reinforcement where durability of one hundred years or more is expected in a marine environment. This presentation focussed on the science of the protection of hot dip galvanizing, using real case studies from Australia, New Zealand and the rest of the world. Cathodic Protection Update with Reinforced Concrete Structures, Case Studies in Marine Environments GHD Chloride induced reinforcement corrosion in marine structures has traditionally been repaired through a combination of traditional concrete repair methods, electrochemical installations and application of protective coatings. Typical electrochemical methods employed for reinforced concrete structures include Impressed Current Cathodic Protection (ICCP) or Sacrificial Anode Cathodic Protection systems (SACP). GHD as consulting engineers have been involved in the design, installation, testing and monitoring of numerous SACP and ICCP installations over the last 30 years. Many of these systems have been designed using a mix of cathodic protection (CP) materials and installation methods. Continuing monitoring of these systems has revealed a range of system performances which have successfully extended the life of the structure and allowed cost savings for the asset owner through reduced maintenance cycles. This presentation used case studies on design advancements, constructability

PROUDLY SPONSORED BY:

Long Term Asset Protection challenges faced, and the methods used to overcome the challenges for currently operating CP installations in marine environments. An Ocean of Galvanizing – Case Study Reviews & Lessons Learnt Industrial Galvanizers Galvanizing has a successful history as a trusted and proven corrosion protection system. It has been used for many different applications, in locations from coast to desert, and is seen by many as an ‘all purpose’ coating solution. Despite its proven success, there are situations where its unexpectedly early failure has promoted the use of alternative coatings in the consciousness of engineers, architects or asset owners. However, alternative coatings such as paint are not trouble-free solutions. Surface preparation, humidity regulation, paint selection and applicator skill are critical to a successful coating and are not always easy to control, nor are they inexpensive – especially for complex in situ locations. The advantage of a coloured topcoat is often offset by the need to recoat several times in the life of the asset – either for aesthetic reasons or to maintain protection from corrosion. Galvanized coatings can be applied quickly; provide a tough metallurgically bonded layer that resists handling damage; are easily inspected; have a low whole of life cost; and are longlasting – even in marine and coastal environments This non-technical presentation illustrated the abundant use of galvanized products in a marine and coastal environment. Case studies were used to show the benefits of galvanizing, and demonstrate that coating selection is a situational decisions based on asset life expectancy, whole of life cost, location, environment and aesthetics.


Long Term Protection of Marine Piling – Are We Stuck In Our Ways, or Just Safely Stuck In the Waves International Paint In most sectors of the protective coatings industry the products on offer are in a constant state of refinement, replacement or improvement, with systems, testing and specification constantly under review. However, in one of the most frequently encountered severe environments in the protective coatings industry, the preferred solution has remained largely unchanged for the last 15-20 years. This presentation demonstrates the reliability with which existing high build systems achieve long term protection of marine pilings, and other marine and coastal assets, and discusses the key elements for consideration as we seek to tinker with a proven solution. The presentation explored current thinking and practice with respect to required system thicknesses, the need (or not) for glass flake reinforcement, and an overview of relevant testing and standards for consideration when evaluating both proven and newly promoted systems. Variations in Corrosion Rates for Marine Structures Pacific Testing & the University of Newcastle This presentation covered atmospheric, tidal and immersion corrosion. Under atmospheric conditions the effect of direction, inclination, height and time of exposure can all make a difference to corrosion rates. Intertidal corrosion can be effected by direction whereas corrosion of immersed infrastructure can be altered by among other things; water velocity, surface roughness and water temperature. Corrosion profiles on such structures as sheet piling will change with the availability of nutrients. Accelerated low water corrosion is a recognised issue in ports across the world and was discussed using case studies. Corrosion Management Design Experiences of Port Structures Vinsi Partners The asset portfolio of Ports in Australia needs to be large and diverse in order to meet the business needs of their stakeholders and customers. Such

asset categories include marine and berth structures, buildings, navigation aids, roads, rail, breakwaters/seawalls, cargo handling infrastructure and high voltage services. The majority of Port assets are located in an aggressive marine environment with corrosion induced deterioration of the elements and components posing to be a challenge. Corrosion management and maintenance approaches are therefore necessary to sustain service lives. This presentation was based on case studies of corrosion management design experiences of a number of port structures around Australia. Issues presented included: • An overview of the wharf and berth structures. • Investigations overview – concrete elements. • Investigations overview – steel elements. • Corrosion management design experiences – concrete wharf and berth elements. • Corrosion management design experiences – steel pile wharf and berth elements. • The Ports advice considered a necessity to regularly assess the condition of assets prior to development of any plans for remediation, maintenance and corrosion management. All remedial, maintenance and corrosion management approaches need to be designed and require whole of life cycle costs to be considered prior to their implementation. Remedial, maintenance and corrosion management approaches adopted have been found to provide improved asset capacity, consequently extending service life while meeting budgetary constraints with low life cycle costs. Corrosion Prevention for Coastal Assets – An Applicators Perspective McElligotts Protection of coastal assets creates many unique challenges not seen in other environments. Some of these challenges include: Environmental and Operational Constraints, Surface Preparation and selection of Specification. This presentation explored these challenges

and the methods used to help minimise their effect on project outcomes, from an Applicators point of view. Protection of Marine Assets Using CSI Technology Rustproof Services NZ Ltd This presentation clarified what CSI Technology is and outlined the technology’s capabilities. The talk clarified that this was a compound that created a film with Continuous Substrate Interaction (CSI) which had specific characteristics that are useful to the specifier or maintenance engineer in the protection of Marine Assets. This included why abrasive blasting is not commonly used, why inter-coat contamination issues are minimised, why applied costs tend to be lower or why asset shutdown periods can be reduced where this is critical for port functions or bridge closures. Specific case studies (where CSI is costed into the capital expenditure of an initial project) or where the coating can be used at the first or second maintenance period as a standalone coating or where it can support paint coatings at their stress points, was then discussed. Lastly, the presentation gave an overview of a variety of case studies that have used the CSI Technology. Using Stainless and Nickel Alloys in Marine Environments ASSDA This presentation discussed choosing corrosion resistant alloys such as stainless steel or copper nickel alloys as a deliberate decision to reduce maintenance expense, increase durability and embrace lower life cycle costs. For successful applications, the design, surface finish, condition and on-going care must all be considered. In other cases, selective use of stainless steel as reinforcement has found its niche in tidal or other zones where corrodents concentrate or where maintenance or repair of less durable materials would cause intolerable disruption. A less frequently considered family is the copper nickel alloys which have niche roles because of their good corrosion and fouling resistance, as well as their good thermal conductivity, ductility and reasonable strength.

June 2014  www.corrosion.com.au  p.37


ACA CERTIFICATION PROGRAM

ACA’s Certification Program The ACA’s Certification program for ACA Corrosion Technicians and Technologists recognises those with education and experience in the corrosion industry. A Corrosion Technician has at least 4 years work experience and has attended a number of formal training courses, whilst those awarded Corrosion Technologist have at least 10 years work experience and have obtained further training. For a more detailed explanation of the

eligibility criteria, please consult our ACA Certification Program brochure which is available on our website www.corrosion.com.au. A schedule of current ACA Corrosion Technicians and Technologists appears below and will be published in Corrosion & Materials in full each June and November and will be continuously updated on the ACA’s web site. All current ACA Technicians and Technologists have been issued a

wallet card with their certification number and membership details. Please note continued membership of the ACA is a requirement for certification and therefore all certified Corrosion Technicians and Technologists will have an expiry date which coincides with their ACA membership renewal date. ‘Pending’ expiry dates indicate that a membership payment is overdue.

Corrosion Technologists

Corrosion Technicians Name

Cert No:

Expiry Date

Name

Cert No:

Expiry Date

Gary Barber

248

30/06/2014

Bruce Ackland

82

30/06/2014

Heath Boelen

306

Pending

Fred Andrews-Phaedonos

153

30/06/2014

214

30/06/2014

Stephen Brown

263

4/02/2015

Ross Antunovich

Christopher Butler

320

24/01/2015

Arthur Austin

106

30/06/2014

295

19/08/2014

Dave Charters

261

21/01/2015

Derek Avery

Craig Clarke

246

Pending

Dinesh Bankar

264

23/02/2015

20/12/2014

Stuart Bayliss

236

7/11/2014

74

1/01/2015

Rodney Clarke

206

Venkatesh Coimbatore

192

30/06/2014

Tony Betts

Ross Darrigan

174

5/09/2014

Rob Billing

12

30/06/2014

Harvey Blackburn

10

1/01/2015

Michael Boardman

30

12/07/2014

Les Boulton

43

1/01/2015

John Bristow

107

1/01/2015

Gary Brockett

215

30/06/2014

Kingsley Brown

257

30/06/2014

Philip Bundy

209

30/06/2014

Wayne Burns

100

1/01/2015

Brian Byrne

27

1/01/2015

Bryan Cackett

70

30/06/2014

Neil Campbell

38

30/06/2015

Graham Carlisle

281

19/05/2015

Antonio Carnovale

203

30/06/2014

Luis Carro

260

30/06/2014

Reg Casling

11

1/01/2015

Dylan Cawley

224

29/06/2014

Pasquale Chiaravalloti

274

11/07/2014

Peter Clark

80

30/06/2014

Stan Collins

128

30/06/2015

Geoff Cope

71

29/06/2014

Glenn Dean

280

20/01/2015

Clint Doherty

298

Pending

Raed El Sarraf

305

25/09/2014

David Fairfull

179

30/06/2014

Geoff Farrant

253

30/06/2014

Robert Gentry

114

30/06/2015

Haydn George

307

23/11/2014

William Guest

316

15/12/2014

David Harley

291

17/12/2014

Trevor Henderson

322

14/10/2014

Stephen Holt

207

28/02/2015

Bradley Jones

258

18/04/2015

Gary Martin

57

1/06/2015

Ian McNair

163

30/06/2014

Terence Moore

125

9/06/2014

David Morgan

234

Pending

Reg Oliver

223

19/08/2014

David Parravicini

296

2/09/2014

Sean Ryder

262

21/11/2014

Ian Saunders

251

24/06/2014

Leon Cordewener

44

30/06/2014

Brendan Schapers

314

5/07/2014

Robert Cox

14

30/06/2015

Justin Tanti

238

14/02/2015

Peter Crampton

8

29/06/2014

Gavin Telford

244

30/06/2015

Roman Dankiw

208

29/06/2014

Akash Deep Verma

319

7/03/2015

Rene D'Ath

197

11/03/2015

Ben Ward

300

16/07/2014

Robert de Graaf

154

1/01/2015

Mark Watson

186

3/09/2014

Mike Dinon

5

30/06/2015

Derek Whitcombe

123

30/06/2014

Bradley Dockrill

241

15/07/2014

p.38  CORROSION & MATERIALS


Peter Dove

210

29/03/2015

Stuart McLaughlin

299

17/12/2014

Gary Doyle

294

2/08/2014

Vic McLean

237

30/06/2014

Adrian Dundas

250

1/02/2015

Jim McMonagle

56

1/01/2015

Lucas Edwards

273

11/07/2014

John Mitchell

115

30/06/2015

Bernard Egan

20

30/06/2014

Elio Monzu

159

30/06/2014

Wayne Ferguson

242

4/09/2014

Greg Moore

97

1/01/2015

Peter Ferris

195

30/06/2014

Hamid Moradi Fard

321

9/04/2015

Gavin Forrester

282

10/02/2015

Janet Morris

256

5/07/2014

Rob Francis

23

1/01/2015

Robert Mumford

33

30/06/2014

Dale Franke

199

30/06/2014

Tony Murray

134

30/06/2014

Max Fraser

283

Pending

David Nicholas

94

1/01/2015

Robert Freedman

147

1/01/2015

Calvin Ogilvie

17

19/01/2015

Jim Galanos

254

17/12/2014

Dean Parker

108

5/07/2014

Barry Gartner

2

30/06/2014

David Pettigrew

297

17/12/2014

Bill Gerritsen

18

30/06/2014

Dennis Richards

180

1/01/2015

Ian Glover

129

30/06/2015

Steve Richards

110

30/06/2015

Frederick Gooder

141

30/06/2014

Gavin Richardson

48

30/06/2014

Graeme Gummow

318

20/09/2014

Tony Ridgers

36

30/06/2014

Wade Guye

313

9/08/2014

Geoff Robb

124

30/06/2015

Chris Hargreaves

292

28/05/2014

Bernd Rose

252

1/05/2015

Phil Harrison

145

1/01/2015

John Rudd

243

21/06/2014

Peter Hart

200

30/06/2014

Fred Salome

231

1/01/2015

Frank Hewitt

67

1/01/2015

Philip Schembri

198

17/12/2014

Brian Hickinbottom

138

30/06/2014

David Scott

173

29/06/2015

Brett Hollis

88

30/06/2014

Mike Slade

175

7/06/2015

Marshall Holmes

293

26/08/2014

Brian Smallridge

201

30/06/2014

Peter Hosford

216

1/01/2015

Jim Steele

119

17/12/2014

Peter Hunger

301

4/08/2014

Alan Steinicke

9

1/06/2014

Paul Hunter

62

30/06/2014

Allan Sterling

191

31/03/2015

Jeffrey Hurst

202

30/06/2014

Ian Stewart

155

5/09/2014

Craig Hutchinson

249

26/10/2014

Gordon Stewart

68

1/01/2015

Luciano Ioan

228

30/06/2015

Hussain Sulaiman Abdallah

311

25/05/2014

Bruce Jewell

245

10/05/2015

Graham Sussex

136

30/06/2015

Michael Johnstone

230

5/09/2014

Tan Swee Hain

189

30/06/2014

Michael Jukes

90

3/03/2015

Yongjun Tan

194

30/06/2014

John Kalis

166

17/12/2014

Ronald Tan

308

30/06/2014

Graeme Kelly

102

1/01/2015

Peter Thorpe

144

1/01/2015

John Kilby

193

30/06/2015

Peter Tomlin

120

30/06/2014

Alireza Kouklan

317

13/11/2014

Narendra Tripathi

312

30/06/2014

Ulf Kreher

304

11/09/2014

Francesco Turco

309

11/07/2014

Boris Krizman

169

17/12/2014

Nicholas Van Styn

229

25/02/2015

John Lane

188

20/01/2015

Peter Wade

190

9/03/2015

Bill Lannen

111

1/01/2015

Stephen Wargula

310

11/07/2014

Harry Lee

19

1/01/2015

John Waters

121

30/06/2014

Keith Lichti

133

30/06/2014

John Watson

239

10/06/2014

Verne Linkhorn

39

30/06/2014

Richard Webster

69

30/06/2015

Garry Luskan

117

2/02/2015

Mark Weston

149

1/01/2015

Willie Mandeno

13

1/01/2015

Geoffrey White

182

1/07/2014

Brian Martin

60

1/01/2015

Paul Wilson

290

Pending

William McCaffrey

142

30/06/2015

Kevin Woodland

323

30/10/2014

John McCallum

59

30/06/2014

Rodney Wubben

46

30/06/2015

Murry McCormick

196

28/06/2014

Xiaoda (David) Xu

315

28/11/2014

Daryl McCormick

1

17/12/2014

Morris Young

217

30/06/2014

Brad McCoy

178

14/07/2014

Nizam Yusoff

302

9/02/2015

Michael McCoy

109

14/04/2015

Bill McEwan

32

1/01/2015

Please note this list is current as at 19 May 2014

June 2014  www.corrosion.com.au  p.39


PROJECT PROFILE

Perth Arena Perth Arena is Western Australia's proud new home of entertainment, music and sports.

"This is an iconic venue for Perth for many years to come. The arena is a work of art itself!” - Premier Colin Barnett.¹

The $548M arena is located on Wellington Street, near the site of the former Perth Entertainment Centre, and was officially opened on 10 November 2012. Twelve months from its opening, it was awarded with a string of accolades taking the top prize at the 2013 Western Australia Design Institute of Australia (DIA) Design Awards, top honours at the Australian Institute of Architecture awards in Perth (George Temple Poole Award) and not to mention the Sir Zelman Cowen Award for Public Architecture, the most prestigious award for an architecture project at the prestigious National Architecture Awards 2013.

been designed to provoke symbolic interpretation, create direct visual responses from all approaches, and become an integral part of the city’s overall urban design and architectural strategy” said Design Director Howard Raggatt.¹ The arena can be closed down for an intimate concert with 3000 people, utilizing Vector Lifting’s Retractable Roof. The moving roof weighs 320 tonnes and closes in 7 minutes, with a state-of-the-art tracking system. Made from two separate roof panels,

each panel is controlled independently to provide shade for spectators, protect the bowl from weather and to track the sun to prevent shadows being cast on the court. The very complex structural steel skeleton for Perth Arena consumed 40,000 litres of protective coatings produced by International Paint (IP). The off-site blast cleaning and painting of the structural steel for this project was conducted by Ferro-Clean Pty Ltd, a Perth-based company established almost 50 years ago, which specialises

The venue has 36 luxury appointed corporate suites, a 680-bay underground car park, five dedicated function spaces and space for touring trucks, which can drive directly onto the arena floor. The stadium’s very flexible design allows for crowds of up to 12,000 in general admission concert mode and up to 15,500 in tennis mode. Perth Arena was designed by Melbourne-based design house A-R-M Architecture. The striking building design was inspired by the 12-sided Round House in Fremantle and the 209 irregular shaped pieces of Christopher Monckton’s Eternity puzzle. “This landmark building has

p.40  CORROSION & MATERIALS

Complex structural steel skeleton during the construction stage of the Perth Arena.


PROJECT PROFILE Barber’s Pole featured at the external section of Perth Arena. with Intergard 269 epoxy primer and Interthane 870 high build acrylic polyurethane for the topcoat. The Totem pole in the first stages of painting had been a challenge to ensure a suitable system could be applied not only to protect but also to give a smooth finish as the lower section is very visible to the public.

in applying protective coatings to steelwork for projects in Infrastructure, Mining and Oil & Gas. The steelwork was fabricated locally, and was made in sections to facilitate transport and construction. The two 130 metre long ‘mega-trusses’ weighed 400 tonnes each and consisted of 32 K-shaped sections, designed to support the main roof structure, which weighed 2200 tonnes all up. The roof was built on the ground, and then hoisted 22 metres up to its required position with eight hydraulic jacks, where it remained for three months while the supporting columns were installed. It is understandable that given the nature of the building, some of the steel sections were very complex pieces and required expert applicators to ensure they were completed to standard. One of the highlights was the ‘Barber’s Pole’ – A 25 metre long pole which marks the Western Australian border on the Arena’s Australia-shaped side. The pole was split in two sections, due to its length, and painted with red and white stripes. The intricate pipework at the main entry to the arena was also a challenge, due to its size and irregularity. However the result is very impressive – when viewed from a certain spot (marked with a brass tile) the pipework forms an outline of the building, following the perimeter and internal lines very accurately. Understanding the project’s necessity for a high technology coating with excellent long term colour and gloss retention properties, the IP engineering sales team specified a combination of inorganic zinc and epoxy zinc for internal steelwork, including the roof frames and cat-walks, which are visible from the audience area of the building’s internals. This used approximately half of the protective coatings painted 1

by Ferro-Clean – over 20,000 litres. The external or exposed steelwork was then coated with Interplus 356, and the visible portions then topcoated with Interfine 979 polysiloxane, appropriately named ‘Perth Arena Blue’.

TLC painted 12-15 of these triangular sections at any one time until completion which spanned over a 3-month period. The Pineapple changes colour and shape as it moves. Aluminium panels coated in yellow and violet paint open and close creating a constantly changing appearance.

Ferro-Clean’s CEO commented, “During the colder winter months of the 3-year construction period, paint curing times were a challenge. In order to have the mega-truss roof frames ready for permit transportation into the inner-city site, IP’s low temperature rapid cure paint made it possible to meet the very tight construction deadlines and therefore we were able to maintain a high level of throughput at our multiple facilities”. IP Area Manager Bob Parry is extremely satisfied with the high performance acrylic polysiloxane finish on the exposed surfaces of the megastructure, and their long lasting appearance will truly complement this iconic building for years to come. Another interesting feature of the Perth Arena project is a totem tower, designed by Perth-born artist Geoffrey DrakeBrockman. Affectionately nick-named as ‘The Pineapple’ by the people of Perth, the tower is situated on the eastern side of the Arena. It stands at 10.5 metres high and 3.5 metres in diameter, with some 108 moving elements. Its moving panels are programmed to open and close like flower petals in response to people walking past and it shoots geometric laser projections onto the wall of the Arena at night, visible from several parts of the city. The centre section holds a laser projector, and the triangular panels open up and undergo a colour change to violet. This laser tower artwork created by Living Iron, was painted by TLC Surface Treatment in Welshpool. The tower used multiple triangular aluminium panels, and was painted

Pineapple changes colour as the segments open and close. Truly an iconic feature, the Perth Arena has sealed itself as Western Australia’s landmark of live entertainment, music and sports. The breathtaking design, large crowd capacity and world’sleading technology is no wonder the arena is ranked no: 22 in the world’s top 200 venues by respected live music industry magazine Pollstar. Submitted by Bob Parry and Jasmine Moey of International Paint

http://www.a-r-m.com.au/projects_PerthArena.html

June 2014  www.corrosion.com.au  p.41


PROJECT PROFILE

Perfect Match – Laser Scanning and Fitness for Service 4Z and Quest Integrity Group have recently agreed to provide integrated services, combining the laser scanning, inspection and modeling services provided by 4Z with the fitness-for-service and remaining life assessment by Quest Integrity Group. This new service is the first of its kind in Australia’s Industrial Sector. Laser scanning is a highly effective and accurate inspection method for measuring changes in geometry of pressurised vessels, piping and pipelines. The laser scanning data is used to measure the deviations from normal geometry, such as those caused by corrosion, mechanical damage, and other structural distortions. The primary goal of the laser scanning analysis is to feed highly accurate geometric data of in-service vessels and components into advanced modelling and analysis software packages. 4Z experts provide 3D laser scanning services for vessels and components that enable both internal and external

assessment of corrosion, displacement and other forms of structural damage. The laser data is taken and analysed for geometric deviations that meet or exceed the client’s performance indicators, such as wall thickness loss, pit depth, size and shape of structural defects. Once a problem area has been identified, the data can then be reverse engineered into a CAD model so that it can be imported for further analysis into Quest’s proprietary software Signal™ Fitness-for-Service (Signal FFS) for conducting a Level 1 or 2 corrosion assessments. Signal FFS provides rapid Level 1 and Level 2 fitness-for-service corrosion

Figure 1. Laser scanning of a large pressure vessel.

p.42  CORROSION & MATERIALS

assessments and fracture mechanics analyses on fixed and rotating equipment such as piping, pipelines, pressure vessels and tanks. All analyses adhere to industry standards such as API 579/ASME-FFS or BS 7910. The three levels of assessment vary in complexity and conservatism, with Level 1 being the least complex and most conservative. Level 2 assessments require more detailed input regarding operating conditions and material properties in order to provide a higher level of analysis. Level 3 assessments are the most advanced, requiring detailed data, computer analysis and a high level of technical knowledge and expertise in


PROJECT PROFILE

fitness-for-service assessment procedures. Once a Level 3 assessment has been carried out on a piece of pressure equipment employing laser scan data in a finite element analysis, the cost of subsequent assessments is reduced. Laser scanning is highly advantageous if an assessment doesn’t comply with or pass the Level 2 assessment, for example, when the area of interest is in close proximity to a major structural discontinuity, or the geometry of

the component is complicated and difficult to model accurately through finite element analysis (FEA). The resultant stress from the model can then be assessed against a fitness-forservice acceptability criteria for failure. Laser scanning data allows for a rapid assessment, and therefore a much faster return to service outcome or remediation planning. The natural corollary of this is that overall asset and safety management is significantly improved.

Figure 2. Example of a Signal™ FFS assessment.

The following example shows laser scanning applied to a pipe suffering from both internal and external corrosion. The pipe was 1320mm long, with an outer diameter of 635mm and a thickness of 24mm. Compared with traditional methods of conducting thickness grid measurements using a thickness gauge, laser scanning provides a more accurate thickness profile and enables future repeatability. The high level of accuracy also means that the level of conservatism employed during an assessment can be minimised, reducing unnecessary repairs and downtime. The scanned thickness data gathered from Level 1 or 2 assessments can be imported into Signal FFS, enabling component assessment within a short timeframe. Figure 2 shows the input screen from Signal FFS which indicates the input parameters for the corroded conditions, such as nominal thickness and inside diameter. The thickness grid, as measured following the recommendations in API 579, is given at the bottom of the figure, indicating that the minimum measured thickness is 8.2mm compared to the nominal thickness of 13.5mm which equates to 39% wall loss.

June 2014  www.corrosion.com.au  p.43


PROJECT PROFILE

subjected to an internal pressure of 1 MPa. The magnitude and location of the peak stresses can be clearly seen and extracted for use in a Level 3 assessment. Besides metal loss assessments, the results can also be used for a variety of purposes, including but not limited to, evaluation of maximum allowable working pressure, cyclic fatigue analysis and leak before break analysis. More advanced forms of assessment such as coupled heat transfer-mechanical simulations and modal analysis are also made possible through the use of FEA. Figure 3. Solid model constructed from laser scan data. Laser scans are compatible with all major FEA and modelling software. The images below illustrate the process of a Level 3 metal loss FEA assessment using a laser scanned model. In this case, it can be seen that the corrosion profile is captured by the scan (Figure 3). This level of corrosion profile modelling cannot be reasonably achieved through standard techniques.

loading conditions are applied, preceeded by the construction of the FEA mesh over the model (Figure 4). The simulation is then run and stress results extracted. Another advantage of FEA based analysis is that loading/ operational parameters can be easily modified, allowing assessment of multiple operational scenarios quickly and easily.

In the following steps, corresponding material properties, boundary and

Figure 5 shows an example of the stress results when the pipe is

With micron accuracy precision and reduction of inspection times by a factor of 10 times, laser inspection integrated with modern fitness-forservice and finite element analysis software is a rapid return to service method of analysis. The integration of 4Z laser scanning data with Quest Integrity Group’s fitness-for-service and remaining life assessment provides more accurate, cost effective and time efficient assessment that is not possible using currently available methods.

Figure 4. Example of FEA mesh applied to model (left) and refinement around areas of interest (right).

Figure 5. Stress results visualised (left) and detailed view of high stressed location (right). Units in MPa.

p.44  CORROSION & MATERIALS


UNIVERSITY PROFILE

Deakin Corrosion Research Centre The Deakin Corrosion Research Centre is a centre for research in corrosion science and engineering, with particular focus on the durability, reliability and protection of critical infrastructure such as oil and gas pipelines, water, waste water and desalination infrastructure. The centre’s research and teaching programs are developed based upon its existing national and international reputation in metallurgy and materials research within the Institute for Frontier Materials (IFM), and its multi- disciplinary engineering teaching units in the School of Engineering. The Centre has a flexible approach towards research and development in a wide range of areas, including infrastructure durability, materials and alloy development, corrosion monitoring and prevention, biocorrosion, and coatings and inhibitors for surfaces and interfaces. The centre’s research is funded by Deakin’s fellowship and scholarship programs, the Energy Pipelines CRC, the National Centre of Excellence for Desalination Australia (NCEDA) and Australian Research Council programs. Led by Professors Maria Forsyth and Mike Yongjun Tan, the Deakin Corrosion Research Centre draws together researchers from a range of disciplines, including chemists, engineers, physicists and microbiologists. The centre comprises researchers from both the School of Engineering and the Institute for Frontier Materials, working across two campuses – Geelong Waurn Ponds and Melbourne Burwood. Honorary Professor Bruce Hinton is also a part of the centre. He, together with Adjunct Associate Professors Frederic Blin and Warren Green provide key technical advice from an industry perspective, on the centre’s research projects as well as

co-supervising students on collaborative research projects. Corrosion research at Deakin University is supported by advanced electrochemical facilities and state-ofthe-art testing and characterisation facilities available within IFM and the School of Engineering. In the last two Australian Research Council ERA assessments, Deakin University’s Materials Engineering and Macromolecular and Materials Chemistry disciplines were ranked 5 (well above world standard). The Deakin Corrosion Research Centre has expertise in:  ngineering research solutions E to corrosion Materials testing in simulated environmental conditions Coating testing and assessment Corrosion inhibitors and protective coatings Corrosion monitoring and prediction Applied electrochemistry and cathodic protection Metallurgy (including fatigue and fracture analysis) Materials engineering, composites, structural polymers and coatings

S tress corrosion cracking and new alloys development. We are focusing our expertise on projects in the following areas:  orrosion, infrastructure reliability C and durability Materials selection for corrosion control (e.g. protective coatings for underground pipeline and metals or alloys for desalination plants) Pipeline corrosion and prevention through our participation in the Energy Pipelines CRC Carbon dioxide corrosion and inhibition (e.g. corrosion inhibitors in oil and gas production environments) Biocorrosion and microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC) Light metals and reactive metals coatings and inhibitors. The Deakin Corrosion Centre is home to a new National Facility for Pipelines Coating Assessment. The facility, which opened in March 2014, is an independent laboratory supported by the Energy Pipelines CRC. Its role is to provide a pipeline coating testing facility that meets the needs of the Australian energy pipeline sector. Services include testing to support pipeline coating selection and development, research into pipeline coatings and corrosion inhibitors and a range of standard tests. Another new research centre will be opened in September 2014. The Australian Centre for Infrastructure Durability (ACID) will be a national centre that brings together corrosion/durability researchers to carry out industryfocused, large-scale research projects.

The National Facility for Pipelines Coating Assessment can provide a large number of tests according to Australian and International standards. Research engineer, Davi Abreu (L) tests pipeline coating samples and PhD student Ying Huo experiments on the effects of stray current.

Contact: Prof Mike Yongjun Tan, School of Engineering, Deakin University, Geelong Waurn Ponds Campus, mike.tan@deakin.edu.au; Ph. 03 5227 2443

June 2014  www.corrosion.com.au  p.45


TECHNICAL NOTE

Ice and Snow, Away We Go! Painting Ships In Cold Winter Conditions

November to March is a beautiful time of the year in the wintry climate of the United States and Canada. People participate in all kinds of wintertime activities. It is also the time owners of marine vessels working on the Great Lakes use to do repairs and maintenance, including painting. Although the weather during this time poses many challenges, necessity has been the mother of invention in coming up with equipment and products to meet this challenge. Introduction There are a wide variety of vessels that ply the Great Lakes. These include 1000- foot bulk carriers, passenger ferries, barges, and research vessels. Although the size and focus of each vessel is unique, the one common denominator is taking time during winter lay up to do maintenance, including painting. This can be very challenging as ambient temperatures are almost always below 32°F (0° C), very often below 20°F (-7° C), and occasionally below 0° F (-17° C). Despite these harsh conditions, painting does take place on the exterior hulls, unheated cargo holds, superstructure, ballast tanks, and decks of many vessels. Timing and Cost When a vessel comes into a dry dock, many work items are usually scheduled. These can include hull surveys, bearing and shaft repairs, propeller maintenance, and painting. The commercial bulk carriers, in particular, are usually in need of a paint job from the keel to the top rail, bow to stern. Damage to the vessels occur as pilots sometimes enter the various lock systems on the Great Lakes by using the side of the locks as Figure 1. Note heavy abrasion on freeboard along with “frog hair” growth in boot top area.

p.46  CORROSION & MATERIALS

a guide to align the vessel for passage. This heavy abrasion makes for a skinned up freeboard. A heavy build up of “frog hair” marine growth from the deep load line to the bilge turn is also usually present. Fleet engineers want this removed as it can slow the vessel’s speed by 1-1.5 knots. With time equating to money, this is an important task to complete (See figure 1). The underwater hull suffers a similar fate of heavy abrasion. Many Great Lakes ports have not been regularly dredged and the Lakers (slang for Great Lake’s freighters) end up dragging the bottom coming into or out of port fully loaded. The turn of the bilge area is particularly at risk for heavy abrasion. For all this work to be done, there is still a schedule to maintain and a budget to keep. Dry dock fees alone, exclusive of any repair fees, for the largest Lakers often run into the high six figures. With these large expenses, delays for inclement weather to complete a paint job are rarely tolerated as work continues 24 hours a day, seven days a week while the boat is in dry dock.

Equipment Painting in low temperatures has created many modifications of equipment to cope with these conditions. One of the modifications is to outfit a container box as a paint kitchen. Changes include hard piping the box for air supply, bolting two to three airless spray pumps on the wall and hard wiring explosion proof electrical connections and lights. The pumps are typically 45:1 to 70:1 in size. The larger pumps are preferred as spray hose lengths are 500’ to 600’ long. The hoses are not heated and sit on the cold concrete floor of a dry dock, which is often coated with ice. A hole is cut into the door and warm air is piped into box. The temperature inside the kitchen is maintained between 35°F (2°C) and 45°F (7°C). This self-contained kitchen is lowered to the floor of the dry dock and is rarely moved. Yard personnel mix the paint and keep an extra supply of paint in this kitchen. It is also used as a warming house for the blast and paint crews working outside.


Figure 2. Notice the areas starting to dry toward the stern of the vessel after only 1 hour of dry time at -3°F (-19°C) surface temperature.

Personal protective equipment consists of the standard hardhat, full-face respirator, and fall protection equipment. Extra clothing, gloves, and an Andes Mountain style hat to protect the ears worn underneath the hard hat help keep the worker as warm as possible. Another method used with success in these temperatures is to have a tarp draped from the handrails of the ship to the top rail of the dry dock, either floating or graving. This helps keep the abrasive contained along with providing protection from the elements. In this configuration a heater is attached to the pump. The paint is heated between 90°F (32°C) and 110°F (43°C). With hundreds of feet of spray hose laying on the cold floor of a dry dock the paint loses temperature fast but is warm enough to get the paint on the surface being coated. Surface Preparation and Paint Surface preparation is typically an abrasive blast per SSPC-SP7 Brush Blast. In some situations a more thorough blast is required to accommodate higher performance coatings or entirely remove failed or excessively thick coatings. There are also situations where lead paint on the vessel cannot be removed. Abrasive blasting is not possible, as the contamination cannot be cleaned up from the dry dock due to ice on the floor. Containment is not feasible due to budget and time constraints. Pressure washing is out of the question as the water in sub-freezing temperatures would make an ideal skating rink on the dry dock floor and make clean up impossible. In these situations small areas are cleaned per SSPC-SP3 Hand Tool Cleaning with

an epoxy coating applied over a very marginally prepared surface. Other situations where minimal surface preparation has been used include vessels not in a dry dock. These include vessels that are painted while frozen in the ice next to an occupied dry dock and vessels frozen in a river while docked at a pier. In the first example workers stand on the ice, walk completely around the vessel, use extension poles and paint the free board. In the other situation workers paint the free board that is pier side while standing on the ground. The water side/ice side painting is then done from a basket attached to a crane, hanging the basket over the deck and painting the opposite free board when the ice was not safe to traverse. The type of coating used is dependent on the owner’s request, budget, and area being painted. Phenalkamine epoxies are typically used on the underwater hull and as a first coat on the freeboard. Depending on the temperature, thinning with the recommended solvent is almost always done to reduce the viscosity of cold paint. Moisture cure zincs have also been used successfully in below zero Fahrenheit (less than -17 C°) temperatures. Topcoats include acrylic polyurethanes, polyester urethanes, alkyd modified urethanes, acrylic modified alkyds, and moisture cure urethanes. Cargo hold coatings have included flake filled amine epoxies with a low temperature hardener and plural component elastomers. Polyureas have been used on some work boat decks. Low temperature pre-mixed aggregate epoxies have been used on the automobile deck of car ferries.

Case Histories A 700-foot Great Lakes bulk carrier came into dry dock in January. It’s main cargo had been road salt. The exterior freeboard was heavily corroded and the owner wanted a new paint job. To beef up the corrosion protection, a zinc primer was used versus the standard epoxy. The challenge was that the ambient temperature was -7°F (-22°C) and the surface temperature was -3°F (-19°C). The decision was made to use a singlepack moisture cure urethane organic zinc with four ounces of a moisture scavenging amine accelerator per gallon. The intermediate coat would be a phenalkamine epoxy followed by a single component acrylic modified alkyd topcoat. This unusual topcoat for this system was chosen for it’s future ease of touch up and repairs by the crew of the vessel. The starboard area to be painted was 25 feet high by 400 feet long. The surface was abrasive blasted per SSPCSP6 Commercial Blast. A 70:1 pump with 500 feet of hose and a 521 tip were used to apply the coating. There were two pot tenders mixing and feeding the pump along with a man lift driver and sprayer in the bucket. Painting application began at 11:45 am. The area was completed at 2:00 pm. By the time the first coat of zinc primer had been completed, the coating applied to the first 50 feet had begun to flash off and was mostly dry to the touch. (See Figure 2) At 3:00 pm a coin rub adhesion test was done to check the integrity and adhesion of the paint film. The results convinced the shipyard to proceed. They began applying the intermediate coat of epoxy at 3:00 pm

June 2014  www.corrosion.com.au  p.47


TECHNICAL NOTE

and completed around 5:45 pm. The topcoat was applied the next day. Another challenge faced by northern dry docks in the winter is ice build up on the vessel’s hull. After a boat is layed up and sits dockside for its turn in the dry dock, ice builds up on the underwater hull and free board. This can make for some interesting uses of equipment to remove that ice. Some shipyards have a bubbler system in place for waiting boats. That system has marginal success, particularly if the temperature is really cold. The other piece of equipment used to remove ice in preparation for painting is the forklift. After the boat is docked and with ice hanging on the side of the vessel, the operator will take the forks and catch an edge of the ice on the hull. They then move the forks up and have it act as a lever on the edge and remove large chunks of ice. To quantify, the ice is THICK. Many times this build up can be over 12” thick, so this can be a dangerous situation as large pieces of ice are peeled from the hull. Many times the ice falls off the aft end of the ship by itself. The heat generated inside from keeping the engine room warm for interior work and crew comfort radiates through the steel and breaks the bond of the ice from the

hull. This sometimes creates a safety issue as large “glacial” size chunks of ice fall onto the floor of the dry dock. Proper safety procedures have to be followed at all times. (See Figure 3, Figure 4, Figure 5). As you can see in Figure 5, sometimes the ice does not come off. In these situations crews work around the ice and those areas just don’t get painted. Another interesting contradiction is that the shipyards prefer colder temperatures, that is, in the 10°F to15°F (-12°C to -9°C) range for this winter work. When the temperature gets too warm the sun heats the deck, usually above freezing. This in turn begins to melt any ice and snow that may have accumulated on the deck. The resultant run off flows over the deck edge and down the side of the free board. Two things happen. The water flows to the dry dock floor, refreezes, and creates an ice rink and the water runs over the deck edge, freezes and creates an ice flow on the freeboard. With an ice flow on the freeboard, painting of those unpainted areas is interrupted and, if freshly painted, those surfaces are usually damaged and have to be repaired. (See Figure 6).

Conclusions Painting outside in the cold winter weather is a frequent occurrence. Attention to the temperature of the coating either with a “warming house” storage unit or actual heating of the paint with heaters is paramount. Equipment requirements are not stringent but larger pumps are needed to adequately spray cold paint and service long lengths of hose. Budget and time constraints force the shipyard to push the envelope in regards to accepted painting practices and following a manufacturer’s recommendations. The trade off is getting a job done on time with usually only a small amount of repair for violating those accepted practices. Below freezing temperatures, bring it on! It’s a great day to paint. This paper was originally presented in the technical program at SSPC 2010, featuring GreenCoat by Mark Edmonds, retired from Sherwin-Williams, now a NACE Level 3 Coating Inspector who is consultant for US Coast Guard paint work and and an SSPC instructor teaching US Navy (NAVSEA) paint inspector certification classes.

Figure 3. Large blocks of ice peeled from the free board.

Figure 4. Ice removed from underwater hull and free board piled up by front-end loader.

Figure 5. Blasters working around remaining ice on boot top area of hull.

Figure 6. Note ice flows on port side.

p.48  CORROSION & MATERIALS


THE AUSTRALASIAN CORROSION ASSOCIATION INC SEMINAR

Corrosion in the Mining Industry

PROUDLY PRESENTED BY:

Thursday 3 July 2014 • Mercure Hotel Perth, 10 Irwin Street, Perth WA SPONSORED BY:

Overview The Mining Industry Technical Group of the ACA will be hosting a follow up technical event to build on the success of the Corrosion in the Mining Industry Event held in Newcastle in 2013. This event will further investigate the effects of corrosion throughout the entire mining industry. Taking into consideration everything from the mines themselves to the road, rail and shipping infrastructure needed to ensure this billion dollar industry continues to run effectively. The negative impact corrosion can have on this industry if unchecked can run into the millions of dollars. Bringing all the stakeholders together for this one day technical event to discuss corrosion challenges

will help ensure corrosion is not forgotten and that we tackle this problem together. Who should attend? Presentations should appeal to all industry sectors involved in the Mining Industry – including asset owners, consultants, specifiers, maintenance personnel, and suppliers. Venue Mercure Hotel Perth 10 Irwin Street Perth WA 6000

now at r e t s i g Re .com.au n o i s o r r www.co

Time

Session

Speaker

8.30 – 8.55

Registration

8:55 – 9:00

Welcome and Seminar Opening

9.00 – 9.40

Corrosion Never Sleeps: Asset Management in the Gold Mining Sector

Stephen Foley, Newmont Mining Corporation

9.40 – 10.20

Protection Against Chemical Exposure In Mining Process Areas

Jamie O’Brien, International Paint

10.20 – 10.50

Morning Tea

10.50 – 11.30

Management of Microbial Corrosion in Mining Industry: Lies, Stereotypes Dr. Reza Javaherdashti, and Facts ParsCorrosion

11.30 – 12.10

Cathodic Protection for the Maintenance and Life Extension of Mining Infrastructure

12.10 – 13.00

Lunch

13.00 – 13.40

Corrosion Mitigation of Support Structures in the Mining Industry

Prof Rolf Gubner, Curtin University

13.40 – 14.20

Corrosion Engineering Incorporating Composites:- An Unconventional Solution to Conventional Problems

Graham Carlisle, Inovas

14.20 – 14.50

Afternoon Tea

14.50 – 15.30

Corrosion Management and Compliance with Health & Safety Legislation Oliver Gasior, Extrin Consultants

15.30 – 16.10

Reinforced Concrete; Waterproofing & Durability for the Mining Industry

16.10 – 16.50

Open Floor Speakers Forum and Discussion

16.50 – 17.00

Seminar Close

17.00 – 18.30

Cocktail Function

Liam Halloway, SAVCOR

Anton Aldred, Cementaid


COATINGS GROUP MEMBER PROFILE

Innovative Asset Solutions Group Q: In what year was your company established? A: Innovative Asset Solutions Group (IAS Group) is made up of a number of entities. Jetcut Pty Ltd (+20 yrs specialised industrial services), Inovas Pty Ltd (10 yrs specialised engineering solutions) and IC Integrity (specialised composite repair solutions). Profile is a CNC cuttings services provider (+25 yrs). Q: How many employees did you employ when you first started the business? A: 2 Q: How many do you currently employ? A: 45 Q: Do you operate from a number of locations in Australia? A: Based in Perth, but have regional alliances throughout Australia and South East Asia. Q: What is your core business? (e.g. blasting and painting, rubber lining, waterjetting, laminating, insulation, flooring etc.) A: IAS Group provides innovative asset integrity, reliability and maintenance solutions, for assets in the Resources and Industrial sectors.  ow dust abrasive blasting L Ultra high pressure water jetting Remotely operated tooling Industrial vacuuming & waste filtration Protective coatings Hydro-demolition & excavation Cutting, coring and drilling Asset Remediation (composite, concrete & other innovative techniques) Q: What markets do you cover with your products or services? eg: oil & gas, marine, chemical process, general fabrication, tank lining, offshore etc.

p.50  CORROSION & MATERIALS

A: All companies within the IAS Group are predominantly focused on production and distribution assets in the Oil and Gas, mining and infrastructure sectors. Q: Is the business yard based, site based or both? A: We have a large yard facility in Canning Vale but the bulk of our work is project based on mine sites, offshore platforms and vessels, processing plants and jetties/wharfs. Q: What is your monthly capacity or tonnage that you can blast and prime? A: We are more renowned for applying specialised coatings in technically challenging projects needing specialised applications than for applying traditional commercial grade coatings. Q: Do you offer any specialty services outside your core business? (eg. primary yard based but will do site touch up etc.) A: Our speciality services are based around our specialised product range that we distribute and support. Nansulate thermal barrier coatings, provides thermal insulation on tanks, pipework, and process equipment and building envelopes. Oxifree thermoplastic coating provides corrosion protection of irregular geometries such as wellheads, bolted flanges etc. Belzona high performance polymers are used for the rebuilding and protection and plant and equipment. SpongeJet low dust abrasive blasting, Remotely Operated Tooling and UHPWJ are utilised by us to achieve the required surface preparation prior to the application of these specialised coatings. Q: What is the most satisfying project that you have completed in the past two years and why? A: The splash zone is known to be the most corrosive environments in

an offshore environment and one of the most difficult to prepare and coat. Companies within the IAS Group designed and constructed a system that could remotely clean a conductor, from +3.4m to -2.5m below LAT to a WJ-1 finish using UHPWJ delivered by a fully automated remotely operated tool. Thereafter, a specialised composite Sitejacket™ and epoxy resin was installed without the need for any divers to protect the prepared surface. Q: What positive advice can you pass on to the Coatings Group from that satisfying project or job? A: This was achievable and successful because the project team members, all from different disciplines, were willing to step outside of their comfort zone to challenge convention. Q: Do you have an internal training scheme or do you outsource training for your employees? A: IAS Group of companies invests heavily in their people all with the goal of producing highly trained and multidisciplined technicians. A number of training programs are outsourced. Contact Us Inovas Pty Ltd 17-19 ILDA Road, Canning Vale, WA, 6155 Phone +61 8 9248 9901 Email contact@inovas.com.au Web www.inovas.com.au


NEW PRODUCT SHOWCASE

SHOWCASE Maxi-Tube from Orrcon Orrcon Steel says its zinc-alloy coated Maxi-Tube, which it will soon launch into the Australian market, can provide exceptional corrosion resistance for tubular steel products used near marine and corrosive industrial elements. Orrcon's Maxi-Tube features a resistant zinc-alloy coating. Orrcon’s Lester Kirkwood told AJM the release of Maxi-Tube reflected Orrcon’s pursuit of continuous innovation and desire to offer its customers solutions to corrosion issues and sustainability. “It is a real game-changer for us, suitable for a wide range of steel tube and pipe applications where corrosion resistance is required,” he said. Independent studies into the durability of Maxi-Tube have shown that it provides at least 50% greater corrosion resistance than traditional batch hot-dip galvanised steel. Orrcon describes the further features of Maxi-Tube, saying:

it is suited for coastal, industrial, intensive farming, food processing and infrastructure applications it has lower life cycle and maintenance costs compared to galvanised products it can be welded, painted and powdercoated lead times are reduced by eliminating steps from the traditional batch HDG process with a coating 2.5 times harder than zinc, Maxi-Tube delivers superior scratch resistance it has a lower carbon footprint due to reduced manufacturing processes and a longer product life it is aesthetically pleasing with zero spangle and a smooth satin finish Orrcon is offering a defined warranty for tubular steel products in areas less than 1km from marine and coastal environments, and MaxiTube comes with a warranty of up to 25 years depending on the environment and the application in which the product will be used. Contact: www.maxitube.com.au

Phased Array Ultrasonics Gaining Momentum in Corrosion Inspection The use of Phased Array ultrasonics (PA) is gaining wide acceptance in the area of corrosion inspection. The Sonatest Corrosion Wheel Probe (CWP) has become increasingly popular for its simple and effective ability to map corrosion by signal loss and remaining wall thickness data. Colour maps of internal surfaces of pipes and vessels are created in realtime and in greater detail than with other techniques. From pipelines in the desert to oil rigs and Floating Production, Storage and Offloading facilities (FPSO’s) off the coast, the Sonatest Veo 16:64 with the CWP has increased the standard of detailed meaningful reporting available to asset owners. All recorded data contains the raw signal data for post analysis, options of presentation, sharing and digital archiving.

Sonatest’s UT Studio post analysis/ reporting software is easy to use and speeds up reporting from a PC. UT Studio Viewer is available for free to allow raw scan data and colour map presentations to be shared with colleges or the client, giving them the ability to focus or investigate further than would be possible with a completed report. Full UT studio allows report production and can export depth or wave form data to Excel for manipulation by engineers with other software. For more information contact the team at Russell Fraser Sales: T: +612 9545 4433 F: +612 9545 4218 E: rfs@rfsales.com.au Web: www.rfsales.com.au

June 2014  www.corrosion.com.au  p.51


THE AUSTRALASIAN CORROSION ASSOCIATION INC SEMINAR PROUDLY PRESENTED BY:

SPONSORED BY:

MEDIA PARTNER:

24 July 2014, Brisbane

Overview The ACA’s Petroleum & Chemical Processing Industry Technical Group (PCPI TG) will host a one day event to provide a technical platform for the Oil & Gas Industries. The latest challenges and developments in the materials engineering and corrosion control for both Onshore and Offshore environments will be discussed.

This one day technical event will focus on the development and innovative solutions from the design phase to decommissioning of the plant equipment in these areas: • Oil & Gas upstream and downstream operations • Refining & Distribution • Pipeline operations • Petrochemical and other chemical processes Speakers and participants will have the opportunity to share their work experiences, case studies, best practices, engineering guidelines, and failure analysis in a technical

exchange open forum, aiming to look at new technologies and methodologies to fill the gaps in these industries. Who should attend? Presentations will appeal to all industry sectors involved se with the Oil & Gas and Chemical Processing lea 3 industries – including asset owners, project p 83 ts and integrity engineers, operators, en 90 4 v e inspection and maintenance personnel, 98 se )3 u e 0 contractors, and suppliers. h ( t Venue Novotel Brisbane 200 Creek Street, Brisbane, QLD

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THE AUSTRALASIAN CORROSION ASSOCIATION INC SEMINAR

Corrosion in the Oil & Gas Industries SPONSORED BY:

PROUDLY PRESENTED BY:

MEDIA PARTNER:

7 August 2014, New Plymouth (NZ)

Overview The New Zealand Branch of the ACA in conjunction with the Petroleum & Chemical Processing Industry Technical Group (PCPI TG) is organising a full day technical event focusing on Corrosion in the Oil & Gas Industries. It is a forum to discuss the latest developments and best practices in materials engineering and corrosion control in onshore and offshore environments. This technical event will look into these areas: • Oil & Gas upstream and downstream operations • Refining & Distribution • Pipeline operations • Petrochemical and other chemical processes Speakers and participants will have the opportunity to share their work and experiences from the Oil & Gas

Industries to develop best practices, share solutions and look at new technologies at preventing corrosion.

Who should attend? Presentations will appeal to all industry sectors involved with the Oil & Gas and Chemical Processing industries – including asset owners, project and integrity engineers, operators, inspection and maintenance personnel, contractors, and suppliers.

Venue Quality Hotel Plymouth International Cnr Courtenay & Leach Sts New Plymouth, NZ

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David Pocock

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Geelong Office: 193 Station Street, Corio, Victoria 3214 Australia Postal Address: P.O. Box 1080, Corio, Victoria 3214 Australia Tel: +61 3 5275 3339 Fax: +61 3 5275 0585 Mob: 0412 520 699 Email: dmay@drmay.com.au

22 Irvine Street Bayswater WA 6053 T: 08 9721 2265 F: 08 9271 2235 M: 0409 112 010 E: david@tfgpumpline.com.au www.pumpline.com.au

HEMPEL A/S 1 Garston Way North Coogee WA 6163 Australia www.hempel.com

Phone: Mobile: Fax: Email:

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Australia

Russell Fraser Sales Pty Ltd

David Dawson

Phone: 1800-RENT-DH (736 834) Mobile: 0450 008 259 Office: 02 9833 0777 Fax: 02 9833 0700 Email: ddawson@rentdh.com www.rentdh.com

National Sales & Operations Manager

DeHumidification Technologies PTY LTD 6 Warrior Place St Marys NSW 2760 Australia

 SWITCH MODE RECTIFIERS SWITCHMONITORING MODE RECTIFIERS  REMOTE REMOTE MONITORING  MMO ANODES  ENGINEERING MMO ANODES  SURVEYS / COMMISSIONING ENGINEERING  SURVEYS / COMMISSIONING

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Phone: +46Phone: 418 411 900 E-mail: +46 418 411 900 info@3ccc.net E-mail: www.3ccc.net info@3ccc.net www.3ccc.net

Original Bumax® Stainless Fasteners: » Bumax® 88 tensile strength to Class 8.8 » Unmatched Corrosion resistance Tel: (02) 8818 0222

www.hobson.com.au

Gianni Mattioli

Operations Manager

Mobile: 0412 360 378 Phone: (03) 9544 9555 Facsimile: (03) 9544 3755 Email: gmattioli@mattiolibros.com.au Web: www.mattiolibros.com.au

Corrosion, Materials Failure & Mould Investigations Remediation Specification, Contract Administration Industrial and Environmental Chemistry Structural and Civil Design for Durability

For Applications in: • Surface preparation and coating • Condensation and corrosion prevention

Contact Dr ANTHEA AIREY BSc(Hons) PhD MBA MRACI CChem email: anthea@atconsulting.com.au ph: 08 92650400 12/18 Harvest Terrace, West Perth WA 6005

Toll free: 1800 008 379 Fax: (02) 88431589 Email: dh.info@munters.com.au www.munters.com.au

TRISTAR AUSTRALIA PTY LTD T:+61 894942151 F:+61 894349206 Website: www.tristar-au.com Email: sales@tristar-au.com

KURT RUSSELL Sales Manager

Abrasive Blast Media Supplier

SUPER GARNET & GEO-BLASTER® Exclusive Distributor for Australia & New Zealand www.mineralscorp.com

AU Free Phone 1800 309 734

sales@industrial-minerals.co.nz NZ Free Phone 0800 646 372

p.58  CORROSION & MATERIALS

SYDNEY Tel: 02 9545 4433 Fax: 02 9545 4218 rfs@rfsales.com.au www.rfsales.com.au

- 3D Laser Scanning - Ultrasonic Thickness Gauges - Holiday Detectors - Coating Thickness Gauges - Pit Gauges, Borescopes, Magnifiers - Surface Replication & much more…

1-3 Commercial Road Notting Hill Victoria 3168 Australia

Manufacturers and Suppliers of: • Dessicant Dehumidifiers • HCU- Humidity Control Units • Temporary Humidity Control Systems

Munters Pty. Limited Sydney – Brisbane – Melbourne

InSPectIon & teStIng equIPment

Sydney | BriSBane | MelBourne | Perth

Manufacturer of: • DIMET Sacrificial Anodes. Design, survey, installation and commissioning of ICCP by NACE certified CP Engineers •  MASTERCOTE PTFE Coated, and high grade alloy/ stainless/ high nickel/ super duplex special fasteners (e.g. anchor/stud/hex bolt). A Division of TRI-STAR Industries (Singapore) Website: www.tristar.com.sg Email: sales@tristar.com.sg T: +65 62663636 F: +65 62653635 / 2801


SUPPLIERS & CONSULTANTS

Leading Suppliers of NDT Equipment for the Corrosion Industry

Cathodic Anodes Australasia

Head Office T +61 7 5476 9788 sales@cathodicanodes.com.au www.cathodicanodes.com.au

Unit 23, 58 Box Rd Taren Point NSW 2229 Tel: 02 9524-0558 • Fax: 02 9524-0560 Email: ndt@ndt.com.au • Web: www.ndt.com.au

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p.59


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