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GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY’S NEWSPAPER OF RECORD SINCE 1920 thehoya.com

Georgetown University • Washington, D.C. Vol. 94, No. 5, © 2012

friDAY, september 14, 2012

ON THE MOVE

EDITORIAL GU’s expansion plans value the interests of undergraduates.

Whether to race, relax or stay in shape, GU students keep running. GUIDE, G8

HEALTH Health Education Services will launch its first Social Norms Campaign.

FOOTBALL After five straight defeats, the Blue and Gray aim for a reversal against Yale.

NEWS, A5

SPORTS, A10

OPINION, A2

GCP Aims to Foster Leo’s Violated DC Health Code Town-Gown Dialogue Sarah Kaplan Hoya Staff Writer

Braden McDonald

Tuesday’s announcement that Gustafson would be part of the GCP Hoya Staff Writer leadership came after months of In contrast to the hostility and GUSA’s lobbying to get a student tension that characterized the rela- representative named to the steertionship between Georgetown and ing committee. its neighbors during the 2010 Cam“Vail [Kohnert-Yount (SFS ’13), pus Plan negotiations, both parties vice president of GUSA,] and I over are starting to express optimism the summer have literally been saythat a new era of cooperation has ing in every meeting with every begun. administrator, no matter who they According to Lauralyn Lee, who is are or if they’re related to the GCP, set to become the university’s asso- that having a student representaciate vice president for community tive on the GCP is of the utmost engagement and strategic initia- importance and a symbolic step totives in early October, the university ward establishing the students as a and the surrounding community legitimate party in our immediate have identified a series of common and neighboring community,” Gusobjectives that lend themselves to tafson said. collaboration rather than combat. Lee said that while students were Lee said that the Georgetown excluded from the closed-door Community Partnership — an or- negotiations that led to the agreeganization of university and neigh- ment between Georgetown and the borhood representatives that aims community on the campus plan, to provide a there is now an forum for the opportunity for joint resolution “Given the history ... greater student of town-gown involvement. there’s a natural first few issues — will “We recoghelp enable months that will be nized that the this shift in atnature of the challenging.” titude. particular nego“One of the tiation process LAURALYN LEE future associate VP for community things we’ve wasn’t conduengagement and strategic initiatives agreed on gocive to having ing into the students at the partnership is a common set of table but that we would ultimately goals,” Lee said at a Wednesday get to the partnership where we meeting with campus press. “We’ve really think the rubber is going to identified some strategic priorities hit the road in terms of the work of that we share, and … we’re asking the real value of building our comeverybody who’s engaged in the munity and that will have student partnership to work toward the engagement,” she said. kind of community in which we Gustafson is hopeful that her want to live.” spot on the GCP will allow her Ron Lewis, chair of Advisory to channel student opinion in a Neighborhood Commission 2E and meaningful and results-oriented neighborhood appointee to the way. She said that she and her team GCP’s steering committee, also at- will gather feedback through officetended the meeting. hour conversations with students, “[The GCP] is revolutionary for ev- special working groups and suberybody,” he said. committees of the GCP in which The partnership will operate on students will be more widely reprea committee structure, with work- sented. ing groups designated to deal with “It will be important that stuspecific issues related to George- dents who care about housing and town’s neighborhood relations. The transportation get involved as soon groups will be overseen by a steer- as [the GCP] starts,” she said. ing committee that includes Lewis, Lee identified GUSA’s Feb. 27 Georgetown University Student As- Student Life Report and the Hoya sociation President Clara Gustafson (SFS ’13) and a university appointee. See GCP, A7

The Department of Health reported six critical and two noncritical violations of the D.C. Health Code in an inspection of O’Donovan Hall conducted Sept. 4. According to the department’s

report, a food establishment with six or more critical violations would typically be closed immediately, but Georgetown’s dining hall was allowed to remain operative because it corrected two of the violations — improper separation and protection of different foods and the absence of an advisory notice warning diners

about raw or undercooked foods — during the course of the inspection. The other four critical violations identified during the Sept. 4 inspection were unclean food surfaces, improper temperatures for holding cold food, worn-out cutting boards and a broken walk-in cooler. The two noncritical violations were that some employees did not wear hair restraints and that the facility lacked chemical strips for testing sanitizing solutions. The dining hall was last inspected in September 2011, when the DOH reported only one noncritical violation of the health code. Leo’s is designated as a level three institution— an evaluation made independently of a food establishment’s inspection results — by the DOH, indicating that diners are at moderate risk of contracting foodborne illnesses. According to the District of Columbia Register, a level three rating indicates extensive handling of raw ingredients and preparation or processing of potentially hazardous foods. In the aftermath of eight health code violations, Leo’s also continues to face backlash from students and workers about dining changes that were implemented at the beginning

LEONEL DE VELEZ/THE HOYA

The DOH identified eight violations of the D.C. Health Code at Leo’s.

See LEO’S, A7

GU Jumps to No. 21 in Rankings Sarah Patrick Hoya Staff Writer

Georgetown University and the McDonough School of Business each moved up in the U.S. News and World Report’s 2013 college rankings, which were announced Tuesday. Georgetown rose one spot to No. 21 in the national university category, tying with the University of California at Berkeley. This category encompasses schools that conduct large-scale research and offer a full range of undergraduate majors as well as master’s and Ph.D. programs. Despite Georgetown’s improved placement, Dean of Admissions Charles Deacon said that the university does not place much value on rankings. “It is no big deal and really of no

influence on admissions,” Deacon wrote in an email. “Everyone tends to overrate the importance of these ratings.” According to the publication’s website, U.S. News bases its rankings on a metric that considers peer evaluations, high school counselor ratings, freshman retention rate, sixyear graduation rate, class sizes, faculty pay and credentials, admissions selectivity and financial resources. The MSB experienced a more sizeable improvement in rank this year: The school rose three places in the best undergraduate business list to No. 17 and tied for fourth in the international business school category. U.S. News forms its business school rankings by surveying deans and senior faculty at undergraduate business programs and asking peer

schools to rate other programs. MSB Dean David Thomas said that the new ranking will increase awareness of Georgetown’s business school. “I think [the ranking change] is a result of making our peers more informed about what we are doing,” he said. Unlike Deacon, Thomas said the magazine’s rankings have the potential to affect applicant interest in the MSB. “There are a lot of students … for whom U.S. News and World Report is almost like a bible in terms of judging the quality of schools and [how they will] influence where students are going to work,” Thomas said. “So there’s no question in my mind that those reports and rankings have a huge influence on applicants and applicants’ parents.”

ANC Candidates Seek to Encourage Student Voters

IN MEMORIAM

Kelly Church Hoya Staff Writer

ERICA WONG/THE HOYA

In an event organized by the Village A community and Hoyas for Troops, students wrote letters to soldiers in remembrance of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Newsroom: (202) 687-3415 Business: (202) 687-3947

Although Craig Cassey (COL ’15) and Peter Prindiville (SFS ’14) are running unopposed for seats on Advisory Neighborhood Commission 2E, both candidates have launched efforts to increase their vote count in November’s election. Cassey and Prindiville are aiming to improve on voter turnout from the last election cycle, when current ANC Commissioner Jake Sticka (COL ’13) was able to win his seat with nine votes in an uncontested election. According to ANC 2E Chair Ron Lewis, more than those nine people attempted to vote in Sticka’s district, SMD 2E04, but several students filled out their ballots incorrectly, using Georgetown’s main campus address as their home address rather than their individual dorm address. Still, this year’s candidates are working to encourage more students to vote in D.C. Sticka feels that there will be better voter turnout this year due to student dissatisfaction with the outcome of the 2010 Campus Plan negotiations, despite the fact that the presidential election might compel students to vote in their home districts. See VOTING, A7 Published Tuesdays and Fridays

LEONEL DE VELEZ/THE HOYA

Peter Prindiville (SFS ’14) and Craig Cassey (COL ’15) seek seats on ANC 2E. Send Story Ideas and Tips to news@thehoya.com


A2

OPINION

THE HOYA

FriDAY, september 14, 2012

THE VERDICT

EDITORIAL

A Competitive Vision For University Growth

W

ith negotiations for the 2010 Campus Plan at a virtual standstill this spring, university leadership had an epiphany. Rather than continue to quibble with uncompromising neighbors over short-term proposals, the administration decided to broaden its vision for the future and explore opportunities for the growth of graduate programs across the District. This new perspective did not just provide a breakthrough at the campus plan negotiating table; it created the possibility for a new era of university expansion — physical, to be sure, but also academic and conceptual. The Editorial Board of The Hoya sat down recently with University President John J. DeGioia and Chief Operating Officer Chris Augostini, who provided insight into the “next 100 acres.”

Sarah Patrick, Campus News Editor Braden McDonald, City News Editor Evan Hollander, Sports Editor Victoria Edel, Guide Editor Danny Funt, Opinion Editor Leonel De Velez, Photography Editor Emory Wellman, Layout Editor Emily Perkins, Copy Chief Michelle Cassidy, Blog Editor

Contributing Editors Mariah Byrne, Patrick Curran, Kavya Devarakonda, Katherine Foley, Bethany Imondi, Upasana Kaku, Shakti Nochur, Samantha Randazzo, Ashwin Wadekar, Lauren Weber

Caught Crimson Handed — More than 100 students of an undergraduate government class at Harvard are under investigation for cheating on an exam.

@professorbowman Sept. 11 So honored to be quoted by @thehoya Workforce Study Released — News — The Hoya.

grams can have a difficult time attending school in our affluent and isolated community, and a move downtown will improve their access to public transportation and affordable housing. Popular and successful programs in the School of Continuing Studies will be able to continue to grow and offer a service that DeGioia says is in high demand. “We want to contribute to the needs of the community, but we wanted to do it in a way that responded to the competitive pressures of being effective at it,” DeGioia said. In doing so, the university’s reputation — in D.C. and beyond — stands to get only stronger. The fact that this announcement coincided with campus plan talks should not be interpreted as a compromise. If it was in fact part of a bargain, it has remarkably mutual benefits. “Once we came to this realization and were guided by longer-term thinking, that enabled the community, the District and the university to come together,” Augostini said.

@CntrEdWrkfrce Sept. 11 @thehoya: Completing ur #postsec degree is best thing u can do during economic recovery. @willsommer Sept. 12 Strange: Georgetown’s @thehoya urges students NOT to register in D.C.

READER’S RESPONSE No, The Hoya is right; why should GUSA attempt to mobilize a normally lethargic campus about an issue that is critically important to the way they are treated in the eyes of the administration? I applaud GUSA’s effort to mobilize the campus, and Clara and Vail proved in their campaign that this campus can be engaged in the politics of the university when prompted. The board misses the mark in its statement, “This unusual type of referendum risks exacerbating student disenchantment with GUSA and the administration.” Instead, this vote will mobilize and catalyze the student body as they realize that a wildly popular demand of the students is being ignored and stonewalled (in typical fashion) by the administration.

Matt on “Justice Waits for Review” Posted Sept. 11, 2012

ALWAYS ON THE SUNNY SIDE by Sania Salman

“First and foremost, we want to make this a far more residential campus,” Augostini said. “And that doesn’t just mean beds.” Whether freed-up venues are converted into housing or social space, the changes will address concerns that have been a longstanding cause for contention in town-gown relations. There has been pressure to push students back on campus for years, but only through this plan can such a move be well received by both sides. The announcement of a development plan spanning multiple decades raises an important question for current students. It’s hard to feel strongly about campus construction that won’t be completed until after graduation; it’s even more difficult to take interest in construction that will serve future generations. But a Georgetown education is more than a four-year transaction, and it would be selfish and unproductive if each class of students stalled the administration with demands tailored to its immediate needs. We are permanently invested in this university, and for that reason, these plans deserve our full support. Students past, present and future should be grateful that the university has ambitions for a greater role in the District and in higher education.

Connor Gregoire, Editor-in-Chief Sarah Kaplan, Executive Editor Steven Piccione, Managing Editor

Science $pecial — As part of their grand opening special in Regents Hall, Einstein Bros. Bagels is charging a steep $3.50 for a bagel with cream cheese and coffee.

@madinamania Sept. 11 Thanks to @thehoya for your “super senior” article today, especially re: medical leaves. It’s nice to know I’m not alone.

Undergraduates Not Overlooked With all this talk of expanding professional and graduate programs, as undergraduates we can’t help but wonder: What about us? One might worry that with so much focus on graduate development, the university’s attention is shifting away from the undergraduate experience. After reviewing the impact of this proposal, we are relieved and grateful to say that undergraduates remain at the center of the university’s long-term planning. “Whatever we develop here would be designed to ensure that we sustain the commitment to undergraduate education,” DeGioia said. “The heart and soul of this place for 225 years is the undergraduate experience.” Graduate students and professors are a valued resource in undergraduate education, and there are no plans to disrupt that relationship. DeGioia clarified that Ph.D. programs with corresponding undergraduate departments would likely stay on campus or at least maintain easy access to it, and we appreciate the university’s foresight in this regard. What’s more, some of the space vacated by departing graduate programs is expected to serve undergraduates.

Departing Irish — One of Georgetown’s top rivals, Notre Dame, will be leaving the Big East Conference for the Atlantic Coast Conference.

A LITTLE BIRDIE TOLD US ...

Expansion Invigorates Image Georgetown’s pursuit of satellite campuses across the D.C. metropolitan area is a momentous step forward in the university’s development. The process may take more than 20 years to complete, but it signals a commitment by the university to remain competitive as a top-tier institution. Georgetown has long benefited from its balance of undergraduate and graduate academic opportunities. Many graduate programs feel cramped on the main campus, so relocating some of them to new spaces will provide more opportunities for growth without detracting from the Hilltop environment. Initial discussions have explored expansion into underdeveloped areas of the District. The establishment of new Georgetown campuses elsewhere in D.C. would alleviate local tensions while building partnerships in blossoming communities. “We are part of the fabric of this city … and we would be a crucial partner for the development of Washington,” DeGioia said. For the university, expansion is not simply a luxury. Students in executive pro-

C C C C

Founded January 14, 1920

One-Upmanship — Georgetown rose to No. 21 Tuesday in the U.S. News & World Report college rankings for 2013.

Emma Hinchliffe Hiromi Oka Kelly Church Sam Rodman Arik Parnass Ryan Bacic Zach Gordon Sheena Karkal Phoebe Lett Hunter Main Jamie Slater Hanaa Khadraoui Sari Frankel Chris Grivas Zoe Bertrand Kyle Hunter Jessica Natinsky Nikita Buley Martin Hussey

Deputy Campus News Editor Deputy Campus News Editor Deputy City News Editor Deputy Features Editor Deputy Sports Editor Sports Blog Editor Deputy Guide Editor Deputy Guide Editor Deputy Copy Editor Deputy Copy Editor Deputy Copy Editor Deputy Opinion Editor Deputy Photography Editor Deputy Photography Editor Deputy Layout Editor Deputy Layout Editor Deputy Layout Editor Graphics Editor Deputy Blog Editor

Editorial Board Danny Funt, Chair Kent Carlson, Sidney Chiang, Patrick Gavin, Hanaa Khadraoui, Laura Wagner

Jonathan Rabar, General Manager David Hanna, Director of Corporate Development James Church, Director of Finance Erica Hanichak, Director of Marketing Kent Carlson, Director of Personnel Mary Nancy Walter, Director of Sales Michael Vu, Director of Technology Glenn Russo Martha DiSimone Kelsey Zehentbauer John Bauke Molly Lynch Holly DiClemente Michal Grabias Keeley Williams Suzanne Fonzi Michael Lindsay-Bayley Ryan Smith

Special Programs Manager Accounts Manager Operations Manager Statements Manager Treasury Manager Public Relations Manager Human Resources Manager Institutional Diversity Manager Professional Development Manager Online Advertisements Manager Web Manager

Board of Directors

Lauren Weber, Chair

Patrick Curran, Connor Gregoire, Dylan Hunt, Jonathan Rabar, Mairead Reilly, Sam Schneider

Policies & Information Letter to the Editor & Viewpoint Policies The Hoya welcomes letters and viewpoints from our readers and will print as many as possible. To be eligible for publication, letters should specifically address a recent campus issue or Hoya story. Letters should not exceed 300 words. Viewpoints are always welcome from all members of the Georgetown community on any topic, but priority will be given to relevant campus issues. Viewpoint submissions should be between 600-800 words. Send all submissions to: opinion@ thehoya.com. Letters and viewpoints are due Sunday at 5 p.m. for Tuesday’s issue and Wednesday at 5 p.m. for Friday’s issue. The Hoya reserves the right to reject letters or viewpoints and edit for length, style, clarity and accuracy. The Hoya further reserves the right to write headlines and select illustrations to accompany letters and viewpoints. Corrections & Clarifications If you have a comment or question about the fairness or accuracy of a story, contact Executive Editor Sarah Kaplan at (917) 605-0509 or email executive@ thehoya.com. News Tips Campus News Editor Sarah Patrick: Call (860) 841-7530 or email campus@ thehoya.com. City News Editor Braden McDonald: Call (202) 687-3415 or email city@thehoya.com. Sports Editor Evan Hollander: Call (202) 687-3415 or email sports@thehoya.com. General Information The Hoya is published twice each week during the academic year with the excep-

tion of holiday and exam periods. Address all correspondence to: The Hoya Georgetown University Box 571065 Washington, D.C. 20057-1065 The writing, articles, pictures, layout and format are the responsibility of The Hoya and do not necessarily represent the views of the administration, faculty or students of Georgetown University. Signed columns and cartoons represent the opinions of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the editorial position of The Hoya. Unsigned essays that appear on the left side of the editorial page are the opinion of the majority of the editorial board. Georgetown University subscribes to the principle of responsible freedom of expression for student editors. The Hoya does not discriminate on the basis of age, gender, sexual orientation, race, disability, color, national or ethnic origin. © 1920-2012. The Hoya, Georgetown University twice weekly. No part of this publication may be used without the permission of The Hoya Board of Editors. All rights reserved. The Hoya is available free of charge, one copy per reader, at distribution sites on and around the Georgetown University campus. Additional copies are $1 each. Editorial: (202) 687-3415 Advertising: (202) 687-3947 Business: (202) 687-3947 Facsimile: (202) 687-2741 Email: editor@thehoya.com Online at www.thehoya.com Circulation: 6,500.


OPINION

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2012

VIEWPOINT • Cottrell

THE HOYA

A3

CONTEMPLATION IN ACTION

RA Life: Ponies and Police Distorted Religious T Identity Divides GU G

ake what you know about dormitory life. Now, imagine having to tell people on your floor that you can hear them having an in-depth conversation about masturbating from down the hall. Or waking up to find a pile of human feces in the hallway. Or chasing a pony in Southwest Quad after a petting zoo went awry. These moments as a residence assistant make it, without a doubt, the worst job on campus. There are, of course, a lot of thankless jobs out there for Georgetown students. Making $8.25 an hour logging packages in a Residence Hall Office? No, thank you. Waking up at 7:30 a.m. to swipe people into the library? I’ll pass. What makes being an RA the best — and worst — job on campus is the challenge of constantly learning how to deal with some incredibly uncomfortable situations. One of the most awkward aspects of life as an RA is being responsible for peers and older students, especially if those students are your friends. No one wants to shut down a friend’s birthday party at midnight because of quiet hours. And, in all honesty, what senior is going to regard a lowly sophomore as a figure of authority? RAs are forced to toe a fine line between keeping their jobs and keeping their friends. As an RA in Kennedy Hall last year, I learned that to survive such situations, you have to be consistent and upfront. If you’re going to be a negligent RA, be a negligent RA to everyone. If you’re going to stalk the halls, listening at each door for signs of unauthorized fun, you have to do it to all the students on your floor. As horrible as disciplining your friends sounds (and trust me, it is), it’s not too different from many awkward situations faced in the real world. Once you’ve had to write up your friends for pregaming and sit next to them in class the next day, you’ll be able to approach tough situations with professionalism and neutrality. Dealing with the Department of Public Safety was easily among the most unpleasant parts of

my experience on the job. I learned that interacting with DPS is like participating in the highly ritualized animal courting processes you see on the National Geographic Channel: One wrong move, and your relationship is over. For example, don’t make the fatal mistake of referring to them as “Dops” instead of their preferred “DPS.” To put it bluntly, a DPS officer can be quite the diva. I’m not saying that I don’t appreciate the function of DPS. They once protected me from a bleeding and belligerently drunk resident who refused to go back to his room. DPS also deals with intense conflicts that are beyond the scope of an RA’s expertise, and for that I’m grateful. However, I have also personally seen many situations escalate unnecessarily at the hands of an overeager DPS officer — or 20. One such situation stands out vividly. Late one night, a couple of DPS officers were questioning some residents from my floor about drunkenly roughhousing in the hallway. The situation escalated quickly, as things do, and soon, several more officers had appeared and were threatening arrest for assault and providing alcohol to minors. What had started as a routine write-up had suddenly turned into a tense interrogation. As an RA and a peer, I was in a difficult position. On the one hand, RAs are technically university staff and are expected to work with DPS to keep the peace. On the other hand, as a student, I felt extremely uncomfortable with what was happening. Seeing that it was 3 a.m., the latter instinct kicked in, and I voiced my concern about the situation. Bad choice. DPS wrote up a report on me, stating that I was “impeding the investigation.” This is just one example of the unpredictable experience of life as an RA. Confronting these challenges on a daily basis is draining, but you get to work through these obstacles with other RAs. When it’s all over, you come out having learned a lot about life — and chasing ponies. HALEY COTTRELL is a junior in the College.

1789 PROBLEMS by Arturo Altamirano

AS THIS JESUIT SEES IT...

Data Points to Education I

love data. This should come as no surprise ideas and artifacts. But just seeing the panoto any student who has taken my classes. ply of data points is not an education. Our I tend to pepper my lectures with graphs, more important task is to put them in concharts, maps and dynamic data visualizations. text, to see the relationships between them Sometimes I use them to highlight trends, and ultimately, to discern in them our place while other times, I hone in on a single outlier and purpose in the world. Jesuits have emthat begs explanation. I even love to analyze braced this task for centuries because we see data on student performance and study hab- a world charged with meaning, order and its — I’m still trying to understand why there’s purpose. We see a world in which rigorous an uptick in Blackboard use at 6 a.m. each inquiry leads us into an experience of curimorning. My love for data is one of the main osity and wonder — at nature, the human person and every aspect of our human socireasons I chose to be a social scientist. We are living in an unparalleled time in the ety and culture — and propels us into action. development of our ability to collect, analyze Jesuit education traces the arc from experiand visualize data. We have at our fingertips ence to reflection, decision and action. As a student, your biggest responsibility is access to measures and computational tools that would have been unthinkable to previous to see how one key data point — you, today, generations. When I was in college just two on this campus, in each of your classes and decades ago, a professor might spend months activities — connects with the world and its future. The study of the range producing a single graph to use of human experiences and in her class; I remember nearly thought, of nature and socievery chart that was ever shown ety and politics and economin a lecture because they were so ics, is anything but “academrare. My undergraduate thesis ic” — at least in the way that seemed cutting edge because it word gets misused to mean had a single regression in it. an inquiry distanced from Now, we can turn to dozens practical choices. It is the of data repositories and quickmost practical of pursuits, ly find answers to questions because it is all about develabout our world and society. My favorite tool of the moment, Fr. Matthew Carnes, S.J. oping a worldview that helps yousee where you fit in and Gapminder, displays populaallows you to choose how to tion-sized dots on graphs that Data often fl atten the respond to this world. compare relationships between What makes this so excitpolitical, economic and social importance of the ing to me, as a Jesuit and a variables and can even put reality they convey. professor, is that nobody can them in motion through time. do this for you. We can conIt’s dazzling to watch. Gapminder’s graph displaying the relationship be- front you with the best data and encourage tween GDP per capita and life expectancy has you to collect new data and analyze it in new ways. We can present to you the theories become a viral hit. But data points are exactly as Gapminder and perspectives that the best minds have presents them — dots. They tell us a great deal, developed to explain the data and to devise but they often flatten the importance of the solutions to problems and to understand our reality they convey. Take the single data point place in the world. But ultimately, you must of 15.1 percent of Americans, or 46.2 million connect the dots for yourselves. You have this privileged, graced time to people, who currently live in poverty. Shocking as this statistic is, it obscures as much as sift the data, reflect on meaning and make it reveals. It begs inquiry into the diversity of the critical transition from merely accumuexperiences among poor families across the lating knowledge to cultivating wisdom. nation, and it conveys almost nothing about Each time you do this — and discover your the human experience of living so precarious- place and purpose, and move forward from ly. To understand poverty and inequality, one Healy gates as people of meaning and comneeds to probe more deeply, exploring the mitment — you give us cause for wonder and gratitude. complexity the data point summarizes. At its heart, a Georgetown education — and speaking more broadly, a Jesuit education — Fr. Matthew Carnes, S.J., is an assistant prois about connecting the dots. It begins with fessor in the government department. He is data: information about the world around us, one of the alternating writers for AS THIS JESUIT its peoples, its cultures and its production of SEES IT ..., which appears every other Friday.

eorgetown students hail from over 40 countries and have ties to nearly every identity imaginable, from ethnicity to religion, sexuality to political beliefs. At face value, the limits to campus dialogue are few. Yet in an era of divisive identity politics, what should be this school’s greatest strength has instead become our greatest weakness. Georgetown is senselessly divided at the community level. De facto racial segregation is an accepted part of campus life. Political dialogue is often stunted and condescending. Social identity is club based, and limited resources have made these groups necessarily exclusive. Of course, Georgetown is no stranger to division. During the Civil War, the student body dropped to 17 as hundreds of students enlisted in the Union and Confederate armies. Yet blue and gray became Georgetown’s colors after the war to signal the school’s regained unity, when soldiers on opposing sides began to walk the halls once again as a single student body. Common purpose is the essence of our Catholic identity. It means we accept certain responsibilities by nature of matriculation: We agree to respect human dignity, help the poor, be conscious stewards of the planet and live in communal solidarity with one another. Georgetown was founded as a university open to all faiths. Fr. John Carroll, S.J., emphasized the importance of interfaith dialogue at a time when the Catholic Church was far from supportive of dissenting opinion. Fr. Patrick Healy, S.J., who served as university president 90 years after Carroll, was born a slave in Macon, Ga. About a century after that, in 1969, the College opened up to women. And then, at some point, things got messy. Georgetown refused to recognize LGBTQ groups on campus until the administration’s hand was forced by federal

courts in 1985. Student pushback on these issues brought scrutiny from above. The administration slowly but steadily began to protect itself by codifying its identity as a Catholic university in rules and regulations. As a result of this continuing tension, the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education ranked Georgetown this year among the

Nate Tisa

For many Georgetown students, Catholic has come to mean “no.” nation’s worst universities for freedom of expression. Administrators’ responses — pointing out “free-speech zones” in Red Square and on individual doors in residence halls — merely implies that you better behave on the remaining 98 percent of campus property. “Anti-Catholic” speech is often listed as a primary reason for the poor ranking. But this policy totally undercuts the Catholic principles of solidarity and community. It makes organizing large groups and outdoor demonstrations exceptionally difficult. During the “Out for Change” campaign in 2007, it resulted in the expulsion of any student wearing an “I Am” T-shirt inside Healy Hall and Dalghren Quad. What’s more, if campus dialogue centered on Catholic identity were a sincere value, restrictions on free speech would be unnecessary. H*yas for Choice, a prochoice student group, has existed on the periphery for years. The group contributes in meaningful ways to an

important campus conversation but is refused university recognition and relegated exclusively to the aforementioned “free-speech zones.” If Georgetown administrators and pro-life students believe, as I do, that the arguments against abortion are convincing, then they should not fear open dialogue with those who disagree. In fact, our Catholic identity calls us to participate in that discussion to open minds and soften hearts. The ban on H*yas for Choice delegitimizes the abortion dialogue and removes value from pro-life arguments in the eyes of those who are unconvinced. For many Georgetown students, Catholic means “no.” No, because donors would be offended. No, because it risks the ire of the Vatican. No pro-choice groups on campus. No access to contraception. No openly gay groups, period. Yet by refusing to engage students in open dialogue on these issues, administrators undermine Georgetown’s founding principles and alienate students from our school’s Catholic identity. We will not regain a lasting sense of community until we return to the trust and common purpose implied in our Catholic heritage. Not all of the needed change lies at the university level. As individuals, we benefit from engaging others on new issues and in new ways. Challenge yourself to breach the established lines, whether they are social, political or cultural in nature. Georgetown students have the potential to spark a major renewal of the university’s Catholic identity — properly understood. In a charged and divisive national environment, we can find in our roots a universalism that aims to teach, not dictate, foster understanding, not resentment, and remind us day by day why we found ourselves on the Hilltop. NATE TISA is a junior in the School of Foreign Service. He is transition chair of the GUSA senate.

VIEWPOINT • Mathis

System Stymies Progress

B

ack in 2007, nearly one in seven water fountains on Georgetown’s campus was broken. One student saw this as a problem that could easily be solved by a meeting with the Department of Facilities. A “Reimagine Georgetown” grant, an article in THE HOYA and a GUSA resolution later, Karen Frank, at the time vice president for housing and facilities, and her colleagues still stonewalled repairs, citing “student vandalism.” It took several months before the fountains were finally fixed. This minor issue represents a larger problem at Georgetown. The school is characterized by a bloated administration with a culture and mindset that impedes innovation. In a 2007 study, the Goldwater Institute researched 200 universities and reported their administrator-tostudent ratios. The combined average was 8.4 administrators per 100 students. Georgetown’s ratio was 12.8. Along with this immense bureaucracy, Georgetown’s administrative culture seems to further impede student-driven change. Students and alumni alike are often met with a boilerplate “no” when they put forward new ideas, like the proposed Healy Pub or a recently scrapped project to convert historical parts of campus into student space. Frank, who recently retired, was infamous for her steadfast refusal to compromise with students. Along with the water fountain debacle, she’s remembered for her reluctance to participate in student roundtables. Instead, she designated a proxy

to deal with student concerns. As a member of the executive team in charge of the Solar Street initiative to install solar panels on university townhouses, I can speak firsthand about such bureaucratic inertia. Since I joined the project a year ago, I have encountered constant pushback from university administrators at all levels, despite the project’s proven payback and financial resources from funds recently freed up by SAFE reform. Representatives from facilities, legal counsel, housing and other departments constantly tell me, “This won’t work because of ...” instead of exploring ways to make it happen. What makes things even more frustrating is that American University and The George Washington University — with the backing of their respective administrations — have installed much larger renewable energy systems in a fraction of the time. Georgetown must ask itself: “How can other universities be so in touch with student-led innovations and bring them to fruition efficiently?” The problem lies in a culture that is unwelcoming to change. Glacially paced bureaucracy and an obsession with maintaining the status quo have prevented Georgetown from capitalizing on cutting-edge opportunities time and time again. And in this case, the inability of all parties to be on the same page could have disastrous consequences, as we face the possibility of losing funding when our award expires at the end of the year.

The future is not totally bleak, however. The ongoing planning process for the New South Student Center is a good example of how the university can interact on a positive level with students. Students are participating in design meetings, and there was even a chance for students and alumni to meet with the project’s architects in New York City. Students have been treated as if they actually have a stake in the NSSC, which is appropriate — after all, they are paying for almost $2 million of it. Some administrators successfully interact with students and strive to put Georgetown at the forefront of innovation. More administrators should follow their example and encourage the sort of collaboration and transparency that have been integrated into the NSSC design process. As the university searches for a replacement for Karen Frank and other retiring administrators, it is necessary to seek candidates who are forward thinkers and realize the potential of student-led initiatives on Georgetown. Student influence and inclusion on projects that affect them are essential to creating a vibrant campus community and learning environment, but institutional bureaucracy and a culture that favors the status quo endanger future progress. If this trend continues, Georgetown will squander opportunities to lead our peers through cooperative innovation. DAN MATHIS is a senior in the School of Foreign Service. He is an executive board member of Georgetown Energy.


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THE HOYA

PAGE FOUR

NEWS

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2012

INSIDE THIS ISSUE Bayit, a Jewish Living Learning Community, will be an option on housing applications for next fall. See story on A6.

Your news — from every corner of The Hoya.

IN FOCUS

verbatim

VIOLENTOLOGÍA

We live on one of the most inaccessible campuses ever.

Lydia Brown (COL ’15), On the need for a Disability Cultural Center at Georgetown. See story on A7

from

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ERICA WONG/THE HOYA

Writers Stephen Ferry and Sibylla Brodzinsky shared their expertise on the ongoing violence in Colombia at an event organized by the Lannan Center held Wednesday.

SURVIVING THE APOCALYPSE It’s the beginning of the end, and we couldn’t be more excited. Check out our guide to Senior Dis-Orientation, starting this weekend! blog.thehoya.com

Contract Dispute Delays Taxi Meter Upgrade MEGHAN PATZER Hoya Staff Writer

The installation of credit card meters with GPS tracking devices in all District taxis, a centerpiece of Mayor Vincent Gray’s 2010 election campaign, has been postponed indefinitely following a contract dispute levied by bidders that failed to win the Taxicab Smart Meter System contract. The $35 million contract, which was granted exclusively to VeriFone Systems, Inc. in July, was suspended after Monica Parchment, a judge on D.C.’s Contract Appeals Board, ruled that protests by a pair of losing bidders must be resolved before installation of the “smart meters” in all of the District’s 6,500 taxis can be continued. Only a few dozen meters were installed before the protesting bidders, Creative Mobile Technologies, LLC of New York, and RideCharge, Inc. of Alexandria, Va., forced installation to grind to a halt. This decision came after Gray celebrated the installation of the first meter in August. The modernization of D.C. cabs was one of the mayor’s most highly publicized goals throughout his campaign, according to Doxie McCoy, the mayor’s senior communications manager. “When [Gray] came into office in January 2011, this was one of his main priorities. It continues to be a major focus despite the recent setbacks, and we are confident that things will be settled as soon as pos-

sible,” McCoy said. However, fulfilling the initial goal of outfitting all city cabs with the new meters in time for the presidential inauguration in January will prove difficult. “We’re disappointed with the conflict, though we are very hopeful that it can be resolved quickly. That said, if the judge orders that the contract needs to be resolicited, that goal will no longer be reachable,” said Neville Waters (MSB ’91), public affairs specialist for the D.C. Taxi Commission. “The commission really was hoping for all of the cabs to be ready with this new technology by the time of the inauguration, particularly because of the added tourism we will see.” Both the DCTC, including its commissioner, Ron Linton, and the mayor’s office are hopeful the deadline can still be met. “These meters will be a disincentive for crime, as drivers will not have to carry as much cash and will therefore be lesser targets for robbery and assault,” McCoy said. The GPS-equipped meters will also include a safety button that drivers can push to notify medical or police personnel of an emergency. “We are really counting on [having] this contract pull through because we have a distinct vision to incorporate technology into public vehicles for hire, whether CHRISTINA MCGRATH/THE HOYA for hailing, booking or paying for An upgrade to DC’s taxi meters to include credit card and GPS capabilities has been halted by a contract dispute. cabs,” Waters said.

BeWell Campaign Seeks to Redefine Alcohol Norms LAURA ZHANG

Special To The Hoya

Georgetown’s first-ever Social Norms Campaign, which aims to promote responsible drinking on campus, will begin this Monday. Health Education Services is launching the campaign as part of its annual BeWell Week, which now lasts 14 days. Similar to last year’s event, which was held the week of Sept. 26, BeWell Week aims to promote a happier and

more health-conscious environment at Georgetown. The Hoya Health Hut, where Health Services staff and student volunteers will offer advice and provide healthy food, will rotate locations between O’Donovan Hall, Copley Lawn, Red Square, Leavey Center and Village C. Additionally, Yates Field House will offer free fitness classes to encourage the community to stay active. “We’re trying to encourage laughing, relaxing, exercising and other components of a healthy lifestyle,”

said Catherine Merwin (NHS ’15), a BeWell Week student organizer. But the primary focus of the program is the Social Norms Campaign, which will highlight the dangers of binge drinking and alcohol abuse. Planning for this campaign began nine years ago and will culminate this year on Sept. 26 in a day devoted to alcohol education. According to Social Norms Coordinator and Health Promotion Counselor Tessa Telly, the campaign aims to encourage responsible

drinking rather than to lecture students about the consequences of alcohol consumption. “The theme this year is ‘work hard, play hard.’ We hear this slogan all the time, so we thought it was a better way to connect with students, as it is definitely relevant to college students,” Telly said. “We hope students will make smarter choices.” BeWell Week Student Coordinator Jessica Kohan (NHS ’14) emphasized that the campaign aims to address the pressure that some students

may feel to drink heavily. “Being a college student, I know that one of the assumptions that comes along with college life is binge drinking. We understand that Georgetown students are very ambitious and hard working, and to contrast that constant work, students often feel they need to ‘play’ just as hard as they work,” Kohan said. “We want this campaign to show students that having fun and partying does not have to mean getting black-out drunk.”


News

friday, september 14, 2012

THE HOYA

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Outdoor Ed Looks to Grow Panel Examines Violence Laura Zhang

Special to The Hoya

Despite former Director of Georgetown University Outdoor Education Russ Watts’ resignation, the program continues to expand its presence on campus. Watts resigned after accepting a job at the Dog Tag Bakery, a local nonprofit organization that serves veterans and their families by providing baked goods. Former Assistant Director Sam Bonfield assumed responsibility as Outdoor Education’s interim director in April. Student Director Alex Moran (SFS ’13), who temporarily filled Watts’ position in the spring, described Watts as a very enthusiastic and popular leader but said that the travel-intensive nature of the position contributed to Watts’ decision.

COURTESY RUSS WATTS

Former Director of Georgetown University Outdoor Education Russ Watts resigned.

“Russ just recently got married, and he has a five-month-old baby. Outdoor Education required him to travel a lot, so it wasn’t the most convenient,” Moran said. The recent change in leadership, however, provides opportunities for a more influential student management team. “Outdoor Education at Georgetown is pretty much a student-run organization now. In my opinion, new leadership is always an opportunity for positive change and growth,” Moran said. “We’ve hired a new team of coordinators and base camp managers and, as the new director, Sam has a very clear idea of what we should focus on this year and how we want to grow.” According to Moran, Outdoor Education plans to create more leadership positions to encourage student involvement. The department is also looking to expand its class offerings in response to a surge in student interest at this year’s Student Activities Fair. The Georgetown Outdoor Activities Training program will hold a wilderness first-aid course in the spring, while the Georgetown Rock Instructor Program will be collaborating with GOAT to provide more outdoor activities and training options and to plan more trips for students on campus. “I know Outdoor Education is in great hands,” Watts said. “I loved working at Outdoor Education and am excited to see how Georgetown and the new managers and future directors can take what we all have built over the last decade to the next level of excellence.”

Hiromi Oka

ages from his book “Violentology” — named after a Latin American field of study that examines conflict, called violentología. “I realized it’s far more severe, far more complex, than I had imagined,” Ferry said about the Colombian violence. He traced the history of violence in the South American country to La Violencia, a civil war between the country’s liberal and conservative parties that gripped the country during the 1940s and 1950s. The end of the war, however, did not bring a stop to the violence. Since then, government forces, a leftist insurgency and right-wing paramilitaries have jockeyed for control of this volatile region. “The reaction to [the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia] was the paramilitary movement, which was a cure worse than the disease,” Ferry said. He described how the paramilitaries joined with drug traffickers to create an unholy alliance against the leftist guerrillas, which caused vio-

Hoya Staff Writer

Three experts on the violence in Colombia discussed their work at a panel on Wednesday. The event, called “Immortal Joy and Furrows of Pain: Terror and Testimony in Colombia,” was organized by the Lannan Center for Poetics and Social Practice and featured photographer Stephen Ferry and writers Sibylla Brodzinsky and Max Schoening. Photographer Harry Mattison served as moderator for the discussion and showed photos from his experiences documenting the conflict in El Salvador during the 1970s and 1980s. One image featured rows of massacred victims with a crowd looking on and a priest photographing the bodies. “Why was the priest taking pictures?” Mattison said. “Because no one would believe.” The event emphasized this sense of disbelief, which Ferry illustrated by presenting im-

lence in Colombia to increase. Brodzinsky and Schoening also presented excerpts from a collection of oral histories that they edited “Throwing Stones at the Moon.” The excerpts included the stories of survivors of the conflict. “A lot of them continue to live in dire situations,” Schoening said of his interviewees for the book. “There’s a limit to the regeneration that could happen through the process of storytelling.” While the violence has subsided, Brodzinsky noted that the country still faces a long path to recovery. “There are certainly fewer massacres, kidnappings [and] killings than 10 years ago, but it’s by no means over,” she said. “The situation in Colombia will remain violent for many years.” Students who attended the panel had strong emotional reactions. “I felt like I could really connect with the images,” Katherine Everitt (COL ’13) said. “Any word I could use is too shallow.”

Georgetown Course Criticized for Portrayal of Hinduism Emma Hinchliffe Hoya Staff Writer

Rajan Zed, president of the Universal Society of Hinduism, released a statement to the media Saturday criticizing Georgetown’s representation of the Hindu faith in its theology courses. Zed said that a spring 2012 Georgetown course on Hinduism, “Hinduism Today,” made use of dacoit film, a genre that depicts bandits in rural India. He argued that the course should instead focus on the more religious aspects of Hindu culture. “GU should treat the … third largest religion of the world more respectfully and depict it more honestly,” he said in the statement. The film in question, “Bandit Queen,” tells the nonfictional story of a child bride who escapes from her much older husband to live as a criminal but eventually becomes a member of the Indian parliament.

Ariel Glucklich, the theology professor who taught the course last spring, defended his decision to show the film in class. “It’s not dacoit. It’s not an exploitative commercial movie,” he said. “I would wager any amount of money [Zed] never saw the movie.” Zed’s statement listed many alternative media sources and texts that he thought would be more appropriate to a Hinduism course. In response, Glucklich explained that “Hinduism Today” was intended to focus on modern representations of Hinduism as well as current cultural practices. He said that in his other courses, which focus on the history of traditional Hinduism, he teaches many of Zed’s suggested texts. “This critique came from someone trying to defend a point of view, not thinking about students’ education,” Glucklich said. “He’s thinking of defending a privileged point of view, and that’s not my job at Georgetown.”

asked if any practicing Hindus had anything to say,” she said. Some of Georgetown’s introductory theology classes also touch on Hinduism. HSA Vice President Neha Jejurikar (NHS ’13), who is currently enrolled in “The Church in the 21st Century,” taught by Fr. Kevin O’Brien, S.J. (CAS ’88), said she has enjoyed her theology courses. “Although our focus is on Christianity today, [O’Brien] is very proactive about including the Hindu faith in discussion in the classroom,” Jejurikar wrote in an email. “I am thankful that he makes a conscious effort to relate the issues we talk about in class to every student’s faith tradition.” But Banjeree, Mohan and Glucklich agreed that they want to see more resources for Hindu students at Georgetown. “Hinduism is so vast and diverse, so having classes that focus on smaller

Theology courses that explore Hinduism attract Hindu and non-Hindu students alike, and some agreed with Zed’s criticisms. “I was worried for the people who didn’t have a background in Hinduism,” Hindu Students Association President Anwesha Banjeree (COL ’13) said. “I remember sitting in class, wondering what everyone else was thinking about us.” Banjeree, who took Gluckich’s class “Hindu Religious Tradition,” said she thought she interpreted the lectures differently from her non-Hindu classmates. “To me it was like a history class, but to other people it was a Hinduism class,” she said. “I liked it, but it still concerned me to some extent.” Smiti Mohan (MSB ’15), who serves as HSA’s treasurer, took the course in question, Glucklich’s “Hinduism Today,” in the spring of 2012. “I would speak up if [the professor]

aspects of the religion could be cool,” Mohan said. “Maybe a class about holidays or a class exploring different incarnations of the gods. The [current] classes are so broad and try to cover so much.” Glucklich also expressed interest in reintroducing classes that focus on teaching the Hindi language. “We had a Hindi teacher for two years, but she’s gone,” he said. “Sanskrit is taught by a professor in the linguistics department, so the approach is not to read scripture but from a linguistic perspective.” Banjeree expressed gratitude to Georgetown’s Campus Ministry staff for their support of HSA. “They have been very supportive [of] HSA and HSA’s growth over the past few years,” Banjeree said. “I think they’re very open minded to our future and the Hindu community on campus. We would not be half of what we are without their support.”

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A6

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THE HOYA

FRIday, september 14, 2012

Student Life Progress Remains Tentative Hiromi Oka & Annie Chen Hoya Staff Writer

Almost seven months after the release of the Student Life Report, a 10-year blueprint for improving the quality of the on-campus experience, its primary recommendations are still in the process of being addressed. The main requests brought up in the report included improving administrative accessibility, increasing the availability of student space, expanding Georgetown’s arts programs, increasing undergraduate research opportunities and hiring a professional director of club sports, among others. According to Director of Student Life Report Implementation Jack Appelbaum (COL ’14), the Georgetown University Student Association wants to carefully prioritize recommendations and ensure that student autonomy is emphasized in the process of enacting the goals listed in the report. “We’re not saying these are the 60 recommendations and we’re trying to check them off,” he said. “A lot of the recommendations are in progress.” Appelbaum said the Hoya Roundtables and the crowd-sourcing website IdeaScale will be utilized to allow students to input their suggestions for campus improvement. According to President Clara Gustafson (SFS ’13), GUSA has struggled to implement several of the recommendations related to improving communication between students and administrators. “Reducing bureaucracy is always a challenge at this university,” she said. Thus far, GUSA is working to institute office hours for University President John J. DeGioia and Vice President for Student Affairs Todd Olson. “We all love him, but we don’t see him, so it would be great to see him at those bigger events,” Gustafson said of DeGioia. According to Chief of Staff Jake Sticka (COL ’13), GUSA has successfully made strides toward addressing space recommendations included in

the report. The construction of Regents Hall has increased the number of study areas on campus, but GUSA hopes to continue to add to study space on campus based on recommendations made in the report. Additionally, a centralized spacebooking system, overseen by Director of Student Programs Erika CohenDerr and Chief Information Officer Lisa Davis, has been created to consolidate information about space availability across campus. GUSA is also working with the performing arts board to improve arts at the university. Students and faculty alike have expressed disappointment with the current programs. Department of Performing Arts Chair Maya Roth said that the university recognizes its oversight of the department. “The last time Georgetown went through [the Middle States accreditation process], there was serious concern about how you can call yourself a rigorous liberal arts institution for not taking the arts seriously,” Roth said. However, Roth said that due to an increased interest in the arts, the arrival of new students with fresh talent and the university’s recognition of the need to dedicate more resources to this program, she is hopeful that the department will expand. GUSA also aims to improve student intellectual life by instituting an undergraduate research symposium that will be held in the spring. “It’s a great way to centralize intellectual life,” Sticka said. “Now we see Georgetown as a school rewarding research.” Though the university has not yet hired a professional director to manage Georgetown’s club sports program, these teams now have a cabinet member to represent their interests in GUSA. Overall, Sticka was optimistic about the progress of the report’s implementation. “It’ll be exciting, going forward,” he said.

ZACH GORDON/THE HOYA

The Jewish Student Association Board was instrumental to the approval of the new Living Learning Community.

Jewish Community Centralized Annie Chen

Hoya Staff Writer

The Office of Residence Life approved plans to institute a Jewish Living Learning Community on Wednesday. Dubbed Bayit — “home” in Hebrew — the program is the 10th Living Learning Community at Georgetown and will become an option on housing applications for next fall. The LLC’s future location is still unknown. According to Mitchel Hochberg (SFS ’15), who spearheaded the project, the LLC aims to provide a hub for Jewish life on campus. The idea emerged after Hochberg had a casual conversation with a friend from the Muslim Interest LLC. “[He] told me, ‘Why don’t you guys start one of these?’” Hochberg said. “We joked around a bit, but I started to really consider it after the conversation.” Hochberg observed that despite the prevalence of student groups and initiatives dedicated to Jewish interests — the Jewish Student Association, the Georgetown Israel Alliance, the Jewish Chaplaincy and the Program for Jewish Civilization — there is no defined home for Jewish students on campus. “It’s taking a community that exists [and] really centralizing it, [creating] a

hub for its activities and a residential dimension,” Hochberg said. Jewish Student Association Co-President Isaac Mishlove (SFS ’15) said that the LLC will facilitate the exchange of information between Jewish student groups. “There is a lot of redundancy that happens when you look at a wall and you have a PJC poster, a JSA poster, a chaplaincy poster. … When anyone looks at it, all of them blend together,” Mishlove said. “I think it will be a good space for people that are involved in different groups to have a lot more transparency on what’s going on in different aspects of Jewish-related life on campus.” Hochberg distinguished Bayit from other LLCs by pointing out that it will meet the needs of an already well-developed group. “It is unique among the other Living Learning Communities because it’s not creating a community in the same way that some of the other ones are,” Hochberg said. “It serves a function for an existing community that was not served before.” However, Mishlove expressed concern that the LLC, which can accommodate only a limited number of students, will potentially create an exclusive group. “Initially, I thought it was going

to be a divider for Jewish students on campus. I still [have] that hesitation,” Mishlove said. “Because we come from so many places, [have] so many ways of practicing [and] so many mixes of students identify as Jewish in different ways … unity is a thing we need to work on.” As with other LLCs, interested students can apply to live in the space, but Hochberg said that those who follow the kashrut, a set of strict Jewish dietary laws, will be given priority. “It will be a lot easier for prospective students who are very observant [of] Jewish dietary laws to come to Georgetown if they [have] an environment like this,” Hochberg said. Mishlove said he anticipates that Bayit will attract students who already are involved in Jewish leadership positions on campus. “The names that would be going into this lottery would be pretty predictable already,” Mishlove said. Director of Jewish Chaplaincy Rabbi Rachel Gartner, the faculty adviser for Bayit, said the LLC will provide more opportunities for Georgetown’s Jewish students. “For folks that want a slightly more intensive cultural experience and holistic experience of living a Jewish life, this will be a great opportunity,” Gartner said.


news

Friday, september 14, 2012

THE HOYA

A7

Voter Registration in DC Disability Cultural Center A Priority for ANC Hopefuls Under Development VOTING, from A1 “I think there have been a lot of events in the past two years that have shown people how important it is to get involved by registering,” he said. “I think you’re still going to see a lot more people vote here, and I think in 2014 that will go up even higher because people won’t be voting at home.” Both Cassey and Prindiville are also hopeful that recent events relating to the campus plan will increase turnout, even though their elections are uncontested. “I’m hoping to receive as many as I can possibly get,” Cassey said. “When Jake Sticka ran, he was also uncontested, but there’s an importance in having a large student turnout. It represents a unified student body that wants to engage in local politics and hold their elected officials accountable.” Cassey added that a strong voter turnout will send a clear message to the representative of SMD 03, a district split almost evenly between students

and local residents. The district is likely to elect a nonstudent in this election, but a high vote count for Cassey and Prindiville would show the SMD 03 representative that he could be defeated in the next election if he fails to represent student interests during his term. Lewis, however, questioned the significance of increasing the number of students registered to vote in D.C. “I don’t think it matters,” he said. “In an uncontested race, you don’t expect a high vote count, no matter who is registered where.” The issue of where students should register to vote this year has prompted controversy. While some say that students should vote at home, where their votes may count for more, Prindiville and Cassey feel that students should use their vote to influence local elections. “I hope students will register in the District,” Prindiville said. “Students in the District have remarkable power in a local election. My hope is to encourage students to exercise

this power and exercise their vote.” In the months leading up to the election, both Cassey and Prindiville are focused on educating students and helping them register. Their efforts include one-on-one conversations and social media campaigns. Prindiville has devoted a section of his campaign to student outreach and education. “We’re going to be doing a lot of door-to-door knocking, tabling in Red Square and reaching out to specific students, helping them through the registration and voting process … [and] encouraging them to vote in their local election,” he said. “I think students … need to add their voice to the conversation.” Prindiville added that TurboVote, a service that allows constituents to register to vote online, should increase student participation this year. “Registering [to vote] in D.C. is already very simple, but I think TurboVote is great because it targets students and makes [registration] very easy,” Prindiville said.

Lily Westergaard Hoya Staff Writer

For every disabled student who has struggled to navigate campus, Georgetown students are in the initial stages of establishing one of the country’s first Disability Cultural Centers. “As a whole we live on one of the most inaccessible campuses ever,” said Lydia Brown (COL ’15), an autistic student who is spearheading the project. About 20 members of the university community attended an event on Wednesday night that Brown organized, at which they began the process of assembling a planning committee that will write a proposal and lobby support for the center. “This is in the very beginning stages,” Brown said, adding that the Center will require funding, office space and a full-time faculty director and will likely take a few years to get off the ground. “It will be the foundational branch of the university for addressing disability and it will directly collaborate with student organizations and centers specific to disability and diversity in general,” she said. The proposed center will serve as an administrative office similar to the LGBTQ Resource Center. The center will promote equal access, provide a safe space for conversation and encourage activism. Additionally, the center will offer social activities, a mentorship program and community service projects. “It’s very different from a disability support services office. Their primary goal is to facilitate and provide support services. … The idea behind establishing a Disability Cultural Center is to not just talk about disability in the medical sense,” Brown said. While groups like DiversAbility, Best Buddies and Active Minds address the needs of

FILE PHOTO

Lydia Brown (COL ’15) is leading the campaign for a GU disability center. disabled students on campus, Georgetown’s disabled community lacks a unified center, Brown said. Renleigh Bartlett (COL ’15), who struggled with getting around campus on crutches because of a sprained ankle, rated Georgetown a six out of ten on its accessibility. “Getting around campus [when I was on crutches] was ridiculous,” Bartlett said. “Not every building has ramps or pressure-sensitive doors.” Bartlett added that students on campus do not always respect their disabled peers. “A lot of ableist language goes on,” she said. “There’s a lot of dismissal on campus. I think there needs to be less hesitation on open discourse.” Ally Collin Segura (COL ’15) echoed Bartlett’s statement. “There’s a lot of ignorance surrounding the neurodiversity community, and I think Georgetown could do more to help,” he said. “This is a social justice issue.”

GCP Leadership Lauds New Era of Cooperation GCP, from A1

LEONEL DE VELEZ/THE HOYA

On top of health code violations, recent changes at the dining hall have met with distaste from students, some of whom are launching a campaign to bring back popular features.

Students Petition for Further Leo’s Changes LEOS, from A1 of the semester. Among those alterations were the removal of the popular make-your-ownpizza station and the scaling back of the pasta station. “A lot of the things that students liked best about Leo’s are gone,” Craig Cassey (COL ’15) said. “I never leave Leo’s satiated any more.” Cassey is among a group of several students, including members of the Georgetown Solidarity Committee, that has been informally petitioning Dining Services and the administration to bring back some of the old favorites.

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“Essentially, we’ve seen a lot of food changes happening at Leo’s that have impacted students and the quality of food … and we’ve seen a lot of student response to that as well as a lot of worker response to that,” GSC member Erin Riordan (COL ’15) said. The criticism prompted the university to launch a revamped outreach campaign titled “We Hear You 2.0.” The new effort includes the reintroduction of make-your-own pizza on weekends, an expansion of the pasta station and the creation of daily wok specials and a taco station. But according to GSC member Julia Hubbell (COL ’15),

these changes aren’t enough. “[The GSC] thinks that this is a very important [issue] that we want to bring into conversation on the campus about the quality of food that our students are receiving and for there to be a discussion about how to make it better,” Hubbell said. Cassey believes that news of the dining hall’s Sept. 4 health code violations will provide greater impetus for the campaign. “It’s a good thing to use to get people motivated to change Leo’s,” he said. Hoya Staff Writer Sarah Patrick contributed to this report.

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Roundtables that have taken place on campus throughout the year as other ways of gathering student feedback. Both Lee and Lewis stressed developing quality on-campus student life as a top priority of the GCP’s steering committee. “In terms of campus student life [and] the idea of a true living and learning community on campus … there’s room for improvement,” Lewis said. “We need places where it can be made a lot more congenial for students and a lot more opportunities for students to socialize on campus and have a welcoming, safe and physically adequate building space that just doesn’t exist now.” Gustafson agreed that on-campus student spaces should be a main focus, adding that she would also emphasize the need for a wider array of transportation options through her position on the GCP. Lewis said that he and other community partners will ensure that the neighborhood voice is also effectively represented on the GCP. In addition to Lewis, representatives of the Burleith Citizens Association, the Citizens Association of George-

town, ANC 3D and the Foxhall Community Citizens Association will serve on various GCP committees. While the details of the structure of the GCP have yet to be ironed out, Lewis and Lee said that it will function on the basis of consensus. “There’s going to be lots of listening, lots of discussing [and] lots of conversation,” Lee said. “We’re going to hear different opinions and … work together in the partnership to get to a consensus. Sometimes … people are not happy about the decision that is also ultimately the recommendation … but that’s the design. The plan is to let those perspectives be fleshed out.” Lee also acknowledged that while the formation of the GCP foreshadows a norm of cooperation, the group will continue to face challenges as it begins to tackle concrete issues. “One of the challenges is to begin to think and act like partners,” Lee said. “We are transitioning from what was sort of a hostile environment. … Given the history … there’s a natural first few months of the partnership that will be challenging.”

DPS BLOTTER Friday, Sept. 6, 2012 Suspicious Person, Reiss Science Building, 1:02 p.m. The Department of Public Safety received a report of a man soliciting money from students. The man was identified, apprehended and barred from campus. Alcohol/Drug Violation, Harbin Hall, 9:23 p.m. A student was found to be in possession of alcohol and marijuana. The student is under the age of 21. The case is being forwarded to student conduct. Saturday, Sept. 7, 2012 Assault, 34th and O Streets NW, 2 a.m. Two female Georgetown students were involved in an argument that resulted in a physical assault. One of the females reported that the second female grabbed her arm and twisted it. She did not require medical attention. This case is under investigation. Disorderly Conduct, 1300 Block of 35th Street NW, 3:33 a.m. An intoxicated male Georgetown student was observed knocking down trash cans as he walked down the street. This case will be forwarded to student conduct. Disorderly Conduct, 35th and N Streets NW, 3:36 a.m. An intoxicated male identified as a Georgetown student was observed knocking down trash cans as he walked down the street. This case will be forward to student conduct. Sunday, Sept. 9, 2012 Assault, 3600 Block of N Street NW, 1:54 a.m. A Georgetown student reported that he was assaulted by an unknown male. When DPS arrived on the scene, the student had a

torn shirt collar, scratches on his neck and scrapes on his left elbow. He was uncooperative and refused to give any details beyond telling the officer that a random male pushed him into a parked vehicle. The student left the scene after becoming irate and refused to comply with DPS. Assault, Nevils, 2:40 a.m. DPS responded to a report of an assault involving three male Georgetown students. Two of the students reported being punched by the third. One student required medical attention. The case is being forwarded to student conduct. Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2012 Theft, ICC, 1:36 p.m. An employee reported the theft of her purse that was left unattended in an unlocked office. The credit cards that were in her purse were used at several off campus locations. The Metropolitan Police Department was notified. The case is being handled by DPS and MPD. Attempted Theft, Lauinger Library, 5:56 p.m. DPS apprehended and arrested two males who were in the process of trying to use bolt cutters on a bike that was secured in a bike rack. This case is being handled by MPD. Theft, Yates Field House, 7:30 p.m. An unattended backpack left in an unsecured locker was stolen. The backpack contained a cell phone, credit cards and cash that were in a wallet. No suspects or witnesses have been identified. This case is under investigation. The blotter is compiled weekly by the Department of Public Safety.


A8

Sports

THE HOYA

the bleacher seats

women’s soccer

Nationals Deny Fans Playoff Glory With Strasburg Decision W

ashington Nationals’ manager Davey highest payroll in the majors and gaping holes Johnson has let down fans of his club at some positions, has caught lightning in a — as well as the members of his team bottle. Teams with small payrolls struggle to rec— with his decision last Saturday to bench ace Stephen Strasburg for the remainder of a season reate success. In fact, the only team below that, up to now, has been the young franchise’s the Nationals in payroll that has still found consistent recent success is the Tampa Bay most successful. Strasburg has been nothing short of domi- Rays — a team whose financial strategies have nant this season with a 15-6 record and an been chronicled by baseball writer Jonah Keri ERA of only 3.16, leading Washington to a in his book “The Extra 2%.” Supporters of Johnson’s decision have commanding division lead in the highly competitive National League East. Advanced statis- pointed to the risk of injury that Strasburg tics show that he is even better than his ERA would face should he go beyond his innings and record suggest, ranking in the top 10 in limit. Other managers, however, have figured out ways to stretch young pitchers longer baseball in many categories. Johnson says the shutdown was planned in into the season. In Chicago, for example, the an attempt to limit Strasburg’s chance of anoth- White Sox have increased the rests between starter Chris Sale’s starts to ener injury after the star starter’s sure he is not overworked this Tommy John surgery in 2010. season and is available for the After all, the Nationals’ future postseason. does hinge on the San Diego But the biggest weakness State product’s right arm, one in Johnson’s argument is the the club used the top overall assumption that somehow a pick in the 2009 draft to acquire. healthy Strasburg would be Considering risk alone, the more meaningful in the future Strasburg shutdown is logical. But Strasburg himself said it than he is now. With the Phillies Corey Blaine best this week when he told reloading, the Mets mired in The Washington Post, “You mediocrity and the Marlins failThis year’s don’t grow up dreaming about ing to gel as a team, this year’s playing in the big leagues to campaign is Washington’s best campaign is get shut down when the games chance to win the NL East. start to matter.” Based on the track record of Washington’s best For the Nationals’ fans and the division, it would be naive players, Strasburg’s quote is chance to win the to think the window of opporspot on. tunity for the squad will reNL East. For the two million people main open much longer. who have paid to attend one of For a team that hasn’t had a Washington’s games so far this year, shutting winning record since moving to the nation’s down the franchise’s star pitcher before the capital, this postseason could create a generagames start to matter is unacceptable. With the tion of lifelong fans. Instead of sending Strasbest record in baseball, the Nationals have cre- burg to the mound in the first game of the ated for themselves an unnecessary handicap. playoffs, though, the Nationals will send a qualI have spent my whole life cheering for a ity starter that nonetheless fails to match the team — the Cincinnati Reds — that has failed intimidation factor of their ace. to win a World Series in my lifetime. Knowing In that attempt to win their first World Sethe pain of that experience, I would be en- ries, Washington is willingly disarming, givraged if I were a Nationals’ fan who knew the ing up one of their best weapons for the sake club was sacrificing a shot at the World Series. of a future that is anything but guaranteed. The relative risk of throwing Strasburg for When the team is eliminated in the first another month seems trivial compared to the round, its fans will be able to direct the glory and enthusiasm that would accompany blame to Davey Johnson and tell their kids hanging a banner reading “2012 World Cham- — who may not even grow up as Nationals pions” in Nationals Park. fans — about the 2012 World Series that alThanks to the National League’s win in the most was. All-Star game, the Nats will enter the postseason not only with a tremendous record but also Corey Blaine is a senior in the McDonough with a potential home-field advantage in the School of Business. THE BLEACHER SEATS World Series. Washington, with only the 20th- appears every Friday.

friDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2012

FILE PHOTO: CHRIS GRIVAS/THE HOYA

Junior midfielder Alexa St. Martin (20) has started all eight games, providing much-needed support for the Blue and Gray on the field.

GU Awaits No. 16 Rutgers PIRATES, from A10 out of the weekend feeling much better about ourselves.” Despite the impact of the loss on his team, Nolan doesn’t regret going for the win against the Cardinal. “It was my decision to go toe to toe with Stanford. We could have done what the majority of teams in the country do, which is sit back, get all 10 players in your half, and try and lose narrowly,” Nolan said. “But I had more confidence in this team. … I felt if we played it a certain way, [then] we would get chances … and essentially, we did. We got chances: We didn’t score them, but we got them.” While Georgetown works to regroup from the defeat, it will face two Big East teams as it opens league play this weekend, including a road date with No. 16 Rutgers. Before the Scarlet Knights, however, the Hoyas get Seton

Hall (5-3) on North Kehoe Field this afternoon. The Pirates have been shaky this season, losing 6-2 to LaSalle last weekend. As was the case for the Blue and Gray last time out, though, Seton Hall likely deserved a better fate. “It was the exact same game as us against Stanford,” Nolan said. “LaSalle scored six times on maybe six chances, but Seton Hall scored twice off six chances, so it was a very even game.” After losing three in a row, the Pirates will be desperate to get back on track in a season they started with five straight wins. “We lost a tough one last year up at Seton Hall, 3-2 double-overtime loss, where on the night we played quite well and deserved something from the game, but when you get into golden goal opportunities, anything can happen,” Nolan said. While the Hoyas will be seek-

ing revenge this afternoon, they will be on the receiving end when they travel to New Jersey to face No. 16 Rutgers on Sunday. “We absolutely battered [Rutgers] here last year, and they were having a difficult year. Now they’re 7-1, and they’re probably looking at us and saying, ‘That’s the game we want back.’ So I think we’re going to get that kind of emotion.” With Big East play opening this weekend, Georgetown must do well to maintain a good position in the National Division, where the Blue and Gray were tabbed third in the preseason poll. “It’s early in Big East play, and everybody’s jockeying for points,” Nolan said. “There is going to be a little bit of an edge in both of those games.” The Hoyas take on Seton Hall at North Kehoe Field today at 3 p.m. They then face Rutgers in Piscataway, N.J., Sunday at noon.


sports

friDAY, september 14, 2012

THE HOYA

A9

football

Five Years of Futility Provide Fuel for Georgetown BULLDOGS, from A10 to be sharpened, he is confident that the Blue and Gray are strong on fundamentals. “We had some plays that we didn’t execute,” Kelly said. “We had 85 plays, and the one bad snap we had happened to be on the 1-yard line. That’s football.” While Georgetown’s fundamentals have been sound, Yale’s program has been wracked by turmoil since the teams last met. Former Head Coach Tom Williams resigned following a scandal over his academic credentials. Quarterback Patrick Witt and running back Alex Thomas have graduated. Making scouting even harder, the Bulldogs’ Tony Reno is a first-time head coach, having most recently served as an assistant at Harvard. “It’s tough because he came from Harvard, he has a couple of offensive coaches who came from Harvard, the ex-head coach at UMass is on the staff as offensive coordinator and the receivers coach is from Maine,” Kelly said. “We’ve been watching film on all those teams, trying to figure out what might fit.” Reno has some experience as an offensive coach but has spent most of his career spearheading defenses. Georgetown’s 1310 win over Wagner last Saturday was a defensive battle, and something similar might be expected for this week. Kelly, however, is not sure what to expect from the Bulldogs. With a freshman quarterback making his first collegiate

start, Kelly’s staff has resorted to watching tapes of high school games. “The advantage we’ve got is that we’ve played two games and they’ve played none,” Kelly said. “The advantage they have is that they’ve got our film and we have none. It’s kind of a wash.” Because of the dramatic differences between this year’s Bulldogs and last’s, the fact that the Hoyas have lost five straight to Yale — including a 37-27 defeat last year — is less relevant. But a win would still be a sign that Georgetown has arrived. “People know of Yale. It’s a storied program. It’s got a lot of tradition and history,” Kelly said. “It would definitely be a signature win for us.” In an intriguing subplot to Saturday’s game, Kelly was interviewed for the top job at Yale after Williams resigned. In the end, he withdrew from consideration to stay at Georgetown and focus on winning the Patriot League title. For his part, Kelly says that back story doesn’t make this game any different. “It’s like every game. I want to win every game,” Kelly said. In his January statement announcing that he wanted to remain with the Blue and Gray, the coach emphasized that he wants to achieve even more success at Georgetown. “We really want to finish what we’ve started here at Georgetown,” Kelly said. One way to make a lasting mark on a program is with a signature win. The Hoyas have a shot at one Saturday. Kickoff is set for 1 p.m. at MultiSport Facility.

men’s soccer

fresh out of philly

Jeter Deserves Benefit of the Doubt V

FILE PHOTO: CHRIS GRIVAS/THE HOYA

Sophomore goalie Tomas Gomez has made 20 saves this season.

GU Aims for Revenge Over Winless Quakers QUAKERS, from A10 “So our strengths potentially could fall in nicely for what they want the game to be like, and that makes it always a little unnerving.” Wiese and his staff are all too familiar with what Penn is capable of, having played them at North Kehoe Field two years ago and suffered a devastating defeat. Up one at the half, Georgetown gave up three goals to the visitors in an epic second-half collapse. The Hoyas will be apt to avoid a similar fate when they host their rematch on Sunday, but this series has traditionally not been easy on them. Wiese remarked that recording two wins this weekend would be “a tre-

FILE PHOTO: CHRIS GRIVAS/THE HOYA

Junior quarterback Aaron Aiken (12) will get the start for Georgetown for the second week in a row.

mendous accomplishment.” The Blue and Gray will be sporting special gold laces in conjunction with the Go4theGoal Foundation to help raise awareness for pediatric cancer. The team visited the clinic at Lombardi Cancer Center at the end of August, and according to Wiese, the experience was a powerful one for the players. “It keeps some things in perspective for the guys, to be honest with you,” he said. “I think the guys are excited about trying to help in the little way that we can, and hopefully, we build some awareness in the bigger picture for it.” Princeton plays host to Georgetown on Friday, with kickoff scheduled for 7 p.m.

ery few players in sports history have earned the title “iconic.” Derek Jeter, current New York Yankees shortstop and 13-time MLB All-Star, is one of those players. Jeter is iconic to the city of New York, the biggest and brightest sports market in the world. He’s iconic to every player who’s ever had the privilege of calling him a teammate. Iconic even to his sworn enemies, the Boston Red Sox, after nearly two decades of heated divisional races and historic playoff duels. Jeter is a model athlete in the truest sense of the word. He is the centerpiece of a franchise that some would argue is the proudest and most accomplished not only in the sport’s history, but in the history of sports itself. Jeter is a five-time World Series champion — how many players can say that? — and, since his 1995 debut, has earned just about every other accolade in the book. He’s surpassed the likes of Lou Gehrig, Babe Ruth, Micky Mantle and Yogi Berra to become the Yankees’ all-time leader in hits. And he’s done it all with the same winning smile that earned him the admiration of every baseball fan, young and old, years ago. So naturally, when sports analyst Skip Bayless publicly and forcefully brought up a possible link between Jeter and performance-enhancing drugs back in August on “ESPN First Take,” I found myself in a state of denial. Baseball, at least as much as any other sport, has had its share of shocking stories and falls from grace — see Pete Rose or the 1919 World Series. But most of us never expected Jeter to be tarred with a similar brush. The remarks were met with shock by Bayless’ on-air adversary, Stephen A. Smith, and a lighthearted but nonetheless affected response from Jeter him-

self. “Maybe Skip should be tested,” he joked. It must be said that Derek Jeter has never been a power hitter by major league standards. His season-high home run total came in 1999, when he blasted 24 over the fence, and even that is modest compared with league leaders. Entering 2012, Jeter’s yearly long-ball production had dropped every year since 2004 — with the exception of 2009. For

Matt Bell

Jeter is a model athlete in the truest sense of the word. most players, “power numbers” decline as a product of aging, but such a trend goes out the window when dealing with a non-power hitter. As of Sept. 10, Jeter has 15 homers on the year, two and a half times his 2011 total. It is his highest production since 2009 and the second highest since 2005. With over 20 games remaining, that number will likely inch even higher. The steroid era has put baseball in an ominous light. Some of the game’s biggest names over the last quarter-century have admitted to illegal substance use: Barry Bonds, Mark McGwire, Sammy Sosa, Rafael Palmeiro and Jose Canseco all come to

mind. These, however, are just the players whose naming in the infamous 2007 Mitchell Report was publicized because of their home-run tallies. A further look at the list actually reveals a good number of players whose styles of play resemble Jeter’s. That being the case, then, can an argument be entertained on the remote possibility that Derek Jeter did, in fact, disobey league rules and take HGH or another PED? Common logic says to run tests and decide the matter once and for all. Yankees’ fans and Jeter supporters would argue to the contrary. To single one man out in such an investigation displays a unique suspicion and distrust of a player who is supposed to represent everything good and clean about sports. Simply testing Jeter, regardless of the outcome, would tarnish his reputation; in other words, testing Jeter would be Commissioner Bud Selig’s coming out and saying, “Let’s just make sure.” Jeter, if any professional athlete ever was, is beyond “let’s just make sure.” His stoic reaction to Bayless alone likely put the argument to rest in many people’s minds. What lifelong Yanks’ fans and Jeter obsessors need to understand is that, beyond the pinstripes and incessant gum-chewing, Derek Jeter is only a human being. In an era when scandals like the one at Penn State have shaken our faith in the most deified figures, we cannot say that Jeter is beyond suspicion. Still, as the foundations of our legal system remind us — and as Smith retorted to Bayless — Jeter is innocent until proven guilty.

Matt Bell is a sophomore in the McDonough School of Business. FRESH OUT OF PHILLY appears every Friday.

field hockey

Hoyas Welcome Providence in Home, Big East Opener Celee Belmonte Hoya Staff Writer

After splitting a pair of games during last weekend’s trip to Missouri, Georgetown’s field hockey team (2-4) will play its home opener Friday against Providence. The Hoyas outshot Missouri State last Saturday but, in a three-minute period at the end of the game, allowed two goals that let the Bears seal a 2-0 win. Despite the tough loss, Head Coach Tiffany Marsh was pleased with how her squad bounced back for the following day’s game, a 4-1 victory over St. Louis. “[The loss] gave the girls a lot of motivation, I think, going into Sun-

day,” Marsh said. “Sunday is, hands down, the best we’ve played all season.” To beat the Friars (3-2) on Friday, Georgetown will have to dig deep and find the same resilience they showed against Missouri State. “We have to keep our energy high [and] our confidence even higher and kind of ride what we did on Sunday into Friday,” Marsh said. “We beat Providence last year in our last game of the season in overtime, so I think we could be in a good position. But we are expecting it to be a hard game, as it always is.” The Friars, the Hoyas’ first Big East opponent, present a critical test for a team whose goal is a top-four finish in the league.

“The Big East is such a strong conference, so we always expect them to come and be good competitors,” Marsh said. “It makes everything feel real, once the Big East games start.” The Blue and Gray know that finishing in the top four requires beating the Friars, the only Big East team they defeated last season. “Providence is one of the teams that we identified from the start that we have a strong chance against,” Marsh said. “We don’t want to waste an opportunity.” After resting Saturday, Georgetown will be back in action against Lehigh (1-5) on Sunday. “I think we match up very well with Lehigh,” Marsh said. “It will be a really competitive game, but also one

that we feel is winnable if we play our game. As easy as it can be won, it can be lost.” For games that turn on a dime, the Hoyas hope to rely on their mix of senior leadership and stellar freshmen to come through in the clutch. “There’s [seniors] Catherine [Shugrue], Annie [Wilson] and Kimmy [Keating], and our starting lineup of seniors really leads that forward line,” Marsh said. “The freshmen are really surprising me with how well they are doing. [Freshman Louise] Chakejian is doing so well for us in the back.” With both classes competing for playing time, Marsh is also pleased with the team ethos that her squad

has developed. “I don’t think we really have a star player,” Marsh said. “Everyone is kind of rising at the same quick rate right now, so we’ll see a lot of good things out of a lot of people.” Without an on-campus field, Georgetown has played at American University’s field in Tenleytown the last three years. This season, however, the Blue and Gray will play home games at the University of Maryland’s Field Hockey and Lacrosse Complex. The weekend’s action kicks off when the Hoyas play host to Providence Friday at 4 p.m. On Sunday, Georgetown will take on Lehigh, also at 4 p.m. Both games are in College Park, Md.


Sports

FOOTBALL Hoyas (2-0) vs. Yale (0-0) Saturday, 1 p.m. MultiSport Facility

friDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2012

tHE BLEachER SEATS Corey Blaine says that Nats’ fans are the real victims of the shutdown of Stephen Strasburg. See A8

talkING POINTS

NUMBERS GAME

3 ”

It makes everything feel real, once Big East games start.

Field hockey Head Coach Tiffany Marsh

volleyball

Second-half goals Penn scored the last time it visited the Hilltop, a 3-1 loss for Georgetown

football

Struggling Hoyas Set GU to Tackle Yale in Early Test For Southern Swing Evan Hollander Hoya Staff Writer

Josh Simmons

cused as a team, came together and we had a great practice.” Hoya Staff Writer They will need that renewed When Georgetown’s vol- sense of purpose as they face leyball team (6-3) traveled to College of Charleston, MichiDelaware Tuesday night, they gan State and Presbyterian in hoped to use the road match as this weekend’s Holiday Inn a chance to get back on track Tournament in Charleston, S.C. after dropping two of three First up for the Hoyas is Colgames last weekend. Instead, lege of Charleston (5-4), which the Hoyas left with another promises to be a tough test disappointing loss. despite its record. The CouAlthough the Blue and Gray gars have been the Southern believed that they would have Conference champions for 11 the upper hand on the Blue straight years. Hens (2-7) if they performed up “This is a team that knows to their standards, Georgetown how to win,” Williams said. came out flat, allowing Dela- “Their girls are just going to ware to take the first set, 25-20. come out battling, so we have “This is not the first time got to take it one point at a [our outside hitters] have been time and make sure we take attacked, nor is it the first time care of our side of the net.” the right back has been atSaturday’s doubleheader tacked,” Head features one Coach Arlisa daunting game Williams said. and another “We know that seems how to stop it, quite winnable. but we were First up is unjust not rundefeated Michining on all gan State (9-0). cylinders.” For the Hoyas In the secto win, they ond set, Delamust avoid Arlisa williams even the smallware was even Volleyball head coach more domiest errors, lest nant, leading the Spartans from the get-go and winning it, make them pay. 25-18. Williams, however, says her “We knew Delaware was a team is not thinking about team that we could compete that marquee matchup until with,” Williams said. “We they get past the Cougars. found ourselves in a hole, and “We have not even looked at I think, more than anything, the second match yet, and we we just got anxious. We made a have not talked about Michiwhole lot of unforced errors — gan State yet,” she said. “We pressing a little too hard.” have got Charleston right in That impatience and frus- front of us.” tration was obvious in the In the final match of the third set, which Georgetown weekend, Presbyterian (2dropped, 25-13, in a rather sul- 10) seems like an easier test. len end to the match. Though the Blue Hose have “The bottom line is the Hoyas struggled this season, the did not show up to play and Hoyas will have to remain on Delaware did,” Williams said. guard, given that they have Having dropped three of been surprised twice by teams their last four games after a that did not seem to present a 5-0 start, the Blue and Gray are considerable challenge. now urgently looking to recreGeorgetown will kick off ate the chemistry that fueled the tournament tonight at 7 this season’s beginning. p.m. against the Cougars be“It is just very easy to get in- fore their doubleheader on volved in your total life and not Saturday, when they face the just your volleyball life, and Spartans at 10 a.m. and the that distracts from what we Blue Hose at 4:30 p.m. All three do,” Williams said. “So we refo- games are in Charleston, S.C.

“The bottom line is the Hoyas did not show up to play and Delaware did.”

FILE PHOTO: CHRIS GRIVAS/THE HOYA

Junior defensive back Dustin Wharton (11) had nine tackles last Saturday.

In each of the past five years, Yale (00) has lined up opposite Georgetown (2-0) and has left the gridiron with the same result, a win for the Bulldogs. But with renewal on the Hilltop and upheaval in New Haven, this may be the year for the Hoyas to snag a win in the series. “We’re hungry,” Head Coach Kevin Kelly said. “We want to beat Yale. Badly.” For the second straight game, junior quarterback Aaron Aiken will start in place of senior Isaiah Kempf, who is convalescing from a concussion he sustained during Georgetown’s season opener against Davidson. “I think every week, [Aiken is] going to get more and more comfortable with what we’re calling, what we’re playing,” Kelly said. “He’s going to get better and better every week. He had a good week of practice this week.” One problem for Georgetown in its 13-10 win over Wagner last Saturday was converting on third downs and in the red zone. The Hoyas were 7-for-18 on third downs and missed a critical chance in the red zone. While Kelly knows that play needs See BULLDOGS, A9

women’s soccer

Big East Schedule Begins With Pirates Arik Parnass Hoya Staff Writer

Although the No. 23 Georgetown women’s soccer team (6-1-1) emerged with only one of a possible six points on their West Coast road trip last week, Head Coach Dave Nolan doesn’t anticipate changing much going into two weekend games. After a hard-fought 1-1 draw with perennial power Santa Clara (3-2-2), the Hoyas were embarrassed by No. 5 Stanford, 6-0. But Nolan thinks there is more to those games than the box score suggests. “When I looked at the game again last night, I came [out of it] with a much better feeling for the game because we actually played quite well,” Nolan said. “So there’s nothing you can really do, other than continue to train how you’ve always defended.” While the Hoyas had allowed only three goals in seven games before encountering Stanford, their opponents

in that match put up twice that many over the course of just 90 minutes. Three of the Cardinal’s goals came off set pieces, something the Blue and Gray did not allow until their 20th game last year. “Against a good team that’s dangerous on set pieces, maybe we were just a little bit naive or a little bit complacent,” Nolan said. “We’ll certainly go over them, but we’re not going to change anything.” Nolan’s bigger worry is the mental state of the team going into this weekend, with discouragement over the loss to Stanford still lingering. “I talked to the group a little bit yesterday, and today we’re going to go watch some of the game,” Nolan said on Wednesday. “I want them to see that we played well, but the mistakes we made are very preventable, and if we had lost 1-0 or 2-0 to Stanford, I think maybe we would have come See PIRATES, A8

FILE PHOTO: CHRIS GRIVAS/THE HOYA

Sophomore forward Jessica Clinton has four points in 2012.

men’s soccer

Trip to Princeton Kicks Off Pair of Ivy League Matches Ryan Bacic

Hoya Staff Writer

FILE PHOTO: CHRIS GRIVAS/THE HOYA

Sophomore midfielder Tyler Rudy scored against Princeton last season.

After spending last weekend road-tripping to a pair of midwestern state schools, the No. 12 Georgetown men’s soccer team will face a different type of duo this weekend. The Blue and Gray (5-0-1) will travel to Princeton on Friday before returning to the Hilltop for a Sunday afternoon matchup with fellow Ivy Leaguers Penn (0-4). The Tigers (1-2) have played three games thus far this year — only half of the Hoyas’ six — and their record doesn’t seem to indicate that they are much of a threat. Georgetown, however, will be Princeton’s fourth tough Big East matchup to start the season. The Tigers defeated Seton Hall in their opener but lost to St. John’s and Rutgers their last two times out. Due to the Tigers’ strong

competition so far, Head Coach Brian Wiese spoke with caution when discussing the challenges that Princeton will pose. “They are dangerous in a lot of ways, and it’s too young a season to say ‘Oh, they’re a below-.500 team or an above-.500 team,’” Wiese said. “The two games they lost were against two of the better teams in the Big East, two teams that were in the NCAA tournament last year. “I think playing at home in another big game [means] you’re going to get a good performance from them. And for us, we’re into game seven now, and now it’s [about whether] we can keep ourselves going.” That has yet to be a problem for his team, which still hasn’t dropped a game this season. Maintaining a high energy level late in games has proven even less of a problem, as seven of the Hoyas’ 10 goals on the season have come in the second half or in overtime. On the other hand, slow starts have become a problem lately — particu-

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larly against Illinois-Chicago and Wisconsin last weekend. Georgetown was favored in both contests but found itself down 2-0 early to UIC and 1-0 to UW, both difficult holes from which to emerge victorious. That’s a trend, of course, that can’t become a habit if the team wants to continue with its winning ways. Their records may say otherwise — Penn is still winless — but Wiese made clear that Georgetown’s opponents this weekend can and will take advantage of any Hoya miscues. Because of their style of play, the Quakers — who Wiese called “unlucky” in several close losses — may be the more dangerous of the Hoyas’ two weekend opponents. “If it’s a game where we have the ball — and we want the ball — it might be exactly what they want, because all it takes is one pass, one ball, and they’ve got these guys up front who will be putting on the afterburners and getting in behind you,” Wiese said. See QUAKERS, A9

The Hoya: Sept. 14, 2012  

Friday, Sept. 14, 2012

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