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GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY’S NEWSPAPER OF RECORD SINCE 1920 thehoya.com

Georgetown University • Washington, D.C. Vol. 95, No. 44, © 2014

friday, APRIL 4, 2014

CREATIVE WRITING

EDITORIAL The decision to hold Daniel Milzman (COL ’16) in custody is misguided.

Students express a range of creative styles in short stories and poems. SPECIAL PULLOUT GUIDE

SMOKING BAN Georgetown considers a smoke-free main campus, following GUMC.

WOES CONTINUE The women’s lacrosse team lost its sixth straight game Tuesday.

NEWS, A4

OPINION, A2

SPORTS, A10

MAYORAL RACE

Bowser Unseats Gray in Primary Johnny Verhovek Hoya Staff Writer

Muriel Bowser, an upshot D.C. councilmember representing Ward 4, won the D.C. Democratic mayoral primary Tuesday with 44.2 percent of the vote, bringing the administration of Mayor Vincent Gray to a close and catapulting Bowser to the position of presumptive mayor in a city

where winning the Democratic primary is almost always akin to winning the general election. The lowest voter turnout in 30 years, dipping below 32 percent, coupled with slow election returns Tuesday night prevented Gray from conceding the race until after midnight. Up until a few months ago, the race seemed firmly within his grasp.

NATASHA THOMSON/THE HOYA

Muriel Bowser, a councilmember for Ward 4, addresses supporters after winning the Democratic nomination for D.C. mayor Tuesday night.

Uber Safety Debated

With a 12-percent edge against Gray’s 32.3 percent, Bowser has earned a strong endorsement from D.C. Democrats heading into the November general election. In large part, Bowser was able to soundly defeat Gray by racking up large margins in the voting precincts Gray lost in the 2010 elections. Ultimately, Bowser won 28 precincts that Gray had carried in 2010, most of them in Bowser’s home turf in Ward 4, which encompasses the north corner of the city. Additionally, Gray’s vote total in Ward 8, considered his strongest area of support, decreased by 6,590 votes from 2010. As his support waned in the campaign’s closing weeks, Gray made a last-ditch effort to rally voters east of the Anacostia River, travelling to Ward 7 to cut the ribbon at a subsidized housing complex on Minnesota Avenue, NE and visiting a church in Ward 8, whose pastor, C. Matthew Hudson, praised Gray as the “best mayor this side of heaven.” However, despite his success in Wards 7 and 8 in his last election, Gray’s efforts this year could not stem the rising tide against him elsewhere in the city. Bowser was able not only to defeat Gray, but also to separate herself from a field of six candidates, including three other councilmen, Jack Evans (D-Ward 2), Tommy Wells (D-Ward 6) and Vincent Orange (DAt Large), by distinguishing herself as a fresh, energetic politician able to gain traction across the District’s See BOWSER, A6

SONIA TALKS SCOTUS

Lancaster Steps Down as SFS Dean Mallika Sen

acting dean, and I will be the acting dean until the new dean is in place.” Reardon-Anderson estimated that Carol Lancaster (SFS ’64) has Lancaster’s permanent replacement stepped down as dean of the School would take office in summer 2015, of Foreign Service, as announced in when her term was scheduled to an April 2 email to the Georgetown end. A search committee convened community from University Presi- by the president will most likely dent John J. DeGioia. SFS Acting assemble this spring and organize Dean James Reardon-Anderson will during the summer, with a formal remain in place until Lancaster’s announcement of her replacement replacement is announced in fall made in the fall. The search pro2015. cess will take six to Lancaster took a nine months, with leave of absence in formal recommenlate November afdations most likely ter being diagnosed forthcoming in with a brain tumor. spring 2015. Georgetown UniverFor now, Reardonsity Medical Center Anderson’s focus JAMES REARDON-ANDERSON doctors removed the lies in shepherding SFS Acting Dean mass December 2. Lancaster’s projects “Carol has decided now to step forward. down as Dean to devote her full at“All of the things she started are tention to her recovery,” DeGioia now well underway,” he said. “While wrote. she was dean, I was the senior assoLancaster will assume the posi- ciate dean, so I worked quite closely tion of dean emerita and will serve with her, so I was quite familiar as an SFS professor upon her return with all her goals and plans. Takto campus, the time of which is yet ing temporary responsibility was undetermined. very easy. I have been seeing her on According to Reardon-Anderson, a fairly regular basis and reporting who has served as the SFS acting to her.” dean since November, Lancaster subLancaster, one of the first female mitted her resignation to DeGioia SFS graduates, returned to the uni“in the past few weeks.” versity as a professor in 1981, after “In terms of returning to profes- earning a masters and doctorate at sor, that would really depend on the London School of Economics the pace of the recovery,” Reardon- and stints in the State Department Anderson said. “She’s effectively and the United States Agency for resigned as dean, and she has been named emerita. Instead, there’s an See LANCASTER, A6

Hoya Staff Writer

“She’s been a huge asset to the university.”

Suzanne Monyak Hoya Staff Writer

On New Years’ Eve 2013 in San Francisco, Sofia Liu was on a crosswalk with her family when she was hit by Syed Muzzafar, an Uber driver who worked out of his own car. Liu’s mother and brother sustained injuries, and Liu, aged 6, was killed. Uber, asserting that the driver was off duty at the time of the accident, refused to take responsibility and denied the family insurance protection. This incident was one of several over the course of the past year that prompted the Taxicab, Limousine and Paratransit Association to launch the “Who’s Driving You?” initiative, a public safety initiative aiming to raise awareness of the dangers of unregulated, private sedan services, or “ridesharing” transportation services such as Uber, Sidecar and Lyft. “This is outrageous. Like a legitimate taxicab or limousine company, the vehicle possesses commercial insurance which covers every phase of the driver’s operations,” said Dave Sutton, spokesman for the “Who’s Driving You?” initiative. “So despite whatever Uber claims about its insurance policies, we’re seeing injured people who are not being covered.” These ridesharing services, popular with Georgetown students, have come under fire for insurance gaps, insufficient and ineffective background checks on drivers, nominal driver training and minimal vehicle inspection. Represented by Bethesda-based public relations firm Melwood Global and Interaction Strategies, a design and online marketing agency located in Dupont, the TLPA has been tracking Uber and other transportation apps for the past two years. In the wake of recent reports of misconduct by Uber drivers, including accusations against Uber drivers of sexual harassment and car accidents, the TLPA hopes the initiative will help alert city populations to what exactly it means to drive with an unregulated company.

ALEXANDER BROWN/THE HOYA

Carol Lancaster, pictured at commencement last May, is stepping down as dean of the School of Foreign Service to recover from a brain tumor.

BENJAMIN APPLEY EPSTEIN/THE HOYA

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor discussed the challenges she faced as a minority in her path to the bench Wednesday. See A4.

Students to March for Immigration Reform Sydney Winkler Hoya Staff Writer

Students from Georgetown will take to the streets this Saturday as part of a nationwide protest of the Obama administration’s deportation of undocumented immigrants, encompassing 40 cities in a National Day of Action. Hoyas for Immigrant Rights and the Georgetown University Immigration Coalition, two student groups advocating immigration reform, in coalition with Movimiento Estudiantil Chican@ de Aztlán, or MEChA, will lead a march to the rally from Georgetown’s front gates starting at 12 p.m. Approximatly 200 people are expected to attend the rally in front of the White House. “Halting deportations is extremely important because, as we wait for progress on legislation, thousands of people are being deported, and this is simply unacceptable,” President of Hoyas for Immigrant Rights Citlalli Alvarez (COL ’16) said.

See UBER, A7 Newsroom: (202) 687-3415 Business: (202) 687-3947

See IMMIGRATION, A6

CHARLIE LOWE/THE HOYA

Georgetown students were among 10,000 protesters in an immigration rally at the Capitol in October. A similar protest will take place Saturday as part of a National Day of Action protesting Obama’s immigration policy. Published Tuesdays and Fridays

Send Story Ideas and Tips to news@thehoya.com


A2

OPINION

THE HOYA

FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 2014

THE VERDICT

C C

Founded January 14, 1920

EDITORIALS

Mercy for Milzman The Georgetown community watched with great attention as Daniel Milzman (COL ’16) was arrested, arraigned and detained by federal officials for possession of ricin, a deadly biological toxin, over the past two weeks. In a pre-trial detention hearing, Magistrate Judge John M. Facciola ordered Milzman’s release to Sibley Memorial Hospital for psychiatric care and then to his parents’ home pending trial, on the basis that Milzman had been suffering from depression since high school, spurring his decision to make the toxin. On Monday, however, Chief Judge Richard W. Roberts reversed that decision, ordering Milzman to stay in jail pending trial. This decision, while based on Milzman’s manufacturing of ricin as well as threatening Facebook messages he sent to another student earlier this year, is not in the best interest of Milzman or those he put in danger on the sixth floor of McCarthy Hall. Both Facciola and Roberts recognized that Milzman suffers from depression. However, the two judges evaluated Milzman’s potential danger to the community differently, coming to opposing conclusions about his continued detention. In the original deten-

tion hearing and subsequent appeal hearings, attorneys discussed the type of psychiatric treatment available at Sibley and at D.C. Jail, where Milzman is being held. It seems clear that D.C. Jail does not offer the same level of treatment as Sibley, and that staying in confinement has the potential to exacerbate Milzman’s depression. Holding the indicted without bail for the most egregious crimes provides a protective service to the public. But holding Milzman — a college sophomore entangled in the criminal justice system as a result of a history of poor mental health — in prison before his conviction is an empty decision that protects no one. At this point, it is clear that Milzman committed a federal offense. But holding him in jail does not benefit his surrounding community any more than keeping him in psychiatric treatment would, and it certainly does not benefit Milzman or his family. We support any effort the defense takes to appeal this decision, and we urge the federal court to show mercy and an understanding of mental health issues when it comes to our classmate Daniel Milzman.

Uber’s Risky Business In this age of convenience, ridesharing services such as Uber, Lyft and Sidecar fit seamlessly into students’ lives. With few apparent drawbacks besides cost, Uber has gone unquestioned as many Georgetown students’ transportation method of choice, especially on weekends and on evenings when public transit is unavailable and taxis are hard to come by. However, the recent outcries against the management of this popular car service have risen sharply in volume, saliency and validity. As a technology company contracting out to amateur rideshare drivers, Uber has not been held to the same stringent tests and requirements to which limousine and taxi operators in the District are otherwise subject to — for instance, the standard and reasonable criminal background checks and drug tests that are a requirement for any D.C. taxi operator. This enabled Uber to avoid responsibility when a driver hit a young pedestrian earlier this year and when Uber drivers were accused of sexually assaulting female passengers, as detailed in a recent article in The Daily Beast. “Who’s Driving You?” is a campaign that

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Wi-Fi Out in Open — The NoMa Business Investment District now provides free outdoor Wi-Fi in NoMa, making it the first neighborhood to do so. Capitol Concealer — The Architect of the Capitol warned that spectators have a roughly two-week window of opportunity before the dome will be shrouded in scaffolding for a multi-year restoration project. Beer for All Nationals — Atlas Brew Works has paired with the Washington Nationals to brew 1500 South Cap, a beer to be served exclusively at Nationals Park this season and named after the stadium’s address. A Fair Place to Do Your Business — The city of Washington has promised to strongly advocate for more gender-neutral bathrooms in private businesses throughout the District. The Long Road Home — Twelve trains, carrying over 1500 people, were delayed during rush hour yesterday by downed power lines on Amtrak and MARC routes between Baltimore and Washington. Porter in the Playoffs — The Washington Wizards will be competing in the NBA playoffs for the first time in five years along with former Georgetown forward Otto Porter Jr. Turn Out for What? — Only about a quarter of D.C. voters turned out in Tuesday’s primary election, the lowest rate in more than 30 years. Late Years for Letterman — David Letterman, the host of NBC’s “Late Night” since 1982, will retire at some point next year.

A LITTLE BIRDIE TOLD US ... @KatKelley46 April 3 3A- @thehoya: Drug use & illegal violence is part of rap because it is part of people’s narratives. @GUDCReads April 2 @thehoya @GeorgetownGAAP Great point! Class visits are so helpful in understanding #georgetown academics

has taken up the laudable task of publicizing and eradicating the undue risks of these deregulated taxi services. The campaign rightly claims that ridesharing companies dodge costs by inadequately insuring their cars and inadequately training drivers — neither of which is mandated to the same degree as taxicabs. When travelling in a city, safety is always a concern. Those who have opted for the additional security of a private vehicle service deserve exactly that. And for those attending a college like Georgetown that is not easily accessible by public transit, maintaining a commitment to safety and security in affordable private vehicle services should be a priority of the utmost importance. There are, of course, obvious ways to minimize risk: avoid travelling alone, at night or in car services of dubious legitimacy. It is unfortunate that we must add a service so innovative as Uber to this list. Until tighter regulations are imposed on rideshare operators, we urge these companies to be forthcoming about the qualifications of their drivers, and — more importantly — we urge students to be aware of the risks of these services.

@GUHoya07 April 1 Interesting article from @TheHoya with this years undergrad admissions data. 16.6% acceptance rate for Class of 2018. http://bit.ly/1e9GaHn

EDITORIAL CARTOON by Sheena Karkal

A Capitol Idea for GUTS If there’s one place Georgetown students can be counted on to intern every semester, it’s Congress. With this trend in mind, the university has added a new Georgetown University Transportation Shuttle bus that will make the commute from the Hilltop to the Hill easier. While the exact logistics of the route, which will travel between Georgetown and Capitol Hill, have yet to be determined, it is clear that any direct path between the two heavily trafficked locations will considerably cut down on the commute time for students and other members of the Georgetown community who travel between the two locations. The addition of a shuttle bus route that travels to Capitol Hill is an example of university services adapting to the needs of the student body. By adding this new route, Georgetown has effectively encouraged students to take full advantage of the resourc-

es in the vicinity of the Hilltop, and has reduced barriers — both physically and financially — that may have limited students in some way from pursuing internships in other neighborhoods of Washington, D.C. In addition to this program’s practical benefits, it is just as significant that it was first brought to the university’s attention through IdeaScale. As students continue to share ideas and support one another’s projects on the idea-sharing platform, the implementation of the new GUTS bus service shows a promising commitment to the forum and bodes well for other ideas — that for now remain a pipe dream. Given the size and diversity of our campus, IdeaScale provides a necessary platform to ensure that all voices at Georgetown have the chance to be heard. Hopefully, the implementation of the new GUTS route is just one of many ideas that will be addressed by the administration.

Emma Hinchliffe, Editor-in-Chief TM Gibbons-Neff, Executive Editor Sheena Karkal, Managing Editor Lindsay Lee, Online Editor Mallika Sen, Campus News Editor Madison Ashley, City News Editor Carolyn Maguire, Sports Editor Kim Bussing, Guide Editor David Chardack, Opinion Editor Alexander Brown, Photography Editor Ian Tice, Layout Editor Robert DePaolo, Copy Chief Karl Pielmeier, Blog Editor

Contributing Editors

Katy Berk, Zoe Bertrand, Pat Curran, Victoria Edel, Danny Funt, Chris Grivas, Penny Hung, Sarah Kaplan, Hanaa Khadraoui, Hunter Main, Eitan Sayag, Sean Sullivan, Emory Wellman

Deputy Campus News Editor Sam Abrams Deputy Campus News Editor Kit Clemente Deputy City News Editor Suzanne Monyak Deputy Business Editor Natasha Khan Deputy Sports Editor Andrew May Deputy Sports Editor Tom Schnoor Sports Blog Editor Max Wheeler Deputy Guide Editor Allison Hillsbery Deputy Guide Editor Jess Kelham-Hohler Deputy Opinion Editor Matthew Grisier Opinion Blog Editor Jinwoo Chong Deputy Photography Editor Julia Hennrikus Deputy Photography Editor Daniel Smith Deputy Photography Editor Michelle Xu Deputy Layout Editor Michelle Cardona Deputy Layout Editor Kennedy Shields Deputy Copy Editor Jackie McCadden Deputy Copy Editor Zack Saravay Deputy Copy Editor Sharanya Sriram Deputy Blog Editor Emma Holland

Editorial Board David Chardack, Chair Katy Berk, Taylor Coles, Patrick Drown, Ben Germano, Kelly Nosé

Michal Grabias, General Manager Jason Yoffe, Director of Accounting Christina Wing, Director of Corporate Development Nicole Foggan, Director of Marketing Addie Fleron, Director of Personnel Brian Carden, Director of Sales Nick DeLessio, Director of Technology Clara Cheng Kevin Wilson Tessa Bell Sean Choksi Laura Tonnessen Chris Amaya Dimitri Roumeliotis Natasha Patel Charles Lee Nicole Yuksel Ellen Zamsky Emily Manbeck Christine Cha Chris Hedley Katherine Seder Matthew De Silva Casandra Schwartz Janet Zhu

Operations Manager Revenue Outreach Manager Senior Accounts Manager Local Accounts Manager National Accounts Manager Treasury Manager Statements Manager Alumni Relations Manager Special Events Manager Public Relations Manager Human Resources Manager Professional Development Manager Institutional Diversity Manager Online Advertisements Manager Local Advertisements Manager Systems Manager Technical Support Manager Web Manager

Consultants Kent Carlson, Kevin Tian, Mary Nancy Walter, Mullin Weerakoon, Simon Wu

Board of Directors

Evan Hollander, Chair

Michal Grabias, Emma Hinchliffe, Hanaa Khadraoui, Vidur Khatri, Hunter Main, Braden McDonald Letter to the Editor & Viewpoint Policies The Hoya welcomes letters and viewpoints from our readers and will print as many as possible. To be eligible for publication, letters should specifically address a recent campus issue or Hoya story. Letters should not exceed 300 words. Viewpoints are always welcome from all members of the Georgetown community on any topic, but priority will be given to relevant campus issues. Viewpoint submissions should be between 600-800 words. Send all submissions to: opinion@thehoya.com. Letters and viewpoints are due Sunday at 5 p.m. for Tuesday’s issue and Wednesday at 5 p.m. for Friday’s issue. The Hoya reserves the right to reject letters or viewpoints and edit for length, style, clarity and accuracy. The Hoya further reserves the right to write headlines and select illustrations to accompany letters and viewpoints. Corrections & Clarifications If you have a comment or question about the fairness or accuracy of a story, contact Executive Editor TM Gibbons-Neff at (203) 858-1127 or email executive@thehoya.com. News Tips Campus News Editor Mallika Sen: Call (310) 918-6116 or email campus@thehoya.com. City News Editor Madison Ashley: Call (504) 3446845 or email city@thehoya.com. Sports Editor Carolyn Maguire: Call (908) 4471445 or email sports@thehoya.com. General Information The Hoya is published twice each week during the academic year with the exception of holiday and exam periods. Address all correspondence to:

The Hoya Georgetown University Box 571065 Washington, D.C. 20057-1065 The writing, articles, pictures, layout and format are the responsibility of The Hoya and do not necessarily represent the views of the administration, faculty or students of Georgetown University. Signed columns and cartoons represent the opinions of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the editorial position of The Hoya. Unsigned essays that appear on the left side of the editorial page are the opinion of the majority of the editorial board. Georgetown University subscribes to the principle of responsible freedom of expression for student editors. The Hoya does not discriminate on the basis of age, gender, sexual orientation, race, disability, color, national or ethnic origin. © 1920-2014. The Hoya, Georgetown University twice weekly. No part of this publication may be used without the permission of The Hoya Board of Editors. All rights reserved. The Hoya is available free of charge, one copy per reader, at distribution sites on and around the Georgetown University campus. Additional copies are $1 each. Editorial: (202) 687-3415 Advertising: (202) 687-3947 Business: (202) 687-3947 Facsimile: (202) 687-2741 Email: editor@thehoya.com Online at www.thehoya.com Circulation: 6,500


OPINION

FRIDAY, april 4, 2014

THROUGH THE GLASS CEILING

THE HOYA

A3

VIEWPOINT • Vaddadi

Housed in Miscommunication A

Allie Heymann

My Bare Approach To Beauty W

e all have some weird habits that range from fingernail biting to eating “victory” breakfasts on the morning of a big test. Pretty much everyone has something unique they like to do when no one’s watching. And what’s mine you ask? After I shower, I like to sit around naked for a few minutes before getting dressed. Sound strange? It shouldn’t. I think that there is something amazingly empowering about being naked. From looking at and examining our bodies in the mirror, to just relaxing in on our own skin, being naked is a powerful and natural way to be. Every time I enter a Yates or residence hall bathroom, I am simultaneously accosted and informed by the infamous Stall Seat Journals. The one in the Yates women’s bathroom hasn’t changed in the past few months, and it sports a real scary set of statistics about weight and body image. It is difficult to imagine that one in every five women has an eating disorder, or that four out of every five women look at themselves in the mirror and see a heavier person than in reality. Another interesting tidbit I gleaned from said Journal is that while the average American woman has gotten more curvaceous, the average runway model has gotten skinnier and taller. Even plussize models are five or six sizes smaller than they were 30 years ago. These statistics infuriate me for a variety of reasons. Where were the statistics about health or happiness or sanity? While body image does in part stem from the media and the modelling industry, it is also a product of confidence, comfort and general well-being. Now here is where the nudity bit comes in. I have been kidding around

I like to sit around naked for a few minutes before getting dressed. with friends for the past few days about how being naked in and around the house is one of the most fantastic things in the day-to-day grind. Stripping off the clothes and expectations and frustrations and stress — that is, being naked — is a necessary part of healthy living. When I was talking with a friend, she confessed, “I am not an incredibly secure person. In fact, I find that I am increasingly insecure about many things, from my Facebook presence to my physical presence. Yet, despite my fear of unflattering pictures (with chins and thighs and such), I love being naked. I delight in simply feeling cold, in showering, in doing mundane tasks without a stitch of clothing.” In high school and in college — and increasingly in the years leading up to and after these time spans — social media has become the lens through which the rest of the world sees us. We are opened up to critique and pain, and we constantly assess our validity through picture likes and comments. These are arbitrary standards of beauty, but the most frustrating part of social media sites is that they are “confidence-strippers.” Despite being strong and independent and healthy, we still worry about our Facebook personas and Twitter personalities. And every time an unflattering picture goes up, we feel that little hit of embarrassment (regardless of our outward weight or looks). At the end of the day, the most important question remains: Are you happy and healthy? The answer to that is far more important than “Are you pretty?” or “Are you skinny?” To supplement this piece, I stumbled across an article on a website called MindBodyGreen: “Five Reasons to Get Naked Daily.” I encourage you to read it in depth. But here are the basics: Nakedness allows you to own your story, to embrace your completeness, to experience vulnerability, to show your unique beauty and to face your fears. I completely agree, but I also believe that nakedness is singularly empowering. By being alone with our thoughts, our choices and our bodies, we can reflect more deeply, live more fully and feel truly strong. Also, have you ever just done some naked cooking? If you haven’t, give it a try (I recommend a specialty grilled cheese), and see if you don’t feel the confidence flowing. Allie Heymann is a sophomore in the School of Foreign Service. THROUGH THE GLASS CEILING appears every other Friday.

few months ago, students on the Hilltop gathered in protest when they found out about the subtle, yet radical change in Georgetown’s housing policy. The decision to redact the housing eligibility of students studying abroad, thus preventing them from participating in housing selection, illustrates the Office of Residential Living’s lack of understanding and its apparent disconnect from the students. While the Class of 2016 may have gained a brief victory when Residential Living postponed this policy change to next year, this does not mask the dramatic change in housing selection further classes will face. Moreover, it is symptomatic of Residential Living’s poor performance in perception of what students actually need. Last week’s housing selection process exemplifies this evident lack of communication. When I found out that the study abroad policy changes would take effect next fall, I assumed that the selection process would still be relatively straightforward. But what Residential Living failed to communicate clearly that once students studying abroad had their selections dropped, their housemates would only have three days to find a “hold” for the semester. To me, this was ridiculous. In the past, sophomores received their selections in the fall and had months to find potential “fill-ins” if they were considering studying abroad. Not only did the Office dramatically hasten the process, it did not convey these policy changes clearly, causing students to scramble to find replacements for next semester. The old model was working: While it wasn’t regulated by Residential Living, students holding spots in apartments were trusted to give up their spots the following

On a much broader scale, Residential Living should revise the way it communicates with undergraduates. semester, a process that was, for the most part, maintained. Forcing fall study-abroad students to re-apply for housing does not resolve the problem. It seems ridiculous that students should have to go through their first two years in a dorm with the expectation of an upgrade to an apartment during their junior year, only

to lose this opportunity because of the independent academic decision to study abroad. Residential Living claims that these changes will streamline the system, albeit at the expense of some student freedom, but they have succeeded only in further adding to the unnecessary regulation of student life. Why does the administration see a need to fix

something that is not broken? While I am unsure of how much of this article Residential Living will actually take into consideration, I have simple proposals as to how the department can improve the policy. I have no problem with the housing selection process for both rising sophomores and rising juniors, but preventing fall studyabroad students from getting the apartment they have been waiting two years for is a wholly unnecessary deterrent for students to study abroad at all. Continuing the informal but effective process of holding spots is the best way that juniors can ensure they have their preferred housing choices. The best option is simply to run selection in a similar manner to how it was done this year, but with more time for students to find suitable replacements if they are studying abroad. On a much broader scale, Residential Living should revise the way it communicates with undergraduates. These recent incidents illustrate a clear shortfall in the department’s ability to understand what appropriate measures to take. Involving students more in the planning of housing policy and keeping them informed of changes will go a long way in developing a much stronger and constructive relationship. It should not take the persuasive action of Georgetown University Student Association to alter a policy that the majority of students look upon unfavorably. If Residential Living is truly committed to incentivizing students to stay on campus, it should start listening to the actual demands of students rather than basing its policies on what it perceives people need. Anirudha Vaddadi is a sophomore in the School of Foreign Service.

COLLEGE ON A HILL

viewpoint • Dostal

Outside Classrooms, Examining What Is Engaging the Hilltop And What Ought to Be

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ollege tour guides have to answer dozens of questions. From “What does the blue light do?” to “Do coeds share bathrooms?”, the questions span from normal to bizarre. While many of the questions are regarding academics, the bulk are certainly concerning extracurricular activities. One of the key assets of the Georgetown experience is the prestigious academics on the Hilltop, yet the undergraduate experience is more than just academics. Students at Georgetown love to define themselves not by their major or minor, but usually by what they do outside of the classroom. W h e n other students ask us what we do, we respond by listing our role in Georgetown University Student Association, our job at The Corp, our position on the debate team or whatever else we’re inclined to do or not do. With such a strong identity surrounding our activities outside the classroom, too many cases exist in which Georgetown’s academic commitments are unnecessarily inflexible, in effect discouraging our participation in the world outside academia. In order to participate in our activities, sometimes we miss class. Varsity athletes are intimately familiar with this constant conflict. By completing the necessary paperwork, planning and training, varsity athletes can be excused from class in order to represent Georgetown in competition out of town. Those who have comparable competitions should be able to do the same. While I do firmly believe that it should be up to individual professors to decide how to handle a student whose extracurriculars involve missing class, the university should do better to foster an environment in which it is not only encouraged to join clubs and groups, but also where professors allow leeway in class attendance when essential participation requires one to miss a reasonable number of classes. To be clear, I am not endorsing a system where one could skip class whenever one wants, and I also believe that every organization

should do its utmost to make sure students have no need to miss school. But as anyone on a competitive club sport or debate team knows, sometimes in order to compete, Friday afternoon travel is a necessary conflict with the recitation and discussion sessions that meet during those times. I have encountered many stories of students who are unable to attend a competition because of a professor who said that their grade would suffer. Luckily, I have never had this experience. Whenever I have had to miss a class for a club activity my professors have been very und e r st a n d ing. They have let me know what I need to do to make up for missing the class and have supported me in my engagement with campus and the community outside of academic coursework. Georgetown is a university that prospers on promoting the whole person. But for many of us, the whole person includes what we do when ICC is empty of professors and MultiSport Facility is available for club sport use. When professors deny students the opportunity to participate in events and competitions that their club or team is attending, it not only hurts the group that depends on them, but it does not allow the student to partake in everything this amazing school has to offer. As a member of an organization that necessitates travel for competition, I am honored to represent my school and compete at a high level across the country, but when conflicts arise that make it so our members cannot compete, it is frustrating to see that Georgetown is not acting in the best interests of its students. What our students do outside the classroom is just as important as what they do in it, and the university needs to do a better job of reminding professors of this fact and allowing students to make the most out of their Georgetown experience.

The university should foster a culture in which professors better support extracurriculars.

Josh Dostal is a freshman in the College and a member of the Georgetown University Mock Trial team.

R

ecently, there seems to be a ment. One-sixteenth of a student’s glorification of science, math- curriculum is specifically dedicated ematics, engineering and tech- to the moral component of his or her nology fields in academic circles. work. From federal funding for engineerMaybe this is just a reflection of a ing programs to Nate Silver’s new larger trend — an abandonment of website driven by statistical analy- the bigger questions — and Georgesis, intellectuals around the United town is merely following. But GeorgeStates are smitten with the idea town, with its rich Jesuit legacy and that numbers, calculations and tests vast experience teaching philosophy deserve our intense admiration. In- and theology, should challenge even deed, the most apparent sign of this the public policy students to engage obsession is Neil deGrasse Tyson’s with the ethical issues and how the cult following and his success re- world ought to be. Statecraft and viving the television good government are show “Cosmos.” not simply about beGeorgetown aping able to analyze pears to be following data. Our ability to dethis trend as well. The scribe the world will construction of new never tell us how it science facilities, the should to be. increased pursuit of In a recent interscientific grants and view, Neil deGrasse even the establishTyson stated that he Kent Carlson ment of the McCourt found philosophy School of Public Polpointless. Specifically, icy with its focus on he said, “My concern Philosophy is an Big Data show Georgethere is that the phiessential part of our losopher believes that town’s commitment to science and math, are asking deep human knowledge. they even when it comes to questions about nagovernmental studies. ture and to the scientist, it’s, ‘What Yet I always found something puz- are you doing? Why are you wasting zling with the Nate Silver approach. your time?’… The scientist says, ‘I His statistical analysis in the 2012 U.S. have got all this world of unknown. presidential election achieved fame I’m moving on and I’m leaving you for its accuracy. His success, however, behind. You can’t even cross the reveals the limitations of statistics: street because you are distracted by They can only describe the world as it what you are sure are deep questions is and predict how the world will be. that you have asked of yourself.’” They cannot tell us anything about He sees philosophy as a force that how the world ought to be. is holding him back rather than havThe academic world has two ing any intellectual or moral value. main objectives: discovery of how Philosophy is an essential part of the world is and articulating how our human knowledge. Universities the world should be. So much of our are not just places where smart peoacademic pursuits are concerned ple come together and analyze the only with how the world is. This, of world around them. They are places course, is true for the hard sciences where professors reflect and discern that aim to discover truths about the moral context of their work and the natural world. Other disciplines challenge their students to think like philosophy, politics or theol- about how the world is and ought to ogy tackle morality and lead us be. To learn about both constitutes a into discussions and realizations of complete education, and for Tyson how the world should be. Engaging to argue that he cannot be bothered in discussions of normativity help with these deep questions and the inform us as to how we can aim to moral context of his work is shortshape our society. sighted. Take, for example, the modern There are truths about our purpose study of international relations: Aca- and how we should live. These truths demic debates about which theoreti- can be discerned, not tested, but that cal framework (realism, neoliberal does not negate their importance. We institutionalism and constructiv- should not trap ourselves by thinkism) best describes the world have ing the only questions that matter consumed the study of international are the ones that are answered with relations. Absent from most of this tests and numbers. Understanding debate are any moral considerations the world that “is” is important, but of how we ought to conduct our for- there is so much more to human life eign policy. that cannot be understood without The McCourt School of Public Poli- asking the bigger questions — the cy may be the worst offender of this questions that numbers and data are form of normative negligence. In a unable to answer. two-year full-time curriculum composed mostly of elective courses, only Kent Carlson is a senior in the School one specific course tackles issues of of Foreign Service. COLLEGE ON A HILL ethics in public policy and develop- appears every other Friday.


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ONLINE EXCLUSIVE Sarah Santana (COL ’16) serves as an ambassador to the National Cherry Blossom Festival. See thehoya.com.

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UKRAINE, RISING

I think by nature, universities are liberal institutions. That’s been a trend forever.”

College Republicans Vice-Chair Abbey McNaughton (COL ’16), on a strong affinity for Democrats among youth. See story on A7.

from

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Ukrainian activist Yulia Marushevska, who became a symbol of the Euromaidan protests with her appearance in the viral “I Am A Ukrainian” video, spoke Tuesday in ICC Auditorium about her experience and hopes for her country. See story thehoya.com.

HOT, SMART AND RANKED FOR IT Georgetown was just named one of the top campuses in the country — for both brains and beauty. blog.thehoya.com

Sotomayor Details Smoking Ban Efforts Coalesce Challenges in Law RYAN THOMAS Hoya Staff Writer

NICOLE JARVIS

Bronx, to her time at Princeton, Yale Law and her career in the Hoya Staff Writer New York Circuit Court, leadThe Marver H. Bernstein Sym- ing up to the confirmation proposium brought United States cess to the Supreme Court. AlSupreme Court Associate Jus- though now she is entrenched tice Sonia Sotomayor to Gaston in her position in the Supreme Hall on Wednesday for a con- Court for life, her New York ties versation entitled “A Life in the still run deep. Law,” sponsored by the Office of “The Supreme Court would the President and the govern- be perfect if I could cut it out ment department. and put it in lower Manhattan,” After introductions by Uni- Sotomayor said. versity President John J. DeWhen the session moved into Gioia and Robert Katzmann, answering student questions, the chief judge of the U.S. submitted in writing at the Court of Appeals for the Second beginning of the event, the disCircuit, Georgetown University cussion shifted to focus on her Law Center professor Eloise Pa- life as a Latina and how worksachoff — who clerked for Soto- ing in law as a minority woman mayor as her first year as justice was both vitally important and — took over to intensely difguide the conficult. versation. “I know Sotomayor that I used opened with my minora few anecity status and dotes about people’s exher initial pectations of encounters me to my adwith Justice vantage,” she Sandra Day said. “And I O’Connor and still do that.” Justice John Her stories SONIA SOTOMAYOR Paul Stevens, of the dismisSupreme Court Associate Justice as well as her sive lawyers mission to introduce herself to and disrespectful treatment every elevator clerk on day one. that peppered her entire career Sotomayor emphasized that on the bench clearly illustrate even though the court seems that, for many, it is hard to sepobtuse and divided, it is still arate the stereotypes associated important for the public to with her background from her recognize the unique burden reputation as an esteemed judiit faces. Her appearance in Gas- cial scholar. ton coincided with the day’s “Someone told me I only got announcement of the Supreme into Yale because I was Latina,” Court’s decision to lift limits she said. “I told them that may on private donations to politi- be true, but that it didn’t hurt cal campaigns. that I graduated summa cum “You have to believe that this laude, Phi Kappa Alpha from group of nine is passionate Princeton.” about finding the right answer. Sotomayor’s words resonated No matter what we all think with members of the audience. the right answer is, we’re all “I think it was really imporfilled with the same passion tant for a lot of people to hear and that’s how I can stand to be that, especially as a Chineseon the losing side,” Sotomayor American student here I think said. “We are the highest court. a lot of that stuff is relevant to If you get it wrong, you are af- me as well, especially hearing fecting people’s lives. If not for- about different challenges that ever then for a very long time.” minorities have in society toThroughout the event, she day,” Daniel Choy (SFS ’15) said. referenced her most recent “I thought she was really book, her memoir, “My Beloved engaging and it was great to World,” of which every GOCard- hear a firsthand perspective holder in attendance received a and even how she had her own signed copy. The book ties her fears and doubts as a Supreme childhood, growing up in a Court justice,” Eric Sheets (SFS Spanish-speaking home in the ’17) said.

“We are the highest court. If we get it wrong, we’re affecting people’s lives.”

Students have created a petition to make the main campus of the university tobacco smoke free, coinciding with the convening of a nonsmoking campus working group March 25 regarding the university’s smoking policy. After the working group’s formation in February, spurred by Assistant Vice President for Benefits and Chief Benefits Officer Charles DeSantis, it held its first meeting March 25. The meeting comes in the wake of the Georgetown University Medical Center’s campus smoking ban, mirrored at The George Washington University. “[GWU] has gone smoke free but does not do any enforcement,” Director of Health Education Services Carol Day said. “Essentially, that just means making a statement for where the university stands on the matter. The medical campus is another model, but they’ve been very strict with enforcing standards regarding nonsmoking.” Students in a Health Promotion and Disease Prevention class at the

School of Nursing and Health Sciences, including smoke-free student advocates Kelly Kimball (NHS ’16) and Cailin Grant (NHS ’16), said that they believe the issue deserves more attention on campus because of the health risks associated with tobacco usage. “We feel that a smoke-free campus would exemplify the Georgetown values of cura personalis and being men and women for others.” Grant said. “Smoking is a huge public health issue. It not only harms those who smoke, but also those who are subjected to it.” The movement to ban smoking elicited backlash from some students, prompting vigorous debate on the “Petition to Make Georgetown a Smoke Free Campus” Facebook event page, which garnered 244 attendees. “I would be really disappointed if they decided to ban smoking on campus.” Andrew Shaughnessy (SFS ’16) said. “It’s a personal choice, and I don’t think that the university should go so far as to ban smoking.” Others recognized the dangers of smoking in certain situations, but also stood by the smokers’ rights to continue doing so. “Obviously smoking cigarettes

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The university has convened a working group to examine a potential main campus smoking ban, which is already in place on the medical campus.

inside isn’t allowed because of secondhand smoke, but if you want to smoke outside and not blow smoke into other people’s faces, then that should be allowed,” Juan Luis Tirado (COL ’16), who smokes e-cigarettes because they are less damaging to lungs and vocal chords, said. “I would totally be for support groups for people to stop smoking, but not anything that makes it mandatory, that’s counterproductive.” Petition organizer Sonya Nasim (NHS ’16) put the emphasis on students enacting positive chance on campus. “Can we as public health advocates watch the campus allow smoking to negatively impact our community?” Nasim said. “I don’t think banning smoking is the panacea, but it’s a step in the right direction that lots of universities and college campuses have taken.” Currently, smoking on the main campus is not allowed inside buildings, or within 25 feet of entrances, windows or outdoor air intakes, in accordance with Washington, D.C. laws. There are also no designated smoking areas on campus. “Georgetown is committed to maintaining an environment that is reasonably free from tobacco smoke,” Director of Media Relations Rachel Pugh said. “We are always exploring new ways of promoting a culture of wellness at Georgetown.” In the past three years alone, a host of other D.C. schools have moved toward banning tobacco or smoking on their campuses. American University and the University of Maryland at College Park joined GWU in going smoke free. GU Center for the Environment Director Edward Barrows has been involved with anti-smoking efforts on campus for a number of years. He said that his interest in the project stemmed from his desire for clean air and healthy students. “I’ve been pushing for a smoke-free Georgetown for a number of years now, but up until now there hasn’t really been much progress,” Barrows said. “Last month, I sent a long email to Provost [Robert] Groves. I wonder if this finally started the ball rolling for the formation of the Smoke-free Campus Working Group.” Despite being confident that smoking will eventually be banned on campus, Day recognized that smoking at Georgetown is a complicated issue. “I think for the most part, people will be on board with this, but it is a human rights issue.” Day said. “It deals with individual choices, and smoking is not illegal. We’re trying to make it a sensitive campus and not wanting to impede on people’s rights to do that.”


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With Weibo, Programs Big Sean Kicks Off Spring Connect With China KSHITHIJ SHRINATH Hoya Staff Writer

LAURA OWSIANY

MBA students through Weibo in order to take them out on a local food Hoya Staff Writer tour during their Global Residency As research, recruitment, and fac- Program in Shanghai. ulty and student interest from China Since the launch of Georgetown continues to grow at Georgetown, University’s account, the Law Cenadministrators are looking to build ter’s Graduate Admissions Office, greater ties with China through We- Chinese Student Alliance, Chinese ibo, a Chinese social media site that Student and Scholar Association and works much like Twitter. Berkley Center for Religion, Peace “Georgetown University is the lead- and World Affairs have established ing university in Washington, D.C., their own Weibo pages. and in the country in terms of its While the Chinese government focus on China,” Supervisor of Aca- blocks social media sites such as demic Programs at the Asian Studies Facebook and Twitter, the domestic Program Robert Lyons said. Chinese-language network offers an Aside from academic ties, George- uncensored platform. town additionally holds strong com“Neither the Berkley Center’s Weimunity ties with China. Students bo page nor the university’s page has from China make up the largest encountered any issues with censorinternational population at George- ship thus far,” Wulan wrote. town. China also serves as one of the The center has little cause for wortop 10 destinations for student study ry anyway, as its page’s content is far abroad. from controversial. The Georgetown first Berkley Center’s Weibo established its Weibo page first launched page in 2011, becomin order to share a reing one of the first unisource page that the versities in the United center developed on reStates to do so. Associligion in China and the ate Director of InterUnited States. It continnational Initiatives ues to post news links, KAT HARRINGTON Tuoya Wulan is heavily faculty research and Assistant Director, involved in the page’s relevant publications. Asian Studies Program development and conDirector of the Berktinues to work on social media out- ley Center and Vice President for reach in China. Global Engagement professor Thom“Engagement with Chinese social as Banchoff believes Georgetown’s media is to build the university’s location and value system make it an brand in China, to reach out to pro- ideal institutional partner for Chispective and current students, par- nese students and universities, but ents, alumni and other interested the Georgetown community stands visitors and to increase awareness of to learn just as much from China. the student life on campus as well as “There is a lot that Georgetown teaching and research of Georgetown students and faculty can learn about faculty,” Wulan wrote in an email. history, culture, religion, politics, According to School of Foreign Ser- science, business and other topics in vice Asian Studies Program Assistant China. … We look forward to continuDirector Kat Harrington, the connec- ing the two-way flow of students betion augments student learning as tween Georgetown and universities well as the university’s engagement across China,” Banchoff wrote in an with China. email. “Through these social and academThe university is looking to develic initiatives, Georgetown is diversify- op even more Chinese and foreign ing opportunities for its students in- language pages outside of Weibo. terested in China. They provide ‘real Currently, a general university Chiworld’ learning to complement the nese intro page and a Chinese info textbook learning on China,” Har- page for the Master of Science in Forrington wrote in an email. eign Service program exist. The page also provides a space for “A lot can be lost in translation in Georgetown students and alumni to terms of meaning, significance,” Lyshare personal stories. ons said. “I think it’s useful that the The group also fosters connections university’s keeping up with trends among Hoyas abroad. For instance, that are currently going on in China a McDonough School of Business and just because having an insight of alumnus who is a food critic living culture, having experts in the field in Shanghai, reached out to visiting really helps us engage better.”

“Georgetown is diversifying opportunities for its students.”

The Georgetown Program Board’s Spring Kickoff Concert — featuring Big Sean, White Panda and two student DJs, Tate Tucker and Keylow — starts tonight at 10 p.m. in McDonough Arena. The concert is open to the general public, but Georgetown students earn a $15 student discount. The GPB concert will be the kickoff to Big Sean’s college tour, which includes events at the University of Maryland and Pennsylvania State University. Calvin Harris and Wiz Khalifa performed during the last two spring concerts, respectively. The planning process for the concert began in early November when the concert committee received the concert’s official date and budget. “We tried to get Harbin Field, but the only date that we could do it, Relay for Life had already booked the field,” GPB Vice Chair Kevin Phelan (MSB ’16) said. “Between various athletic activities, this was the only weekend available for McDonough Arena.” The committee reached out to a middleman, who presented a list of artists available at the time of the concert. According to Phelan, the committee looked for artists who would be interesting for students and active in the spring. GPB Vice Chair Andrew Minkovitz (SFS ’17) said the board looked into holding the concert at 2 Chainz’s 9:30 Club performance, which was scheduled for two weeks before the GPB concert. However, a clause prevented GPB from having an open concert that allowed attendees other than Georgetown students at the 2 Chainz venue. “We need to sell out to break even, so restricting our attendance would not have been ideal,” Minkovitz said. The committee chose hip-hop artist Big Sean, who released his second studio album “Hall of Fame” in August 2013. Minkovitz also had the idea to reach out to White Panda, an electronic duo that is known for mashups and remixes like “Midnight City.” “I’ve heard a lot of good things about either Big Sean or White Panda,” Minkovitz said. “People are usually interested, if not in one, then the other. I thought White Panda would be good because they’re not a pure electronic act. They’re mashup artists

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Last spring, GPB brought electronic artist Calvin Harris to McDonough Arena. Tonight, Big Sean and White Panda will perform. who deal with hip-hop and other genres as well.” According to Phelan, student interest in the concert is high, although some students are unfamiliar with the performers. “Big Sean would be cool to see, but I hadn’t heard of White Panda until now,” Joshua Davis (COL ’17) said. However, even students who are unfamiliar with the artists are still interested in attending. “I don’t know that many songs by Big Sean, but I know him, and it would be fun,” Jennifer Holloway (COL ’16) said. Others expressed disappointment with ticket costs: $20 for Georgetown students and $35 for non-students. Last year’s concert required a valid GOCard for entry. “We deserve more of a student discount, though, since most concerts with artists like [Big Sean] are $20 anyway,” Davis said. A date conflict with the Diplomatic Ball has also posed problems for GBP during the planning process. “Unfortunately, the date conflict was unavoidable [dependent on the availability of McDonough Gym]. Obviously, we were never planning on having that happen,” Phelan said. “I think I’ve seen people say both ways, that they’re missing Diplomatic Ball for the spring concert and vice versa, and overall, there’s enough interest in

both.” Despite these roadblocks, the concert is almost sold out. “We have some more tickets to sell, but not that many anymore, after this past week,” Minkovitz said. Overall, planning has gone relatively smoothly in light of last year’s challenges. During the fall of 2012, GPB conducted a poll to gauge student interest in prospective artists; the eventual performer, Calvin Harris, was not on the list. “The way we got Calvin Harris was so hectic and last-minute, so we tried to revise things this year,” Phelan said. “Even before we got our budget, we looked at interest within the [GPB] group. By joining, you were able to have a say and express your interest for genre and potential artists.” However, this year’s logistical challenges remain formidable. “We’ve had multiple meetings with a lot of heads of departments going over details that I hadn’t even considered, like where to put DPS, how many porta-potties to place and how to coordinate a potential evacuation,” Phelan said. For those on GPB, the day of the concert will certainly be a long one. “Our day on Friday starts at 7:15 in the morning, and we’ll be volunteering until 4 a.m. on Saturday,” Minkovitz said.

Coca-Cola Endows GHD Chair CHRIS BALTHAZARD Hoya Staff Writer

The Global Human Development program, one of eight master’s programs in the School of Foreign Service, will establish its first endowed chair after receiving a $4 million donation from The CocaCola Foundation, announced April 2. The GHD program, founded in fall 2012, will graduate its first class of 21 this spring. The first occupant of the chair will be Steven Radelet, who is currently Distinguished Professor in the Practice of Development at Georgetown University. Radelet formerly served as Chief Economist for the U.S. Agency for International Development. “[Radelet] will occupy the chair, and he will teach courses primarily in the Global Human Development program. And he’s quite a prolific scholar, so he will also publish,” SFS Acting Dean James ReardonAnderson said. The Coca-Cola Foundation has made a large impact on the SFS over the last 20 years: from supporting minority students in the Master of Science in Foreign Service program to supporting the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy. Anne DeVine (GRD ’14) spent last summer in Istanbul working for various partnerships in development, including Every Drop Matters — a partnership between The Coca-Cola Company and the United Nations Development Programme. “Muhtar Kent, Coca-Cola’s CEO, established the concept of the Golden Triangle, the idea that civil society, government and the private sector need to work together in order to make development initiatives work,” DeVine said. “And I think that resonated with me and I saw that happening on the ground.” DeVine, who spent seven years working with NGOs on education and youth issues, was excited about the newly established GHD chair.

COURTESY GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY

Professor Steven Radelet will serve as the first Coca-Colaendowed Global Human Development chair. “It’s valuable to academia in general, but I think the thing that’s really important about this specific chair is the recognition for the need for this type of program,” DeVine said. The program addresses current global development issues and aims to produce the next generation of policy leaders and activists. ReardonAnderson emphasized Dean Carol Lancaster’s (SFS ’64) role in both the founding of the GHD and the creation of the chair, which will be one of 12 to 15 endowed chairs across the master’s programs in the SFS. “This is entirely Dean Lancaster’s project. She was really the creator of the Global Human Development program,” Reardon-Anderson said of Lancaster, whose resignation was announced this week following a medical leave of absence. “And then she went out and arranged for this very generous gift from The CocaCola Foundation. … So this was really her project from beginning to end and unfortunately she was not there to witness the celebration.” SFS Director of Outreach Gail Griffith, who served as

lead writer on the grant proposal, also credited GHD Director Ann Van Dusen for the program’s overall success. “The persons who deserve all of the credit for the creation of the chair and the establishment of the program in Global Human Development are Dean Carol Lancaster and professor Ann Van Dusen, respectively,” Griffith said. Reardon-Anderson added that the chair will be named for former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations and current Distinguished Professor in the Practice of Diplomacy Donald F. McHenry after his retirement. “Our SFS faculty, Ambassador Donald McHenry, who is on the Coca-Cola Board, was instrumental in shepherding this grant application through to fruition,” Griffith said. “Ambassador McHenry himself donated funds, along with SFS alums Amre Youness (SFS ’84) and Caroline HeinzYouness (SFS ’84), to complement the monies needed to establish the chair.” Youness and Heinz-Youness also serve as members of the Campaign for Georgetown Executive Council.


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New SFS Dean for Fall 2015 LANCASTER, from A1 International Development. At Georgetown, she served as a professor of politics, the director of the African Studies Program, the director of the Master of Foreign Service Program and the director of the Mortara Center for International Studies, before assuming the deanship in 2010, after serving as interim dean the previous year. During her tenure, Lancaster oversaw the addition of the Global Human Development and Asian Studies masters programs, as well as the establishment of the Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security. “She’s just been a huge asset to the university,” Reardon-Anderson said. “She’s really served the school and the university in many different ways.” The SFS Dean’s Office spear-

headed a drive for well wishes in December, following Lancaster’s surgery, with a digital card. In his email, DeGioia thanked Lancaster for her service and anticipated her return. Provost Robert Groves also expressed admiration for Lancaster. “When I arrived at Georgetown last year as a new provost, Carol Lancaster welcomed me with genuine support. Over the early weeks, I learned how devoted she was to building a strong SFS and how committed she was to Georgetown,” Groves wrote in an email. “I look forward to her return as a colleague and thank her for her service.” Similarly, BMW Center for German and European Studies Director and SFS Faculty Chair Jeffrey Anderson described Lancaster’s commitment to the school. “I started as Faculty Chair this past summer, so I was able to work

with her closely, and I’ve known her for over a decade. It has always been a pleasure and honor to work with Carol, and she did the impossible, balancing the needs of the provosts above her and the faculty under her charge,” Anderson said. “Her vision as a leader to build upon our solid foundations at SFS, and her ability to resist the temptation to start from scratch was very impressive.” SFS Academic Council President Kyle Zhu (SFS ’14) highlighted his appreciation for Lancaster’s dedication to students. “Dean Lancaster was really caring about finding out the student perspective on a lot of issues and she was really proactive in making sure she got basically the full support of the vote of students. With Dean Lancaster, we built a really good relationship between the Academic Council and the Dean’s Office,” Zhu said.

at 2 p.m. in Lafayette Square, is sponsored by Trabajadores Unidos in partnership with the National Day Labor Organizing Network, the D.C. Immigration Coalition and the Virginia Coalition of Latino Organizations. A national coalition of immigrant laborers, Trabajadores Unidos developed the slogan, “Not One More Deportation” for the rally. According to NDLON Campaign Coordinator Salvador Sarmiento, supporters of the rally are asking Obama to use his executive authority to cease deportations. The NDLON assembled a list of six things that Obama could do without Congressional approval to reduce deportations including expanding the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Act and ending Operation Streamline in which groups migrants are sentenced before judges in border states such as Arizona in a matter of minutes. “We’ve been very vocal about the very misguided programs that have created a deportation machine to basically round up immigrant workers,” Sarmiento said. Last year, Obama took executive action to allow young immigrants brought to the United States illegally as children to apply for work permits and avoid deportation. However, the program, entitled Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, does not alter the immigrants’ status or provide a path to citizenship. The protesters are calling for an expansion of the executive order to include adults with no criminal history and strong ties to the United States. “Trying to navigate that balance between maintaining the legal things that you have set up in so-

ciety and also acknowledging the human aspect is important,” Sepp said. Protesters are also calling for Obama to end the Secure Communities program which disseminates informations about individuals’ immigration status when they are fingerprinted in a local prison, because, rather than upholding its original goal of deporting criminals, the program is currently used as a general deportation facilitation tool. “I think this is an ongoing conversation,” Sarmiento said. “Immigrants have really put themselves out there, sometimes risking their livelihoods and their well-being, by telling their stories and by committing acts of civil disobedience to stop deportation.” Sepp, who co-led an Alternative Spring Break Border Awareness trip to the Mexican border in El Paso, Texas this year, stressed the need for face-to-face interaction in bringing about reform and the power of conducting the march in the nation’s capital. “You get this face-to-face interaction with people that really brings home the human dimension, which is something that was lost a lot in the national debate about immigration reform,” Sepp said. “Especially in D.C., we have a lot of social capital and the opportunities to bring more attention to the issue.” According to Fleming, Georgetown is a strong proponent of immigration reform legislation and the Dream Act, which has the potential to affect students on campus. “We are very much involved in the immigration debate more broadly,” Fleming said. “[University President John J. DeGioia] has weighed in on several occasions, some of them going back many years at this point, in support of comprehensive immigration reform and in support in particular of changes that relate to the Dream Act.” Although comprehensive immigration reform is unlikely to pass in the House this year, Georgetown’s participation in the rally has increased student interest in taking a more active role in the conversation on immigration reform. “We are happy to see that there is a lot of interest and support coming from Georgetown students and faculty,” Sarmiento said. Alvarez echoed Sarmiento’s thoughts, emphasizing the prescient nature of Saturday’s march for Georgetown’s immigrant community. “Our communities, our families cannot wait,” Alvarez said. “This issue may seem miles away on the Hilltop, but it directly affects the lives of immigrant Hoyas.”

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Councilmember Muriel Bowser (D-Ward 4) will face off in the November general election after handily winning the Democratic mayoral primary Tuesday.

With 44.2% of Vote, Students Rally on Immigration Bowser Takes Primary IMMIGRATION, from A1 Since taking office in 2009, President Obama’s administration has deported 1.5 million undocumented immigrants, the highest during any presidential term. Every day, approximately 30,000 individuals are held in the U.S. immigration detention system, the largest in the world. Associate Vice President for Federal Government Relations Scott Fleming (SFS ’72) noted that the displeasure leveled at the White House for its stance on immigration has not fallen on deaf ears. “The issue of deportations is very much on the White House’s mind,” Fleming said. “It has been raised to the White House by Hispanic leaders, who represent various Hispanic organizations, and also by members of the Congressional Hispanic caucus.” While members of Hoyas for Immigrant Rights organized and attended a similar march in October to call on the House of Representatives to take action on immigration reform, according to Sophia Sepp (SFS ’14), a student coordinator for the Day Laborer Exchange at Georgetown’s Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and Working Poor, the march Saturday more directly targets the administration’s immigration policy. “There is a lot of discontent because the platform that he ran on was that he was going to fix the immigration system, and now he is the most hawkish,” Sepp said. “A lot of the debate in Congress also is about national security and needing to enforce the laws that we have.” The rally, which will take place

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Students will lead a march from campus to Lafayette Square Saturday as part of the #2Million2Many immigration reform rally.

BOWSER, from A1

disparate eight wards. “All eight wards is not a slogan. We’ve tried to demonstrate that physically by where we chose to have our election night rally [at Imagine Southeast Public Charter School in Ward 8] and where we chose to open campaign offices. We’ll be out there again before the general, in all eight wards across the city, knocking on doors and listening to voters. It will be a focus on the entire city, and that’s also how Muriel intends to govern, and I think that’s the most important thing,” Bowser’s campaign manager, Bo Shuff, said. Shuff attributed the support for Bowser’s campaign to her clear vision for D.C., including more efficient school reform, increased vocational training and stronger protection for the middle class, as well as honesty in government. “I think other candidates’ supporters realized that they had far more in common with Muriel than they did with Mayor Gray and wanted to see those types of changes and reforms brought to city hall,” Shuff said. In his concession speech, Gray praised the work he and his staff have done over his 3 1/4 years as mayor, a period viewed as a continuation of the robust — albeit uneven — economic progress the District has seen over the past decade. In an attempt to fulfill his promise to bring more jobs, housing and shopping into struggling areas of D.C., Gray successfully pushed Wal-Mart to agree to open a fifth store in southeast D.C. in Skyland Shopping Center. Additionally, Gray actively encouraged real estate deals and promotions involving technology, higher education and healthcare in more underdeveloped areas of the District. “I think the work that we have done over the last 3 1/4 years has been nothing short of phenomenal,” Gray told a small crowd of loyal supporters during his concession speech Tuesday evening. However, new construction has come with high price tags, including an $8.3 million food pavilion on the grounds of the former St. Elizabeth’s hospital in southeast D.C. The pavilion, designed for the nearly 4,000 U.S. Coast Guard employees who work across the street, has ended up going $3 million over its original budget. For Gray’s supporters, the disappointment was palpable. Much of his campaign was run under a cloud of suspicion stemming from the federal investigation in his 2010 campaign, in which he allegedly received illegal campaign contributions in order to fund a “shadow campaign” to smear his opponents, including then-Mayor Adrian Fenty, whom Gray eventually defeated. While Gray was able to hold a steady lead in the polls, his campaign was dealt a heavy blow March 10 when Ronald Machen, the U.S. attorney investigating Gray’s 2010 campaign, held a press conference announcing the guilty plea of Jeffrey Thompson, the man who claims

he met with Gray prior to the race and agreed to funnel money illegally into his campaign. One of Gray’s most prominent supporters, Councilmember and former Mayor Marion Barry (D-Ward 8), summed up what seems to be the sentiment among many of Gray’s supporters. “Ron Machen decided this election,” Barry tweeted on Election Day as it became clear that Gray would not be reelected. What follows is yet another period of uncertainty, as Gray finishes out the last nine months of his term still facing the possibility of a federal indictment. If indicted, Gray has made it clear he will fight all charges against him to clear his name of any wrongdoing. “I will see this through,” Gray said in one of the campaign’s most heated debates Feb. 26. For Bowser, who fought criticism that she was inexperienced and lacked the knowledge to manage a city of D.C.’s size throughout the race, the next seven months will likely be spent shoring up Democratic support for the November general election against longtime Councilman David Catania (I-At Large) (SFS’ 90, LAW ’94). Based on the District’s electoral history, Catania, a white, gay ex-Republican would normally be considered at least a long shot, but with four citywide electoral victories under his belt, Catania has demonstrated that he is not a candidate to be taken lightly. But Catania, a member of the D.C. Council since 1997, has a long way to go before he has any chance of besting Bowser, who will likely have the full resources of the Democratic Party in the District behind her. Recent polls by The Washington Post have Bowser up by more than 30 points in a head-to-head matchup against Catania. Georgetown University Student Association Undersecretary for D.C. Relations Olivia Hinerfeld (SFS ’17) expressed her frustration with the candidates’ lack of outreach to the student voting population. “We are a huge voting block, and with the possibility of same-day registration, there is no reason why students shouldn’t be targeted by campaign efforts. To my knowledge, very few students voted. I don’t think many students even knew there was an election going on,” Hinerfeld said. “Come November, it will be important to try to gauge student interest with the election as these policies will directly affect us.” GUSA President Trevor Tezel (SFS ’15), a former president of the College Democrats, hoped that Bowser would engage with the university if elected the District’s next mayor. “While Muriel Bowser has not returned repeated requests to speak at Georgetown University, we hope that, if elected, her term as mayor brings a new attitude toward student engagement in District politics,” Tezel said.

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NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 2014

THE HOYA

A7

Democrats Boast Ball Ups Diplomat Quotient Strong Youth Support Laura Owsiany Hoya Staff Writer

Ashley Miller Hoya Staff Writer

The generalization of colleges as being bastions of liberalism is a stereotype that’s here to stay at 37th and O streets. A March 28 Gallup poll indicated a growth in youth identifying an affinity for the Democratic Party, currently resting at 53 percent. The Democratic Party’s attraction to students is no novelty, with Georgetown boasting a robust presence of college Democrats. But with the stuttered rollout of the Affordable Care Act’s and President Obama’s apparent mishandling of environmental issues, the poll flies in the face of critics claiming that Democrats are losing touch with their largest demographic: young voters. By the measure of emails sent out to interested students, the College Democrats, which sent out emails to over 2,000 students, is the largest group on ALEXANDER BROWN/THE HOYA campus. The group also over 100 leadership positions. In comparison, the GUCR and GUCD attract promiCollege Republicans’ Listserv numbers nent speakers like Dennis Hastert. around 1,000 students. According to the College Demo- grow, but across campus it will be crats, the size of these groups reflects more common to run into conservathe overall political alignment of tives,” McNaughton said. Georgetown students. For both groups, size causes difficul“I think the fact that we do have the ties. For example, the large size of the largest group on campus does tell a Democrats leads to some difficulties in lot about where people’s political be- keeping a close-knit atmosphere. liefs lie,” College Democrats Treasurer “Our big issue in the club is just Anirudha Vaddadi (SFS ’16) said. making sure that we can connect all College Republicans members attri- our members in a way that makes it bute the discrepancy in popularity to feel like a community,” Jha said. “A the character of a university. byproduct of our success is that we “I think by nature, universities are want to have the community feel of a liberal institutions. … That’s been a smaller club.” trend forever, as long as I know of. It College Democrats are also careful doesn’t surprise me in that way that about not speaking for their diverse Georgetown is liberal,” College Repub- and large group. licans Vice-Chair Abbey McNaughton “We don’t want to speak for all of (COL ’16) said. “In general, I think our members, given that we are such the university as an institution often a big club, so that’s something that times has a liberal population, wheth- we are very aware of and try to be er that’s undergraduates, graduates, careful of,” Jha said. professors.” For the College According to Republicans, the McNaughton, the small size of their university’s Jesuit group does not reidentity additionstrict their liberty ally adds to its in programming perceived liberal and presenting atmosphere. their views. “I would say “I don’t think PATRICK MUSGRAVE (COL ’16) that, if anything, there’s any subCollege Republicans Chair Georgetown being stantial inequality Jesuit — not specifically Catholic, just in terms of what we are able to proJesuit — has an influence just because gram for or in terms of being able to of the Jesuit focus on social justice is- hold enough events,” McNaughton sues that often steer people more to said. the left,” McNaughton said. However, as the smaller group, ColHowever, according to College Dem- lege Republicans face more voices ocrats Chair Chandini Jha (COL ’16), ready to challenge their policies. this perceived liberal atmosphere is “I think maybe there’s more outbecause of progressive ideas that align spoken disagreement with some of with changing social values among our policies with the Republican students. Party on campus, but it doesn’t affect “I think the issue really is just the my engagement in the organization,” social construction of things like mar- McNaughton said. riage equality and women’s rights Students did seem to identify a lean that attract more people to the Demo- toward the left among the student crats as being the more progressive body. party on those issues,” Jha said. “I think the College Democrats are Although College Republicans rec- probably more present on campus ognize the predominance of liberals just because I feel like the student on campus, members see a potential body itself is composed of more libershift in the campus’s alignment. al leaning students,” Joey Shive (COL “I think that college students on ’17) said. “College students are very fomargin will always trend toward the cused on social atmosphere, and I feel more liberal persuasion; however I that liberals tend to put that out there expect there to be a resurgence in a lot more so it’s just a very activist atyoung conservatism in the next few mosphere and a lot of those people years, as we see the effects of the cur- are fighting for, it’s not necessarily a rent administration,” College Republi- financial perspective, it’s more like a cans Chair Patrick Musgrave (COL ’16) social opinion.” wrote in an email. Thomas Massad (COL ’17) conMcNaughton additionally felt that curred, attributing this appearance to the effects of current political occur- marketing. rences may shift political alignment “I feel the College Democrats in the future. more on campus through the “When implications of Obamacare means of social media and through and the Social Security structure that the means of more extensive flyeris going to hurt our age group the ing around campus, and in that most right now, I think that when way they are more visible to me in those realities start to hit in, certainly my day-to-day activity,” Massad said. the young republicans will definitely “We have such a young population expand,” McNaughton said. and I think peoples’ political views However, if the political alignment are more outwardly expressed and of members on campus grows in the I see in my day-to-day interactions future, College Republicans do not with other people and day-to day necessarily feel the size of the group activity around campus, generally would accurately reflect the conserva- more liberal outspoken viewpoints tive presence on campus. as opposed to outspoken conserva“Maybe our particular group won’t tive viewpoints.”

“I expect there to be a resurgence in young conservatism.”

The School of Foreign Service’s 89th Annual Diplomatic Ball, held tonight at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, has resurrected old traditions and is also seeking to establish new ones. As the 90th Diplomatic Ball and the School of Foreign Service centennial approach in the coming years, the 2014 Dip Ball Planning Committee Co-Chairs Victoire Carrasco (SFS ’15) and Isobel Blakeway-Phillips (SFS ’16) decided to go through university archives to bring back old traditions in a fresh way. “Georgetown is a great place to do innovative things, to do innovative projects, to set up student groups, but what we like and what we’re trying to bring back is the fact that Georgetown also has a great history,” Carrasco said. Most notably, the committee revived the turtle hunt, where wooden turtles with a voucher for subsidized ball tickets around their necks are hidden around campus for lucky students to discover. “It was kind of a way to include campus also,” Carrasco said. “We found an ad in one of the archives and so we thought we’d change it up a bit and do something different.” Turtle finders posted photos to the Georgetown University Diplomatic Ball Facebook page, where other archived material, including news clippings dating back 50 years, has been posted in the past few weeks. Mixing the old with the new, the committee changed up the guest list with help from the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy. The ISD worked with the committee to invite mid-level foreign service officers and other professionals in the fields of international relations and government to encourage more interaction between students and professionals. “We thought that inviting mid-

level officials or professionals would be a good chance for students to actually get that real networking opportunity because sometimes with the older diplomats it’s a bit hard,” Carrasco said. Many aspects of the ball, however, remain unchanged. Tickets for the event are, as is typical, sold out. Over 750 Georgetown students, State Department workers, professors and diplomats will attend. This year’s diplomats hail from 45 different countries, including Ukraine, Afghanistan, Egypt and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The Corcoran offers a venue appropriate for the specific capacity, financial needs and excitement of Dip Ball, according to SFS Special Programs Assistant Benjamin Zimmerman. “Venue decisions come largely down to availability first, then size to accommodate enough guests for us to cover our costs — this is a nonprofit venture — and then the factor of the most exciting venue for the guests comes into play,” Zimmerman said. Some galleries will be open for viewing the night of the ball, including “Loop,” by Jennifer Steinkamp and Jimmy Johnson, an installation at the gallery until April 20. The event traditionally draws high attendance from SFS and College students, while numbers from the School of Nursing and Health Studies and the McDonough School of Business lag. Similar demographics are expected this year, which Carrasco says is common sense. “Yes, it’s mainly SFS and College because we do invite diplomats. … So, it’s a big party, everyone dresses up, it’s a formal, but it’s also a chance to network,” Carrasco said. “People who want to come usually find a way of coming, so we don’t feel the need to kind of greatly go about diversifying. I think we always try to make it a campus-wide event.” However, students may be de-

COURTESY GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY

The Diplomatic Ball will return for its 89th year tonight. terred by the high price tag of the nonprofit ball. Anna Stone (COL ’15) has attended Dip Ball since her freshman year, but only gratis courtesy of her boyfriend’s involvement in the SFS Academic Council. She says having to pay full price for tickets would definitely deter her. “Especially because Dip Ball happens so close to Senior Ball, and a lot of seniors go to Dip Ball, you’re buying basically two $100 tickets. … Especially when you think about girls, they don’t want to wear the same dress twice,” Stone said. Though Dip Ball may face challenges such as a high price tag and competition with attendees to the Spring Kickoff Concert, which is being held on campus the same night, it certainly isn’t a Georgetown tradition that is going anywhere. “The Diplomatic Ball is a great chance to network. You go, it’s very formal, but at the same time it’s informal. You get to meet people that you wouldn’t normally meet,” Carrasco said.

Rideshare Services Spark Controversy UBER, from A1 “We see it’s a gigantic public safety problem, so we’ve really ramped up in the beginning of this year,” Sutton said. Uber, based in San Francisco, is popular with college students and other young people for its convenience. Users can request a black car, taxi or UberX driver’s personal car using the app on their smartphone. The service also automatically charges a user’s credit card — an extra point of convenience before D.C. taxis added credit card readers to all cabs earlier this year. “I would suspect that the majority of those people that use those services are probably 40 and below, with the sweet spot being twenties and thirties, whereas old people who may not be as prone to use smart phones or that sort of technology,” D.C. Taxi Cab Commission Spokesman Neville Waters said. Uber East Coast Regional Manager Rachel Holt agreed, adding that Uber’s lower prices add to its appeal for students. “UberX, the low-cost option, is approximately 20 percent cheaper than a taxi in D.C. It’s a great option for students on a budget,” Holt said. However, in light of recent reports against Uber drivers, Sutton warned against the use of Uber drivers, especially for young people at night. “You wander out into a Georgetown street — don’t make your life any more dangerous by getting taking an Uber or an UberX, at least not until they have complied with safety,” Sutton said. In a recent article in The Daily Beast, journalist Olivia Nuzzi shared her story of being sexually harassed by an Uber driver in September 2013. According to Nuzzi’s report, the driver had taken a picture of her on the street, and when

she rated him negatively using the service’s feedback mechanism, the driver, who had access to her full name, reached out to her at her place of employment and sent a message to her friend on Facebook that said, “Is she single lol.” In March 2013, a 20-year-old woman accused her Uber driver of rape, but charges were dropped a month later, and in November 2013, a man claimed that his Uber driver had physically and verbally abused him. “Not only does the driver have your name, but sometimes … they’ve got your cell phone number through texting, and they know where you live,” Sutton warned. “They have interesting technology and a really cool website, but they are not safe, and that’s the one thing that we’re really trying get the message out to young people,” As a major component of the campaign, the TLPA created a website for Uber users to share concerns and past experiences with ridesharing companies. The D.C. Taxi Commission will hold a hearing April 9 regarding the lack of regulations on various ridesharing companies in the interest of public safety. “I am aware that there has been an increasing amount of attention on the issue of insurance and safety, and as I said, our overriding responsibility is to try to ensure public safety and consumer protection,” Waters said. The D.C. Council had previously passed legislation that would allow such services to operate through January 2014. After several cancelled meetings throughout January and February, the Council will now reconvene to more clearly define these services. “Right now I would say that there is a gray area in terms of their operation. Our interpretation is that any vehicle or any unlicensed driv-

er is subject to enforcement acts. We are not targeting any specific company, but our hack inspectors are responsible — one of their duties is to identify any unlicensed or illegal vehicles that are engaging in picking up and transporting passengers,” Waters said. The DCTC has assembled a panel that is currently in the process of drafting proposed regulations that will require certain commercial insurance requirements as well as inventory reports of drivers and vehicles. “Essentially the proposed regulations would create a framework for what we are referring to as the private sedan service to be able to operate legally in this market. And while it’s still a week away from the proposed regulations, it’s likely that they will include many of the recommendations from our panel,” Waters said. “Our main concern would be consumer protection and public safety.” In response to the Who’s Driving You? initiative, Uber launched “I’m Driving You,” a website gathering personal testimonies from Uber drivers explaining why they decided to drive for Uber. In addition to the “I’m Driving You” campaign, Uber also broadened its insurance policy to cover accidents that occur at any time while the driver is logged into the Uber system as of March 2014. In February, Uber announced it expanded driver background checks. Natalia Montalvo, an Uber communications and public policy representative, responded to request for comment about the company’s initiative. “Uber connects riders to the best transportation providers to deliver safe, reliable and comfortable rides,” Montalvo said. Hoya Staff Writer Ryan Thomas contributed reporting.

Debate Captains Take Home 2nd Title Kit Clemente Hoya Staff Writer

Georgetown University Debate Team captains Andrew Markoff (SFS ’14) and Andrew Arsht (COL ’14) won their second national debate championship title at the University of Indiana Bloomington on April 1. After a long tournament that began on March 28, Markoff and Arsht were notified of their win at 2:30 a.m. “The first person I see is [Arsht] and just the smile on his face, and then all of our teammates were gathered there right behind us, kind of tackle us, and everyone is celebrating,” Markoff said. “It’s just euphoria because of just how hard we’ve worked and how much it takes to get to that point.” Coach Jonathan Paul also expressed pride in the win. “I was just completely elated. I was

proud of everyone on the team and coaching staff that worked so hard. I was just immensely excited for [them] that they were able to win their last debate and leave the debate team and Georgetown on top,” Paul said. To qualify for one of the tournament’s 80 spots, a partnership had to be ranked in the national top 16 teams, win regional debates or be directly offered a spot. In addition to Markoff and Arsht, the pair of Andy McCoy (SFS ’16) and Tyler Engler (SFS ’15) also qualified. Markoff and Arsht are ranked third in the nation, while McCoy and Engler are ranked 12th. Going into the tournament, Georgetown overall ranked as the 10th best team. This year’s National Debate Tournament topic was the reduction of presidential powers. The debaters said that this year’s topic proved especially difficult because of its contentious legal

nature. “The core question of the topic was about legal authority, but the vast majority of the literature wasn’t really about who has control over something like drone strikes — legally. It was more just ‘Are drone strikes good or bad,’” McCoy said. “It was really challenging, but it was good to force a very technical debate over a tough legal issue.” Markoff and Arsht also won the championship title in 2012; together, the pair holds more championships than all but eight out of the 286 schools that attended the National Debate Tournament. Despite their previous win, however, Markoff and Arsht placed third in last year’s tournament. “They won a national championship as sophomores, and it happened so fast and was so surreal — it was such a fairytale — that we kind of walked away with it with this unnatural un-

derstanding of how hard it was,” Assistant Coach Seth Gannon said. “Last year, they were even better at debate, and they were working so hard and yet didn’t win.” According to Paul, Markoff and Arsht’s hard work, recruitment and mentorship strengthened the team to its current position as one of the nation’s top debate teams. “They set the tone for other people on the team with their hard work, their preparation, and we had a great deal of success their first year,” Paul said. “It helped us a lot with recruiting good high school debaters to come to Georgetown and debate.” Gannon agreed and praised their teamwork. “They are a finely tuned machine. They kind of read one another’s minds, [and] they work together hardly having to talk,” Gannon said.


A8

SPORTS

THE HOYA

FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 2014

DOWN TO THE WIRE

NHL Point System Needs Fixing I

n the NHL, a team is awarded two points for a regulation, overtime or shootout win. Meanwhile, a team receives zero points for a loss in regulation, but receives one point — the “loser point” — if they lose in overtime or a shootout. Many hockey fans take issue with this point structure, others also have a problem with the shootout itself and believe it is a gimmick and not actual hockey. The winning team has always received two points for a win, but prior to the 19992000 season a team did not receive a point for an overtime loss. There were ties back then, however, in such games both teams would receive a point. This system was similar to the NFL’s current system, because a tie essentially earns “half” of a win while an overtime win or loss is the same as a regulation win or loss. The NHL introduced the loser point to stop teams from playing for ties once a game reached overtime. Prior to it, teams would rather walk away with the tie points than play a more riskaverse style of hockey, lose and receive no points. The NHL, however, underwent drastic changes after the 2005 lockout. The tie was eliminated and thus the loser point changed as well. If a game was tied after overtime,

the winner would be decided scrap the shootout and go with a shootout. Casual fans back to the days where there welcomed this addition be- were ties and a loser point. cause of its perceived excite- Others say that we should go ment. Diehard fans, how- back to the days where there ever, felt that a game should were ties but no loser point. not end on something other Some say keep the shootout, than a “hockey play” and but abolish the loser point. ending a hockey game on This would award two points a series of penalty shots is for a three-shooter shootout, which would akin to deinject even ciding a basmore ranketball game domness into solely on free the standings throws. than there alEven to the ready is. shootout’s Or, we biggest supcould change porters, it Tom Hoff the scoring does seem system in the strange that a The NHL should NHL. Many win that ends fans do not in regulation is worth adopt the Olympics’ realize this, but T.J. Oshie the same to point system. didn’t actua team as a ally provide win that ends in the shootout. It can be Team USA with a true win incredibly exciting, as the in the instant classic of a USA-Russia Olympic game shootout against Russia. In showed a month and a half the Olympics, a regulation ago. But is it relevant in an win is worth three points, an actual hockey game? After overtime or shootout win is all, NHL playoff games end worth two, an overtime loss with multiple sudden death is worth one and a regulaovertimes until a winner tion loss is worth zero. This is the system that the emerges. The fact that the shootout is not employed NHL needs to adopt. While the shootout is really just a there proves its flaws. There are numerous pro- gimmick and does have tons posals to fix the end of hock- of flaws, going back to ties ey games, and just about ev- would be problematic in the ery fan has a different one. NHL. Casual fans, and espeSome say that we should cially casual American fans,

WOMEN’S LACROSSE

don’t seem to like ties in any sport. Can you ever remember a fan saying, “I really like ties!” after a tie in the NFL? Me neither. It also seems to me that ties are part of the reason that soccer has not taken off in this country, and the NHL should and probably does notice that. Because of the shootout’s sheer excitement, it’s a great way to continue to bring in casual fans, which is the only way that the sport will keep growing. However, a shootout win should not, by any means, be equal to a regulation win. No game that ends in an individual skills competition should even be compared with one that ends in regulation, and the point totals for these kinds of wins should reflect that difference. By the same token, it doesn’t make sense to punish a team that made it through regulation, the focal point of a game, with an even score by awarding them the same point total as a team that didn’t reach overtime. A team that makes it to overtime but loses afterwards should receive one point, the same way that Team Russia did after T.J. Oshie’s performance of a lifetime. Tom Hoff is a junior in the McDonough School of Business. DOWN TO THE WIRE appears every Friday.

SOFTBALL

FILE PHOTO: ALEXANDER BROWN/THE HOYA

Senior midfielder Kelyn Freedman scored three goals in Georgetown’s 8-6 loss to Pennsylvania.

Penn Loss Extends Slide To 6 Straight

QUAKERS, from A10

ERIN NAPIER/THE HOYA

In Georgetown’s 7-1 win over Cornell, senior outfielder Elyse Graziano (top) went 3-4, senior first baseman Madeleine Giaquinto (left) went 1-4 and sophomore catcher Molly Morrison (right) went 1-3. The Hoyas take on St. John’s this weekend.

Red Storm Present Next Challenge CORNELL, from A10 in the second game of the doubleheader. Georgetown committed an error in the top of the first that allowed Cornell to score two unearned runs, and the Hoyas never recovered. Cornell junior catcher Sophie Giaquinto hit a tworun homerun in the third inning and drove in another two runs with her single in the seventh. She finished the game with two hits, a run and five RBIs. Cornell senior pitcher Alyson Onyon went the distance for the complete game shutout, scattering three hits over seven innings and striking out 10. Senior pitcher Megan Hyson started for the Hoyas, but after the two unearned runs in the first inning, gave

up four earned runs to take the loss, although she recorded nine strikeouts. “I think the biggest difference from game one to game two against Cornell was their pitcher,” Conlan said. “She threw a fantastic game and kept our bats silent. We couldn’t get anything going offensively.” Georgetown will not have much time to recover after its first loss since March 9 as it faces St. John’s this weekend in its third Big East series of the season. St. John’s (15-17, 1-4 Big East) got its first conference win of the season against Butler last weekend when senior first baseman Jackie Reed went 4-6 with a homerun and four RBIs in two games. St. John’s junior catcher

and shortstop Erin Burner earned a spot on the Big East Weekly Honor Roll for her three-hit, three-run and fiveRBI outing against Iona, in which she hit two homeruns. “St. John’s has a strong team, but we won’t change anything we are doing to prepare for them,” Conlan said. “We will continue to work hard in all aspects of the game and get better at what we do. That’s the best kind of preparation.” But the Hoyas’ Hyson took the top honor, being named Big East Player of the Week after her performance against Creighton last weekend. She earned two wins and recorded 23 strikeouts over two games as well as going 5-9 with a homerun in the series. She currently sports a .402 batting average

and leads the team with 22 RBI. Georgetown, DePaul and Seton Hall are the only remaining undefeated teams in the Big East play. The Hoyas currently sit atop the Big East with six conference wins. “Every game is a big one — especially conference games,” Conlan said. “I am sure other teams are looking at our conference record and will target us.” But she is not too worried about how her team will react or how they will attempt to continue their Big East winning streak. “There’s no pressure,” she said. “We have a long season ahead of us still, and all I ask our team to do is go out, have fun and play the way they are capable of playing.”

led to a goal by freshman attack Colleen Lovett to give the Hoyas the 3-2 lead. With less than three minutes remaining in the half, DeSimone scored another goal for Penn on a play the Quakers controlled from start to finish. It looked as though the teams would enter the locker room tied at three apiece, but Freedman found the back of the net with five seconds left in the period. Her 18th goal of the season gave Georgetown the 4-3 lead at halftime. “We had a little change in tactics [in the first half], packing it in a little bit more and trying to protect the middle, and we were successful,” Head Coach Ricky Fried said. “I think it took a while for [Penn] to get used to what we were doing because it was probably a little different from what they’ve seen, and so when we didn’t give up shots, we were able to get the saves that we wanted.” Penn, however, made halftime adjustments and began the second period by scoring five consecutive goals within the first 15 minutes of the game. Although the half began with Georgetown receiving two free-position shots, it was unable to convert on either opportunity. “On our first possession, I thought we had four or five quality shots, one hit the pipe and three were saved by the goalie,” Fried said. The Quakers’ third clear was successful and resulted in a shot on goal. Though Georgetown freshman goalkeeper Maddy Fisher saved the initial shot, the rebound was recovered by the Quakers and deposited in the back of the net, tying the game at four apiece. Less than a minute later, Penn notched another point off a quick play after the draw to make it 5-4. The Quakers then scored their next two goals in the next four minutes. They secured both draw controls and connected fast passes to make their way down the field. An unusual turnover by Fisher resulted in Penn’s fifth consecutive goal, and although the run stopped there, the four-goal deficit proved to be too large for the Hoyas to overcome. “On their first four shots [of the second half], they made three of them,” Fried said. “That became the big difference in the game.” With the clock ticking down, the Hoyas looked to their offense to provide the spark that the team desperately needed. A draw control from senior attack Reilly Woodman started the play that ended in Farrell’s second goal, which was assisted by sophomore attack Corinne Etchison. Georgetown’s next goal came on an impressive individual effort from Freedman in which she won the draw, caused a turnover and finally scored on a free-position shot to make it 8-6. That score would serve as the final. Georgetown once again won the majority of stats, including total shots, ground balls and free-position shots. Fisher had four saves and took the loss in goal for the Hoyas. Despite allowing eight goals, the freshman successfully cleared the ball 9-of-10 times out of the cage. It was Georgetown’s last nonconference game of the season, and although the season has not gone the way the Hoyas had hoped, the team must now turn its attention to Big East play, starting with Saturday’s matchup against Marquette (5-5, 1-0 Big East). The Golden Eagles have several players who are capable of causing trouble, most notably sophomore attack Claire Costanza. The sophomore was named the Big East Offensive Player of the Week after her efforts in the team’s first-ever conference win over Cincinnati last week. Costanza had four goals in the game and three assists for a total of seven points.


sports

friDAY, april 4, 2014

tennis

Depleted GU Welcomes Xavier Hoya Staff Writer

FILE PHOTO: ALEXANDER BROWN/THE HOYA

Junior John Brosens is 8-6 in singles play this season. Georgetown plays Xavier this weekend in its first Big East match of the year.

Hoyas Set to Take On Conference Foes Hoya Staff Writer

With only a few short weeks until the Big East tournament, the Georgetown men’s and women’s tennis teams will face conference matchups versus the Xavier Musketeers (9-9, 0-2 Big East) and the Seton Hall Pirates (10-6, 2-1 Big East) on Friday at home. The men (6-8) face Xavier after their first win since late February. The dominant 6-1 victory over Mary Washington ended Georgetown’s five-match losing streak after falling to the Yale, Bryant and UC Santa Barbara, among others over the past few weeks. Although Mary Washington is a Division III program, the match still helped prepare the team for more competitive matchups going forward. “We had to play a match where we were the heavy favorite, and they put together a competitive group. We played with all the pressure, and I think we handled that well,” Head Coach Gordie Ernst said. The Hoyas will look to build upon this momentum in their first conference match of the year against the Musketeers, according to Ernst. “Winning is a contagious, learned habit, so if we can build on winning there then that’ll make the guys more confident when we play basically an even team. It’s a big match so I think it’ll help,” Ernst said. On the same day, the women (7-8, 1-2 Big East) will face Seton Hall. The Hoyas look to bring their regular season record and their conference record to an even .500. Although the Blue and Gray dominated the Providence Friars (4-10, 0-3 Big East) last week in a 7-0 sweep, they struggled against St. John’s (7-6, 2-0

Big East) and No. 25 DePaul (17-1, 2-0 Big East) earlier in the year. Seton Hall has fared moderately well in the Big East this season, defeating Providence and Villanova, but it also fell to DePaul. Last year the Hoyas edged out the Pirates in a 5-2 decision. “We always have competitive matches with them. Last year it was very close. So far this is the biggest match of the season for the girls,” Ernst said. Freshman Victoire Saperstein will look to improve her 5-2 record in the first singles slot. Senior co-captain Madeline Jaeger has won three matches in a row at number three singles after defeating Rachel Nelson of James Madison last weekend. Freshman Sophia Barnard has won six of her last seven matches, the majority of which she competed in the fourth slot for the Hoyas. Though singles performances have been strong, the Hoyas’ doubles game needs focus and improvement going into the latter stages of the season. Ernst mentioned the importance of knowing doubles strategy and utilizing it in a variety of situations. “It’s about repetition, so they just sort of memorize where to go at certain times,” Ernst said. “At the same time, play a little more relaxed out there. They’re so seasoned at this point, and we’re pretty confident right now.” As a new member of the Big East, Xavier represents an unfamiliar opponent for the men’s team. In contrast, Seton Hall will be a familiar foe for the women’s side. “It’s two big matches for Friday,” Ernst said. The matches are set to take place on Georgetown’s McDonough courts beginning at 12:00 p.m. Friday.

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After a mixed half season of nonconference play featuring bursts of wins and losses that ultimately led the team to a record just under the .500 mark, the Georgetown baseball team (12-13) will now turn its attention to the Big East Conference. The reworking of the conference adds several new opponents to the Hoyas’ slate, including the first team they will face: the Xavier Musketeers (13-13). Despite some struggles earlier in the season, the Hoyas will enter a three-game home series with the Musketeers Friday after stringing together some much-needed success over the past week. The Hoyas have won three of their last four, including two road wins against Grambling State in Louisiana and a win against crosstown rival George Washington earlier in the week. These wins have contributed to positive sentiments in the dugout. “I think we’re feeling pretty good,” Head Coach Pete Wilk said. “I know we’re optimistic. I know we’re fired up to start the conference.” Many of the difficulties Georgetown has faced so far have risen from issues with starting pitching and a lack of available arms. Injuries and issues with the development of younger players mean these issues will continue to be a factor as conference play begins. “In an ideal world, you know who your top three guys are and you know who your bullpen is,” Wilk said. “We’re shy a few arms because of a couple injuries, and it’s not as easily applied as it normally is.” Pitching slots are being filled by players called upon to step up, but the team has found difficulty preventing runs on a consistent basis. And with the season already so far along, it may continue to be an issue indeterminately. “It’s a mix-and-match weekend, and that’s not an ideal spot for any weekend,” Wilk said. “But it may be the situation for the rest of the

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FILE PHOTO: ALEXANDER BROWN/THE HOYA

Sophomore catcher Nick Collins is hitting .337 this season. against Georgetown on the end of a string of losses that abruptly drew its record down to .500. The Musketeers were able to snap a five-game losing streak March 29 against Butler, but they have still struggled considerably in past weeks, going 2-7 in their previous nine games dating back to March 19. Georgetown, alternatively, has gone 6-3 in the same time period, including strong road wins against Grambling State. Welcoming Xavier at home to Shirley Povich Field provides an opportunity for the Hoyas to jump ahead early in league play against an opponent that seems to be following an opposite track. All three games in the series will be held at Shirley Povich Field in Bethesda, Md. First pitch for Friday is set at 3 p.m., for Saturday at 1 p.m. and for Sunday at 12 p.m. The Hoyas will face George Mason and Creighton later in the week.

Angels’ Star Worthy of Contract MAJD, from A10 Cabrera’s body has seen more mileage than most; the latter third of last season saw Miggy slowed by chronic foot injuries that seriously hampered his play. Presumably, such occurrences will only be more likely as age creeps up on him. A day after Cabrera received his massive deal, Trout finally reaped the rewards of his performance the past few years by signing an extension with the Angels worth $144.5 million over six years. It wasn’t the record pay out that Trout might have earned in free agency a few years from now, but upon further inspection, Trout is most likely better off with the deal he got. To start with, Trout just guaranteed himself $144.5 million after only two seasons of play, and as such has given himself ample insurance money in case of a career-threatening injury —

something that could have been a catastrophic occurrence before free agency if he had not gotten the extension. But the deal also holds up under the assumption that Trout’s development continues on its current trajectory. Trout is just 22 years old, and thus will be up for another contract when he is 28. This would put him right in the middle of his prime — a prime that could potentially be among the all-time greats. Assuming that the current freeagent market trends do not change drastically in the next few years, Trout will almost certainly be able to demand the sort of contract that Cabrera just received, or perhaps even more. This was a truly fantastic deal for Mike Trout, who is making more money than anyone his age has ever made before playing baseball. It was also a great move on the part of the Angels. Usually, the team that brings up a superstar either has

him under a long contract from the beginning, or is able to negotiate an expensive but acceptable extension before the player reaches the highest echelon of players in the game. Trout’s situation did not allow the Angels either of these options; his contract only ran for another three seasons, and he shot straight past the all-star level to MVP-caliber play within his first year in the league. By securing Trout for six years and $144.5 million, the Angels were able to acquire Trout’s best years without having to cripple their payroll later in order to shell out a record contract. All in all, this contract is a win-win, and now Mike Trout only has to worry about raising the extraordinarily high bar he has already set for himself. Darius Majd is a junior in the College. The Sporting Life appears every Friday.

track and field

Trio of Meets Leads to Regionals Hoya Staff Writer

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year.” Younger players have been forced to step up into pitching roles as a result of these shortages, The success of these young arms will play a pivotal role in giving Georgetown the edge over a Xavier team finishing non conference play with similar results to those of the Hoyas. Poor performances from the pitchers could mean a poor start to conference play. “Some guys have got to step up who haven’t stepped up yet. I think we should have a few more wins than we do, but we’re not far away from where we should be either,” Wilk said. “These kids battle and they fight. I like the way we play together as a team.” Offensive ability has powered the Hoyas when pitching efforts flounder, and it has been an important factor in Georgetown’s recent wins. In particular, the efforts of senior first baseman Steve Anderson and sophomore catcher Nick Collins have provided critical power and production for the Hoyas, and their presence has the potential to control the outcome of any of the Georgetown-Xavier matchups. Junior infielder Ryan Busch has also provided potency in the leadoff spot. “Steve Anderson obviously had some huge hits down in Louisiana for us, major hits at critical times in games,” Wilk said. “Collins has been consistently very good all year, and if you take those two out of our lineup, I have no idea where we’d be. I can guarantee you it wouldn’t be a very good offensive team without those guys.” The new rivals in the Big East add an element of uncertainty to the remainder of the season for Georgetown, with many of the Hoya’s traditional rivals gone and replaced with unfamiliar squads. “We’re going to have our work cut out for us against Seton Hall. St. Johns should be a dogfight and Villanova, on paper we come in being a little better there, but they’re all going to be dogfights,” Wilk said. “As far as the three new teams, we’ll find out in a hurry.” Xavier comes into the series

The Sporting LIfe

Morgan Birck

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A9

Baseball

Matt Raab

Madeline Auerbach

THE HOYA

The Georgetown track and field team will be flying all over the country to compete in three different meets this weekend. The long-distance runners head to Palo Alto to run in the Cardinal Relays at Stanford, sprinters and jumpers will compete at Auburn in the Tiger Track Classic and a third group will go head to the Colonial Relays at William and Mary. The reason for sending runners to different places is simple, according to Director of Track and Field Patrick Henner: give the athletes the best chance at qualifying for the NCAA regionals in the best climate possible “Typically for distance races, having cool, dry air is really important,” Henner said. “It makes running the times much easier. Typically at these California meets, they run all the races at night. The weather is cool and the air is dry, so it’s really fast running conditions for distance runners. Our sprinters and jumpers are going to do a lot better if it’s warmer weather during the day, so that’s why we’re sending them to Auburn.” The runners that have been chosen to attend these events have been selected because their coaches feel that they have a legitimate chance at making the NCAA regionals. “The people we are sending out

to Stanford or to Auburn all should have a very good shot at qualifying for that first round,” Henner said. “We’ve got other athletes that are running Colonial that maybe aren’t quite ready to do that, or they’re going to take a trip later in the season to try and put up their times.” Henner is optimistic about the athletes he is sending to each meet. “I think everybody that we’re sending is ready to run really well, especially [graduate student] Amanda Kimbers and [senior] Deseree King on the women’s sprint,” Henner said. King finished the indoor season earning first team All-American honors in the women’s distance medley relay at the NCAA Championships in March. In her first 4-x400 meter relay race of the outdoor season at Richmond last weekend, King, along with Kimbers, senior Chelsea Cox and senior Becca DeLoache took first place with a time of 3:50.77. King also placed second in the women’s 400m hurdles. Kimbers, in her first event of the outdoor season, won the women’s 100m dash with a time of 12.00 at Richmond. Both women will be traveling to Auburn. As for the men’s team, Henner expects all of his athletes to put up potential qualifying times at Auburn this weekend. “[Junior] Tyler Smith got off to a great start at Richmond, [and so did sophomore] Devante Washing-

ton, [sophomore] Mike Andre also on the men’s,” Henner said. “[Senior] Eghosa Aghayere is sitting at number eight in the triple jump, but he’s going to jump again at Auburn. Hopefully he’ll put up an even better jump out there.” Aghayere was named the Big East Male Field Athlete of the Week for his performance at Richmond. The senior’s triple-jump mark of 15.39m was a personal best and also earned him a first-place finish at the meet. He holds the best mark in the Big East this season. Smith placed sixth in the 100m dash and 16th in the 400m dash at last weekend. Washington and Andre were both a part of the third-place men’s 4-x-400m relay squad, which put up a time of 3:18.55. Henner also feels good about the long-distance runners on the men’s side he is sending to Stanford. “We’ve got some very good distance runners going out to Stanford,” Henner said. “I think pretty much everybody we’re sending out there has a great shot at putting their mark up.” If Henner’s plan is successful, his team will return to the Hilltop at the end of the weekend having had several athletes qualify for NCAA regionals. That would give the qualifiers plenty of time to prepare for the meet, which does not take place until the last week of May.


SPORTS

WOMEN’S LACROSSE Georgetown (3-7) vs Marquette (5-5) Saturday, 12 p.m. MultiSport Facility

FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 2014

BIG EAST MATCHUP The Hoyas begin conference play this weekend with a series against Xavier. See A9

TALKING POINTS

NUMBERS GAME

They’re so seasoned at this point, and we’re confident right now.

3 ”

The number of different meets the track and field team will be competing in this weekend.

Tennis Head Coach Gordie Ernst

MEN’S LACROSSE

WOMEN’S LACROSSE

2nd-Half Scoring Drought Seals Loss MOLLY MALONE Hoya Staff Writer

FILE PHOTO: JULIA HENNRIKUS/THE HOYA

Senior attack Jeff Fountain has scored eight goals and has eight assists this season for the Hoyas. Georgetown will look to end its four-game losing streak against Providence on Saturday.

Struggling Rivals Face Off ELIZABETH CAVACOS Hoya Staff Writer

After dropping its past four games, the Georgetown men’s lacrosse team (3-7, 0-3 Big East) is hoping to get back on track with a win against conference rival Providence College (3-8, 0-2 Big East) on Saturday. Though the Hoyas are mired in a losing streak, they have played well at times, especially in a loss to No. 1 Loyola Maryland on March 19. Georgetown displayed a commanding offensive presence, establishing a two-goal lead twice during the course of the game; in addition, the game was tied in the final minute. Although Loyola was ultimately victorious, Georgetown’s impressive performance was a vast improvement over its 15-7 loss in the conference opener against St. John’s and seemed to be a sign of good things to come. Unfortunately, the intensity that the Hoyas demonstrated in the loss against the Greyhounds diminished over the course of the following week. First, Georgetown fell 13-8 to Villanova and then to No. 6 Big East newcomer Denver by a final of 17-9. In this most recent loss to Denver, Georgetown struggled to capitalize on its offensive possessions. Although redshirt senior defender and co-captain Tyler Knarr won

20-of-27 faceoffs against Denver, Georgetown was unable to capitalize on these possessions and lost by eight goals. Head Coach Kevin Warne says that the Hoyas have been working toward achieving this goal during practice. “We just went back to lacrosse camp a little bit [during] the past couple days,” Warne said. “I think it’s been good just teaching the guys tempo, and we have to create, sometimes, a sense of urgency. Sometimes we lose focus in the game. We have to make sure that we’re able to practice [fixing] that, and the best way to do that is to just force some urgency. …It just makes the guys think faster, and they can anticipate and react a little bit faster as well.” Providence will be playing with the same sense of urgency as Georgetown on Saturday; both teams are winless in the Big East this season and will be battling to reach the Big East tournament. The Friars have several dangerous offensive players that could present a challenge for the Hoyas. Senior midfielder Andrew Barton currently leads Providence with 36 points and senior attack Sean Wright follows closely in second with 34 points. Barton and Wright’s leadership is balanced by underclassmen talent; freshman attack Alex Corboy and freshman

midfielder Joseph Fitzpatrick have stepped up, notching 19 and 15 points, respectively. Georgetown will need to be up to the task of staying with the Providence offense. Warne is encouraged by the efforts that he has seen during practice, and he believes that his players understand the importance of good decisionmaking when playing against the Friars. “I think because of what we’ve done in practice…it forces you to make better decisions,” Warne said. “It forces you to concentrate a little bit more because you’re not sure if you’re going to get the ball back in some of our drills. …We’ve scored as many goals in practice as we have in a couple weeks, so it’s been encouraging.” After the loss against Denver, Warne said that the postseason has essentially begun for the Hoyas. The Big East tournament features only four of the seven teams in the league and Georgetown is currently in last place with only three conference games remaining. “The pressure is on, so to speak — we’re not going to hide from it,” Warne said. “We know what’s in front of us and we know what our goal is at the end of the year, but we have to take care of everything day by day in order to hopefully extend our season. But our guys know that it’s crunch time now”

After opening the season winning three of its first four games, the No. 19 Georgetown women’s lacrosse team has dropped six straight. The latest loss came Tuesday as the No. 12 University of Pennsylvania Quakers (6-2, 2-0 Ivy) defeated the Hoyas (3-7, 0-1 Big East) by a final score of 8-6. Though Georgetown led at halftime, a strong second-half run by the Quakers proved to be the deciding factor in the otherwise evenly matched game. It was the fourth straight game the Hoyas have lost by three goals or less. Georgetown set the tone early as senior midfielder Kelyn Freedman scored her first goal of the day just a minute and 45 seconds into the game. Penn then tied the game 10 minutes later and scored again after another eight minutes to take a 2-1 lead. The second of the two came from sophomore midfielder Lely DeSimone, who went on to notch two more for the Quakers. The Hoyas dominated play for the

FILE PHOTO: ALEXANDER BROWN/THE HOYA

Senior attack Meghan Farrell scored two goals in the loss against Penn. last seven minutes of the first half. It was senior attack Meghan Farrell who struck first for the Blue and Gray on a shot well outside the cage for her 14th goal of the season, tying the game at two apiece. Next, senior defender Maggie Brown recovered a turnover which See QUAKERS, A8

THE SPORTING LIFE

Revisiting Mike Trout And His Record Contract

M

onday was Opening Day, and it been up there with the all-time greats, didn’t take long for Mike Trout and as such, the back-to-back AL MVP is to reaffirm the trajectory of as worthy of the contract he received as his meteoric rise from touted rookie to anyone else. best player in the game However, this is a deal of baseball. Although it that will cost the Tigers in is rare for even the top the long run. In the MLB, sluggers in the game to elite players give their hit a homerun on their best years when they are first at bat of the year, young and cheap; after somehow it didn’t feel that their value goes up unexpected when Mike while their production Trout opened his seagoes down. The big conDarius Majd son with a blast to left tract essentially amounts field. Not much comes to back pay, and when a as a surprise anymore new team signs the playThe Angels and when Mike Trout is iner, his original team that volved. Trout both benefit got the impressive proI have spoken of my duction cheaply doesn’t from extension. have to foot the bill. belief that with the escalation of contracts in Cabrera is less than baseball today, Trout could not only be a month away from his 31st birthday, the first 10-year, $300 million player, an age that has shown steady drop-off but he would also deserve that money. for many top free agents in the past It turns out that I was at least half few years — particularly in the case of wrong, as Miguel Cabrera beat Trout Trout’s teammates Albert Pujols and to the milestone, agreeing to a 10-year, Josh Hamilton. And for a 31-year-old, $292 million extension with the Tigers. Cabrera’s play the last few seasons has See MAJD, A9

SOFTBALL

Hoyas Return Home, Split Doubleheader With Cornell JULIANA ZOVAK Hoya Staff Writer

The Georgetown softball team finally played its home opener for the 2014 season, splitting a doubleheader against Cornell on Tuesday. The Hoyas (16-13, 6-0 Big East) won the first game 7-1 but could not keep the momentum in game two, falling 6-0 to the Big Red (8-13, 0-2 Ivy League). “We love being at home. We played our first 27 games on the road so it was great to be back at Guy Mason,” Head Coach Pat Conlan said. Playing at Guy Mason Field for the first time this season, the Hoyas started out strong, scoring in the second inning. After two singles with one out put runners on first and second, sophomore catcher Molly Morrison doubled in the first run of the game. Senior centerfielder Elyse Graziano followed with another double to give the Blue and Gray the 2-0 lead. “Anytime you can score early it sets the tone for the game,” Conlan said. Graziano sparked the offense again in the bottom of the fourth when she led off with a triple, and sophomore shortstop Grace Appelbe followed with a two-run shot. In the

sixth inning, junior pitcher Megan Hyson doubled to right center after Cornell allowed two walks, driving in a run. Sophomore infielder Samantha Giovanniello singled in two more, and the Hoyas took their seven-run lead into the last inning. “We have received contributions from everyone in our lineup,” Conlan said. “I think this is what makes us dangerous right now. Anyone can start the rally or drive in the runs.” Junior pitcher Lauren O’Leary got the start for Georgetown, and she tossed six shutout innings before allowing a lead off homerun in the top of the seventh. But she shut them down after that, earning the win for her complete-game, four-strikeout effort. “I thought Lauren threw a great game. She’s been locating and spinning the ball well and really kept the Cornell bats quiet,” Conlan said. Graziano led the offensive effort for the Hoyas, going 3-for-4 with a single, a double and a triple, with one RBI and a run scored. But after a strong game offensively and defensively, the Hoyas struggled See CORNELL, A8

ERIN NAPIER/THE HOYA

Junior pitcher Lauren O’Leary (left) pitched six shutout innings in Georgetown’s 7-1 win over Cornell in the first half of the doubleheader. Junior pitcher Megan Hyson (right) earned the loss in the second game. Visit us online at thehoya.com/sports


The Hoya: April 4, 2014  

The Hoya: Friday, April 4, 2014

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