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November 3, 2020 . Volume 75 . Issue 8

SU Reinstates Pass/Fall Grading

Debrandin Brown Digest Managing Editor

Last Spring, the Pass/Fail option provided students with a choice of forgoing a traditional letter grade in favor of a “P”, “F”, or “Withdrawal”. This allowed students to protect their GPAs in scenarios where remote learning methods may have negatively affected their learning processes as far as final graders were concerned. On October 27th, students learned the same options will be available in the Fall.

Digital Dash: Southern Introduces A.I. Program for Student Recruitment Evan Funchess The Southern DIGEST

“We don’t want to hurt anyone’s [academic] reputation because of something environmental because they can exactly help that. I’m excited that the Board of Supervisors have approved this because it’s something that the student body needs,” said Vadrine in regards to the motivation of both himself and the administration worked under as they sought to finalize the decision. from academic and student affairs, This issue specifically was brought among numerous other student multiple times during the groups being in attendance, the Transition Meetings that have main goal of these meetings was been taking place throughout the to open dialogues and clear lines semester. With representatives of communication between the

On Friday, the Southern University Board of Supervisors held its annual meeting to discuss inquiries and concerns made from those within the university. One of the many issues that were discussed was concerning the use of A.I. technology in recruitment. The Online Service Director, Tracy Barley spoke about the use of the new strategy, noting how Fall 2020 recorded a nine percent growth.”

different departments.

For many students, the transition to online learning due to the COVID-19 pandemic has been an arduous one that’s left many members of the student body

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fearing for their academic future as they attempt to complete their necessary credit hours via new mediums of education. See PASS OR FAIL page 3

An Acknowledgment of Excellence: SU Elementary Prep Program receives Plaudits Debrandin Brown Digest Managing Editor

Southern University’s Department of Education has a storied history of producing diverse educators through means of their training and educational programs. The Elementary Preparation Program has recently been acknowledged as one of the top programs in the country by the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ).

effective mentor teachers, often due to lack of quality control by their partner school districts. The effort that these top programs have made to ensure alignment with their local districts so they can offer strong clinical experiences will have lasting positive impacts on their teacher candidates, and more importantly, their candidates’ future students.”

As explained by Dr. Verjanis Peoples, the challenging work that goes into their Prep Program Out of thousands of teacher prep makes the honor even more programs from a multitude of exciting. With only a fraction different universities around the of the prospective teachers who country, Southern University’s entered the program completing Elementary Preparation Program it, Peoples noted that those was one of thirty-three that who do have the potential to be was chosen to be recognized. some of the most well-trained According to Kate Walsh, educators in their field. president of NCTQ, this honor According to Peoples, there are is not one to be taken lightly. three main phases of the teacher “Too many teacher prep programs struggle to make clinical practice a meaningful learning experience for aspiring teachers—especially when it comes to selecting

prep program that focuses on different aspects of the education process. These phases include Admissions, Teacher Education, and Clinical, all of which must be

This growth came as good news being that there is a decrease in college enrollment across the United States. This is due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which has affected many schools in diverse ways. With the economy being in one of its tougher spots overall, enrollment nationwide has gone down three percent.

To counteract the decrease in college enrollment, Barley explained that “We must expand recruitment both regionally and nationally,” using a presentation with the theme necessities for consistent efforts in recruitment. During the presentation, she discussed looking into setting up credentials as well as the micro-credentials of college registration. She also emphasized the importance of certification programs which would lead to graduate degrees.

Other schools around Southern have a larger online student population growth. However, Barley says the bottom line of these population growths is that “Those schools invest millions of dollars initially and outsource.”

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completed before you can obtain certification.

“We’re the only program at Southern that requires admissions requirements. You can’t just come on campus and say you want to be a teacher; you have to meet those admissions requirements, which are set by the department of education,” said Dr. Peoples in regards to the admissions process.

To increase the enrollment numbers Barley recommended that Southern invest at least $600 per student in terms of recruitment. Southern University board member, Dr. Domoine D. Rutledge comments saying that “If you want to know where a person’s priorities are you are asking for their checkbook.” In terms of goals for the next semester Barley noted that the department is looking to bring in 500 more students. Being amid a pandemic, it is worth noting that

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The Sentinel of an Enlightened Student Body Since 1926

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FALL 2020 STAFF

Editor-in-Chief.....................................................................................James Eaglin, Jr. Managing Editor............................................................................... Debrandin Brown Copy Editor .........................................................................................Yamere Rashada Multimedia Editor......................................................................................Jairus Moore Public Relations Editor...............................................................................Aliya Creecy Managing Editor.................................................................................. Diamond Butler Features Editor ..................................................................................... Keenon Glover Photo Editor...................................................................................... Adriana Trosclair Sports Editor............................................................................................... Jayln Garner Staff Writer............................................................................................... Alexis Easton Staff Writer......................................................................................... Jamien Williams Staff Writer............................................................................................. Nolan Johnson Staff Writer......................................................................................... Spencer Wiliams Staff Writer............................................................................................ Jalexis Edwards Staff Writer........................................................................................... Tyanaese Moore Staff Writer............................................................................................. Evan Funchess Staff Writer...................................................................................... Terronesha Lubom Staff Writer............................................................................................... Jaylnn Jacobs Staff Writer.............................................................................................. Jarriel Jacksoin Staff Writer.......................................................................................... Kynnedi Jackson Staff Writer......................................................................................... Whitney Thomas Staff Photographer.................................................................................... Kyndall Jones Staff Photographer...............................................................................Tiffany Williams Staff Photographer................................................................................Te’yanah Owens Staff Photographer.......................................................................................Keith Lewis

CAMPUS BRIEFS #SUVOTES Throughout the last weeks, members of the Southern University community have been voting. Today marks election day for the presidential election. Results should come in later today or in the upcoming week.

GOING HOME There are 21 days until students will be expected to depart from campus back to their homes for the Thanksgiving holiday break. Students living in campus dormitory will be expected to take all of their belongings with them.

HURRICANE ZETA Southern University students received a day off last week as hurricane Zeta hit. Fortunately, nothing on Southern University’s campus was harmed, and campus was open the next day.

LSAT ASSISTANCE Southern University Law Center is hosting virtual group tutoring sessions for up to fifty individuals interested in taking the law school admissions test. For more information contact Dean Garrard at mgarrard@sulc.edu.

COURSE REGISTRATION Course registration begins November 9, 2020. The office of first and second year experience encourages students to connect with athletic and academic advisors when creating their schedule in order to stay on track to graduate on time. NON-HOMECOMING/ HALLOWEEN WEEK Students made their own fun this week by participating in festive activities in the spirit of what originally was scheduled to be this year’s homecoming week. Students also participated in Halloween activities.

LSAT ASSISTANCE Southern University Law Center is hosting virtual group tutoring sessions for up to fifty individuals interested in taking the law school admissions test. For more information contact Dean Garrard at mgarrard@sulc.edu. LSAT ASSISTANCE Southern University Law Center is hosting virtual group tutoring sessions for up to fifty individuals interested

SUBMISSIONS POLICY

The Southern DIGEST welcomes letters from readers commenting on current issues and other matters of general interest to the SU family and public. We set aside this space to publish these letters for others to enjoy. This newspaper is not responsible for individual opinions expressed on its editorials, commentaries, ans speakouts. The Southern DIGEST reserves the right to edit any contributions and or reject them without notification. Authors are encouraged to limit the length of submissions to 300 words. Letters should not include libelous statements. Offensive and personal attacks will not be permitted. The DIGEST will not print “open letters” addressed to someone else. All contributions must be type written, signed and must include the author’s address and phone number. Unsigned letters will not be printed. Southern University students should include their majors, hometowns and year in school. When referring to specific DIGEST articles, please include the date and title. All materials should be directed to the editor in chief of The Southern DIGEST, P.O. Box 10180, Baton Rouge, La. 70813. Materials may be delivered by hand to the DIGEST office located in Suite 1064 Harris Hall or can be e-mailed to digest@subr.edu.

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Tuesday, November 3, 2020 | Page 3

Louisiana officials feud over generators for polling places Courtesy Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — New Orleans’ Democratic mayor and Louisiana’s Republican secretary of state argued Sunday over who’s responsible for providing generators if some polling places didn’t have electricity on Election Day but by the end of the day it appeared all polling stations would have power.

immediately provide a response to questions about it from The Associated Press on Sunday.

Later Sunday, the city issued a statement saying that Entergy New Orleans was now estimating that three polling stations could be without power Tuesday — down from the 11 earlier estimated. Portable generators and lighting for two of the locations was being provided by the Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness and the Secretary of State’s Office, and Entergy New Orleans would provide the generator for the third site, the statement said. Entergy would transport and operate the generators provided by the state to the other two locations, the city said.

Mayor LaToya Cantrell said Sunday that up to 11 precincts in the city could still be without power Tuesday, nearly a week after Hurricane Zeta took down power lines. She said Secretary of State Kyle Ardoin and his commissioner of elections, Sherri Wharton Hadskey, “are refusing to provide support for generators” The city was expecting that all for those precincts. original polling places would be “In failing to fulfill its duty, in operation come Tuesday. the Secretary of State’s office risks disenfranchising Orleans Ardoin has publicly supported residents and threatens to President Donald Trump’s suppress the vote,” Cantrell said reelection bid, declaring at a November 2019 rally that in a news release. Louisiana “will win with Donald Ardoin responded in his own news Trump.” Cantrell endorsed the release Sunday: “It is unfortunate Democratic presidential nominee, that politicians like Mayor former Vice President Joe Biden, Cantrell ... have responded to in August. Hurricane Zeta by trying to score cheap political points instead of Zeta hit southeastern Louisiana as a Category 2 hurricane being part of any solution.” Wednesday before sweeping Cantrell said the Secretary of through parts of Mississippi, State’s office “has taken the Alabama, Georgia, South unprecedented position” that the Carolina, North Carolina and city of New Orleans must use its Virginia. The storm initially employees and money to provide knocked out power for about generators for polling places. 2.5 million customers. More Ardoin issued a statement than 343,500 outages were still Saturday saying that Louisiana reported in those states Sunday, polling places without power according to poweroutage.us, would receive generators for though it was unclear whether all Election Day, but it did not were because of Zeta. specify whether providing the Mississippi Secretary of State generators would be a state or Michael Watson said Friday that local responsibility. A spokesman the state emergency management for Ardoin’s office did not agency is on standby to provide

NEWS

PASS OR FAIL from page 1 “I’m used to going to class, getting whatever information I needed, and leaving. Now that we don’t have in-person classes [for the most part] it’s almost like out of sight, out of mind,” said Devon Campbell, a junior agricultural science major for Little Rock, Arkansas when asked how this new form of education has impacted his learning process.

“[Pass/Fail option] is much needed. No one wanted to show off a C or D at Christmas in class. You feel like you could’ve gotten an A in normal circumstances, so having that option is great,” continued Campbell. According to SGA President Chandler Vidrine, his main goal for the semester has been to help reinstate the Pass/Fail option in an attempt to provide relief to pockets of the student body who need it.

While many university administrators from around the country seek a return to normalcy in some regard, Vidrine noted how there was no hesitation on the part of the Board of Supervisors in reinstating the P/F option. Taking the circumstances of the pandemic into account, Vadrine pointed out how all parties involved wanted to do the right thing by the student body.

As the outer eye wall passes by New Orleans, residents come out to assess the damage from Hurricane Zeta on Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2020. (Chris Granger/The Times-Picayune/The New Orleans Advocate via AP)

support to any county that needs it before or on Election Day.

Gabriel Sterling, voting system implementation manager for the Georgia Secretary of State, said Friday that he’s been in contact with Georgia Power and with the

electric membership cooperatives and expects power to be restored to the state’s 2,419 polling places by Tuesday. Sterling also said the Secretary of State’s office was talking to the state emergency management agency about backup generators.

“At the end of the day, it’s providing them the extra academic support that they need in order to succeed and matriculate well. No one has ever experienced [this specific scenario] before, so we want to ensure that we’re providing stability and safety for the academia as a whole, especially in regards to our graduating seniors,” said Vidrine.

After a unanimous vote by the Board of Supervisors, it was decided that the Pass/Fail option would be extended for the remainder of the academic year, which will include the Spring semester. EXCELLENCE from page 1 Of the 200+ students who are currently in the admissions and teacher education phase of things, only eighteen are currently involved in the final phase of clinical education. It is this phase of the elementary preparation program that has received national recognition in recent weeks by the NCTQ. A.I. from page 1 Southern is doing better with recruitment than many other schools. However, if the trend of recruiting growth is to continue, strides must be made to extend their influence into new and untapped markets.

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SPORTS

Page 4 | Tuesday, November 3, 2020

The Sentinel of an Enlightened Student Body Since 1926

Football Preview: Can the Jaguars make a solid run in 2020? Jalyn Garner Digest Sports Editor

Spring football is something all of us are looking forward to in 2021. After a crazy 2020 with no football or any other sports in the SWAC, the Jaguars will pursue victory in the SWAC Championship game once again, and in Atlanta for the Celebration Bowl. Until then, it is crucial to see what the Jags have lost, players that returned and the improvements needed to be made. The quarterback for the Jags has always been the focal point for essential positions, but also reveals the team’s Achilles heel. Skeptics feel that past quarterback errors are the reason why the Jags were twice bested by an Alcornshaped hurdle on the road to SWAC championship victory. All of it can’t be blamed on the quarterback however, especially when a team has an offensive line that stands up the opposing team’s defensive line. Giving your quarterback time in the pocket helps, but offense has to answer that call consistently. The defensive line knows how to create pressure that was needed in key moments, which was something Jags did well last season and are looking to continue this upcoming season. The secondary has

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some things to work on in order to be a lot more effective at not allowing any huge plays in the air. The Jag’s linebackers seek improvement all around, but particularly against the run and missed tackles. Special teams have to garner more success this year than

anywhere on the team. While giving the offense good field position helps the odds, kickers need to improve as well. There are games where it can come down to a field goal, the last thing anyone needs is an unreliable kicker. Overall, Jaguars will be in that top

bracket again come the playoffs; the plays and situations Coach Odums puts his team in to win will be the saving grace for the team. Executing plays and playing our game will lead SU to the winner’s circle where we belong.

Former Volleyball Standout, SU Alumna, takes World Stage in Miss USA Pageant

SPORTS FEATURE

Te’yanah Owens The Southern DIGEST

Southern University alumni and former volleyball player Mariah Clayton is running for Miss USA! It was just a year ago that she was crowned Miss Louisiana USA 2020. Clayton is a Fall 2017 graduate from Zachary, Louisiana. She was a student athlete that majored in School Counseling during her time on The Bluff. Graduating at the top of her department, she knows how to get down to business. Forced to compete in her first pageant at 18 years old, Clayton was not in her comfort zone. She was a tomboy growing up but fell in love with the world of pageantry and the impact she could make on her community. Having her platform as Miss Louisiana has allowed her to inspire and empower so many people, especially women. Clayton’s sister Shelby, who is a former SU and Saints cheerleader, is the person that inspires her every day to be a confident and self-loving woman. Without her, there would be no journey for Mariah to Miss USA. The pageant contestant didn’t even dream of running for Miss USA. “I never thought this was ever achievable for me. Growing up, I did not have a lot of confidence in myself and was constantly seeking the approval of other people. Through pageantry, I was able to. If you would have told me 6 years ago that I

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would be competing for Miss USA, I wouldn’t have believed you.” Clayton feels that she has a really important story to share with the world. “My journey to Miss USA has truly been focused on being authentically myself and learning not to be defined by anyone else’s standards.

For me, competing in pageants has been a self-discovering journey to embrace my natural beauty and uniqueness. Those features I once desired to hide or change about myself, are now the things that I unapologetically embrace and love the most! And I want to empower other

women to not be held captive by society’s standards. It is such a liberating feeling to fully accept yourself!” Dealing with a global pandemic after her reign, Clayton’s usual duties were taken from her. “I hit the ground running after I was crowned, and did at least 2 appearances a day! When the world shut down, it was almost like I lost a sense of purpose. How was I supposed to make an impact on the community when I couldn’t even be in the community? It was a big adjustment, but because of it, it caused me to think outside of the box. I was able to start my own organization and podcast called Girls in Real Life to continue spreading my message of self-love and women empowerment.” Clayton is very optimistic about her future and has big goals that she wants to accomplish. “After my reign as Miss USA (fingers crossed), I hope to continue using my platform to inspire and empower the next generation of women. I would also love to be a commercial model, actress, and maybe even a motivational speaker! I’m ready for whatever the future holds for me.” We hope everything works out for this beauty and she gets everything she deserves. Be sure to SUpport and watch this lady Jag at the Miss USA competition on November 9 via the FYI channel.

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FEATURE

Tis the Season; Southern Holiday Food Drive Spencer Williams The Southern Digest

It’s almost that time once again: the season of giving and thanks. With COVID-19 taking control of 2020 and separating us all, Thanksgiving seems like it will be different for a lot of families. The moment where we all come together at one table and eat might have to be socially distant this year. On top of the health pandemic taking its toll, some families are also having to deal with some financial struggles, fighting to make general ends meet while also trying to collect the means to celebrate Thanksgiving. The holidays are already difficult enough for some, but the issues that this year has brought has made it just that more difficult. This is where the agricultural center shines as a beacon of light and hope for some. The adminstration for the Agricultural Center and the College of Agriculture presents the Holiday Food Drive. This

food drive begins from October 14th to November 18th. Its collection points are at Fisher Hall, T.T. Allain Hall, Pinkie Thrift Hall and Southern University Agriculture Finance Building. When speaking to Miss Jacqueline Dixon, the Special Assistant to the Chancellor Dean of the Agriculture Center, she answered some questions regarding the food drive. “Thanksgiving is the time of year for giving back and being thankful for what you have and supporting those who may not be so fortunate,” said Dixon on the importance of the food drive. According to Dixon, the Agricultural Center partnered with the Greater Baton Rouge Food Bank because they knew from prior dealings “that they touch a lot of lives.” Dixon stated that this project came about with the administration team for the See FOOD DRIVE page 6

The administration for the Agricultral Center and the College of Agriculture presents the Holiday Food Drive in Fisher Hall, T.T. Allain Hall, Pinkie Thrift Hall and Southern University's Agriculture Finance Department. (Debrandin Brown/DIGEST)

The Show Must Go On: SU Theatre program pushing forward

LEAD Firm Speaker Brings SU the Word Diamond Butler Digest News Editor

Hayden Hall is home to the Speech and Theatre Departments. (Debrandin Brown/DIGEST)

Kynnedi Jackson The Southern Digest

Lights! Camera! Action! The Student Theatre program at Southern University is not letting the Coronavirus stop them. This has been quite a semester for the program, with participants learning how to maneuver with specific guidelines put into place. Several of the classes in the department are treated like most, with the three options including hybrid, face-to-face, and strictly online. According to Dr. Zaunbreecher, Assistant Professor of Speech and Theatre, the program is still waiting for the correct functional equipment to properly operate hybrid classes. “It will be hard keeping the numbers up, but we are looking into other ways to continue the program if the current guidelines remain past the spring semester,” said Zaunbreecher in regards to the pandemic’s lasting

effect on the program. According to Zaunbreecher, the actual acting class is operating semi-normally. It is a small class so social distancing is still in place. For now, they are focusing on monologues and body language. “For a theatre program, it is very hard to put on productions when characters cannot come in close contact with each other and facial expressions cannot be seen. Both the audience and the actor will have to depend strictly on strong physical appearance,” said Zaunbreecher in regards to some of the things that will have to be overcome with the theatre program at present. According to Zaunbreecher, while the program is looking into doing pre-recorded shows in their stead, this is not the main goal for them. The main concern of staff in the theater department is not being able to entertain small crowds or even those See THEATRE page 6

With the hectic situations of COVID and the recent string of hurricanes, Dr. Zackeus Jackson and the First-Year Experience (FYE) organization got a motivational speaker to encourage Southern University students. On October 26, a speaker from LEAD Firm speaks to Southern University students through a Zoom call about the key tools to being successful. For those who may not know, the LEAD Firm is an organization dedicated to educating and inspiring students towards their posteducational success. They would send speakers to colleges, high schools, and other organizations all over the world offering content to becoming the next global leader within higher education. For this event, the FYE got President and CEO of LEAD Firm, Jarrod Benjamin to come and give students some encouraging words. At the beginning of the Zoom call, Mr. Benjamin stated his purpose of speaking is “…

not just to motivate you but to also enhance, not just enhance you but to also empower you.” During this event, Mr. Benjamin and the attending students discussed being able to recap, reaffirm, and recommit in the marathon of their college and future careers. To be able to do those three things certain milestones need to be passed. The first one is to understand who your competition is. This just means that you can look at what is going to challenge you and being able to overcome them. In this case, the competition to overcome to be successful is self-doubt, imposter syndrome, laziness, lack of commitment and accountability, and financial barriers. Based on what Mr. Benjamin was saying, the best way to overcome these adversaries is to have training days. These would be times where you would condition yourself to practice organizing, to prioritize what is important, and to be committed to what you want

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FEATURE

Page 6 | Tuesday, November 3, 2020

The Sentinel of an Enlightened Student Body Since 1926

Jay-Z Launches Cannabis Brand “Mono Gram”

Jalyn Garner The Southern Digest

Mogul and billionaire Jay-Z has a plethora of successful businesses outside of music, such as the streaming service Tidal, record label Roc Nation, and sports agency Roc Sports. Recently Jay-Z added another business to his repertoire, as he announced his new cannabis line called “Monogram”. To be blunt, no pun intended, any and everything Jay-Z has undertaken garnered its success every time, and this new cannabis line should be no different. Partnering up with California cannabis company “Caliva”, Jay-Z joined the company back in 2019 as their brand strategist. Chief executive of Caliva Dennis O’Malley told CNN Business that “We take this partnership with a lot of responsibility, a lot of humility, a lot of accountability moving forward.” The marketing of Jay-Z announcing his new line was pure genius, announcing the unveiling of the new line on the 50th anniversary of the Controlled Substance Act of 1970, which classified cannabis as a drug affecting the lives of black and brown people for over the past half-century. “For so long cannabis culture

has been marred by the effects of the Controlled Substances Act and stigmatized by political agendas…..While there has been progress, as we launch MONOGRAM, we felt it was imperative that we call out the arbitrary borders that still demarcate who can benefit from cannabis, whether that’s through business or the positive effects of its use,” said Jay-Z on

his reasoning for wanting to get into the cannabis business. “I think it’s great. White people have entire TV shows talking about how they use weed as a come up. To say that so many blacks people are in jail [because of weed], we may as well profit from it too,” said Martin Johnson, a freshmen biology major from Fort Worth, Texas.

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Adding his name to the list of celebrities who’ve started their own cannabis line such as Whoopie Goldberg, Snoop Dogg, and Martha Stewart, Jay-Z continues to extend his brand longer than Snoop Dogg’s dreads. Either way Jay-Z will not lose.

defeat. Defining defeat is knowing how it feels, can you manage it well, and can you receive help from it. Once it is defined, it is best to recognize that defeat gives you the understanding to learn from the experience, one should not wear their defeat. In order to consistently win, sometimes one has to lose. Overall, this event was an inspiring meet that gave students many tools to succeed in their life and for overcoming any advisories. Southern University sophomore and Nursing major student, Ololade Leyimu said that from the presentation he learned “…that success requires realistic goals and commitment, and

agriculture center, which is made up of the administrative assistants across the campus who according to Dixon, wanted to do something and collaborate on a project for this time of year to give back. This is the first time the agriculture center has undertaken the project under their new Chancellor Dean’s administration. They are challenging the students of agriculture to give back through their professors but is open for all students to participate and give. The process is very simple: bring a non-perishable food item and place them in the boxes located in the designated areas. The agriculture center wants everyone to know that they will pick up the nonperishable goods from the colleges if needed. In a time where many are doubtful and hopeless, the agriculture center and Greater Baton Rouge Food Bank is here to be an encouragement to families for these holidays. How nice it would be if everyone could contribute and give back to those who are less fortunate and change the thoughts and perception of those who have given up for the holidays. Let us all give back and be thankful for what we have and what we can do.

THEATRE from page 5 LEAD from page 5

to do. Beginning to do all these aspects it is best to set your pace. Setting your pace consists of reviewing your goals, figure out what your impact will be, and to remain committed to your goals. Another aspect that helps with setting your pace is having an accountability partner, someone you know who supports you and your goals, but also holds you accountable for the things you did or did not do. Another point of the presentation was being prepared and being a leader. While success requires realistic goals and commitment, it also requires preparation. When asked about their ideas on what preparation is Southern University senior and Chemistry Pre-Med major, Marlin Williams said “…I think about something called a POA. A POA is a plan of attack, to have your priorities together to know where you want to go in life.” Mr. Williams continued, adding that “You should have time management skills to make sure that you can make it through that plan of attack, because what good is it if you can not execute the goals you put down?” Besides preparation, there are certain keys that one needs to have. The presentation said that for a student to become a leader, they can take key experience and targeted development to create their leadership strength through their own natural talents. One of the final points in the discussion was the occurrence of getting close to the metaphorical finish line, the goal, you have to understand the possibility of

FOOD DRIVE from page 5

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that have to want success as bad as you want to breathe. Also, durability is an ability to withstand world pressure and damage, and don’t let any kind of fear discourage you.” To conclude the event Dr. Johnson reminds us that all students make sure to schedule an appointment to meet with their academic or faculty advisor in terms of early registration. Early registration for the Spring 2021 semester will open on November 9th.

who may attend virtually. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, they were not able to put on a show this semester and probably will not have one for the spring semester either. Currently, the department is weighing its options before moving forward. With everything going on, Dr. Joyce O’Rourke, Program Leader, and Dr. King Godwin, Theatre Professor, says they are just playing the waiting game. According to Zaunbreecher, everything that is happening is done in the best interest of the students, and this is a chance to sharpen up skills that may not have been focused on in the past. While there is a desire to return to normalcy, whatever is decided amongst the leaders of this program will be made in the best interest of student safety, as Zaunbreecher made it clear that they are in no rush to return to normalcy due to the seriousness of the virus. Nevertheless, the show must go on. Break a leg Southern Speech and Theatre Students!

GO VOTE!

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Let’s not recreate the Purge, Please? Jalexis Edwards The Southern Digest

Today is Election Day, and many police departments are expecting there to be an increased amount of civil unrest following the releasing of the results. Politico recently reported that California’s Governor Gavin Newsom, a Democrat, is preparing his state for possible civil unrest on Election Day and the night following. Although the governor did not list specific measures he plans on taking, he did mention that he was considering several “different scenarios” that could take place.

The city of Chicago’s Mayor Lori Lightfoot, Democrat, also said, “Given what we experienced over the course of the spring and the summer, we can’t presume that what’s going to happen ... is going to be peaceful. We are preparing for the worst,” in a conference call with The Hill. Law enforcement agents across the country are concerned and are taking measures to decrease the expected Election Day violence. With President Donald Trump encouraging his supporters to “go into the polls and watch,” many are afraid what could have been a peaceful Election Day will be filled with tension from the

moment the polls open to the moment state’s results start being reported. There is fear that Trump’s comments will cause far-right groups to intimidate voters, and if he does not win, this could lead to rioting in the streets. Many Democratic leaders are also worried that if President Trump does win, it will cause massive protests in their states. So, let’s not recreate the purge! Regardless of political identity, it is safe to say that voter fraud is significantly rare and unlikely to occur. With the election right around the corner, the best way to make your voice heard is not

OPINION

to protest afterwards, but to vote before. Martin Luther King Jr. said, “A riot is the language of the unheard.” Do not allow yourself and your vote to be unheard. Go vote, so there is no need to revolt. After the ballots have been counted and the prospective candidate wins, there is very little that can be done on election night. The best way to handle this truth is not by rioting, but instead accepting that this is our government’s current state and coming up with reasonable changes that can be made in the future.

Who’s making the Potato Salad This Year? Terronesha Lubom The Southern Digest

The CDC has new holiday suggestions during the pandemic, with Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Hanukkah, and New Year’s Eve just months away. They categorize large dinner parties as high-risk activities with people

from various households and geographic locations, and as large indoor celebrations. Halloween activities provided many safer ways to celebrate the holiday since the usual door-todoor style of trick-or-treating and costume parties are prohibited. Instead, opt for a virtual costume contest and have a trick-or-treat scavenger hunt in or near your

home with immediate family members. For Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Eve, the CDC recommends a small dinner with people living in the same household. The normal high volume of travel for the holiday raises the risk of COVID-19 contracting and spreading. Cooking and distributing food

P and F are the only letters I need! Ryann Jordan The Southern Digest

Fall semester has not been what any could have expected, with the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic, hurricanes, and the occasional tropical storms, it’s all too much. Under circumstances like these, it’s possible for family emergencies and things to come up where students have to be pulled away from school to focus on other pressing matters. In spite of 2020 coming with its own challenges,

Southern University is doing what they can to remain flexible and responsive to those students who may be falling behind and can benefit from the pass/fail grading option. The University has sent out a general email to students and faculty on how grading will be done for fall semester. All courses will be graded according to the normal grading system, and will be offered for further review until December 14, 2020. Students will be allowed to convert their

A, B, or C grade to a Pass for all undergraduate courses. For graduate students, any grade earned in a class with an A or B average will also be allowed the Pass option. According to the University in regards to dropping a class, “May elect to withdraw from a course (or courses) with the grade of “W”. The Withdrawn (W) grade is more appropriate for final grades of D or F for undergraduate courses.” “The withdrawn (W) is reserved for final grades of C, D, or F for

Fall 2020 Homecoming Alternatives Jalyn Garner The Southern Digest

We can all agree that COVID has robbed us all of an amazing Homecoming. With this in mind, here are some of the things that can still put you in that Homecoming mood. For starters, you can start by making a playlist of all of your favorite homecoming songs, as it’s bound to

get you in the spirit. You may also find some older songs that you may have forgotten. Also, you can never underestimate the effect of getting a small group of friends together and cooking or watching old football games from last season. The nostalgia of it all will give you that much-needed vibe. Then there’s the essential activity of cooking outside under a tent. Nothing says homecoming quite like driving

over the hump and seeing all the tailgating tents posted up, with smoke from the grills pouring from under them. At home, cooking outside with a small group of family and friends can make up for what we’ve lost this non-homecoming year. Load up the homecoming playlist as background music and start boiling some food. And don’t forget the drinks! Now if you’re underage, don’t drink; it’s not responsible and very dangerous. If you

to needy family members while maintaining social distance, holding a virtual dinner with friends and family, and shopping online rather than after the holiday in the supermarket will all contribute to keep families safe and healthy this season.

graduate courses.” If students choose the pass/fail option for a class they will need to fill out an Electronic Request to Receive a Pass Grade Form and must be submitted to the Registrar’s office by December 18, 2020. For those wanting to withdraw from a course, undergraduate and graduate will need to complete the Covid-19 Electronic Request to Withdraw and submit to the registrar’s office by December 18, 2020.

are of age, drink responsibly and make sure to call an Uber if you can’t drive home. Lastly, tagging pictures and videos of students having homecoming their way can help cement some memories in the colorful story of the 2020 school year. Hopefully come 2021 we’ll have two homecomings to make up for not having a homecoming on The Yard this year

SUBMISSIONS & OPINION POLICY The Southern DIGEST welcomes letters from readers commenting on current issues and other matters of general interest to the SU family and public. We set aside this space to publish these letters for others to enjoy. This newspaper is not responsible for individual opinions expressed in submissions, editorials, opinions and commentary pieces, including sports commentaries. It is the sole opinion of the writer and does not reflect the views of any professional faculty, staff or administrator of the University. The Southern DIGEST reserves the right to edit any contributions and or reject them without notification. Authors are encouraged to limit the length of submissions to 300 words. Letters should not include libelous statements. Offensive and personal attacks will not be permitted. The DIGEST will not print “open letters” addressed to someone else. All contributions must be type written, signed and must include the author’s address and phone number. Unsigned letters will not be printed. Southern University students should include their majors, hometowns and year in school. When referring to specific DIGEST articles, please include the date and title. All materials should be directed to the editor in chief of The Southern DIGEST, P.O. Box 10180, Baton Rouge, La. 70813. Materials may be delivered by hand to the DIGEST office located in Suite 1064 Harris Hall or can be e-mailed to digest@subr. edu.

NOVOTE,NO VOICE! #SUVOTES #HBCUVOTES #WHENWEALLVOTE

THE OFFICIAL STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY AND A&M COLLEGE, BATON ROUGE, LOUISIANA


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Page 8 | Tuesday, November 3, 2020

The Sentinel of an Enlightened Student Body Since 1926

THE OFFICIAL STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY AND A&M COLLEGE, BATON ROUGE, LOUISIANA

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