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GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY’S NEWSPAPER OF RECORD SINCE 1920 thehoya.com

Georgetown University • Washington, D.C. Vol. 94, No. 7, © 2012

friDAY, september 21, 2012

RAISE YOUR GLASS

EDITORIAL CAG’s security cameras overstep the line between protection and privacy.

Take a look inside the District’s burgeoning craft beer industry.

GUIDE, G8

CAG to Ramp Up Security

ELECTIONS Campaigns for the GUSA senate were launched this Wednesday. NEWS, A6

OPINION, A2

Annie Chen

Hoya Staff Writer

Caroline Welch Special to The Hoya

Amid some controversy, the Citizens Association of Georgetown has begun installing private security cameras around the neighborhood in an effort to deter area crime. Following discussions that began in June, CAG composed an installation plan and released a public statement about the project in December 2011. Since then, a pilot program featuring three cameras has been launched. Currently, only one of the cameras is operational. According to CAG President Jennifer Altemus, camera installation was identified as an alternative safety measure to the reimbursable Metropolitan Police Department detail that the organization has been funding.

EUGENE ZONG XIAN ANG FOR THE HOYA

Former top defense officials discussed national security in Gaston Hall Wednesday. See story on A4.

Arabic Department Faces Increased Demand Madison Ashley Special to The Hoya

To accommodate a spike in student interest, the Arabic and Islamic studies department has undergone recent expansions — but not without some growing pains. This fall, the department has increased its presence on campus, in part by organizing two lecture series for the year, but it has also struggled to keep up with demand for enrollment. It took two weeks for Matt Lightfoot (SFS ’14), who was waitlisted alongside about 20 other students, to get into a second-year Arabic course. “It was a huge pain,” he said. “It was not fun … not knowing every day whether I’d even be able to take Arabic.” When he worked with the department to find a spot in a course, Lightfoot was told that there were not enough professors to meet the demand for classes. Eventually, he MICHELLE XU FOR THE HOYA was allowed to join a class that The Arabic and Islamic studies department is experiencing growing pains. had already reached its capacity of

Amid Referendum Prep, GUSA Letter Disappears Annie Chen

Hoya Staff Writer

A banner in Red Square urging Vice President for Student Affairs Todd Olson to change the evidentiary standard in the Code of Student Conduct went missing Tuesday, according to a Georgetown University Student Association press release. The banner included an abridged version of GUSA’s open letter to Olson. It was hung up Monday so that students could sign their names to show their support for a proposal to raise the evidentiary standard from “more likely than not” to “clear and convincing,” except in cases of sexual assault. It is also part of GUSA’s effort to raise student awareness of the upcoming referendum on the issue, which will take place Sept. 27.

SPORTS, A10

CIO Seeks Campus IT Updates

SECURITY STUDIES: FORMER ADVISERS TALK STRATEGY

Neighborhood group will add up to 10 security cameras in Georgetown

See CAMERAS, A6

FOOTBALL Three years after an 0-11 campaign, GU makes its national TV debut.

16 students. “They pretty much caved and … gave the professors authorization to sign add/drop forms and increase class size,” Lightfoot said. “It’s working out so far, but it’s not ideal.” The rapid upswing in student interest — a Modern Language As-

“Some people use the book. Some just ignore it. ... They’re just all over the place.” NICk CHILDRESS (COL ’14), On problems in the Arabic department

sociation study found that the national number of university students enrolled in Arabic language classes increased by 46.3 percent between 2004 and 2009 — coupled with internal changes — has forced the department to innovate. “In the past few years, our

Newsroom: (202) 687-3415 Business: (202) 687-3947

See TECHNOLOGY, A6

EXPRESSION THROUGH DANCE

According to the press release, the banner, two poster boards and three permanent markers disappeared from Red Square before 8 a.m. Tuesday, and the Office of Campus Activities and Facilities denied responsibility for removing the items. “We are dismayed that, for whatever reason, someone has chosen to stifle free expression on this extremely important issue,” the release read. GUSA Vice President Vail KohnertYount (SFS ’13) said she believed someone must have deliberately removed the banner. “It’s very unlikely that it blew away,” she said. “I’m very sad about it. It was student money that went into that poster.” GUSA replaced the letter with a See REFERENDUM, A6

See ARABIC, A6

The Information Technology Executive Steering Committee, a newly established group chaired by Chief Information Officer Lisa Davis, will seek to establish priorities for the development of new information technology on campus in the coming year. Members of the committee include deans from all schools and senior administrators in the university. “The purpose of that committee is to, for the first time, bring visibility to what our IT strategy is so we make better decisions and establish priorities for IT investments,” Davis said. According to Davis, it is inefficient for each school to make individual decisions about investments in information technology. “With today’s budgets … as constrained as they are, we need to do smarter business, we need to make better decisions and we need to find those efficiencies and how we use and leverage technology across the university,” she said. According to Davis, Georgetown partnered with Dell Consulting over the summer to conduct an assessment of the university and build an IT strategy for the next three to five years. “The assessment was both qualitative — conducting over 60 interviews with senior leadership and key stakeholders across campus — and quantitative — assessing IT infrastructure, application portfolio, security and organization and financial models,” she said. Davis pointed out that the assessment has allowed the university to restructure the university information system to provide updated services. Modernizing infrastructure, creating a balanced security posture and transforming the university information system are the top three priorities for the semester, Davis said. Although network modernization, such as completing Wi-Fi coverage, will span an extensive period of time and involve a multi-million-dollar investment, Davis stressed that the project is key to the university’s future development. Davis is currently focusing on expanding Wi-Fi coverage in the Southwest Quad. “If we want to talk about globalization, if we want to talk about online learning, if we want to talk about extending the campus the next 100 acres, all of that has to build on a solid modern foundation,” Davis said.

HANSKY SANTOS/THE HOYA

Black Movements Dance Theater celebrates tradition through performance. See story on A7. Published Tuesdays and Fridays

Send Story Ideas and Tips to news@thehoya.com


A2

OPINION

THE HOYA

FRIDAY, september 21, 2012

THE VERDICT

C

Founded January 14, 1920

You’re Being Watched The Citizens Association of Georgetown has taken the neighborhood watch digital. While it’s hard to say where the line between privacy and protection should be drawn, placing this sensitive police function in the hands of our neighbors seems like an abuse of power waiting to happen. CAG announced in August that it would install security cameras in undisclosed locations around the neighborhood. While the organization argues that the cameras will serve only as a means to review crime scenes after the fact, one can’t help but feel uncomfortable knowing that untrained and unsupervised citizens have cast an invisible eye over the community. There’s much debate and legal scrutiny over police efforts to curtail criminal activity, from the stop-and-frisk program

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EDITORIALS

Burger Madness — In the spirit of BeWell week, GUGS will be giving out free turkey burgers to the first 50 students on Copley Lawn from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Five-Second Rule — Last week, WMATA instituted a new policy: Upon stopping at a station, operators must wait five seconds before opening the train’s doors. The change has already caused delays.

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Born to Run — GU Running Club is holding a 5K fun run tomorrow. The run will start in Red Square at 10 a.m.

in New York City to Patriot Act wiretaps. While many have argued that these practices are invasive, at least government actions are theoretically accountable to internal and external oversight. The supervision of CAG camera footage, on the other hand, remains ambiguous, if not nonexistent. Public areas are, of course, just that: public. But being in public does not mean that one surrenders all of his rights to privacy. CAG members are welcome to stare with binoculars at passersby all day — if they don’t already. Still, that is certainly distinguishable from posting cameras in public places. The CAG security cameras may be legal and supported by the Metropolitan Police Department, but that doesn’t make them any less unsettling.

Playing It Safe — In celebration of National Preparedness Month, there will be a picnic tomorrow on Healy Lawn from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. with presentations by GERMS, DPS and D.C. Fire & EMS.

A LITTLE BIRDIE TOLD US ... @DCStudentsSpeak Sept. 20 @thehoya Margin in 2000 in Florida was 537 votes — most ANC elections don’t even have 500 votes total. @karacpanzer Sept. 19 @TisaTime @thehoya Your column is super thoughtful. Always a good read.

1789 PROBLEMS by Arturo Altamirano

Job Hunt Haunted by SAT Perfidious. Deleterious. Capacious. Miss these three common SAT vocabulary words as a senior in high school, and your score could drop 50 points. These days, it might also cost you your first job after graduation. It has become a rising — and troubling — trend for employers to request the SAT scores of recent college graduates applying for jobs. The SAT is indeed an effective tool for sorting through college applicants, but it’s inappropriate to consider high school test scores when evaluating job candidates in their 20s. In a struggling economy, prospects for post-graduation employment are getting worse, and in this respect, so is the fairness of hiring. In today’s competitive job market, employers are understandably searching for new ways to distinguish between applicants. But asking for SAT scores isn’t a reasonable way to do that. The SAT is designed to gauge high school students’ preparedness for college, but that’s much different than college students’

professional competence for entry-level positions. A successful college career should discredit bad SAT scores, not the other way around. Furthermore, there is no conclusive evidence that SAT scores serve as an accurate indicator of intelligence or potential job performance. Employers in the financial sector who want to see quantitative skills should focus on the most recent examples of a candidate’s proficiency in that area, which demonstrate current ability in a more comparable environment to the prospective job. A standardized test taken four or more years ago says little about the skills a college graduate can bring to a position. A disappointing SAT performance might be a lifelong sore spot, but it should not haunt a student’s financial future. Although the job hiring process may not be perfect, taking into account outdated and imprecise test results solves nothing. These employers should remember that they are hiring people, not test scores.

A Lost Art on Campus Many first-year students entering Georgetown are well versed in the arts. Musicians, visual artists, performers and authors appear in each incoming class. Considering this annually refreshed pool of talent and our tradition of trumpeting “care for the whole person,” the stage is surely set for the university’s arts culture to flourish. But one critical factor has been missing: institutional support. Despite the large and high-quality performance spaces on campus, institutional barriers hinder arts programs’ visibility. Perhaps because of this red tape, the fine and performing arts haven’t struck a chord here at Georgetown. One institutional problem is easily fixed. Unlike its peer schools, Georgetown requires arts groups to pay for performance space, which — although true for other student groups on campus — is a particularly difficult roadblock for

these clubs to overcome. And although the university provides arts groups with funding comparable with that given to similar clubs at other universities, more funding, commensurate with the proclaimed Jesuit emphasis on educating the entire person, would be appropriate. With more institutional support, the arts would potentially make inroads in campus culture. And in the meantime, Georgetown’s arts groups must continue to advertise their productions, draw in attendees and provide the quality performances that embed the arts in Georgetown’s collective experience. If aptitude in the arts is considered meritorious in a Georgetown applicant, one wonders why the same quality is not sufficiently appreciated on campus. Absent institutional and cultural transformations on the Hilltop, performances will remain unattended, paintings unseen and songs unheard.

Connor Gregoire, Editor-in-Chief Sarah Kaplan, Executive Editor Steven Piccione, Managing Editor Sarah Patrick, Campus News Editor Braden McDonald, City News Editor Evan Hollander, Sports Editor Victoria Edel, Guide Editor Danny Funt, Opinion Editor Leonel De Velez, Photography Editor Emory Wellman, Layout Editor Emily Perkins, Copy Chief Michelle Cassidy, Blog Editor

Contributing Editors Mariah Byrne, Patrick Curran, Kavya Devarakonda, Katherine Foley, Bethany Imondi, Upasana Kaku, Shakti Nochur, Samantha Randazzo, Ashwin Wadekar, Lauren Weber

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Emma Hinchliffe Hiromi Oka Kelly Church Sam Rodman Arik Parnass Ryan Bacic Zach Gordon Sheena Karkal Phoebe Lett Hunter Main Jamie Slater Hanaa Khadraoui Chirs Grivas Zoe Bertrand Kyle Hunter Jessica Natinsky Nikita Buley Martin Hussey

Deputy Campus News Editor Deputy Campus News Editor Deputy City News Editor Deputy Features Editor Deputy Sports Editor Sports Blog Editor Deputy Guide Editor Deputy Guide Editor Deputy Copy Editor Deputy Copy Editor Deputy Copy Editor Deputy Opinion Editor Deputy Photography Editor Deputy Layout Editor Deputy Layout Editor Deputy Layout Editor Graphics Editor Deputy Blog Editor

Editorial Board Danny Funt, Chair Kent Carlson, Sidney Chiang, Patrick Gavin, Hanaa Khadraoui, Laura Wagner

DC Students Speak Undersold To the Editor: They say that “any press is good press.” However, The Hoya has been challenging this conventional wisdom recently with a pair of pieces criticizing Georgetown’s chapter of D.C. Students Speak, claiming in “D.C. Students Speak Muted on Hilltop” (The Hoya, A4, Sept. 18, 2012) that our “presence has receded” and in the editorial “D.C. Students Listen” (The Hoya, A2, Sept. 18, 2012) that we lack considerable outside student involvement. It should first be noted that D.C. Students Speak does not receive Student Activities Commission funding. While this allows us the freedom to stand independently for student interests, it creates difficulties when co-sponsoring events with other organizations and utilizing university resources, creating an inherent disadvantage. We do see room for improvement in our recruitment methods, but any forward-looking organization would tell you the same thing. We have

Jonathan Rabar, General Manager David Hanna, Director of Corporate Development James Church, Director of Finance Erica Hanichak, Director of Marketing Kent Carlson, Director of Personnel Mary Nancy Walter, Director of Sales Michael Vu, Director of Technology Glenn Russo Martha DiSimone Kelsey Zehentbauer John Bauke Molly Lynch Sheena Garg Michal Grabias Keeley Williams Suzanne Fonzi Michael Lindsay-Bayley Ryan Smith

Special Programs Manager Accounts Manager Operations Manager Statements Manager Treasury Manager Public Relations Manager Human Resources Manager Institutional Diversity Manager Professional Development Manager Online Advertisements Manager Web Manager

Board of Directors

Lauren Weber, Chair

Patrick Curran, Connor Gregoire, Dylan Hunt, Jonathan Rabar, Mairead Reilly, Sam Schneider

to balance the hard reality of our limited resources with the hope that we can attract students by promoting the importance of local politics. In spite of this, we have a number of accomplishments to stand on during our short history. Over the last few years, we have registered over 700 voters in D.C. and have signed on over 4,000 students as supporters of our cause. We have had three councilmember forums and have held numerous other events such as town halls and community organizing seminars. We hold regular board meetings with a District-wide leadership that is elected, contrary to the claims of the recent editorial. Trevor Tezel (SFS ’15) Georgetown chair, D.C. Students Speak

Editor’s Note: D.C. Students Speak holds elections at its meetings. The editorial being referenced advocated for student bodywide elections.

Policies & Information Letter to the Editor & Viewpoint Policies The Hoya welcomes letters and viewpoints from our readers and will print as many as possible. To be eligible for publication, letters should specifically address a recent campus issue or Hoya story. Letters should not exceed 300 words. Viewpoints are always welcome from all members of the Georgetown community on any topic, but priority will be given to relevant campus issues. Viewpoint submissions should be between 600-800 words. Send all submissions to: opinion@ thehoya.com. Letters and viewpoints are due Sunday at 5 p.m. for Tuesday’s issue and Wednesday at 5 p.m. for Friday’s issue. The Hoya reserves the right to reject letters or viewpoints and edit for length, style, clarity and accuracy. The Hoya further reserves the right to write headlines and select illustrations to accompany letters and viewpoints. Corrections & Clarifications If you have a comment or question about the fairness or accuracy of a story, contact Executive Editor Sarah Kaplan at (917) 605-0509 or email executive@ thehoya.com. News Tips Campus News Editor Sarah Patrick: Call (860) 841-7530 or email campus@ thehoya.com. City News Editor Braden McDonald: Call (202) 687-3415 or email city@thehoya.com. Sports Editor Evan Hollander: Call (202) 687-3415 or email sports@thehoya.com. General Information The Hoya is published twice each week during the academic year with the excep-

tion of holiday and exam periods. Address all correspondence to: The Hoya Georgetown University Box 571065 Washington, D.C. 20057-1065 The writing, articles, pictures, layout and format are the responsibility of The Hoya and do not necessarily represent the views of the administration, faculty or students of Georgetown University. Signed columns and cartoons represent the opinions of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the editorial position of The Hoya. Unsigned essays that appear on the left side of the editorial page are the opinion of the majority of the editorial board. Georgetown University subscribes to the principle of responsible freedom of expression for student editors. The Hoya does not discriminate on the basis of age, gender, sexual orientation, race, disability, color, national or ethnic origin. © 1920-2012. The Hoya, Georgetown University twice weekly. No part of this publication may be used without the permission of The Hoya Board of Editors. All rights reserved. The Hoya is available free of charge, one copy per reader, at distribution sites on and around the Georgetown University campus. Additional copies are $1 each. Editorial: (202) 687-3415 Advertising: (202) 687-3947 Business: (202) 687-3947 Facsimile: (202) 687-2741 Email: editor@thehoya.com Online at www.thehoya.com Circulation: 6,500.


friday, September 21, 2012

OPINION

THE HOYA

A3

VIEWPOINT • Sobhani

THE ETHNICITY OF FEMININITY

On Election Day, Only The Other Debt Crisis One Man for Women T F

irst lady Michelle Obama’s speech, Romney, who seems to want to bring us titled “How Hard You Work,” was per- back to the third century, women have sufhaps the most impressive speech of frage and will hopefully exercise their right the Democratic National Convention. On to be heard by turning out on Election Day. We as women realize that our lives and behalf of her husband, she relayed a simple, well-received message: The Obamas liberties are hanging in the balance. We know the American dream because they have some very different options to choose from. One option seems to be a reversion epitomize it. This Tuesday, the campaign raised $4 to what America used to mean for women. million at an event held by R&B and pop I believe that we have another option that offers something more singer Beyoncé Knowles forward thinking. at the 40/40 Club in New From what I can see, York, which is owned by the appeal of the Obama her husband, rapper Jay-Z. campaign and the DemoWhen the president took cratic Party is obvious to the stage, he jestingly notwomen. The president ed the clout of his wife and has made conscious Knowles and compared strides toward gender his life to Jay-Z’s, saying, equality and women’s “We both have daughters rights. Early in his term, and our wives who are Khadijah Davis he convinced women more popular than we are. that they were a priority So, you know, we’ve got a little bond there.” We as women realize that when he passed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, Knowles and the first which allows women to lady are just two examples our lives and liberties are dispute salary inequalof women who are seizing hanging in the balance. ity. Most attractive to the Obama campaign by women is the Obama adthe reins and doing everything they can to make it successful. On a ministration’s Affordable Care Act, which daily basis, I find myself sorting through ensures that women are treated equally emails from his campaign, amazed by and have access to preventative care like the number of prominent and influential mammograms, prenatal and cervical canwomen from whom the president draws cer screenings and, most controversially, support. I opened one this week from cam- contraception. Through his platform, he paign Chief Operating Officer Ann Marie demonstrates his belief that women should Habershaw. The email from the day before have the right to make decisions about was from actress Jessica Alba. A few weeks their bodies, using their own ethical stanback, I received one from Georgetown’s dards to do so. And what about his opponent’s effort to very own law student, Sandra Fluke (LAW ’12). Each attempts to rally monetary or vot- appeal to women or, for that matter, any er support, hoping to appeal to every wom- individual of a background that is not his an of every socioeconomic status, ethnicity own? With less than 50 days left in the campaign, I am still anxiously waiting to and community. And it is quite effective. Obama has an eight-point advantage hear it. over Mitt Romney in the latest national Pew poll. His lead stems from the impact of his Khadijah Davis is a sophomore in the campaign on young, black and, in particu- School of Nursing and Health Studies. lar, female voters. Women in Detroit have She is secretary of Georgetown Univerhelped widen Obama’s lead in Michigan sity Women of Color. THE ETHNICITY OF to a whopping 14 points. Unfortunately for FEMININITY appears every other Friday.

his past May, the U.S. Senate staged yet another showdown on the issue of how to pay for student loans. At issue was the question of how to pay for the subsidized interest rates on federally backed loans, and the Democrats and Republicans ended up doing what they usually do: they came up with a temporary fix that will soon expire and fail to address the underlying issue. Post-secondary, graduate and professional education in America is unaffordable for too many, and those who do get loans end up saddled with debt the moment they graduate. The market for student loans is more than $1 trillion, making it second only to the home mortgage market. Twothirds of all graduates begin their careers wondering how to pay off an average $25,000 of debt, which handicaps their financial stability right out of life’s gate. Given how critical a college degree is to obtaining a high-paying job in today’s labor market, there must be a better way. Some fresh thinking on how the government approaches student loans offers just that. We need to treat education as an investment and create the right incentives for making this critical investment within reach for more people. After World War II, far-sighted policymakers envisioned the challenges that would confront returning soldiers who had put off their educations and careers to carry arms for America overseas. They created the G.I. Bill, offering recent veterans a path to a college degree. Its effect was profound, not only on the composition of America’s new workforce in the 1950s, but also on universities themselves, which blossomed under the newly available funding. While we no longer enjoy the same kind of peace dividend today that we did then, we can still

be creative in making the legacy of the G.I. Bill — the proliferation of colleges and universities that has become the envy of the world — more accessible to ordinary Americans. Here’s how: Instead of spending billions to artificially suppress interest rates on student loans, we can make that interest, and the overall debt, tax deductible. In the same way that the government incentivizes homeownership by making mortgage interest tax deductible, this would make investment in a post-secondary education more attractive. This incentive would also provide student debt an additional value to another kind of investor in education: future employers. During the Internet bubble of the 1990s, when employers were practically tripping over one another to attract the most talented new employees, there was a brief practice of some paying off student debt at the time of hiring. Tough economic times have put that practice on ice for the most part, but as tax loopholes are disappearing in these revenue-scarce days, employers would be more inclined toward making the kind of long-term hires they’ve held off committing to during this ephemeral “recovery” if it came with the promise of tax deduction. Naturally there will be costs to this plan, especially for a revenuestrapped federal government. Tax incentives are not immune to zero-sum mathematics. During the student loan debate last spring, one side held tax writeoffs for small- and medium-sized businesses hostage in exchange for continued subsidies on Stafford loans, while the other side took the less politically popular route of threatening the loans themselves. Though the federally backed loan program was spared

for the moment, there is no guarantee this debate will not return before the next election. It’s time to start looking farther down the field, as previous generations showed was possible 75 years ago. If my proposal for a tax deduction on student debt can be implemented, which I believe it can be, its effect on education and labor markets will be significant. New competition for borrowing and lending will lead to lower rates. It will also force us to think seriously about the enormous market for student loans — in stark contrast to murky packaging of “toxic” mortgages that went into high gear just before the 2008 financial meltdown. The market, like the loans themselves, must be securitized soundly, and by making the kind of long-term investment this tax incentive would amount to, we would be doing just that. The dividends from such an approach will not be realized in a single election cycle, which is precisely why today’s politicians on both sides are not terribly interested in it. But the effect of more affordable post-secondary education will profoundly and positively shape our economy as America renews and improves its skilled labor force. While our colleges and universities may be the envy of the world, it is incumbent on real leaders to make sure Americans are still able to attend them. Given the short-term challenges of today’s economy and the even shorter vision of today’s political establishment, it’s high time for some bold new approaches to get our country where we want it to be. Rob Sobhani (SFS ’81, GRD ’89) was an adjunct professor in the government department from 1989 to 2005. He is an independent candidate for the U.S. Senate in Maryland.

SCRIBBLES OF A MADMAN by Ben Mazzara

LETTERS TO OUR FRESHMEN SELVES

A Hilltop Bucket List Of Memorable Moments

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very year we find ourselves forming of the readings or catch up on what’s gomental to-do lists of all the things ing on around campus. Take the time to reflect in Dahlgren we are dying to try. Now, the following suggestions may not fall into the Chapel or Dahlgren Quad. Whatever same category as keeping up with that faith tradition (or non-faith tradition) marathon-training schedule you’ve set you follow, we all can benefit from taking up or finishing your homework before a few minutes out of our days for contemdawn. But as seniors, we want to get you plation, Georgetown style. It might be thinking about all the random experienc- hard to do on a regular basis, but trust es that make life at Georgetown unique. us, you’ll be glad you did. Answer that 3 a.m. phone call. No, not If you check some of these off your own bucket list, you’ll leave the Hilltop with because you want to be the next Hillary some great stories — just don’t get caught Clinton, but because you might be able to help a friend in need, and it will often doing a few of them. First on the list: Show up to any events lead to a hilarious story that you could in which your friends are involved. be telling for years. It will also almost Whether that means attending countless always lead to some excellent friendship a cappella concerts (which we highly rec- blackmail. Get to know as many people as is physiommend, by the way), cheering at a swim meet or buying a ticket to Rangila in cally possible. Speaking of the Clintons, November, it means a lot to your friends ol’ Bill (SFS ‘68) spent his first days on the Hilltop at the front gates when you cheer them on. introducing himself to Sneak into Lecture everyone in the freshFund events. You know man class. While that’s that long line outside surely an aggressive stratGaston that ruins your egy, to put it mildly, don’t day and maybe makes be afraid to introduce you skip a meal? Find a yourself to someone that few secret passages in you recognize. Chances Healy or hide in Riggs or are they’ll recognize you, the classics department until the event starts. Lauren Weber & John Morris too. Reenact the Lincoln Invest in a black light. Memorial scene from Everyone loves a good Crashers” highlighter party. There are random expe- “Wedding when Owen Wilson and Take advantage of the Georgetown Waterfront riences that make life at Vince Vaughn share a bottle of champagne as Park — it shouldn’t just be Georgetown unique. they watch the sun rise. a place you run through Most of us will try this on on your way to the monuments. The waterfront has a lot to offer: the morning before graduation, so don’t It’s a perfect spot to picnic, it has good worry if you wait to cross this off your restaurants and it’s a nice, quiet place to list for now. But the main reason to recrestudy. It can even serve as a setting for a ate this moment in front of one of D.C.’s casual first date. Just grab some Pinkber- greatest landmarks is simple: because you can. ry and go for a walk along the Potomac. And, finally, do not waste another minScare a friend at night on the “Exorcist” stairs. But not while they are walking up ute. There may not have been a single or down them. Or after 2 a.m. You know thing that interested you in the above what — maybe just strike this one to avoid list, and that is more than okay. If that’s the case, it’s time to make your own list. any lawsuits. Explore Georgetown’s secrets. Whether Your four years here will fly by faster than that entails poking around the under- you can imagine, and the only thing that ground passages or sneaking inside some you’ll actually regret at the end of your exof the buildings you think you know in- perience is not taking advantage of everyside and out, find out what Georgetown’s thing that a true Georgetown education has to offer. hiding — just don’t say we sent you. See you on the Lincoln Memorial steps. Take a professor to The Tombs. For one, because it’s The Tombs. Not that you need another reason, but relationships with Lauren Weber is a senior in the College. your professors can make your experi- She is chair of the Board of Directors for The ence here great. Just because you think Hoya. John Morris is a senior in the College. your professor is a genius doesn’t mean He is chair of the Board of Directors for Stuhe or she wouldn’t love to grab a meal dents of Georgetown, Inc. TO OUR FRESHwith you to talk over your interpretation MAN SELVES appears every other Friday.

VIEWPOINT • Carter

Don’t Disown Catholic Mission

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ast week, Nate Tisa (SFS ’14) wrote an interesting column (“Distorted Religious Identity Divides GU,” A3, Sept. 14, 2012) in which he explored how Georgetown can more fully express its Catholic identity. With this piece, Tisa did a great service to our campus community, and people are now talking about what it means to live and work at a Catholic university. Tisa astutely identified contentious areas where more work is needed for Georgetown to live out its Catholic mission: De facto segregation indeed threatens the campus community, true political discussions are rare outside the classroom and the administration should consider removing undue barriers to student speech. Yet while Tisa was right to draw attention to these issues, some of his recommendations were off the mark. He argued that Georgetown should formally recognize student organizations that advocate for issues directly in conflict with Catholic teachings and claimed that by not granting these groups full benefits, the university stifles meaningful debate. But in reality, granting university recognition and resources to these groups would not enhance Georgetown’s Catholic identity; it would detract from it. This point is better explained by exploring a broader question that Tisa addresses: What does it mean to

be a Catholic university? As a Catholic institution, Georgetown formally professes its belief in the teachings of the Catholic Church. It maintains that these teachings are both true and comprehensible. Each individual obviously need not agree with all of these teachings to attend a Catholic university and be a valued member of its community, but the official tenets of Catholicism are — or at least should be — the guiding force behind every major university decision. As long as the university claims to support the Catholic Church in mission, it must also do so in action. Tisa is absolutely right that the university cannot shy away from dialogue with those who disagree on fundamental issues. That is why Georgetown invites speakers who are prochoice and pro-gay marriage to campus. In the Georgetown College video “Jesuits at Georgetown,” Fr. Ryan Maher, S.J., says, “We welcome diversity, because we’re not afraid of questions and we’re confident in the answer.” The moment Georgetown ceases to hold this value will be the moment when it stops being a university at all. Georgetown also has a unique mission. As the theologian Fr. Erich Przywara, S.J., notes, Jesuit universities have a mission both to interpret the Church to the world and to interpret the world to the

Church. This means that, while Georgetown should foster open dialogue on all issues, it must never withdraw its support for the most challenging claims of the Catholic faith. As long as the Catholic Church maintains that abortion is a moral evil and that marriage can exist only between one man and one woman, Georgetown cannot grant funds or benefits to groups that explicitly argue otherwise without ignoring the Church’s mission. Groups like H*yas for Choice certainly make valuable contributions to the campus community. They should continue to express their views through their right to free assembly and free speech. As Tisa rightly notes, a Catholic university should never suppress the views of students simply because they disagree with specific Church teachings. And while this university cannot directly support such groups without betraying its Catholic identity, productive dialogue is not impossible. By inviting all students into an ongoing conversation about the significance of Georgetown’s Catholic identity, we can help our university better live out its unique mission. That is a goal that all members of Georgetown’s community, Tisa and myself included, should work toward every day. Luke Carter is a junior in the College.


A4

THE HOYA

PAGE FOUR

NEWS

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE For extended coverage of the GUSA senate elections, including interviews with the candidates, look online at thehoya.com.

Your news — from every corner of The Hoya.

IN FOCUS

verbatim

MEET AND GREET

We move with our bodies but dance with our souls.

BMDT Co-Director Princess Fuller (SFS ’13), describing the company’s unique dance style. See story on A7.

from

RICHARD OLIVEIRA SOENS FOR THE HOYA

NATALIA ORTIZ FOR THE HOYA

New Provost Robert Groves, who joined Georgetown this semester after heading up the 2010 U.S. Census Bureau, met with students, faculty and staff at a reception in Dahlgren Quad held by University President John J. DeGioia.

LIVE LEO’S FREE Leo’s has gone from bad to worse, but don’t despair. We’ve compiled a comprehensive list of alternative on-campus dining options. blog.thehoya.com

Former Dean Dies BRADEN MCDONALD Hoya Staff Writer

Former Georgetown University School of Medicine Dean and Chief of Urology William Maxted (C ’50, MED ’54) died last month at age 83. According to an article in The Washington Post, Maxted died of pneumonia at Georgetown University Medical Center Aug. 20. Maxted graduated cum laude from Georgetown College in 1950 and the School of Medicine in 1954, completing his residency at Georgetown University Hospital in 1961 after serving in the Air Force. He then worked in the hospital’s urology department for 50 years before his retirement in 2011, serving as chief of urology and program director from 1976 to 1989 and as dean of the School of Medicine from 1989 to 1998. In an Aug. 23 letter to the GUSM

community, Stephen Ray Mitchell, the school’s current dean for medical education and a professor of medicine and pediatrics, spoke of Maxted’s importance for the Georgetown medical community. “No Georgetown physician has done more over so long a period of time to mentor our students in clinical medicine,” Mitchell wrote. “There are generations of gratitude from those who remember … Maxted’s superb teaching.” Despite his death, Maxted’s legacy lives on in the Georgetown medical community in the form of the William C. Maxted Urology Award, which honors exceptional performance by senior medical students. An annual endowed lectureship has also been named for him. Maxted is survived by three children, five grandchildren and two sisters. His wife, Claire Maxted, died in 1995.

Website Will Connect Entrepreneurs to Alums Security Officials Talk Tactics

ALEXANDER BROWN FOR THE HOYA

Former national security advisers discussed defense strategies and threats during a panel Wednesday.

ALEX GALAN

Hoya Staff Writer

AlumniFunder, a website that aims to connect Georgetown students with alumni who are working on startup ventures, will launch Sept. 29, according to site founder S. Ryan Meyer (SFS ’99). The website is an electronic platform that facilitates the exchange of capital among “doers” — entrepreneurs who are looking to fund startup companies. According to Meyer, the site will rely on alumni’s relationships with their alma maters, tapping into the common bond of shared college experience to foster trust among site users. “AlumniFunder wants to use that trust and expand that into an online environment,” Meyer said. Although anyone can explore the site, only users with confirmed georgetown.edu email addresses can upload ideas and enter into discussions, Meyer said. AlumniFunder will utilize crowd funding — a collective effort to net-

work and pool resources — to fund startup companies. “Crowd funding offers a certain democratization to the process,” Meyer said. The idea for AlumniFunder arose after Meyer’s first attempt at a startup failed due to lack of funding. He began planning the site at the end of April. According to Meyer, both students and alumni will benefit from the site because it will provide a common platform to pitch and discuss ideas and plans. “Since you are driving the conversation, you can make that change,” Meyer said. Though Georgetown is unaffiliated with AlumniFunder, Meyer said that it offers an opportunity for the university to use the site to raise money and potentially attain more notoriety as alumni create successful startups. After its launch party at F. Scott’s next week, AlumniFunder plans to create fundraising networks for Princeton, Stanford and Harvard before the end of the year.

ANDREW WILSON Special to The Hoya

Former national security advisers discussed national security in the United States and the Middle East in Gaston Hall Wednesday afternoon. President and CEO of the Atlantic Council and former Assistant Managing Editor at The Wall Street Journal Fred Kempe moderated the panel, titled “National Security in the 21st Century.” The speakers included three former national security advisers: Brent Scowcroft, Stephen Hadley and James Jones (SFS ’66). Scowcroft, who served as national security adviser to Presidents Gerald Ford and George H.W. Bush, opened the discussion by commenting on how the American government has changed its approach to national security since his retirement at the end of the Cold War. “Now, the strategy is not a given. As a matter of fact, there is prob-

ably not a strategy, just tactics,” he said. Hadley, former national security adviser to President George W. Bush, noted the increasing importance of a flexible approach to security issues. “We need to shape and change our overall national security system,” Hadley said. “You have to have a vision for the future.” Jones, who retired as President Barack Obama’s national security advisor in October 2010, agreed. “Great powers decline when they don’t address the problems they have,” Jones said. “The world changed, the environment changed and they tried to hold on to the old model instead of the new one.” Jones also emphasized the importance of addressing energy use in the United States. “If you want to make a change in the world, energy is one of the areas where American leadership can be dominant,” Jones said. “We have more of everything within

our borders than everybody else in the world.” The advisers also discussed national security concerns in the Middle East, particularly in Syria. “This [situation is] extremely complicated, and I think we need to talk more seriously with the Russians. Syria is their last hold in the East,” Scowcroft said. However, Jones said he does not support a boots-on-the-ground approach in Syria. “Virtual presence is actual absence,” he said. “You can’t just sit back and hope. Hope is not a strategy.” Fan Zhao (GRD ’13) said he found the panel educational, though he did not agree with much of the discussion. “I thought there were some valid points, [but] some … I disagreed with,” he said. Zhao said he worried that such high-level officials would advocate more involvement overseas. “We’re in more conflicts than we should be,” he said.


News

friday, september 21, 2012

Peace Corps Chief Touts Life of Service Elaina Koros

Special to The Hoya

Peace Corps Chief of Staff Stacy Rhodes discussed his organization’s role in international development on Tuesday. The talk was held in Intercultural Center as a part of the School of Foreign Service’s Global Human Development program. Rhodes entered the Peace Corps in the late 1960s to pursue a life of international service. “It was a life-determining, lifechanging experience in many ways, and [without it,] I certainly wouldn’t have taken the career path I had and wound up where I am today: back at the Peace Corps,” he said. Founded in 1960 by Senator John F. Kennedy (D-Mass.), the Peace Corps is a volunteer organization that works to promote outreach and cooperation

KAYLA NOGUCHI FOR THE HOYA

Peace Corps Chief of Staff Stacy Rhodes recounts his experiences.

in developing countries. “You know with Peace Corps, the one thing you really do gain after a couple of years is something that you can’t gain in school, which is this ‘hot-stove’ understanding of what it means to be poor in this world and what a struggle it is for the vast majority of people in the 130 developing countries of the world,” Rhodes said. He also spoke about the challenges of working in the global development field. “It’s not easy to pick up and move everything, including your spouse, your kids, your possessions [and] your pets every three or four years to another continent and take another job with another language and another group of people,” he said. But the job also comes with its fair share of rewards. According to Rhodes, the Peace Corps is uniquely designed to allow Americans to experience life in a developing country. “Peace Corps is the only volunteer organization in which young and old Americans commit to go out to the village level, to that last mile, and stay there two years to learn the local language, to understand the people and the culture of the area and to work for two years to create opportunities [which] otherwise didn’t exist,” he said. During his talk, Rhodes encouraged students to apply to the Peace Corps and advised them to study foreign languages and cultures and to engage in volunteer work as preparation. Rhodes’ account of his experience with the Peace Corps and his original interest in global development resonated with members of the audience. “I was fascinated by Chief of Staff Rhodes’ career trajectory, and it was very inspiring to hear his reasoning behind why he got into development and why he continues to work in development,” Michaela Core (GRD ’14) said. “At the heart of everything he does is his belief in the mission of the organization for which he works.”

A5

THE HOYA

H2OYAS Push for Clean Water Hiromi Oka

Hoya Staff Writer

A Catholic studies seminar that began last year is making waves in an effort to provide clean drinking water in Africa. Taught by Fr. Richard Curry, S.J., the seminar, “Kenya: Clean Water Project,” was first offered last January. The class was conceived by Matt Demicola (COL ’13) and Pat Clancy (MSB ’13), who approached Curry with the idea. The seminar does not resemble a typical Georgetown course; it is not offered directly through the university registrar, and each class session involves organizing and managing a business, that raises money to provide potable water in Nairobi, Kenya. The business will be called Clean Water H2OYAS, “We want to make a major contribution to clean water in Africa and work with the organizations already in existence so they can lean on the generosity of this university,” Curry said. Demicola and Curry hand-picked students who they believed would contribute to the organization. According to Curry, the pair was looking for students who were passionate and eager to make a difference. “We were looking for zeal,” Curry said. “We were looking for people with a business background, but even if they didn’t have that, if they had zeal, we wanted them.” There are currently 10 students in the course, most of whom are seniors. Despite the unique registration process and basis of the class, all students are graded to ensure they pull their weight. “It helps push accountability,” Clancy said. “There are a lot of organizations who have members that are not as involved as maybe they could be, but — knowing how much everyone at Georgetown cares about their grades — the fact that we’re getting graded pushes us to accomplish our goals.” Last year, the organization raised $4,000 for Sister Mary Owen, who co-founded the Nyumbani Children’s Home, Kenya’s first facility

CONNOR BERNSTEIN FOR THE HOYA

Students in “Kenya: Clean Water Project” discuss plans for H2OYAS. for HIV-positive orphans, with Fr. Angelo D’Agostino in 1992. This year, the seminar chose to focus on two main goals: It wants to become incorporated as a nonprofit organization and seeks to actively build a well in Nairobi instead of only donating the money they raise. While the seminar focuses on how to create a business, Demicola emphasized that it also incorporates the study of Catholic values. “We don’t necessarily just focus on the business aspect and then the moral. It all intertwines,” Demicola said. “We’re driven by the Catholic moral theology and also want to do this in an appropriate business manner.” The organization’s emphasis on Catholic values, which uphold that clean water is a basic human

right, benefits from Georgetown’s network of Jesuits. “This is not going to be a mission accomplished solely by 10 Georgetown students and a Jesuit priest,” Clancy said. “We’re going to have a lot of help from Jesuits over in Kenya, and there are Georgetown connections to St. [Aloysius Gonzaga High School, a coeducational jesuit high school in Nairobi]. It’s definitely an ambitious goal, but it’s something we think is possible.” Although most participants are seniors this year, the organization will continue to pursue its goal next year by recruiting new members who share a passion for helping others. “The organization will continue, and so will the class,” Demicola said. “It will be kind of a legacy.”

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How many d.C. neighborhoods can you find?

sUdOKU fill in the grid so that each row, column and square contains all digits 1-9.


A6

news

THE HOYA

Davis Plans Innovation Summit, IT Fellowship TECHNOLOGY, from A1 In addition to the Information Technology Steering Committee, a Faculty Advisory Committee was created to supplement the existing Student Advisory Committee. Davis explained that the two committees will communicate with her directly to provide both faculty and student opinions regarding technology and to appeal to the Executive Steering Committee on funding issues. “The nice thing about having the steering committee is that you have all the leadership there. A decision can actually be made of what it is we want to do,” Davis said. According to Chief Innovation Officer Michael Wang (MSB ’07), the Student Advisory Committee and the h.Innovation Team, another initiative under UIS, will collaborate to advise the CIO and carry out several projects. Michael Crouch (MSB ’13), a member of both the h.Innovation Team and the Student Advisory Committee, said that the second round of the h.Innovation Summit, a hackathon, will be held in November. The event will aim to promote collaboration on IT projects.

According to Davis, the summit will bring together students, faculty, staff, alumni and representatives from various companies such as Google, Facebook and Teach For America to brainstorm solutions for two main campus issues. “The two problems are, how do we currently use our common space? … [And] how can we reinvent the way we create and collaborate in these spaces?” Davis said. “The other target area is the classroom. How do we currently use our classroom? Can we reinvent the ways we use our classrooms to help students better learn in these spaces?” The CIO’s office is also in the process of developing a technology student fellows program, which will allow underclassmen to work with the CIO on IT issues. According to Crouch, the students who are selected for the fellowship will be given the resources to complete university IT projects and write theses on design and technology. Davis expressed excitement about the impact that each project will have on the university. “For the first time, [we are bringing] unity and synergy to what we’re doing for Georgetown IT,” Davis said.

GUSA Emphasizes Value Of Conduct Standard Vote REFERENDUM, from A1 new banner, which hung in Red Square until it blew away Thursday. Voting on the evidentiary standard referendum will occur concurrently with GUSA senate elections. Students will be required to vote for GUSA senators before they are able to vote in the referendum. According to GUSA President Clara Gustafson (SFS ’13), because the referendum must receive at least 2,000 votes to pass, the decision to hold the two votes concurrently should raise the profile of the senate elections, which have typically attracted relatively low voter turnout. Although the referendum will not carry the authority to alter the evidentiary standard, both Gustafson and Kohnert-Yount emphasized that the referendum’s influence should not be overlooked. Gustafson referred to an instance in January 2007 in which the administration chose not to ban kegs from Georgetown housing after a majority of students rejected the proposal in a fall 2006 GUSA referendum. “Let’s say, if 2,000 students vote and 90 percent of them vote yes, it’s that much harder for the administration to justify a decision when such an overwhelming number of students know what’s in their best interest and

express that,” Kohnert-Yount said. George Spyropoulos (COL ’14), a member of the Speech and Expression Committee’s external board, agreed that the referendum will give students the opportunity to grasp more leverage in the evidentiary standard debate. “I was glad to see that, after meeting with students from all four years, they all had the same enthusiasm and support for the referendum,” Spyropoulos said. “I think it’s very important for GUSA to give the [students] an opportunity to raise their voices.” Olson, who has delayed making a final decision on the change until the Office of Student Conduct undergoes an external review in October, said last week that he has received student input and understands the urgency of the matter. “Student leaders have been very eager to see a final decision on that. I understand that eagerness. I understand the importance of the issue,” he said. “It’s my judgment that it makes the most sense to fold that question into this review, since we’re very quickly doing this comprehensive review.” Olson said he will decide whether to raise the standard by mid-October. “It’s not something that will take a long time after the review, but I do want a little bit of time to talk with the reviewers and digest that after they’re here,” Olson said.

Neighborhood Officials Debate Security Cameras’ Efficacy CAMERAS, from A1 “The [Business Improvement District] had been talking about [cameras] for a while, and our reimbursable detail wasn’t working out. We had some extra money and decided to invest,” Altemus said. Georgetown resident Bill Dean, CEO of the technology systems service provider M.C. Dean, Inc., provided the initial cameras for the project and the electronic resources for the installation. Further funding will be obtained from donations and CAG membership fees. “We still are working on getting the first one up and running,” Altemus said. “But if they work well, we have the budget for 10 at this point.” The CAG-owned cameras will supplement two security cameras that MPD already operates in Georgetown. In addition, a camera above Martin’s Tavern funded by residents of N Street and neighboring businesses has been operational for four years, according to an article in The Washington Post. The cameras will be installed throughout the neighborhood and will aim to survey the main entrances and exits to the area. According to Chair of CAG’s Public Safety Committe Diane Colasanto, signs will be used to alert the public to the presence of the cameras. The plan has faced opposition from area residents, who felt uninformed about the project and are wary of their privacy. The Georgetown Forum, a CAG-run online exchange among Georgetown citizens, revealed much disagreement about the merits of installing CAGowned cameras around Georgetown. Colasanto, refuted possible privacy concerns, stressing that while the camera footage can be reviewed by investigators after a crime has been committed to provide evidentiary support, the cameras will not be actively monitored. “The main purpose we see is deterrence,” Colasanto said. “We have developed a set of procedures that have determined which images can be accessed and who can access them.” Still, Tom Birch, a commissioner on Advisory Neighborhood Commission 2E, questioned the effectiveness of surveillance cameras in

combating crime. “I would say that I have no quarrel with the utility of cameras after [a crime has been committed],” Birch said. “But you watch the nightly news and see these robbers on tape. People know that the camera is there, and that is my concern, that they are not having a preventive effect.” In addition, Birch expressed concern that the presence of the cameras would create an undue sense of complacency. “There would be the presumption that the cameras are having a preventive effect,” Birch said. “[People] wouldn’t lock their house doors [and] wouldn’t do all the things that police tell us to do to protect ourselves and prevent crime.” Altemus disagreed. “The primary goal is to be a deterrent to crime, and the secondary goal would be to help catch criminals after,” Altemus said. “I can’t imagine that people would feel complacent or safer from having a camera four blocks away.” John Hedgecock, lieutenant for MPD’s public service area 206, which includes Georgetown, spoke in support of CAG’s plans to install cameras at the ANC’s September meeting. “I’m a proponent,” he said. “Any tool I can have in my toolbox, I’ll take.” To allay privacy concerns, Hedgecock added that footage from MPD’s cameras is also subject to strict privacy standards, and only officers with specific authorization are allowed access. Gwendolyn Crump, director of MPD’s office of communications, confirmed the legality of the privately owned cameras. “We support the efforts of residents and businesses to secure their own property,” Crump wrote in an email. Two more cameras are scheduled for installation within the next month. CAG will decide in the coming year whether to purchase additional cameras and where to place them. Colasanto is optimistic about the prospects for the new program. “Everybody has been wanting a camera on their street,” said Colasanto. “Maybe now, people who come to Georgetown and commit crimes will think twice.”

friday, september 21, 2012

Candidates Declare Bids For GUSA Senate Seats Roxanne Feitel Special to The Hoya

Students running for seats on the Georgetown University Student Association senate launched their week-long campaigns Wednesday afternoon. Voting for the 27 open senate positions will take place on Sept. 27. Currently, 66 undergraduates are running, almost half of whom are vying to represent the two freshman-only districts. New South and Village C West have 14 candidates, and Harbin and Darnall have 18 candidates. Meanwhile, one student is running for two spots in the district that includes Henle, and three students are running for five positions in the off-campus district. “Typically, the numbers we see actually are that freshmen vote in a much higher percentage than other classes,” Election Commissioner Ethan Chess (COL ’14) said. Senate representatives come from 12 geographically organized districts throughout campus and four at-large seats. Each district has a proportionate number of senators to reflect the size of the population it is serving. Since senate seats correspond to housing assignments, each candidate’s term lasts one academic year. Chess said incumbents

are just as likely to face competition as newcomers, since they are typically running in a new district. “Some incumbents go down; some incumbents don’t,” Chess said. “A lot of it has to do with geography.” Senate Transition Chair Nate Tisa (SFS ’14) said he is looking forward to incorporating new members because of the diversity they will bring to the senate. “We’re going to have more candidates than ever,”

“Seeing what the senate can do in terms of student life ... will set the tone for a new path for GUSA.” NATE TISA (SFS ’14), GUSA senate transition chair

he said. “We’re hoping to get people from groups we really haven’t had in the past … which will bring … new connections and new experiences that we can really incorporate.” Tisa, Chess and GUSA President Clara Gustafson (SFS ’13) agreed that excitement, commitment and motivation are the most important qualities for a senate candidate. “[A senator should be]

excited to advocate for the needs of the student body and can apply their experience elsewhere on campus to that advocacy,” Gustafson said. Tisa gave similar advice to the candidates at their first interest meeting, held on Monday. “You [senators] just have to put yourself out there,” he said. “In the election, but then every day after that, as well.” Gustafson outlined goals that she and the GUSA Cabinet, hopes to tackle in the upcoming term. She singled out the implementation of the Student Life Report, Code of Student Conduct reform and shortterm sustainability improvement as her top goals. “These past three years, GUSA has kind of re-established itself as a legitimate body for change at this university,” she said. “But a lot of that came from financial reforms … and a lot of those financial reforms are now over and being started up. So seeing what the senate can do in terms of student life, intellectual life, et cetera. I think will be really great and will set the tone for a new path for GUSA.” The Hoya interviewed GUSA senate election candidates to learn about their election strategies and favorite Leo’s dishes. For more coverage, visit thehoya.com.

Department Gets Mixed Review ARABIC, from A1 program has moved to include more content-based courses, such as those on Islamic civilization and culture. Here, students write and communicate in Arabic, and we offer content courses in both Arabic and English,” Director of Undergraduate Studies Reem Bassiouney said. These shifts have come with some challenges. Nick Childress (COL ’14), a student in advanced intensive level I, spent an uncomfortably long time on the waitlist at the beginning of the semester expressed annoyance with the department’s apparent lack of a unified teaching method. “Some people use the book; some just ignore it. Others just won’t teach certain parts of Arabic,” Chil-

dress said. “They’re just all over the place.” At the same time, he lauded individual professors within the department. “I mean, they wrote the book,” Childress said, referring to the fact that the textbooks used in most Arabic classes across the country were published by Georgetown University Press. “I definitely get the impression that [Georgetown professors] are better than any other professors out there.” Many professors in the department are well regarded in their field, including professor John Esposito, director of the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding and an authority on the Islamic world, and Bassiouney, who is a prizewinning Arabic fiction author.

While some students chose Georgetown’s program based on its reputation, others simply stumbled upon it. “My freshman year, it was the popular thing to do,” Charlie Caris (COL ’13) said. “So I signed up for a class and ended up loving the professor.” Alli Heymann (SFS ’16), who is taking her first Arabic course this semester, expressed similar enthusiasm for the program. “It’s intensive, but I like the repetition and being constantly immersed,” she said. While the department still has issues to address caused by the jump in its popularity, Caris was optimistic about Arabic at Georgetown. “On the most important issues, they’ve done a fantastic job,” he said.


news

friday, september 21, 2012

THE HOYA

A7

BMDT Dances With Soul car2go Provides More Minali Aggarwal Special to The Hoya

Black Movements Dance Theatre does not need words to tell stories. Founded 23 years ago by approximately 30 female students, BMDT aims to portray black traditions, values and experiences through dance. “Our values are passed down through the stories we tell,” BMDT Co-Director Princess Fuller (SFS ’13) said. The dance company’s repertoire ranges from jazz, ballet and hip-hop to African, lyrical and spiritual dance styles. Guest artists and choreographers also collaborate with the company throughout the year. Although originally founded to celebrate the black experience, BMDT attracts members with diverse backgrounds, dance styles and music preferences. “Our group is so diverse; company members are from all different walks of life,” CoDirector Leotha Hinds (COL

’13) said. “We’re diverse in so many ways, too. This year, we have international students — a dancer from Saudi Arabia and a dancer from France — all different levels of technique, backgrounds and even the way we think about dance is different.” Currently, BMDT also incorporates performances from two spoken-word artists, Vivian Ojo (SFS ’14) and Toby Campion (COL ’13). Ojo auditioned for the company her freshman year, and after the members discovered that she wrote and performed poetry, they began combining dance with her spoken-word performances. Campion, an exchange student from the University of Edinburgh who is new to the program, has not performed yet but will also perform spoken-word poetry this semester. Assistant Director and Publicity Manager Bernadette Nelson (SFS ’14) said that the inclusion of poetry performances goes with BMDT’s emphasis on self-expression. “A dancer’s body can only

go so far, and its movement can only have so much effect. What we’re focused on is eliciting reaction from our audiences, and that requires emotion,” Fuller said. Each semester, the group organizes its performances around a common theme; last spring, its focus was pressure. Each member used dance as a catharsis, conveying pain and struggle through their routines. “Our intention was to connect with the audience and convey the sense [of] happiness that comes with the overcoming of struggle,” Hinds said. According to Nelson, the group is as much a support system as it is a dance company. “Our main goal for the semester is creating a unified group whose members relate through their passion and dedication to expressive dance,” she said. Fuller agreed. “We move with our bodies but dance with our souls,” she said.

Transportation Options Abbey McNaughton Special to The Hoya

The recent arrival of car2go in the Georgetown area provides yet another car-sharing option for students and residents. The company’s distinctive blue-and-white Smart cars have steadily gained ground in D.C. since their launch in the city on March 24. They can be rented on an immediate basis. Though car2go’s expansion into the neighborhood comes on the heels of Georgetown’s recent agreement with Zipcar, another car sharing business, car2go officials expressed confidence about their ability to tap into the student market. car2go vehicles can be used for any amount of time and, after a one-time membership fee, users are charged only for the time they use the car. In addition, the cars may be picked up and dropped off anywhere within the designated “home area” upon ending the rental. Unlike Zipcar, car2go has no monthly fees or security deposits, whereas Zipcar has either a monthly commitment or annual fee, depending on which driving plan is selected. According to a statement from car2go, fulltime college students between the ages of 18 and 20 are eligible for membership. Zipcar has not offered membership to Georgetown students who are under 21, but rental privileges may soon be extended to 18-year-olds, pending negotiations between the university and the company. In addition, car2go is offering discounts to attract new student users. “We are currently waiving the initial registration [of] $35 for college students, plus [adding] 30 minutes of free drive time,” the statement said. Katie Farrell (COL ’16) has never used the car2go system before but expressed enthusiasm about the benefits it could present for collegeage students. “I would love to use it to visit my friends at other universities that are off the Metro line but still nearby,” she said. “And I like that they are energy efficient.” However, Kaitlin Carano (COL ’13), who has

DAVID WANG FOR THE HOYA

Several car2go vehicles are available for hire around Georgetown’s campus. used competitor Zipcar for a variety of purposes, expressed doubt about the usefulness of car2go. “The [lack of] reservations and [ability to] return it anywhere are kind of nice, but I do know that the size is kind of an issue for me,” she said. “You can barely fit your groceries in a Smart car so I think it could be used as a quick way to get somewhere, but I probably won’t use it as often.” While Zipcar offers a wider variety of vehicles for rent, including luxury cars, hybrid vehicles and pickup trucks, users are required to make a reservation, and the cars must be returned to the parking spot where they were obtained. Five Zipcar parking spots are located on Georgetown’s campus outside of McDonough Arena.

SAT Scores Expected on Post-Grad Job Applications Emma Iannini

Special to The Hoya OLIVIA HEWITT FOR THE HOYA

Panelists discussed the War of 1812’s effect on Georgetown at an event Tuesday evening.

Remembering the War of 1812 Lily Westergaard Hoya Staff Writer

In honor of the bicentennial of the War of 1812, the Georgetown University Library Associates and the Lecture Fund invited archivist David Ferriero to speak on the history of the National Archives in Lohrfink Auditorium Tuesday. Ferriero, who was appointed by President Barack Obama as the 10th archivist of the United States in 2009, leads the National Archives and Records Administration, which protects and maintains the original U.S. Constitution, Declaration of Independence and Bill of Rights. University librarian Artemis Kirk introduced Ferriero and spoke briefly about Georgetown’s archives, which were established in 1816. “[The archives] allow us to illuminate Georgetown’s past for

INDEX MISCELLANEOUS

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current and future generations,” Kirk said. Ferriero then provided the audience with a brief history of the National Archives, which were established in 1935 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The Archives include over 12 billion pages, 40 million photographs and 100 million emails. “We are the nation’s record keepers,” Ferriero said. He later spoke about the importance of archived images in commemorating and researching the War of 1812 and exhibited documents ranging from a seaman’s protection certificate — a document that sailors carried before the war to guard against impressment — to President James Madison’s war message to Congress, the House Declaration of War and the Treaty of Ghent, which ended the war. Trevor Plante, chief of reference for the National Archives,

also spoke about the burning of Washington and the influential Battle of New Orleans. “There were 2,000 casualties on the British side and roughly 70 on the U.S. side. That really shows you how lopsided the battle was,” Plante said. The event was the first of several that the Library Associates will organize this fall. The audience included dozens of community members and a handful of students. “I thought it was really interesting,” Karri Nelson (COL ’16) said. “Being a freshman, it’s great to come and listen to the national archivists of the United States.” The staff and students of Lauinger Library were pleased with the event as well. “This was one of our cooler events — having someone so high profile here,” said Elyssa Skeirik (SFS ’15), who works as a library events assistant.

CLASSIFIEDS 800

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Though most students don’t give their SAT scores a second thought after high school, many recent or soon-to-be graduates are discovering that it is common practice for employers to require them on job applications. According to Mike Schaub, executive director of Georgetown’s Cawley Career Education Center, certain consulting firms have asked job applicants to submit their SAT or ACT scores as part of the criteria for evaluating a candidate. “I have routinely seen some employers ask for SAT [and] ACT [scores] over the years,” Schaub said. “If a job requires exceptional quantitative skills, for example, college admission test scores may provide one standardized source of data about the candidate’s quantitative abilities for the employer to evaluate.” Nonetheless, he does not believe that Georgetown students, who he said tend to perform relatively well on standardized testing, face a disadvantage because of this increasingly common practice. “It is important to remember that most employers consider a range of criteria when evaluating candidates for jobs,” Schaub said. “For some employers, stan-

dardized test scores provide just one piece of the puzzle. … The employer is likely to consider other measures of the candidate’s quantitative ability, such as grades in courses that integrate applied math, when making selections.” Some students were comfortable with the idea of being required to include their scores on their job applications. Daniel Feitel (LAW ’14) said that he would have no problem sharing his SAT scores with potential employers. “Personally, I would be happy if an employer asked about my SAT scores, since it would be a chance to share my score without resorting to … actually putting it on my resume,” Feitel said. On the other hand, Benjamin Mishkin (SFS ’13), who has applied to top consulting firms, wondered whether it was fair for employers to base even part of their decision on a few hours of performance four years before. “One’s university achievements should absolutely override one’s SAT scores or what happened in high school,” Mishkin said. “Students should have the opportunity to mature, figure out what they’re interested in and good at and demonstrate it in college, and then be judged on that, instead of on how well they figured out the College Board when they were 17.” 

DPS BLOTTER Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012

Sunday, Sept. 16, 2012

Theft, Regents Hall, 6 a.m. An employee reported the theft of a tool bag and tools. The items were stolen from a secured storage box. No suspects or witnesses have been identified.

Drug Violation, 3500 Block of Prospect Street, 12 a.m. Drug paraphernalia and an unknown substance were found in a residence occupied by Georgetown University students. The substance tested positive for containing marijuana. The case is being forwarded to the Office of Student Conduct.

Theft, Lauinger Library, 8:45 p.m. A student reported the theft of his cell phone, which he had left unattended in a men’s bathroom. Friday, Sept. 14, 2012 Alcohol Violation, Harbin Hall, 9:25 p.m. Underage students were found participating in a game that involved the consumption of alcoholic beverages. The alcohol was disposed of. The case will be forwarded to the Office of Student Conduct. Saturday, Sept. 15, 2012 Suspicious Person, Red Square, 9:30 p.m. The Department of Public Safety received a report of a man’s being verbally abusive. The man was identified and barred from campus. He has no affiliation with the university.

Theft, Poulton Hall, 4:30 p.m. Two laptops were stolen from an unsecured office. No suspects or witnesses have been identified. The case is under investigation. Monday, Sept. 17, 2012 Burglary, 1400 Block of 36th Street, 1:18 p.m. An unknown suspect entered a residence and stole several electronic items. There were no signs of forced entry. The case is under investigation. Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2012 Theft, Yates Field House, 9 p.m. A student reported that her property was stolen from an unsecured locker at the listed location. The case is under investigation. The blotter is compiled weekly by the Department of Public Safety.


A8

Sports

THE HOYA

friDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

fresh out of philly

volleyball

NFL Kickers Grab Limelight With Mistakes W

hen I happened upon the erased by one kick. And Anderson’s final 90 seconds of Sunday legacy as one of the longest-serving afternoon’s game between NFL players was sullied by a single Washington and St. Louis, I saw the performance. Every sport has its lone wolf, the Redskins’ desperate comeback end on the “shank of all shanks” by kick- one player, separate from the rest, who’s relied upon to come through er Billy Cundiff. The attempt was from improbable in the clutch. Soccer and hockey range — 62 yards — and made by a have goalies, baseball has closers kicker not known for exceptional and football has kickers. Each has its own mystique, but leg strength. The kicker faced the blame, but in reality the game was kickers don’t seem to relish their not decided on the right foot of role as much the other lone wolves Cundiff, but rather on the play of an around sports. Mariano Rivera, closer for the entire team for 60 minutes and the fact that the Rams had outplayed New York Yankees, takes the field to the tune of Metallica’s “Enter their opponent. Earlier in the day, New England Sandman.” NHL goalies devote mekicker Stephen Gostkowski missed ticulous time to perfecting the dea 42-yarder at the end of regulation sign on their helmets. NFL kickers, that would’ve won the game against on the other hand, lack the little an inferior Arizona team. Gostkows- quirks that their counterparts enki’s miss came after he had made joy. They simply get off the bench, take a couple practice three field goals from kicks and walk onto greater distance — 46, the field. 51 and 53 yards — earThe life of an NFL lier in the game. Upon kicker is tumultuous firing wide left, his and unpredictable. four-for-four day was There are no gradual immediately forgottrends of improveten; the blame game ment or decline. Their had begun. productivity is largely Unlike the longMatt Bell the result of the oprange effort from portunities they are Cundiff, Gostkowski given. As a result, was supposed to make The life of an some of the league’s that kick. His reputabest kickers play for tion since entering NFL kicker is teams that don’t necthe league in 2006 tumultuous and essarily experience a says he should’ve great deal of success. made the kick. Ask unpredictable. It’s the only conceivPatriots Head Coach able situation in Bill Belichick, quarsports where going terback Tom Brady and field goal holder Zoltan Mesko. one-for-three could be better than They’ll all tell you he should’ve going four-for-five. Kickers will dismiss the notion made the kick. Forty-two yards is no joke, even in the NFL, but the expec- that uncertainty and luck play large tations were on Gostkowski’s ball to roles in their success — or struggles sail through the uprights and for — but it’s an undisputed truth. In fact, one of the most memorable the Patriots to be 2-0. The NFL kicker is a unique speci- kicks in NFL history, Adam Vinatmen. They are some of the least- ieri’s boot in the 2001 AFC divisional hyped, lowest-paid players in the clash between the Patriots and Raidleague. In close games, they are the ers, never should’ve happened. A single most crucial member of the blown call extended New England’s team, yet they are seemingly the game-tying drive, and Vinatieri took most dispensable and least appreci- the field to give the Patriots the tie and, eventually, the game. ated. The NFL is about gut-wrenching Some kickers play their entire careers with one club, while oth- hits, game-winning fourth-quarter ers earn “journeyman” status, such drives and day-long tailgates outas Cundiff’s 10 teams in 10 years, side stadiums all across America. jumping from team to team and fill- Fans dedicate every Sunday from September through February to ing voids around the league. So what makes a good kicker? Ac- watching behemoths run at each curacy? Poise? Consistency? Some other up and down the field. But when it comes down to wincombination of the three? It’s a question that can be only ning games — to walking into the partially answered by statistics. In locker room the victor — you can 1998, Minnesota kicker Gary Ander- forget about the pretty-boy quarterson set an NFL record by making ev- back, the diva receiver and the “badery kick — field goal and extra point boy” middle linebacker. No close game is ever won or lost — he attempted during the regular season. But in that year’s NFC without the say-so of the kicker. championship, Anderson missed a 38-yarder that would have sent the Matt Bell is a freshman in the McVikings to the Super Bowl. Instead, Donough School of Business. Atlanta punched its ticket. FRESH OUT OF PHILLY appears every An entire year of perfection was Friday.

AMY LEE FOR THE HOYA

Redshirt junior right-side hitter Annalee Abell (15) had 13 kills and a .522 hitting percentage in Georgetown’s loss to Liberty Tuesday night.

Skid at Six After Liberty Loss LIBERTY, from A10 “Dani is a huge leader for us — not just what she does for the score, but the demeanor she has on the court,” Williams said. “She just has this presence that allows our team to play with a little bit more confidence out there, and I think that that’s just the leadership that she brings.” As in the first two sets, Georgetown and Liberty traded points in the third set, this time until both teams were tied at 15. The Flames then went on a four-point run, with ball-handling errors from Johnson and junior setter Haley Lowrance and two straight kills by Liberty sophomore middle blocker Loren Thomas accounting for the hot streak. Undeterred, though, the Hoyas fought their way back into the set, tying it up at 25 on a kill from

White and then taking a 26-25 lead on one from Johnson. But Georgetown’s momentum seemed to slip, and Liberty scored three points in a row to take the set and a 2-1 match advantage. Liberty stayed on the offensive in the fourth set, jumping out to a quick 5-1 lead on the Hoyas. The two teams went back and forth for a bit until a small run by Georgetown helped to cut the deficit to 14-12. The Flames quickly rebuilt their lead, however, and coasted to a 25-20 win in the set to seal the win. After the match, Williams cited communication as one area where her team could make immediate improvement before getting into the rigors of their conference schedule. “I think that we can always communicate a little more effectively. There are some changes that were

made from the bench that we need to talk continuously about on the floor,” she said. “We’ve talked about that in the locker room, and we will work on it in practice. … If we can do that, we will be better going into Big East play.” St. John’s (13-3) is currently on a three-game winning streak and has stumbled only three times this season, inclu ding against ACC rival Maryland. “St. John’s is playing well right now. They have a couple of foreigners on their team who are just going to bring a different brand of volleyball,” Williams said. “They are very experienced players, and we know they are going to try to take control. … Hopefully, we’re going to stop them.” After taking on the Johnnies at 7 p.m. tonight, the Hoyas will head to Storrs, Conn., to take on Connecticut at 2 p.m. Sunday.

WOMEN’S SOCCER

Two Conference Tests Loom for GU CONNECTICUT, from A10 her offensive prowess has been on display all season as a focal point of the Hoya attack. St. Martin has been a key to the strong Georgetown defense but earned acclaim this past weekend by shutting down Rutgers redshirt junior striker and Canadian national team member Jonelle Filigno. “Alexa was fantastic,” Nolan said. “We challenged her. We told her, ‘If we’re going to win this game, it’s very important you do a good job on Filigno,’ and she was exceptional.” St. Martin and the rest of the Hoyas’ back line — ranked second in the Big East in goals allowed per game — will have to do a similar job against Connecticut this after-

noon. “[The Huskies] also have a very good player up front,” Nolan said. “First and foremost, we need to do the same job on her, but I think these guys have a little bit more on the offensive side than Rutgers or Seton Hall has.” That striker is senior Danielle Schulmann, who has already registered nine goals and six assists on the season, standing out even in comparison to Corboz’s seven goals and four assists. The Hoyas’ second opponent this weekend will be Providence — winners of six in a row — whose reputation has been steadily improving. “They’re probably in a similar spot to where we were about four years ago, where you’re trying to get over that hump to be a consis-

tent, good team,” Nolan said. “Because they’re such a young team, there’s not a whole lot of feet there. They don’t know, maybe, that Georgetown’s supposed to be better. They’ll probably play with the freedom to go after it.” Both weekend games will take place at North Kehoe Field, where Georgetown has thrived this season. “It makes a huge difference, because you’re playing on the surface you train on,” Nolan said. “Every time you play at home, you’ve got to get something from the game and then hope you can go on the road and get some results as well.” The Hoyas take on the Huskies at 3 p.m. today before hosting the Friars Sunday at 1 p.m.

field hockey

After More Losses, Georgetown Looks to Rebound in Midwest Celee Belmonte Hoya Staff Writer

FILE PHOTO: CHRIS GRIVAS/THE HOYA

Senior Catherine Shugrue (3) has three goals but no assists so far this season.

After losing its first two home games this past weekend, Georgetown’s field hockey team (2-6, 0-1 Big East) is back on the road once again for a pair of weekend matches in the Midwest. First up for the Hoyas is Big East foe Louisville (5-3), which is fresh off of two overtime losses in East Lansing, Mich. The Cardinals will be the second conference rivals the Blue and Gray have faced so far, after they lost to Providence, 5-2, a week ago. The Big East is one of the top leagues for field hockey again this season, with Syracuse and Connecticut sitting in the top 10 nationally. Since Louisville lost by a mere 2-1 count to No. 19 Michigan State in their most recent game, Georgetown is sure to have its work cut out for it. “Louisville is a really strong Big East opponent,” Head Coach Tiffany Marsh said. “It is going to be a tough game.” In order to capture the all-important victory, the Hoyas will need a big effort from their seniors, three of whom — forwards Annie Wilson and Catherine Shugrue and midfielder Kimberly Keating — sit atop the team in scoring this season. Wilson, leading the way in points, has scored

only one goal but has added five assists. Both Shugrue and Keating have recorded three goals apiece, although each has failed to record an assist. While Louisville seems like a daunting task for Georgetown, the Blue and Gray will catch something of a break when they play Miami of Ohio (2-6) on Sunday. “When we are traveling to Louisville or Connecticut, we are always picking up another team to play,” Marsh said. “It just so happens that Miami of Ohio is pretty close to Louisville. It’s only a twohour drive.” Although the RedHawks, like the Hoyas, have a losing record, they are 1-0 at home. In a key win earlier this season, however, they defeated Big Ten foe Ohio State. “[Despite their record,] Miami of Ohio is doing really, really well,” Marsh said. “It will be a really rough weekend for us.” While the results so far this year have brought about only a single win, Marsh noted nonetheless that she has seen improvement from her team. “It is going to be a challenge this weekend, but we feel like we are up for it and ready to go,” she said. Georgetown takes on Louisville at 6 p.m. tonight before traveling to Oxford, Ohio, to take on Miami at 11 a.m. Sunday.


sports

FRIDAY, september 21, 2012

THE HOYA

THE BLEACHER SEATS

football

Goodell Must Put Ego Aside REFEREES, from A1 the outcome of a game. That assumes, however, that the referees are competent and experienced. Instead, the situation in the NFL is like an NBA where LeBron James would be allowed to explain a travel to a referee. When coaches and players must help officials, a conflict of interest has been created. These replacement referees are not intentionally altering the outcome of games. Nonetheless, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell’s decision is starting to make a noticeable impact. Normally, the quality of an officiating crew is often judged by how little they are noticed in a game. If the officials do not alter the game and nobody talks about their performance, then they have done an admirable job. But the extent of discussion on

the replacement referees means that their actions are causing the media and fans to raise many questions. One such question is how the NFL could assign a Saints fan — who even advertises his allegiance on Facebook — to a Saints game? In a perhaps more benign — but equally troubling — case, first reported by CBS, one replacement official even informed an NFL player during a game that the player was on his fantasy football team. On top of struggling to make the correct calls, these refs are even struggling to act like professionals, a huge red flag for anyone concerned with integrity. At this point, Goodell should pay the striking officials any amount they demand in order to end the embarrassment of their replacements. Even the most generous of settlements would be minimal compared to the league’s revenues, which risk being dented as more

A9

attention falls on the situation. But if he caves, Goodell may not be able to withstand the blow to his image. After last season’s lockout, the handling of the Saints’ suspensions and now the referee crisis, it is clear that he puts his ego before the league’s success. With the NFL concussion issue growing under the radar, the commissioner is distracted by trying to save face on an issue as basic as paying his employees. Goodell should have the sense to allocate the league’s resources toward the long-term health of its players, not trying to convince the public that replacement referees can handle the pressure of making calls out of a complicated rulebook in front of thousands of rabid fans.

Corey Blaine is a senior in the McDonough School of Business. THE BLEACHER SEATS appears every Friday.

MEN’S SOCCER

FILE PHOTO: CHRIS GRIVAS/THE HOYA

Senior linebacker Robert McCabe (4) has 46 tackles so far this season.

Princeton Clash Marks National TV Debut TIGERS, from A10

FILE PHOTO: CHRIS GRIVAS/THE HOYA

Senior midfielder Ian Christianson has helped limit the Hoyas’ opponents to 0.75 goals per game.

No. 9 GU Starts Big East Play Ryan Bacic

Hoya Staff Writer

The No. 9 Georgetown men’s soccer team (7-0-1) is undefeated, boasts a top-10 ranking and has plenty of talent to boot. What the Hoyas don’t yet have is a Big East win, but they’ll look to pick that up on Saturday when they play host to Rutgers (3-2) to open their conference schedule. “We’re very pleased with where we are, but now the whole thing kind of shifts into a different element with the Big East starting,” Head Coach Brian Wiese said after his team’s two-goal victory over Penn on Sunday. “Now, you’re dealing with points and the pressures of that, and so the [question] for us is, can we relax and still play with more at stake?” The Blue and Gray came into this season unranked, but their current standing serves as a testament to the quality they’ve shown on the pitch through their first eight games. And while the poll’s voters might not have seen this kind of run coming, senior midfielder and co-captain Ian Christianson isn’t surprised. “I definitely had that [goal] for this team, [but] I don’t know if we necessarily expected it,” he said. “We just want to win every game we can and keep progressing throughout the season and not let the level [of intensity] drop.” And while they are pleased with their position thus far, the Hoyas also know that it can quickly be turned into a vulnerability. “It’s pretty cool, but now we’ve just got a bigger target on our

backs,” Christianson said. The Scarlet Knights will be the first Big East team to take aim at that target this year, and they will challenge for Georgetown on both ends of the field. Offensively, Rutgers is led by freshman midfielder Mael Corboz, the younger brother of women’s soccer standout Daphne Corboz. Mael Corboz, whom Wiese likewise tried to bring to the Hilltop, scored twice at Princeton on Sept. 8 en route to being named Big East rookie of the week.

“It’s pretty cool, but now we’ve got a bigger target on our backs.” Ian christianson Senior midfielder

Corboz’s playmaking abilities propelled the Scarlet Knights to a 2-0 win in that outing against the Tigers, besting the Hoyas’ 1-0 win in the same arena last Friday. Rutgers has played only one more game since then, though, since the team has played only five games thus far. “They’ve scheduled really lightly. It’ll be interesting to see if that has an impact on things,” Wiese said. “They’ll either be fresher — [and] there is merit to that — or they’re maybe having a hard time getting into a game routine.” But while there are a number of unknowns to this Scarlet Knight

squad, the threat they pose is, in Wiese’s eyes, a sure thing. He noted that Rutgers is sound defensively and has talent up front. “It’s going to be a game where we expect it to be hard to break them down and create some chances,” Wiese said. “And we have to be good [at] handling their transition. They’ve got some guys that are pretty talented on the ball.” Christianson was similarly wary of Saturday’s visitors. “I think it’s probably going to be our toughest game yet,” he said. “Big East opponents are always big, and getting three points right off the bat is something that, obviously, we [both] want to do. I expect it to be the highest-level game yet, so we’re going to have to definitely be up for it.” Other than the pair of games they dropped at the Ameritas Classic in Omaha, after all, Rutgers is undefeated. Still, from the overtime opener against Virginia to Sunday’s 3-1 win over Penn — led by senior forward Andy Riemer — the Blue and Gray have been well prepared. And with Wiese opting to go with a more sub-laden lineup against the Quakers — a trend that he indicated is likely to continue — tired legs shouldn’t end up being the issue some might expect. “It’s just a Big East game,” Wiese said of Saturday’s 1 p.m. matchup. “There’s talent and there’s athleticism, and both teams are fighting for three points, so there’s going to be a little extra bite to it, maybe. It’s that time of year.”

Princeton has a TV deal with ESPNU, and scheduling happened to work out in the Hoyas’ favor. Still, the game marks an important milestone for a group of Georgetown seniors who weathered the depressing 2009 season — when the team went winless — and have helped the program reach its current place as one of the best in the Patriot League. “I’m excited for our players ... especially the seniors. They were here when the times were very, very tough,” Head Coach Kevin Kelly said. “They had the courage to stay with the program, and now they’re reaping the benefits of their hard work.” Because the Blue and Gray usually appear on only local TV — if at all — the broadcast will offer an opportunity for some relatives and friends of Georgetown players to watch the team for the first time. “Every one of my friends from back home ... they all know we’re going to be on ESPN. My entire family, too,” senior wide receiver Max Waizenegger said. “It’s going to be unbelievable.” Joe Beninati, whom some will recognize as the voice of the Washington Capitals on CSN Washington, will be the play-by-play man for ESPNU tomorrow night. Rene Ingoglia, a former UMass running back who had brief stints with the Bills and Redskins from 1996 to 1998, will provide color commentary.

The Hoya caught up with Ingoglia this week to discuss the state of Georgetown football, and it was clear that the man had done his homework. “I’m really looking forward to watching him play. He looks like an excellent linebacker,” Ingoglia said of senior Robert McCabe, who leads the Patriot League with 46 total tackles. “The offensive line, as well, stuck out to me. ... I’m a former running back, so I always get excited to see a good, big offensive line.” Although this will be the first time he has covered a college team in its first national TV appearance — ESPN usually has him covering higher-profile Atlantic Coast Conference games — Ingoglia seems to have a good idea of the game’s significance for Georgetown. “They don’t often get a chance to play on national TV, so this is their time to shine,” he said of the Hoyas. “I want to give them the best that I’ve got.” If Ingoglia backs up his words tonight, Georgetown fans should expect a fairly entertaining broadcast. “I’m a high-energy analyst, if anything,” Ingoglia said. “The producers are sometimes in my ear, saying, ‘OK, take a deep breath.’” Students and fans with a cable package that includes ESPNU can tune in to watch the Hoyas — as well as high-octane Ingoglia and studio partner Beninati — live tonight at 7 p.m.

Hoyas Ready for Next Ivy Josh Simmons Special to The Hoya

After dropping their sixth-straight game against Yale last Saturday, Georgetown’s football team (2-1) must rebound quickly as they take on another Ivy League opponent when they travel to Princeton (0-1) tonight. There were nine total turnovers and countless missed opportunities against the Bulldogs, including a game-ending interception in Yale’s end zone as junior quarterback Aaron Aiken went for the win in the Hoyas’ wild, unpredictable 24-21 loss. It was the kind of gut-wrenching defeat that can linger with a team for an entire season and derail lofty expectations. Head Coach Kevin Kelly, however, thinks his team has already moved past the disappointment and is ready to focus on its next opponent. “We talked about [the loss] on Sunday, we had practice and I told them, at the end, that’s it for Yale,” Kelly said. “We’ll learn from it, and our guys have had a terrific week in practice.” Georgetown will look to bring that same sharpness to Princeton Stadium on Friday for their matchup with the Tigers. To do so, they will have to cut back on their turnovers and execute in the red zone, two problems that have plagued the team in its first three games. “It’s all about execution. Usually, when there’s a mistake in a play, it’s one or two guys at the most,” Kelly said. “We’ve had more of an emphasis on [ball security] this week, and we should be fine.” After two straight one-win seasons, the Tigers certainly appear to be an easier opponent for the Blue and Gray. However,

Princeton has made strides of improvement this year with a revamped look and a new quarterback, sophomore Connor Michelson, running the offense. “They’re a program that’s changed their mindset,” Kelly said. “You can see they’ve got some character, as far as their leadership and their coaching staff have done a nice job with them.” Despite the step up, though, Princeton came out looking like the same team of previous seasons in their first game, trailing undefeated Lehigh 17-0 at halftime. But the second half was a vastly different story, as the Tigers came out strong, held Lehigh scoreless and used their rushing attack, led by senior running back Akil Sharp, to pick up two touchdowns on the ground. While the comeback effort fell just short, 1714, Princeton showed that it wouldn’t back down. “At halftime it was 17-0, [but] they didn’t quit, and their defense shut [Lehigh] out,” Kelly said. “Obviously, they’ve got a good defense.” In a twist that will make the game more exciting for the Blue and Gray, it is the first nationally televised game in the program’s history. Kelly, aware of the anticipation, is working to tamp down his players’ pregame angst. “My concern is not to have too much juice when the game starts. I am going to tell them everyone’s one man and has one job,” Kelly said. “It doesn’t feel any different when you play [on television], and it’s just like any other football game.” The Hoyas look to bring that attitude tonight at 7 p.m. The game, held in Princeton, N.J., will be televised on ESPNU.


SPORTS

WOMEN’S SOCCER Hoyas (8-1-1) vs. Connecticut (5-3-1) Today, 3 p.m. North Kehoe Field

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

FRESH OUT OF PHILLY Columnist Matt Bell tackles the conundrum of NFL kickers and their impact on close games. See A8

TALKING POINTS

NUMBERS GAME

9 ”

A good team will go for the jugular. Are we a good team?

Women’s soccer Head Coach Dave Nolan

THE BLEACHER SEATS

The national ranking for Georgetown’s men’s soccer team, which entered the top 10 Tuesday

FOOTBALL

Football Seniors Go From 0-11 to Primetime Needs Its Refs Back W PAT CURRAN

Hoya Staff Writer

ith the first two weeks of professional football now history, some trends are beginning to develop. Manning’s neck appears to be fine, the Cardinals look like they may defy everyone’s expectations and the Falcons and 49ers appear to be the teams to beat. But what has become most obvious is that the replacement referees have to go. Now. At first, I was sympathetic toward the new refs, who have volunteered to step in during a strike. While preseason gaffes like facing the wrong direction while making a call and accidentally thinking the 5-yard

Corey Blaine

This week, the replacements were finally too much to bear.

Due to Georgetown football’s relative obscurity in comparison with the world-famous men’s basketball team, those unfamiliar with the Hilltop often assume the school has no gridiron presence. That’ll change tonight — for some cable subscribers, at least. The Blue and Gray’s (2-1) game at Princeton (0-1) tonight will be broadcast on ESPNU, marking the first time in history that a Georgetown football game has garnered national television coverage. Many factors could have inspired ESPN execs to cover the game. Was it the Hoyas’ meteoric rise from 0-11 to Patriot League runners-up in just three years? The Patriot League’s decision to allow athletic scholarships, prompting Georgetown to schedule more Ivy League schools? Maybe even the Hoyas’ thrilling 2421 loss to Yale last weekend? As it turns out, the answer is far less exciting. According to Georgetown athletic department spokesmen, the game is being televised because

VOLLEYBALL

More Woes for Hoyas in Home Opener PATRICK MUSGRAVE

line was part of the end zone made for great highlights on SportsCenter, I understood that there would be a learning curve. By no means would the replacement refs be on the same level as the league’s normal officiating crews, but the NFL should be able to round up enough people that know enough about football not to damage the on-field product. But on Monday Night Football this week, the replacements were finally too much to bear. After the referees clearly made a mistake in calling a penalty on a play when there was none, the head coach of the Denver Broncos rushed to the nearest referee to explain the rules to one of the individuals tasked with enforcing those rules. Is there another league where the coaches and players have to explain the rules to the referees? In sports, coaches and players normally try to push the rules as much as possible to give their team an advantage. Whether it’s a flop in soccer or a trapped ball in baseball, attempts to dupe the referees are a part of every sport. While such calls are often the subject of debate on sports talk shows and between announcers, they rarely decide See REFEREES, A9

FILE PHOTO: CHRIS GRIVAS/THE HOYA

See TIGERS, A9 Senior wide receiver Max Waizenegger (3) has had five receptions for 55 yards so far this season.

Special to The Hoya

AMY LEE FOR THE HOYA

After 12 road games, Georgetown returned home Tuesday night. Instead of a warm welcome, the Hoyas faced another defeat.

The Georgetown volleyball team (6-7) continued its slide Tuesday night, falling in four sets to Liberty (9-4) in the Hoyas’ home opener. The Blue and Gray, who have now lost seven of their last eight matches, committed 19 errors on the night and now urgently need to regroup before Big East play begins today. “We’ve [still] done some really good things this year,” Head Coach Arlisa Williams said after the loss. “We started out 5-0 and played a pretty high level of volleyball in doing that. We have to remind [the players], ‘Hey, we’ve been there, done that,’ and just have them draw on their experience.” Georgetown started the match strong in a hotly contested first set. But with the score knotted at 21, the Flames went on a 4-0 run started by a block the Hoyas were unable to return. Liberty then sent three straight spikes over the net to clinch the set. Although they were trailing,

the Blue and Gray put on a strong rally in the next period. Sophomore outside hitter Alex Johnson delivered a resounding spike to give the Hoyas an 8-7 lead early in the set, followed that up with a service ace and started her team off on a quick tear that extended the lead all the way to 15-9. Liberty rallied, however, winning three straight points to cut Georgetown’s advantage to 21-18. Williams called for time, and the Hoyas came back after the break to win four straight points and take the second set, 25-18. “There was nothing specific that I told them,” Williams said of the pivotal timeout. “I just reminded them to be composed, take care of the first ball, let’s terminate it and run back at them.” Sophomore middle blocker Dani White, who missed the previous match due to injury, was also key in the second-set victory. Ten of White’s 18 kills on the night came in that second frame, and the sophomore played a key role in firing up her teammates as well. See LIBERTY, A8

WOMEN’S SOCCER

After Eight Wins, NCAA Berth in Sight for Georgetown ARIK PARNASS Hoya Staff Writer

Midway through the season, the No. 19 Georgetown women’s soccer team (8-1-1, 2-0-0 Big East) has its sights set on making the NCAA tournament, which it missed out on a year ago. The squad has a chance to make its case even stronger this weekend when it plays host to conference opponents Connecticut (5-3-1, 1-1-0 Big East) and Providence (7-2-1, 2-0-0 Big East). Despite the Hoyas’ 15-6-0 overall record last season and their win over defending national champion Notre Dame, the NCAA committee still felt there was something missing from their profile. “The argument was that we didn’t

have enough resume wins,” Head Coach Dave Nolan said. “We had a number of wins, and we didn’t really have bad losses, but we didn’t have any banner wins.” Because of that experience, Nolan is impressing on this season’s team that simply beating lower-ranked competition won’t be enough. Up 4-0 at halftime against Seton Hall (6-4-0, 1-1-0 Big East) last Friday, the coach urged his team to continue to press forward. “A good team will go bury this team. A good team will go for the jugular,” Nolan said afterward. “Are we a good team?” His team answered him loud and clear, closing out the Pirates, 8-0. “They did their talking with their feet,” Nolan said. “We came out and we could have won by 10.”

Going into last Sunday’s game against Rutgers (7-3-0, 0-2-0 Big East), Nolan’s message was considerably different. This was the type of banner win the NCAA committee would be looking for, a road game against a top-20 team. The Blue and Gray responded with one of its best efforts of the year, dominating the Scarlet Knights and picking up the valuable conference road victory. For their strong performances, sophomore midfielder Daphne Corboz and junior defender Alexa St. Martin earned offensive and defensive Big East player of the week honors, respectively. Corboz registered her first career hat trick against Seton Hall, and

FILE PHOTO: CHRIS GRIVAS/THE HOYA

Sophomore midfielder Daphne Corboz (6) has 18 points so far this seaSee CONNECTICUT, A8 son, including seven goals and four assists.

Visit us online at thehoya.com/sports

The Hoya: Sept. 21, 2012  

Friday, Sept. 21, 2012

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