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GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY’S NEWSPAPER OF RECORD SINCE 1920 thehoya.com

Georgetown University • Washington, D.C. Vol. 93, No. 41, © 2012

friDAY, march 30, 2012

AT A CROSSROADS

BUSINESS Crêpe Amour and Georgetown Wing Co. are closing Sunday.

The history of the university’s crucifixes tells a story of evolving Catholic identity. GUIDE, G8

RANKINGS The MSB dropped four spots in Businessweek’s rankings.

NEWS, A4

NEWS, A4

Hoya Staff Writer

“Hollis did what Hollis does.” Those words, uttered by Head Coach John Thompson III in December after junior forward Hollis Thompson swished a game-winning three-pointer against No. 12 Alabama with 1.2 seconds left, will be remembered for a long time. On Tuesday, Georgetown announced that Thompson will forgo his senior year, in order to declare for the NBA draft. In doing so, he automatically forfeited his amateur status because he also declared for the draft last year as well. In the fall, Thompson said he had gained valuable insights about his skills during draft workouts. And though he is only a junior, Thompson III expected this to be Thompson’s final year as a Hoya. “We fully anticipated he would enter the 2012 draft after this season,” Thompson III said in a press release. “He is an extremely hard worker, and we wish him the best as he takes his next step.” Thompson finishes his career as Georgetown’s all-time leader in three-point field goal percentage with a 44-percent mark and ranks 12th all-time with 128 threepointers made. His most notable attribute, however, may have been his ability to thrive in late-game situations. One of his most memorable moments

came at the end of the Alabama game, and another took place against No. 20 Marquette at home later that month when the Hoyas capped a shocking comeback after having been down 17 with less than 12 minutes remaining. Thompson’s length alone made it extremely difficult for defenders to disrupt his shot. The 6-foot-8 forward led the Big East this season in three-point field goal percentage with a 43 percent clip and recorded 12.8 points and 5.5 rebounds per game, second and third on the team, respectively. Along with seniors Jason Clark and Henry Sims and sophomore Nate Lubick, Thompson started every game for the Hoyas. He played in 99 total contests in his three years on the Hilltop, starting in 57. Despite opening the 2010-2011 season in the starting lineup, Thompson was switched out for then-freshman Nate Lubick midway through the year and proved more effective off the bench. Last year, his abilities were limited, as he served more in the post due to the Hoyas’ limited size. This year, however, Thompson broke out in his natural position on the wing. Thompson quickly emerged as one of the conference’s most lethal offensive threats early this season, replacing sharpshooter Austin Freeman as the See THOMPSON, A11

SPORTS, A12

Landlord Pledge Criticized

Thompson Elects to Enter 2012 NBA Draft Michael Palmer

WOMEN’S LACROSSE Georgetown scored eight straight goals to cruise past American Tuesday.

DCRA says lack of participation renders GU landlord pledge ineffective Sarah Kaplan Hoya Staff Writer

Six months after the debut of the university’s landlord pledge — an agreement that calls on landlords to abide by D.C. regulations — some city officials are questioning its impact. Since the initiative was announced last October, 36 landlords representing 93 properties have signed the pledge. According to Helder Gil, a spokesperson for the D.C. Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs, more than 1,250 rental properties are registered in the 20007 zip code, which includes the neighborhoods of Georgetown, Burleith and Foxhall Village. He estimated that at least 100 properties FILE PHOTO: CHRIS BIEN/THE HOYA

Thompson scored 23 points in his final game as a Hoya.

GINGRICH SPEECH ON SOCIAL SECURITY DRAWS FULL AUDIENCE, PROTEST

See LANDLORDS, A5

Graduate Applications Increase 4.5 Percent Carly Graf

Hoya Staff Writer

As the university works to reconcile aspects of a traditional liberal arts education with growing research programs, striking a balance can be a particular challenge for its graduate programs. Gerald Mara, dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, hopes to settle the score by boosting the university’s reputation for academic research at a time when graduate application numbers continue to rise. “I want to pay particular importance to the Ph.D. programs, because graduates of these programs often associate with us as a research university,” Mara said.

Applications to Georgetown’s graduate programs are up about 4.5 percent this year compared to 2011, according to Mara, which may be due in part to a nationwide trend of those unable to find jobs deciding to return to school. “In times of economic downturn, graduate programs tend to see their application rates rise due to the difficult job market,” Mara said. Though applications increased in number, debt incurred by graduate students and the potential long-term financial consequences is still a concern to many. According to Mara, the university’s current capital campaign may help See GRADUATE, A5

GEoRGETOWN SCORES NEW RECRUIT LEFT: CHRIS BIEN/THE HOYA; RIGHT: CHRISTIE SHELY/THE HOYA

Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich outlined his plan for Social Security reform Wednesday in Gaston Hall (left). His talk sparked a student demonstration on Copley Lawn. See story on A6.

Justice for All: GU Law’s First Women Elizabeth Garbitelli Hoya Staff Writer

When Agnes Neill Williams (LAW ’54) stepped onto the Georgetown Law Center campus for the first time, she broke 81 years of tradition. In 1951, Williams became part of the first class of women to enroll at the law school. “That was the beginning,” she said. “It was a little bit intimidating, [but] it was exciting to be a pioneer.” Since it opened in 1870, the Law Center’s student body had consisted exclusively of men. “The school’s administrators expressly asserted that the law was a male profession with a bylaw closing the school to women,” the law center wrote in its self-history, “The First 125 Years: An Illustrated History of the

Georgetown University Law Center.” Though by 1950 many area schools had opened their doors to women — The George Washington University did so in 1913 — and women were

“The beginning ... was a little bit intimidating, [but] it was exciting to be a pioneer.” AGNES WILLIAMS (LAW ’54), one of the first eight women to enroll at the Law Center

slowly being admitted to Georgetown’s graduate programs, the idea of a coed law school was unthinkable to administrators. But in 1950, the university quietly

Newsroom: (202) 687-3415 Business: (202) 687-3947

announced the decision to admit women in an official bulletin released in the Georgetown Law School annual catalog. “In view of the success women have achieved in many professional fields including law, Georgetown Law School has decided to break with tradition and accept women applicants,” the bulletin read. The decision sparked a backlash. Joe Gaghan, a professor at the time, was among the strongest opponents to the new policy. “I remember when the question came up, Dean [Hugh] Fegan and I rode a white charger up and down the corridors demanding that we retain the school as the last stronghold of masculinity,” he told professor Wendy See WOMEN, A6 Published Tuesdays and Fridays

COURTESY GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

Jack Jr., a bulldog puppy who will one day succeed Georgetown’s current mascot, will arrive on campus for training April 13. Send Story Ideas and Tips to news@thehoya.com


A2

OPINION

THE HOYA

friDAY, march 30, 2012

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

GUSA Executive Invites Discussion

Founded January 14, 1920

To the Editor:

EDITORIALS

Opening the Front Gates students to take classes that might not be available on their own campus. As reported in The Hoya, (“Undergrad Representation Slim in Consortium Classes,” Oct. 15, 2012) students interested in beginner-level Swahili or American Sign Language can enroll at Howard or Gaulladet respectively, since neither language is offered at Georgetown. But our university has largely limited its promotion of the program to graduate students living off campus, and the administration is generally unwilling to allow undergraduates to participate unless a particular course has no similar counterpart on the Hilltop. Though the consortium has done little to connect Georgetown students to their peers elsewhere in the city, clubs have acted as a more effective bridge. Some on-campus groups like Global Zero — a non-partisan nonprofit group dedicated to eliminating all nuclear weapons — and College Democrats are part of larger national organizations that have chapters at multiple D.C. universities. These chapters often coordinate in co-hosting or attending one another’s events. Similarly, D.C. Students Speak, an organization with the aim of representing students in District governance, regularly rotates the hosting of its events among different D.C. universities. Though these clubs have made inroads in fostering interaction, there is still room for greater cooperation among student groups. By promoting the consortium to more undergraduates and strengthening crosscampus club partnerships, the university could help foster healthier relationships between student communities. We’re all studying here in the District — maybe we could learn something from each other.

It may be that students are interested in sustainability, but initiatives like the Switch It Off Challenge have left us in the dark. The new Georgetown University Student Association executive team, Clara Gustafson (SFS ’13) and Vail Kohnert-Yount (SFS ’13), has emphasized sustainability on campus But the challenge of making Georgetown more environmentally-friendly is that large-scale, student-directed endeavors like the Switch It Off Challenge have generally failed to raise sustainability awareness, and it’s difficult for individual contributions to make a significant difference. In light of those obstacles, we commend the GUSA executive’s initiatives and the proposals of the Visions for a Sustainable Georgetown report for both their smallscale, easily accomplishable goals and their long-term intentions to build community awareness and effect larger change. While the university has already implemented certain initiatives that reduced our greenhouse gas output by almost 20 percent, between 2006 and 2010 students can and should be asked to play a role in making the campus greener as well. Current projects like the Switch It Off Challenge have not received sufficient support; last semester’s challenge saw four dorms actually increase energy usage over the course of the five-week program in com-

parison to the previous year. The Visions for a Sustainable Georgetown report acknowledges that we can improve sustainability education by increasing the publicity of such projects as Switch It Off or Recyclemania, but right now we cannot expect students to sacrifice individually when they can’t immediately see the positive outcome of such initiatives. Gustafson and Konhert-Yount have proposed several measures to help make the university more eco-friendly. A new university Office of Sustainability would advance specific initiatives as well as serve as a symbolic representation that environmental issues are important to the university. The executive duo hopes to put a GUSA representative on the O’Donovan Dining Hall Food Committee to ensure that our cafeteria continues to keep the environment in mind. They also propose more motion sensors in locations such as common rooms or laundry rooms to help reduce electricity usage. We as a community will have to work on both small and large projects to expand the university’s commitment to sustainability. With contributions from student organizations and motivated leaders, we hope conversations about making Georgetown a more sustainable campus can lead to not only more awareness but also a greater chance of reaching our goals.

Connor Gregoire, Editor-in-Chief Upasana Kaku, Executive Editor Suzanne Fonzi, Managing Editor Mariah Byrne, Campus News Editor Sarah Kaplan, City News Editor Pat Curran, Sports Editor Steven Piccione, Guide Editor Katherine Foley, Opinion Editor Chris Bien, Photography Editor Stephen Levy, Online Editor Remy Samuels, Layout Editor Samantha Randazzo, Copy Chief Molly Mitchell, Multimedia Editor Michelle Cassidy, Blog Editor

Contributing Editors Kavya Devarakonda, Kathryn DeVincenzo, Meagan Kelly, Shakti Nochur, Eamon O’Connor, Michael Palmer, Mairead Reilly, Glenn Russo, Lauren Weber

Matthew Strauss Rita Pearson Braden McDonald Jonathan Gillis Evan Hollander Ashwin Wadekar Lawson Ferguson Victoria Edel Bethany Imondi Alex Sanchez Hanaa Khadraoui Leonel De Velez Sari Frankel Christie Shely Zoe Bertrand Jessica Natinsky Emory Wellman Nikita Buley Emily Perkins Kendall Ciesemier Martin Hussey

Deputy Campus News Editor Deputy Campus News Editor Deputy City News Editor Deputy Features Editor Deputy Sports Editor Deputy Sports Editor Sports Blog Editor Deputy Guide Editor Deputy Guide Editor Deputy Guide Editor Deputy Opinion Editor Deputy Photography Editor Deputy Photography Editor Deputy Photography Editor Deputy Layout Editor Deputy Layout Editor Deputy Layout Editor Deputy Copy Editor Deputy Copy Editor Deputy Multimedia Editor Deputy Blog Editor

Editorial Board

To the Editor: After reading the recently finalized 73-page Student Life Report and The Hoya’s coverage of it (“Finalized Student Life Report Debuts,” A1, Feb. 28, 2012), I felt both exasperated and disappointed. This seminal document, purported to discuss and, ultimately, promote “the limited upside of student happiness” failed to direct any attention toward the mental and emotional health of Georgetown students, something that pervasively affects student life and, moreover, is inextricably intertwined with the pursuit of happiness. Indeed, mental and emotional health is not even listed in this report as a topic that has been consciously omitted.  However, roughly 10 percent of Georgetown students present at Counseling and Psychiatric Services within any given year, and in total approximately 25 percent of undergraduates seek help at CAPS sometime during their collegiate careers. Moreover, according to the Spring 2011 National College Health Assessment — whose nationally reported statistics are, according to Carol Day, director of Health Education Services, representative of those gleaned from the Georgetown community — 18.8 percent of college students

C C C

C

It’s Not Easy Being Green

Clara Gustafson (SFS ’13) Vail Kohnert-Yount (SFS ’13)

Mental Health Neglected in SLR

C

D.C. has the potential to be a great college town — but for that to happen, Georgetown can’t isolate itself as a city on a hill. In order to reap the benefits of our proximity to other universities, students should do more to take advantage of the resources offered by the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area and clubs that promote intercollegiate cooperation. Georgetown students rarely interact with peers studying in D.C. In fact, their attitudes toward other D.C. schools can be condescending. For example, we’ve all heard jabs about GWU’s being Georgetown’s waitlist. While it’s natural for proximity to breed competition, Georgetown students’ relationships with other universities lack the qualities that support a healthy, friendly rivalry. In the case of other university rivalries, like Duke-UNC in basketball or BCBU in hockey, games generate tangible anticipation and produce huge, raucous crowds. They’re an opportunity to build relationships and strengthen school spirit. Among Georgetown and D.C.’s other universities, however, no comparable rivalries exist. Instead, our attitude toward games against local institutions borders on indifference. This apathy is a result of our limited interaction with our neighbors. Though Georgetown students can enroll in classes at other D.C. universities through the consortium, few take advantage of the opportunity. The program combines resources from 12 colleges and universities in the District, Maryland and Virginia, allowing universities to focus on their areas of specialized knowledge and

As newly inaugurated president and vice president of the Georgetown University Student Association, we want to take this opportunity to address some of the issues that have arisen during our first few weeks in office. Already, we’re excited about the progress we’ve been able to make. We look forward to working together with students in the coming year to address their concerns and make the Hilltop a better place. First, we’re glad to see students engaged in the Georgetown Day planning process. Right now, there are about 20 committed students pushing forward on logistics and writing a budget. As of now, Georgetown Day plans include a chicken wing-eating contest in Red Square, Georgetown Program Board activities, free makeovers by MAC, food provided by Aramark, dance group performances and a Guild of Bands concert.

The committee is quickly moving forward on programming, and we’re excited about the new ideas they have proposed. We’re also very grateful that students have begun sincere consideration of our proposal for an optional, private LGBTQ-friendly checkbox on CHARMS. We hope to continue talking about how Georgetown can best support students who may feel marginalized, unwelcome or even unsafe on the Hilltop. In the coming weeks, we look forward to explaining our initiatives in greater depth. Please feel free to reach out to us on Facebook, Twitter or at our office hours on Monday evenings. Drop by and tell us whatever is on your mind in any way you feel comfortable. We look forward to working with you.

self-report as having been diagnosed with depression at some point in their lives, and over 10 percent have been diagnosed or treated for anxiety within the past year. Through programming and outreach efforts, CAPS, Health Education Services and a variety of other organizations are able to discuss such pressing topics with thousands of students every year, both inside and outside of the classroom. Such work is, however, limited in number due to a lack of resources and never enough to reach every student, especially those most in need, who lack the energy and ability to attend to class or frequent extracurricular activities. Further raising awareness about such issues is also impeded by a lack of overt instituitional support for and recognition that maintaining mental and emotional health is, indeed, a very real challenge for many Georgetown students. The Student Life Report cautions that, “It is impossible to care for the whole person without considering their artistic endeavors;” I opine that if we really take our slogan of cura personalis to heart, we ought not to neglect the psyche, a source of great strength but also potential adversity. Tyler White (COL ’14)

THE VERDICT Au Revoir — Crepe Amour on M Street is closing due to high rent cost. See our coverage on A4. Peep Show VI — The Washington Post released photos of the winning and finalist Peep creations of its sixth annual Peeps Diaroma Contest Wednesday. Learning a Lesson — In honor of education week in April, The Midnight MUG will feature photos of Georgetown students who mentor and tutor. Traffic Cameras — D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray has proposed installing more traffic and speed cameras to monitor driver, pedestrian and cyclist safety. Murky Waters — The D.C. inspector general found that a study conducted by the D.C. Water and Sewage Authority fabricated results of clean water in the District.

A LITTLE BIRDIE TOLD US ... @MyGrlThrsday March 27 NOOO RT @thehoya: RT@TheHoyaSports ESPN’s Andy Katz is reporting that junior Hollis Thompson will leave the #Hoyas and enter the NBA draft @gc249 March 27 We’ll miss you, Hollis. MT @thehoya: Hollis Thompson declares for NBA draft. @AlexHortonVA March 27 @Georgetown on track to raise $138 mil, but no mention of boosting student veteran services @thehoya

CORRECTION The article “First Black Undergraduate Dies” (The Hoya, A1 March 16, 2012) incorrectly stated stated that Georgetown’s director of affirmative action Michael Smith spoke at Samuel Halsey’s (SFS ’53) burial. Smith actually spoke at the funeral service.

Jonathan Rabar, General Manager Glenn Russo, Director of Corporate Development Kelly Connelly, Director of Finance Claire Willits, Director of Marketing Michael Grasso, Director of Personnel Bryn Hastings, Director of Sales Michael Vu, Director of Technology Caroline Boerwinkle Catherine Hendren Evan Marks Sara Eshleman Shane Sarver Eleonore Durand Kent Carlson Keeley Williams Mary Nancy Walter Michael Lindsay-Bayley Ryan Smith

Alumni Relations Manager Special Programs Manager Accounts Manager Operations Manager Publishing Division Consultant Public Relations Manager Human Resources Manager Institutional Diversity Manager Local Advertisements Manager Online Advertisements Manager Web Manager

Board of Directors

Katherine Foley, Chair

Carolyn Shanahan, Chair

Sidney Chiang, Laura Engshuber, Danny Funt, Alyssa Huberts, Nneka Jackson

Connor Gregoire, Web Leslie, Jonathan Rabar, Sam Schneider, Lauren Weber, Amanda Wynter

Policies & Information Letter to the Editor & Viewpoint Policies The Hoya welcomes letters and viewpoints from our readers and will print as many as possible. To be eligible for publication, letters should specifically address a recent campus issue or Hoya story. Letters should not exceed 300 words. Viewpoints are always welcome from all members of the Georgetown community on any topic, but priority will be given to relevant campus issues. Viewpoint submissions should be between 600-800 words. Send all submissions to: opinion@ thehoya.com. Letters and viewpoints are due Sunday at 5 p.m. for Tuesday’s issue and Wednesday at 5 p.m. for Friday’s issue. The Hoya reserves the right to reject letters or viewpoints and edit for length, style, clarity and accuracy. The Hoya further reserves the right to write headlines and select illustrations to accompany letters and viewpoints. Corrections & Clarifications If you have a comment or question about the fairness or accuracy of a story, contact Executive Editor Upasana Kaku at (202) 687-3415 or email executive@ thehoya.com. News Tips Campus News Editor Maraih Byrne: Call (202) 687-3415 or email campus@ thehoya.com. City News Editor Sarah Kaplan: Call (202) 687-3415 or email city@thehoya. com. Sports Editor Pat Curran: Call (202) 6873415 or email sports@thehoya.com. General Information The Hoya is published twice each week during the academic year with the excep-

tion of holiday and exam periods. Address all correspondence to: The Hoya Georgetown University Box 571065 Washington, D.C. 20057-1065 The writing, articles, pictures, layout and format are the responsibility of The Hoya and do not necessarily represent the views of the administration, faculty or students of Georgetown University. Signed columns and cartoons represent the opinions of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the editorial position of The Hoya. Unsigned essays that appear on the left side of the editorial page are the opinion of the majority of the editorial board. Georgetown University subscribes to the principle of responsible freedom of expression for student editors. The Hoya does not discriminate on the basis of age, gender, sexual orientation, race, disability, color, national or ethnic origin. © 1920-2012. The Hoya, Georgetown University twice weekly. No part of this publication may be used without the permission of The Hoya Board of Editors. All rights reserved. The Hoya is available free of charge, one copy per reader, at distribution sites on and around the Georgetown University campus. Additional copies are $1 each. Editorial: (202) 687-3415 Advertising: (202) 687-3947 Business: (202) 687-3947 Facsimile: (202) 687-2741 Email: editor@thehoya.com Online at www.thehoya.com Circulation: 6,500.


OPINION

friDAY, MARCH 30, 2012

THE HOYA

VIEWPOINT • Anne Musica

Overlooked Female Leaders I

assumed that by the time I reached higher education, women’s leadership wouldn’t really be an issue. However, I could not have been more wrong. I’ve been spoiled when it comes to female mentors and leaders at Georgetown, especially as a student in the languages and linguistics department, which is predominantly female. Most of the organizations I’ve been involved with are led by female students. The organizations I currently work with operate out of Georgetown’s Women’s Center, which fosters female leadership. Despite the fact that I have spent my college career surrounded by amazing female leaders, I am firmly of the opinion that there is a huge overall lack thereof at Georgetown. Before I continue, I’d like to make it very clear that all the opinions I state in this piece are entirely my own, and do not necessarily reflect the position of the Women Advancing Gender Equity fellowship, of which I am a member, or those of the Women’s Center. As a member of WAGE, which was founded by a handful of female leaders in the Class of 2008 to establish mentor relationships for undergraduate female leaders and to provide a space to discuss gender equity issues and leadership development, I have had the privilege of attending panels and discussions on women and student leadership at Georgetown. I’ve also been able to have many conversations with

fellow WAGE members and other female leaders about the state of leadership at Georgetown. I’ve found there are two main schools of thought regarding female student leadership at Georgetown: One is that there are nowhere near enough female leaders at Georgetown and extensive steps should be taken to get more female students involved and recognized for their work and achievements. The other is that by calling attention to female student leaders, we’re making the problem worse. Typically, the women who share the latter perspective hold high-ranking positions in what are traditionally considered male-dominated fields. They may have their authority undermined if it is pointed out that they are, in fact, women. To prove they are just as capable as men, they cannot afford to make gender an issue. I heartily disagree with this view. Women I have spoken with who are leaders in service and culture-oriented fields find they constantly face discrimination for being female leaders. Culture and service are typically female-dominated areas, and so no one really cares that the Center for Social Justice, for example, is full of amazing women student leaders. When student papers like The Voice or The Hoya deign to write about the issue of women’s leadership at Georgetown, they always

look to organizations like the Georgetown University Alumni and Student Federal Credit Union, Georgetown University Student Association and Students of Georgetown, Inc., organizations that are well known among the students, control large amounts of money, have vast influence over the student body and are traditionally male-dominated. The CEO of The Corp last year was a woman. The new GUSA president and vice president are both women. Yes, this is amazing. It’s incredible. But it also undervalues the dozens, even hundreds, of female students who make up the leadership of organizations that are traditionally female-dominated, but are considered less serious because they’re related to culture and service. Do we have a lot of women leaders at Georgetown? Yes. Is there a perception on campus that we don’t? Absolutely. Have we come a long way since Georgetown went fully coed in 1969? Of course. But do we still have a lot of work to do to make female leaders at Georgetown actually represent roughly 50 percent of the student population and feel that they can be women and leaders without it being a big deal? Definitely.

Anne Musica is a senior in the College and a WAGE fellow.

THE DISCONCERTED DEMAGOGUE by Daniel Yang

A3

VIEWPOINT • James Saucedo & Zenen Jaimes

As Bias Lingers, LGBTQ Students Need Safeguards U pon reading “Acceptance Shouldn’t Be Optional, but Expected” (The Hoya, A3, March 27, 2012), we were excited to see campus issues pertinent to the LGBTQ community at Georgetown entering conversations here in a significant way. While we do not disagree that dialogue is a part of a Georgetown education, and that dialogue specifically on acceptance of LGBTQ members needs to be a deeper part of the Georgetown experience, these conversations cannot happen if incoming students do not feel secure in their new homes here. Shaker points out that by allowing students to categorize themselves as willing to live with an LGBTQ roommate or not, Georgetown will not become a more tolerant community. However, experience and the heartbreaking stories of far too many of our fellow students inform us that we cannot assume all incoming first-year students are open to living and interacting with gay roommates. The fact that there are numerous cases every year of harassment, bullying and intimidation by roommates due to students’ actual or perceived sexual orientations tells us otherwise. Gay students who have had positive and fruitful roommate experiences should consider themselves blessed. But many gay students at Georgetown may not have that experience. For many of us, our first-year roommate situations are memories of discomfort and hostility. We need to profess a vision of an inclusive Hilltop to each incoming class, and work toward a time when roommate harassment is a thing of the past; but until we reach that point, we have the responsibility to actively develop ways to prevent such instances from happening at all. Suggesting that discrimination based on sexual orientation does not occur is quite simply a misguided understanding of Georgetown’s actual campus climate. Until we eliminate such intolerance, we need to continually offer resources to those who find themselves victimized. Finally, we suggest caution and deeper reflection to anyone who attempts to link the struggles of gay students at Georgetown with the unique struggles of female students, students of color, non-Christian students, students with disabilities and students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. While we may at times feel unwelcome at Georgetown in similar contexts, it is an injustice to equate

our lived experiences with one another. Further, looking to the way that Georgetown has dealt with discrimination and intolerance of other kinds provides a poor model for addressing bias against LGBTQ students. It was only after the handful of black students on campus in the early 1970s felt so unwelcome that they petitioned President Healy for a safe space, Black House on Magis Row. It was only after students, denigrated as human beings by university officials for their non-heterosexual identities, brought a court case against Georgetown in the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals that GU Pride’s predecessor organization was allowed to form on the Hilltop and at the Law Center. It was only after The Hoya’s 2009 April Fools’ edition that campus began to address racial disparities and other matters of inequity with a series of diversity working groups the following year. It was only after a student was hospitalized in 2007 after being beaten by a fellow student because he was perceived as gay, and after the university administration subsequently chose not to issue a public safety alert or comment on the incident, that student activists lobbying for an LGBTQ Resource Center began to be taken seriously. We need an LGBTQ-friendly checkbox for incoming first-year students not to separate them or suggest that LGBTQ-unfriendliness is an option, but to acknowledge that it is in the best interest of all students to prevent cases of roommate harassment, bullying and intimidation. The initiative will work toward better student safety by ensuring that first-year students do not have to bear the burden of creating acceptance in roommates who are even marginally closed-minded. Those who find themselves less than fully comfortable around LGBTQ people at Georgetown would be welcome and encouraged to engage with their discomfort, as they already are. But we cannot force someone into that conversation, and we should not impose the start of that conversation on our first-year students. No one should feel unwelcome here. It is our duty to stand up for all students and make this campus better and more inclusive than it is when we first arrive on the Hilltop. James Saucedo is a junior in the MSB and Zenen Jaimes is a junior in the SFS. James is also the secretary of diversity affairs in the Georgetown University Student Association cabinet.

AS THIS JESUIT SEES IT ...

Reflection Soothes Souls

IMPERFECT UNION

A US Democracy Under Siege T here will be a dark side to this year’s presidential elections: the precarious state of contemporary American democracy due to the confluence of two trends. The first threat to democracy is the growing disenfranchisement of large swathes of the American population, specifically in the forms of various legal measures implemented by states. These measures serve to make voting difficult or impossible for certain groups. Throughout American history, the right to vote has been contested. At various times, people who didn’t own property, women and racial minorities have been disenfranchised and forced to fight for their voting rights. Unfortunately, the problem of voter disenfranchisement continues. This November, nearly four million Americans will be barred from voting because of a past criminal conviction, despite having completed their prison sentences and repaid their debts to society. In 11 states, including the swing states of Virginia, Florida, Iowa and Nevada, people with felony convictions are disenfranchised for life, even after they finish their prison time. In a country where the criminal justice system disproportionately targets minorities — blacks constitute 12.6 percent of the American population, but account for nearly 40 percent of the prison population — it should come as no surprise that racial minorities are disproportionately affected by criminal disenfranchisement. As the historian Alexander Keyssar documents, these laws emerged after the Civil War, when slavery was abolished and blacks were given the right to vote. Criminal disenfranchisement was implemented alongside literacy tests, poll taxes and grandfather clauses as part of a concerted effort to pre-

vent blacks from voting. In 1901, Virginia politician Carter Glass described felony disenfranchisement as a means to “eliminate the darkey as a political factor,” in Virginia. Today, due to criminal disenfranchisement, 13 percent of black men in America have lost the right to vote. Recently, several states have moved to further restrict voting rights by passing voter ID laws. These laws require voters to show certain approved forms of identification in order to vote on election day. Like the literacy tests and poll taxes of the past, these laws appear

Sam Blank

U.S. voter ID laws place an onerous burden on poor Americans. race neutral. However, in practice, they have a disproportionate effect on poor and minority voters. Obtaining a form of identification, like a driver’s license, costs both time and money. Going to the Department of Motor Vehicles takes time due to travel and long waits. It costs money to obtain both the license itself and a birth certificate, which most states require to get a driver’s license. The reality is that voter ID laws place a disproportionate and onerous burden on poor Americans. Poor and minority Americans are less likely to own cars, and thus may not have driver’s licenses. Many poor Americans work long hours and might not have

the time to go to the DMV. Furthermore, DMVs are often located far from poor and minority communities, placing a further burden on them. Finally, the financial cost of obtaining a license places a disproportionate burden on the poor. The Brennan Center for Justice estimates that 11 percent of eligible voters lack proper identification under these voter ID laws. However, among blacks, the number amounts to nearly 25 percent. Voter ID laws represent a hidden poll tax. Instead of having to pay at the voting booth, Americans are now required to pay to get the proper identification to vote. Thus, more Americans are disenfranchised, limiting American democracy. The second threat to democracy is the decline of the American middle class and rising income inequality in the United States. In Democracy in America, Alexis de Toqueville noted the link between the middle-class and democracy. According to Harvard economist Richard Freeman, the decline of America’s middle class is a threat to democracy. With their increasing wealth, the rich wield disproportionate influence on American politics simply by pouring money into political campaigns. As income inequality grows, the rich will gain more political power. Louis Brandeis said, “We can either have democracy in this country, or we can have great wealth concentrated in the hands of a few, but we can’t have both.” The cumulative effect of these two trends poses a serious threat to American democracy. Voter disenfranchisement takes away the rights of many to vote, while income inequality undermines political equality, an essential feature of democracy. Sam Blank is a senior in the College. IMPERFECT UNION appears every other Friday.

wise Franciscan nun once coun- do we understand our answers to all of seled me that it is imperative to lo- that in the context of our Georgetown cate the oases of grace in your life experience? How do we forge intellectual and visit them regularly. She explained and effective connections between what that we all know of places where the odds we believe and how we live? are good that we will brush up against There’s a lot to chew on, but there’s God or, better, that we will allow God to more. brush up against us. My discovery of an oasis in my class also Over the years, I have found her advice has to do with the voices involved in the to be solid, and I have located some de- conversation, as well as the honesty and pendable oases in my own life: Dahlgren vulnerability with which they ask and Chapel during the 7:30 p.m. Mass, Broad- answer questions. I’ve found that most way shows and the front porch of the Je- Georgetown students are eager to engage suit house in Cape May, N.J. in conversation about things of substance, This semester, a new locale has been including questions of ultimate meaning, added to the list: the ICC 115 on Tuesdays with their peers and professors. and Thursdays between 3:30 and 4:45 p.m. Recently, the class has been taken up by That’s when my class, “Jesuit Education,” students giving short oral presentations meets. entitled “When It Comes to God, I …” They Creatures of habit, hard-wired to re- have been engaging and often powerful. spond to the rhythm of ritual, we always Following each class, students send email begin class in the same way. Students filter reactions to someone whose presentain and arrange the 75 desks tion somehow resonated in a double-rowed open oval with them. and settle into the gentle These, too, are often rumble of friendly converpowerful. One read in sation. I gather their attenpart, “I usually allocate tion, say a short prayer and a few short spaces to read a poem, inviting any make notes during each responses students might reflection. For yours, my have. After a few minutes of notes spilled into the limbering up through these border and across the shared moments, we are off page banner. I think the and running. amount I had to write Fr. Ryan Maher, S.J. Early in the semester, stems directly from the we read a poem titled “On amount of thought you Reading Poems to a Senior put into your reflection, It is imperative to Class at South High” by as well as how much of locate the oases of D.C. Berry. In it, a teacher it resonated with my compares his classroom to own understanding grace in your life. an aquarium where he and of faith. ... I also think his students are frozen fish you’re absolutely right: who thaw as the room fills with the water To find a belief that resonates requires of their conversation, a conversation that an intimate engagement with your own lingers after the students have left the self. How that process occurs, I’m still unclassroom. sure.” I have returned to that poem many How it occurs, of course, is through a times this semester as I have found that life well lived. A life of action and reflecinvariably, the discussion that unfolds in tion, trial and error, prayer and service, class each Tuesday and Thursday after- reading and conversation. And grace — noon sticks with me and keeps expanding lots of grace. That’s why it’s so important in my heart and mind long after class is to be on the lookout for the sorts of oases over. There’s something about that class my Franciscan friend mentioned. And and its conversation that is, at least for why I’m so grateful to the students of “Jeme, oasis-like. It slakes a thirst that’s hard suit Education.” to define but that lies at the heart of what a Jesuit education is all about. Fr. Ryan Maher, S.J., is a professor in the College. Some of it has to do with the subject Fr. Schall, Fr. Maher and Fr. O’Brien alternate as matter. We talk every week about some the writers of AS THIS JESUIT SEES IT …, which apof the most important questions people pears every other Friday. Fr. Maher leaves to take can ask: What do we make of God? Of evil? a position at the University of Scranton at the end What about sin and grace and death? And of the semester; this is the last column he will write the Church and prayer and justice? How for The Hoya.


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NEWS

THE HOYA

PAGE FOUR

FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 2012

MULTIMEDIA Opinion Editor Katherine Foley sat down to chat with three of The Hoya’s columnists in “Behind the Byline.” See thehoya.com.

Your news — from every corner of The Hoya.

IN FOCUS

verbatim

FACING THE WALL

“ You loan power

to the state. [It] does not loan power to you.

Newt Gingrich, Republican presidential candidate, speaking to students Wednesday. See story on A6.

from

GARYGRAEFEN.BLOGSPOT.COM

CHRIS BIEN/THE HOYA

Students from Alternative Spring Break and the Magis El Salvador trips constructed a mock border fence in Red Square Tuesday as part of their week of events about immigration and migrant labor. See story on A7.

YOUNG, WILD AND $20 WITH A GOCARD This week’s Friday Fixat10ns will amp you up for tonight’s Spring Concert, featuring Wiz Khalifa and DJ Earworm. blog.thehoya.com

MSB Drops Four Spots in Rankings EMMA HINCHLIFFE Hoya Staff Writer

The McDonough School of Business fell four spots, from 10th to 14th, in Bloomberg Businessweek’s 2012 rankings of undergraduate business schools. The drop came one year after the university jumped from 23rd in 2010 to 10th place last year. “Once a school breaks into the very top of a ranking, the slightest variation in data can be the difference between several places,” MSB Dean David Thomas wrote in an email. Thomas attributed last year’s increase to curricular enhancements, like the firstyear seminar, and the opening of the Hariri Building in fall 2009. Addressing this year’s drop, MSB Senior Associate Dean and Director of the Undergraduate Program Norean Sharpe emphasized that many measures of the school’s success are not considered when determining rankings, such as this year’s 21 percent increase in regular-decision applicants and 14 percent acceptance rate for early action applicants. Businessweek’s 2012 rankings also listed the MSB as 49th in its student satisfaction rankings, drawing mixed student reactions. Dimitri Roumeliotis (MSB ’15) said he has been very satisfied with his experience in the MSB so far this year. “I think [the school has] a lot of support. The [MSB Technology] Center is really good at helping us get what we need for class, and in general they have a lot of peer advisors and deans to talk to,” he said. However, according to Ian Lundy (MSB ’15), resources for freshmen can be limited at times. “I would like a little more

personalized attention from the counseling office,” he said. “I think I’m going to get that when I declare my major, but for freshmen there aren’t many resources to get advice.” Adrian Mansylla (MSB ’13) also expressed concerns about student-administration interactions. “Although I’m satisfied with my experience at the business school, working with the administration can be tough and frustrating,” he said. While the MSB’s position fell overall, rankings for other categories that gauge student success and teaching quality remained high. The school is currently tied in second place for students’ earning the highest median starting salaries and sixth for sending students to top MBA programs. Its professors earned an A plus in teaching quality. “I personally am very satisfied with the professors I’ve had, with the curriculum and with class sizes,” Lundy said. Lundy expressed enthusiasm about study abroad opportunities that will allow him to explore possible majors early in his academic career. “I’m going to Spain this summer to study international marketing and entrepreneurship,” he said. “That’s not an opportunity most freshmen would have.” Thomas and Sharpe both argued that rankings capture only a limited part of the school’s characteristics. “McDonough is distinguished by its tradition in leadership and service, and I envision the school being known around the world for producing graduates who are principled leaders in service to business and society,” Thomas wrote. “If we build a premier program, the rankings will follow.”

REBECCA GOLDBERG FOR THE HOYA

In the wake of a steep rent increase, Crêpe Amour will relocate from its M Street storefront to Vienna, Va., later this spring.

Crepe Amour to Close This Sunday BRADEN MCDONALD Hoya Staff Writer

Popular M Street creperie and espresso bar Crêpe Amour and its partner restaurant Georgetown Wing Co. are scheduled to close their doors this Sunday. Co-owner Sri Suku said that the company decided to leave the Georgetown location, opened just over two years ago, after its landlord raised the rent for the upcoming lease renewal in May. “[The rent] more than doubled, making it uneconomical to be here,” Suku said. “There’s a certain factor when you have to know when to walk away.” Suku said that Good Stuff Eatery, a Capitol Hill restaurant that specializes in burgers, milkshakes and salads, will be the new occupant of the space. Ac-

cording to Good Stuff Eatery’s website, the restaurant will open a branch in Georgetown this spring. Representatives could not be reached to confirm that the branch would be located in the spot vacated by Crêpe Amour. Meanwhile, Crêpe Amour plans to open a new location in Vienna, Va., later this spring, according to Suku. In addition, the company plans to start a food truck and catering service, both operating under the name “Crêpe Love.” The food truck will serve various locations throughout the District as well as Arlington, Fairfax, Clarendon, Tyson’s Corner and Rosslyn, Va. The owners hope to have the truck up and running in two to three weeks. Suku added that Crêpe Amour is likely to open a new location in George-

town and is also searching for a site in downtown D.C. “We’re continuing to look for a location in Georgetown. As we speak, it’s not 100 percent, but if we get a good space, we’ll obviously take it,” he said. “Nothing is concrete yet. … You’ll see us popping up.” Suku said he is grateful for the support of the surrounding neighborhood, and Georgetown students in particular, throughout Crêpe Amour’s time in the area. “We have done phenomenally well, especially with the support of students and the community,” Suku said. “There’s a great synergy that we’ve had from more than a financial perspective. It’s really been a business for the community, by the community.”


News

friday, march 30, 2012

THE HOYA

A5

Grad Schools Advocate Urges Legalization Crime Hits To Continue Academic Expansion Year Low Sam Rodman Hoya Staff Writer

GRADUATE, from A1 address the issue. “I am excited that the capital campaign will contribute to graduate student financial aid. This is the first time it has been a line item,” he said. The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences functions as an umbrella institution for the graduate degrees offered by departments within the Georgetown College, the School of Nursing and Health Studies, the School of Foreign Service and the McDonough School of Business. According to Mara, applications to all programs have either remained steady or seen recent increases this year. The public policy, foreign service and security studies graduate programs, some of the university’s most specialized offerings, continue to receive the most applicants. The NHS recently added several online nursing programs and has become increasingly popular over the last five years. While the Nursing @ Georgetown program expected to enroll 25 students in fall 2011, 110 students joined that semester. “As our [students] graduate and go on to do really great things, people get interested. I expect that [our popularity] will continue to grow into the future,” Chair of the Department of Health Services and Administration Patricia Coonan said. Administrators in each school said curriculum changes and expansions are planned for several graduate programs. The two NHS offerings, nursing and health systems administration, have developed a new focus on quantitative analysis in an attempt to better prepare students for modern health care systems. A recent overhaul of the masters in business administration program has also increased its focus on quantitative and analytical skills and its emphasis on a global business perspective, according to administrators. “The new curriculum is a better reflection of the Georgetown McDonough identity,” Senior Associate Dean for the full-time MBA program Elaine Romanelli said. Romanelli added that the university’s graduate and undergraduate programs ultimately complement one another. “As one gets stronger, the other gets stronger as well,” she said.

Allen St. Pierre, executive director of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, advocated for the legalization of marijuana in the District and across the country Thursday evening. In 2010, the D.C. City Council approved a medical marijuana legalization initiative originally voted on in 1998. The District’s first store specifically catering to those who want to grow marijuana, weGrow, is slated to open Friday. However, St. Pierre said he believes it will be another year before citizens have the ability to legally purchase medical marijuana at District dispensaries, though he is used to setbacks in legislation. “You need to develop a marathoner’s muscle, not a sprinter’s muscle,” he said in his talk organized by the Lecture Fund. St. Pierre described American criminalization of marijuana as contradictory and dangerous, noting that punishments for the possession of drugs range from fines to criminal prosecution across the United States. “You will be arrested, which is a violent interaction between you and your government. … Who is the victim? Who is the government representing in this interaction, since nobody’s being beaten, no property’s being stolen, nobody’s being harmed?” St. Pierre said. Although legalization of marijuana is on the ballot in seven states, St. Pierre anticipates that only Colorado and Washington are viable candidates for legalization because they are the only two states with heavily funded campaigns. St. Pierre equated the fight for marijuana law reform to Prohibition-era politics, as some of the people most vehemently opposed to legalization of marijuana are those who profit most from the illegal drug trade. He noted that a

Hiromi Oka

Hoya Staff Writer

On-campus crime hit its low for this academic year, as crime plummeted 41 percent between February and March. The Department of Public Safety reported 37 incidents this month, compared to 58 incidents in February. The overall crime decrease was due to a decline in the number of thefts. DPS reported 12 thefts this month, compared with 26 in February. While thefts declined, burglaries made up a greater share of the total crime. DPS reported seven burglaries this month, compared to two in February and one in March of last year. The Metropolitan Police Department is handling two burglaries that occurred on March 4 and 5 in the New Research Building and Building D in the Medical Center. Both incidents remain unresolved. However, perpetrators of a March 18 burglary at St. Mary’s Hall were detained and arrested by DPS and MPD after a late-night chase in Burleith. A March 12 burglary in White-Gravenor Hall is also being handled by MPD and no suspects have been apprehended. The number of assaults fell to two incidents, a decrease from February, during which three assaults and one sexual assault were reported. Drug and alcohol violations remained consistent with previous months, with four and three incidents respectively. All violations were referred to the Office of Student Conduct.

SARI FRANKEL/THE HOYA

St. Pierre supports full legalization of marijuana. significant portion of the opposition to Proposition 19, which would have legalized marijuana in California, came from the “Emerald Triangle,” a region known for growing cannabis. According to St. Pierre, one bright spot for marijuana law reform is the growing support for legalization nationwide. According to a poll published by Gallup in October, 50 percent of Americans supported legalization, while 46 percent were against it. St. Pierre hopes that this level of support will eventually spur the federal government to act. “What idiot cannot look at [the majority] of people supporting something across all strata and not, in a democracy, know that that’s where you need to go?” he said.

University Pushes for Tenant Rights Awareness LANDLORDS, from A1 are currently being rented without proper licensing in the area. Currently, 1,250 undergraduates and 327 graduate students rent properties in West Georgetown and Burleith, according to Director of Media Relations Rachel Pugh. Gil said the pledge is a good opportunity to increase students’ awareness of their rights as renters, but it has not had a significant impact on the numbers of unlicensed properties rented in Georgetown. “I think the folks that are renting … properties that don’t meet code are not likely to be signing the pledge,” he

said. “These are the ones that I think both [the DCRA] and the university are concerned about.” Bill Starrels, an Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner who has advocated for greater landlord accountability since a fire in a rental house killed Daniel Rigby (MSB ’05) in 2004, questioned whether the pledge has had its intended effect. “The landlords haven’t changed; the management companies haven’t changed [since the pledge was created],” he said. “Things are close to the status quo, I’ve been hearing.” Landlord Dori Konopka, one of the signatories, said that the pledge has potential, but students and landlords

need to take it seriously. “It’s a good policy, and if everyone followed it, [the pledge] would work really well. Unfortunately, there are students who don’t pay attention, and there are landlords who don’t pay attention,” she said. According to university spokeswoman Stacy Kerr, the pledge is a part of wider efforts to make students more aware of their rights as tenants. On April 13, the university will bring a program support specialist from D.C.’s Office of the Tenant Advocate to campus to answer students’ questions about renting. Gil said that these efforts are crucial to ensuring that student tenants are

protected. “The university is really stepping up its advocacy for its off-campus students so that they [can live] in safe and legal housing conditions. [It is] a great thing for the university to be highlighting the fact that its students … have basic housing rights to safe and legal housing conditions,” he said. Landlord David Solovey, who rents his property in Burleith to students and has also signed onto the pledge, said that the issue is a joint concern for landlords and tenants. “I’ve been a landlord [in Georgetown] for 48 years. Anything that is involved with the school and the community, I’m interested in,” he said.

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How many states’ names can you find?

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS DECODAQUOTE:

We’re all pretty bizarre. Some of us are just better at hiding it, that’s all. -The Breakfast Club

SUDOKU:

Being defeated is often a temporary condition. Giving up is what makes it permanent. -Marilyn Vos Savant

Kate Sciamanna/THE HOYA


A6

news

THE HOYA

friday, march 30, 2012

Gingrich Talks Social Security First Women at GU Law

Excelled Amid Opposition

Matthew Strauss Hoya Staff Writer

Republican presidential candidate and former Speaker of the House of Representatives Newt Gingrich stressed his desire to return the country to its religious values and reform Social Security Wednesday. Gingrich’s talk in Gaston Hall sparked a protest on Copley Lawn that drew about 20 students chanting and holding signs. At the lecture, Gingrich introduced a proposal to partially privatize Social Security. Under his plan, taxpayers would manage a private savings account with funds drawn from their paychecks. Contributions from employers would continue to fund the Social Security trust. “It turns out, according to the official actuary for social security, if we had adopted in 1983 a personal social security savings account model, we would today have over $16 trillion in savings accounts,” Gingrich said. Opponents of Gingrich’s plan argue that the 2008 financial crisis would have destroyed private Social Security accounts, had his plan already been implemented. Gingrich, however, defended his plan. “If you look at what happened to the stock market in 2008 and 2009, a person, even after the decline of the stock market, would have dramatically more money than they would have gotten out of the traditional system,” he said. Before the lecture, about 20 people chanted phrases holding signs reading “The 1%” and criticizing Gingrich’s desire for less campaign finance restriction. The protesters initially stationed themselves on the sidewalk adjacent to Healy Circle, but were asked to move to Copley Lawn in accordance with university rules. “We want Newt to keep his hands off our Social Security,” protest attendee Cole Stangler (SFS ’13) said. Other protesters criticized Gingrich for his views on social issues and his recent comments about the killing of Trayvon Martin.

WOMEN, from A1

CHRIS BIEN/THE HOYA

Gingrich called for the partial privatization of Social Security at a speech in Gaston Hall Wednesday. “We support civil discourse and understand its importance, but there is nothing civil about Newt’s anti-immigrant, anti-gay, anti-equality speech. Excluding the 99 percent since 1979 is most uncivil,” English professor and protest attendee Jennifer Fink said. In his lecture, Gingrich asserted that the American work ethic stemmed from deep-seated religious values. “We’re the only society where power comes from God to each one of you personally,” Gingrich said. “You are personally sovereign. You loan power to the state. The state does not loan power to you.” In an interview with campus media, Gingrich expressed discontent with the Obama administration’s mandate requiring universities and hospitals, including those with religious affiliations, to provide contraceptive coverage in their employees’

and students’ health care plans. “I don’t understand why [anyone] would suggest that religious universities should be forced by a civil government to violate their religious beliefs,” he said. “It’s pretty simple: are we a country founded on religious liberty or not? If we are, then who is the government to define that liberty?” he told The Hoya. In light of recent cuts to his campaign staff, Gingrich also emphasized that he intends to continue his bid for the Republican nomination. “We streamlined the campaign precisely to be able to continue to [the GOP convention in] Tampa. There’s a big difference between streamlining and suspending,” Gingrich told The Hoya. “I think [presidential candidate Mitt] Romney clearly has not yet gotten a majority, nobody thinks he has gotten a majority, so why would I quit?”

Williams, author of a feature entitled “A History of Women at Georgetown University Law Center” that appeared in the fall 2001 edition of Georgetown Law’s alumni magazine. According to Georgetown historian Fr. Emmett Curran, S.J., the opposition stemmed from a small but vocal minority. “I think it was just … prejudice against women. They didn’t consider them part of the traditional Jesuit mission,” he said. In the summer of 1951, Patricia Anna Collier became the first woman to enroll in a Law Center class. She was joined that September by Williams and six others. In those first years, not all faculty members were convinced that women belonged at the law school. Sherman Cohn (LAW ’57), now a professor at the law school, was a student at Georgetown Law when women were still a small minority at the school. “There were a few [professors] who acted very badly,” Cohn wrote in an email. “My impression is that one, perhaps two, delighted in telling very raunchy jokes when he had a woman in the class. Another, a Jesuit, who was a very tough classroom teacher … seemed to be even harder when he called on one of the few women in the class.” But after a few years, even Gaghan, who had sharply criticized the decision to admit women, acknowledged their contribution. “We have had some terrific girl students here ... and I’m the first to admit that I was just about as wrong as anyone could be wrong,” he told Wendy Williams. Agnes Williams, then Agnes Neill, worked exceptionally hard in her classes and won the Beaudry Moot Court Competition in 1952. “One of the professors … told me that he just wanted me to know that he had been one of the leading opponents of women at the law school … and that he had changed his mind,” Williams said. “And I was impressed that he was willing to say that.” Though the atmosphere gradually grew more accepting, Williams said that the small band of female students sometimes struggled to fit in. “The male students were friendly, but … I missed the companionship of other wom-

en,” Williams said. “I don’t think there was the camaraderie you’d expect, because we weren’t the same age. Once we had more numbers, we had more camaraderie.” Williams found work at a law firm after graduation, but not all female graduates were able to obtain full-time jobs in their field. Williams added that she faced discrimination on the job. “When I was practicing law, I felt that clients did not want a woman lawyer,” she said. Cohn, who took a spot on the hiring committee for the Law Center in 1968, said building the legacy of women in law took time. “With very few women in law school, there were very few applicants for teaching jobs, and then a school had to find a person they concluded were qualified,” he wrote. During the 1970s, women began more aggressively organizing under the banner of the Women’s Rights Collective, a Georgetown group that pushed for larger numbers of female professors and students. “When I joined the faculty in 1972 there were not many women law professors anywhere in the nation. Some of the male students were skeptical … [but] women were very supportive … in part because they were still dealing themselves with the challenge of entering a male dominated profession,” law professor Judith Areen wrote in an email. Areen later became the first female dean of the Law School, in 1989. “Groups like the Women’s Rights Collective also … pressured the faculty to add more women,” she said. “The numbers kept growing.” This shift is reflected in the school’s student body as well. In the 1950s, women made up between 1 and 2 percent of the law school’s student body; by 2010, women comprised 50 percent of the incoming class, according to Law School admissions statistics. Curran said that despite Georgetown’s delayed start to hiring women professors in significant numbers and increasing female student enrollment, the university has done well in its first half-century of integration. “Even though it’s a short history of women at the law school, it’s a strong one,” he said.


news

friday, march 30, 2012

THE HOYA

A7

Student Ideas Put to Work Online Annie Chen

Hoya Staff Writer

CHRISTINA LING FOR THE HOYA

Spring Break trip leaders, participants and friends discussed experiences from service trips that focused on immigrant rights.

Students Bring Global Lessons to Campus Carly Graf

Hoya Staff Writer

Participants in several Alternative Spring Break trips and the Magis Immersion and Justice Program sponsored a week of events to share their experiences learning about the lives of immigrants and migrant workers. The “Nothing Human is Alien to Me” project, which began Monday, aimed to address ideas about home, migration, unequal power structures and human dignity. “What this week was hoping to convey [was] the human reality, the living experience, of people who go through this in their daily lives,” Thomas Scharff (COL ’12), co-leader of the Immokalee Migrant Worker Justice trip, said. The Border Awareness Experience, Kino Border Immersion, Immokalee Migrant Worker Justice and Magis El Salvador spring break trips focused on problems surrounding social justice in immigra-

tion law and the working conditions of migrant day laborers. “All of the trips working on this project truly believe in the title we chose for the week, ‘Nothing Human Is Alien to Me,’ and wanted to raise awareness about these issues on campus and catalyze action to make sure that everyone is treated as a human being,” co-leader of the Border Awareness Experience trip Carly Rosenfield (COL ’14) said. Last year, the trips held individual follow-up events, but this year, the group coordinators collaborated to organize the week. Events ranged from discussions of participants’ personal experiences and evaluations of the trips to reflections on the stories of individual immigrants and migrant workers. “Migrants and refugees are our brothers and sisters. They deserve our help, and they have something to teach us,” Vice President of Mission and Ministry Fr. Kevin O’Brien, S.J., who went on the Kino Border Immersion trip, said.

Hoya Ideas Community, an online platform that allows students to submit, comment on and vote for suggestions to the university, has accumulated about 50 ideas and more than individual 700 users since its launch a month ago. The website aims to facilitate more efficient communication among students, clubs and the university administration. “We want to make sure [the platform] is something integrated in students’ daily life,” James Li (MSB ’13), a student liaison for the platform, said. “We want it to become part of how you would go about solving an issue at Georgetown.” Georgetown University Student Association’s former Secretary of Information and Technology Michael Crouch (MSB ’13), who helped design the site, said the university responded swiftly after students rallied around a post asking for action when the university announced that LXR and Nevils Halls would lack air conditioning until May. “When the [air conditioning] problem arose, it seemed like a very opportune moment to test [Hoya Ideas Community] to see if it would work,” he said. Crouch’s request that university

housing provide fans or repair the air conditioning system before May solicited 121 student votes of support. The university announced that it would install a temporary chiller one day after the post to Hoya Ideas Community, a success that Crouch also attributes to student emails and an open letter sent to the Chief Operating Officer and the Office of Student Housing. Chief Innovation Officer Michael Wang (MSB ’07) said the platform has served as a helpful channel to gauge student needs. According to Wang, university leaders regularly review the website and discuss popular ideas during administrative meetings. A recent post about campus WiFi caught the attention of Chief Information Officer Lisa Davis, Wang said. He added that the university is working to implement short-term solutions to address the issue. Currently, ideas labeled “In Review” by the university include more freedom for meal swipes at O’Donovan Dining Hall and GPS trackers for SafeRides vans. Projects in this section are in the process of being investigated or implemented, according to Wang. GUSA representatives said the platform will allow them to better represent and engage with students.

“The senate is here as a resource, but ultimately we’re only talking to people we know, just like everyone else,” GUSA Senate Speaker Adam Talbot (COL ’12) said. “It’s definitely going to be a place in the future for the senate to look for issues important to students.” Li, however, noted more feedback on the platform should be gathered before the website, which is currently in beta mode, officially launches at the Georgetown Innovation Summit on April 19 and 20. Adam Ramadam (SFS ’12), a member of a focus group organized by Li Tuesday, agreed that the visible connection between students and administrators on the site should be expanded. “Right now, everyone can post anything they want without prior screening, but one of the questions is how do we go ahead and get concerns and relay them to the university administration,” he said. The developers are considering adding features such as email responses, press releases or a blog that the administration could use to address the feasibility of certain ideas. “It’s a good step to have the platform, but to actually get the university to respond, that’s going to be the key to making the platform last years and years,” Li said.

DPS BLOTTER Saturday, March 24, 2012 Drug Violation, Kehoe Field, 3:02 a.m. Department of Public Safety officers on routine patrol made contact with students at the listed location, one of whom was found to be in possession of a controlled substance. The case has been referred to the Office of Student Conduct. Drug Violation, Village C West, 3:56 a.m. DPS officers made contact with a student in the listed location who was found to be in possession of a controlled substance. The case has been referred to Student Conduct. Alcohol Violation, VCW, 11:45 p.m. DPS officers recorded an alcohol violation for a student who had sev-

eral empty alcohol containers in his room at the listed location. The case has been referred to Student Conduct. Sunday, March 25, 2012 Theft, Leavey Center, 12:24 a.m. A student reported leaving her Apple iPhone in the ladies’ restroom and upon returning to retrieve it discovered that unknown persons had taken it. Simple Assault, Leavey Center, 8:59 a.m. DPS officers broke up a physical altercation involving five non-affiliate female individuals. No arrests were made. Theft, Henle Bike Rack, 11:49 p.m. DPS officers went to investigate

a theft at the Henle bike rack. As officers arrived in the area they observed a male subject riding a bicycle while holding on to another bicycle. The subject dropped the second bicycle and fled the area. No arrest was made. Monday, March 26, 2012 Theft, Healy Hall, 7:30 a.m. A staff member reported the theft of a wooden chair. Theft, Car Barn, 4:30 p.m. A student reported the theft of his or her Hybrid Sirrus Sport Bicycle. The blotter is compiled weekly by the Department of Public Safety.


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THE HOYA

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Friday, MARCH 30, 2012


sports

friday, march 30, 2012

The bleacher seats

as, say, breaking Cy Young’s record for all-time wins, but a degree of magnitude remains. The general population knows little about Jamie Moyer. They’re unaware that he’s now pitching in his fourth decade and that his career has stopped in more places than anyone can imagine. In 1992, a full six years after his major league debut, he spent the

Corey Blaine

In a sport with such an illustrious history, records like this seem impossible to break. entire season in the minor leagues, hardly a starting spot of a career that would continue for another 20 years. Despite the weak start, his accolades are numerous. Moyer won 21 games for the Mariners in 2003, he was the 25th left-handed pitcher to win 200 games and he was part of the Philadelphia Phillies championship team in 2008. While achieving all of this, Moyer has run his own charity and raised eight children. So how does he do it? I struggle getting out of bed for my 8 a.m. class twice a week, and Jamie Moyer is trying to pitch in the Majors at 49. Aside from being in amazing shape — and probably cashing in on incredi-

ble karma thanks to his philanthropy — the man who looks more like a grandfather than a Major Leaguer simply knows what works. Moyer throws slowly, but he throws accurately. Long before “Moneyball”, Moyer figured out that keeping unnecessary runners off the bases was the key to winning. As a result, he’s pitched with amazing accuracy and has a lifetime average of 2.5 walks per nine innings. By throwing accurately and intelligently, Moyer hasn’t posted a losing record since 2006. Moyer didn’t always pitch this way, and accordingly, nobody predicted his unprecedented career. In 1991, the season before Moyer spent a year in the minors, he allowed an average of 4.6 walks per nine innings and seemed to be headed out of baseball. At some point during his year in the minors, Moyer realized he could be successful if he could just learn to slow down and throw accurately. That realization was made somewhere in the Detroit Tigers’ farm system and it ended up being the secret to Moyer’s lengthy career. In 1993, Moyer lowered his walks per nine innings to 2.3. From that moment on, he became a staple in the Majors. His career may not be recognized as much as it deserves to be, but the results are undeniable. The same guy who threw the slowest fastball in the National League in 2007 is about to break a record that’s stood since the 1930s, and that should be celebrated. Corey Blaine is a junior in the McDonough School of Business. THE BLEACHER SEATS appears every Friday.

A9

WOMEN’s lacrosse

Moyer’s Record Defies Age T he list of phenomenal pitchers that have had their careers shortened or derailed by injury is too long to count. Kerry Wood, who recorded 20 strikeouts in a single game in 1998 and then had his promising career threatened by Tommy John surgery in 1999 is a recent example. Locally, the Washington Nationals are praying their young star, Steven Strasburg, will be up to par after suffering an injury in his rookie season. It’s almost accepted in baseball that pitchers will get hurt, and it’s the lucky ones, not the normal ones, who are able to defy this rule and sustain a long career. And with this in mind, Jamie Moyer has slowly become the most interesting man in baseball. At 49 years old, Moyer is attempting to pitch his way to his 25th Major League season at the Rockies Spring Training Camp in Scottsdale, Ariz. If he can make the big league rotation, which is expected, Moyer can become the oldest player in the history of Major League Baseball to pick up a win as a pitcher. In a sport with such an illustrious history, records like this seem impossible to break. But Moyer seems poised to break a record that has stood since the 1930s. It makes little sense that Moyer, who states he feels no worse than he did at 35, isn’t receiving a media storm for his attempt at the record. Moyer is currently chasing the mark of a man who, in 1920, was granted special permission to throw a spitball by Major League Baseball. In any other situation, the pursuit of an 80-year-old record would garner unprecedented media attention. Admittedly, this record is not quite as monumental

THE HOYA

CHRIS BIEN/THE HOYA

Graduate student attack Kristen Coleman scored three goals against American.

Hoyas Set to Take on Huskies AMERICAN, from A12 after three American goals. However, freshman attack Caroline Tarzian found the net eight minutes into the half to spark the Blue and Gray scoring streak. The Eagles fought back, though. With a little help from several penalties called on Georgetown, American scored five goals in the last eight minutes of the half to cut the deficit to 11-8. But the Blue and Gray responded quickly out of intermission with four straight goals and never looked back. Junior attack Dina Jackson, sophomore midfielder Hannah Franklin, junior midfielder Sophia Thomas and Tarzian all scored within the first five minutes of the second half, expanding the lead to 15-8. After trading goals, junior midfielder Kelsi Bozel put the Hoyas up seven with eight minutes left to close out the Eagles. American added another goal at the seven-

minute mark, but Georgetown prevailed, 17-11. Bozel led the team with four goals. Tarzian and grad student attack Kristen Coleman both tallied three, while Cumberpatch led the team with two assists. “[Kelsi] was very decisive today. She took shots early and they went in. So I thought she played a very good game in that sense,” Fried said. “I thought the midfield as a whole played well.” Fried recognized the significance of the win in getting his team back above .500 going into the thick of the conference schedule, but he remains focused on the challenge posed by Connecticut (6-2, 0-1 Big East), whom the Blue and Gray take on this Friday. “UConn kind of stands in our way, so we need to make sure we take care of business and have a whole-team effort,” he said. The Hoyas and the Huskies face off at 4 p.m. today at MultiSport Facility.


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SPORTS

THE HOYA

friday, march 30, 2012

men’s lacrosse

top of the key

Casey, Georgetown Look to Earn Cardinals, Wildcats Win Against Struggling Lafayette Renew Strong Rivalry CASEY, from A12 last spring. He played in all 14 games for the Hoyas and contributed 12 goals, making him one of six Hoyas in double figures for the season. Casey also finished fourth on the team in points, with 20, and third in assists, with eight. But this year, Casey is already on his way to surpassing last season’s totals — seven games into the season. Casey already has nine goals and 19 points, and has already bested last season’s assist tally. Casey attributes his increased output to more offensive opportunities. “During the offseason I definitely worked on my finishing a lot more, trying to get one more step on my defenseman, which has definitely helped out a lot more this year.” Casey’s work during the offseason showed up on the field from the start, as he notched three goals on four shots in a season-opening loss to Maryland. Casey then took a backseat, scoring only twice over Georgetown’s next three games. But with leading scorer senior midfielder Zack Angel suffering from a persistent forearm injury, Casey knows it is his time to step up. “It’s a lot tougher this year be-

cause [last year] we had a lot of guys that carried the ball more. I kind of just got thrown into it when during the games I realized I needed to have the ball a lot more in my stick,” Casey said. Casey elevated his game just in time for the Hoyas’ first Big East matchup of the season against Providence. With Angel out of the lineup, Casey took charge, scoring two goals (including the game-winner) and two assists in a 7-6 victory. He followed that performance with another two-goal output in a tough loss to Loyola (Md.). But in keeping with his humble nature, Casey praised his teammates for aiding his success this year. “A lot of guys have been making great feeds. [Junior attack] Zac Guy has been making a lot of good feeds, [junior attack] Jason McFadden has been making some good feeds. It’s just made my job a little bit easier,” Casey said. Coming off a tough loss to Duke, in which a fourth quarter comeback attempt fell just two goals shy, Casey and his teammates will look to snap out of a two-game losing streak this Saturday at Lafayette. While the Blue and Gray cannot look past this game to a matchup with Villanova next week, Lafayette

presents a great opportunity for Georgetown to pick up confidence as the team heads into the remainder of its Big East schedule. “In the beginning of the year, we always start off saying our goal is to win the Big East,” Casey said. “Those games against Duke and Loyola get us ready for the Big East games, and that’s what we got to look forward to. If we win the Big East, I feel like everything will fall into place.” Lafayette (2-6, 0-3 Patriot League) is currently on a five-game losing streak and only mustered three goals against Army in their last game. The Hoyas (4-3, 1-0 Big East) can take the opportunity to work on managing the clock better, an area in which Casey would like to see improvement. “We just need to possess the ball a little bit more. We’re a little too rushed and a little too hectic once we get the ball,” he said. “It’s a little bit easier for our defense to catch their breath, and it’s a lot better for us if we have the ball because the other team can’t score.” Casey and the rest of the men’s lacrosse team will travel to Fisher Stadium in Easton, Pa., this Saturday to battle Lafayette. Faceoff is set for 4 p.m.

baseball

Navy Cruises Past GU Late in Game NAVY, from A12 he faced. A wild pitch, walk, runscoring double play and another walk made it 4-2, Midshipmen, and Wilk replaced Hollenbeck with redshirt junior Billy Cosmopolus. Cosmpolus fared marginally better, allowing the inherited runner to score, along with one runner of his own. When the disastrous inning finally ended, the trio of relievers had surrendered six runs on three hits, three walks and a hit batter. Sophomore pitcher Jack Vander Linden came on to relieve Cosmopolus in the top of the seventh for the Hoyas and stopped the bleeding, pitching three scoreless innings after the bullpen’s sixth-inning implosion. Over his three innings on the mound, Vander Linden allowed only one hit and struck out three batters. The Blue and Gray offense could

muster little in response to Navy’s sudden offensive explosion, although senior right fielder Rand Ravnaas scored in the bottom of the eighth to cut the lead to three when senior designated hitter Kevin Johnson grounded into a double play with men on the corners and no outs. The Hoyas went down in order in the ninth, as Navy junior pitcher Joel Rinehart picked up his second save of the year. The Blue and Gray have now lost seven in a row and nine of their last 10. This losing streak could not come at a worse time, as the Hoyas now enter an important part of their schedule with series against conference opponents Rutgers, Louisville and Villanova all looming. The first of these series starts tonight, as Rutgers (12-10, 2-1 Big East) travels to face Georgetown in a three-game set at Shirley Povich Field.

softball

Hoyas Beat Patriots Rachael Augostini Hoya Staff Writer

A rainy weekend forced four games to be postponed, but the Georgetown softball team (14-17) didn’t show any rust from the hiatus Wednesday when they tied George Mason at the top of the seventh and then claimed their first extra inning win. Despite giving up two hits with two outs in the first inning, senior pitcher Mackensey Carter, who had the start for the Hoyas, was able to finish the first unscathed. But the Patriots didn’t let their next opportunity pass them by. George Mason freshman second baseman Cori Prince advanced to third on a throwing error by Carter in the bottom of the second. Prince crossed the plate when junior infielder Megan Blank singled to third. Blank’s run gave the Patriots a 1-0 lead, which they held until the top of the seventh, when the Hoyas offense was finally able to produce a run. With pressure on, two outs and a final shot to put Georgetown back in the game, Georgetown freshman right fielder Megan Hyson got her second hit of the day, a home run to left center that tied the game at one. “Megan is a ballplayer,” Head Coach Pat Conlan said. “She loves to play and it is evident in her performance.” When George Mason couldn’t produce a run in the bottom of the seventh, the game headed to extras. Carter started the eighth inning with a single to the pitcher. Then a fielding error and a walk loaded the bases for the Hoyas, who only had one out. But two pop-outs ended the eighth abruptly. “We just started taking solid swings at good pitches, Carter said. That’s when good things start to happen. 

Georgetown finally secured the win in the ninth, when sophomore center fielder Taylor Koenig singled and advanced to third on a single to right field from junior catcher Shikara Lowe. Carter had a fly out to center field in the next at-bat that gave Koenig enough time to score, putting the Hoyas up, 2-1. Georgetown then held off George Mason in the bottom of the ninth to secure their fourth straight win. “The late inning comeback and extra inning win showed the fight that this team has,” Conlan said. “They have a never-say-die attitude, and anything is possible until that last out is made.” But the victory was just as attributable to freshman pitcher Lauren O’Leary, who entered the game in the fourth inning. “Lauren came in and shut Mason down,” Conlan said. “We put her in difficult relief situations and she continues to respond.” This weekend, the Hoyas will travel to Piscataway, N.J., to take on Big East opponent Rutgers (13,15, 2-3 Big East) in their first conference games this season. Rutgers is coming off a doubleheader sweep of Big East opponent Seton Hall. Senior infielder Brittney Lindley leads the Scarlet Knights with a batting average of .422 and freshman pitcher Alyssa Landrith leads the pitching staff at 9-5. “Rutgers always fights until the end so we just have to be ready to play good Georgetown softball,” Carter said. Pocketing the win over George Mason helped convince Conlan that her team is ready for conference play. “The team is in a good place. They have a great attitude and continue to work hard,” Conlan said. “They are ready for the Big East part of our schedule to begin.” Georgetown’s first game is set for noon tomorrow in Piscataway.

If the Hoyas want to snap their losing streak, the offense has to break out of its recent funk. The same lineup that scored double-digit runs in five straight games early in the season has been outscored, 55-22, over the last seven games. The Scarlet Knights’ lineup is productive from top to bottom, so if the Hoyas want any shot of winning they will need to score more than a few runs in support of their pitching staff. So far this season, Georgetown pitching has followed a similar course as the lineup: They either throw lights-out or throw batting practice. If the team can find a happy medium and get quality, deep performances from their starters and avoid giving up big innings, then they should have no problem procuring a W. If not, expect this nasty losing streak to go on a little longer.

INDEX

HOLLANDER, from A12 before moving to the NBA, makes this grudge match all the more enticing. After a miserable run with the Celtics, Pitino returned to the Bluegrass State to take the head coaching gig at his old school’s biggest rival. Although he took a surprising team to the Final Four in 2005, Pitino’s best shot at winning the title seemed to be with Terrence Williams, Earl Clark and company in 2009 before that team faltered against Michigan State in the Elite Eight. Until this tournament, it had been all downhill from there for Pitino, who faced embarrassment on and off the court: two first-round exits in the NCAA tournament and an all-too-public personal scandal that led to an extortion case. But after badly underperforming in the regular season, Louisville has caught fire in the last three weeks. The Cards won the Big East tournament title under the bright lights of Madison Square Garden, and they’ve kept that momentum going in the Big Dance. They got sweet revenge against the Spartans in the Sweet 16 before holding off a Florida squad coached by Pitino pupil Billy Donovan to punch their ticket to the Final Four. That makes the upstart Cardinals the polar opposite of the Wildcats, whose seven McDonald’s All-Americans have spearheaded a 36-2 campaign. The freshman talent stretches from power forward Anthony Davis — the nation’s leading shotblocker at nearly five a game — and fellow forward Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, to slick point guard Marquis Teague. Sophomores Doron Lamb and Terrence Jones are just as good as UK’s trio of likely one-and-dones. While no team in the country comes close to Kentucky’s array of skilled players, this isn’t quite a David and Goliath matchup. Louisville has a solid roster made up of experienced players. Junior point guard Peyton Siva is erratic but seems to have turned a corner. Sophomore guard Russ Smith can also get out of control, but is more than capable of taking over a game. Freshman power forward Chane Behanan has emerged as a viable

CLASSIFIEDS

inside option when sophomore center Gorgui Dieng gets into foul trouble. And in one of the Final Four’s best stories, senior guard Kyle Kuric has elevated the level of his game over his four years in Louisville and is a sharpshooter from three-point land. With tremendous talent, megawatt coaches, storied programs and the biggest stage of the year, tomorrow’s game might be the best college basketball game in decades. It harkens back to the 1992 East Regional final, where Christian Laettner got Duke past Pitino’s Kentucky squad in a 104103 game for the ages. This Final Four matchup is just as compelling, but it won’t be that sort of high-scoring affair. These teams have had a particularly rocky relationship ever since Calipari came to Lexington. When the Cards and Wildcats met at Rupp Arena on Dec. 31, Louisville was whistled for 29 fouls. Kentucky secured its seven-point win at the charity stripe, where the Wildcats went 32-of-43 and the Cardinals just 18-of-27. Although Kentucky fans rightfully argue their team has grown since that game, Louisville has improved even more, especially once the team got healthy. This allowed Pitino to reset the Cardinals’ defense to rely more on stifling pressure and closing out on the perimeter. That defense should neutralize Calipari’s trademark dribbledrive motion offense, but Davis will outmuscle Dieng in the post. With the Unibrow in command down low, Louisville’s perimeter shooters have their work cut out for them. But the Cardinals have proven it’s doable, rising to the occasion eight times this postseason. The NBA’s slogan is “where amazing happens.” This NCAA tournament’s slogan might be “where unbelievable happens.” Tomorrow night, a team with an old coach and ragtag bunch of experienced players is in with a shot against an amazing bunch of NBA prospects. It’ll be unbelievable and, hopefully, unforgettable. Evan Hollander is a sophomore in the School of Foreign Service and a deputy sports editor for The Hoya. TOP OF THE KEY appears every Friday.

MISCELLANEOUS

800

The Hoya Classifieds Classical Jazz dance in the heart of Georgetown! The Centre de Danse Ballet School is offering special Jazz dance intensives this April. Guest professor Lynn McMurrey will be at in Georgetown for TWO DAYS ONLY!! Professor McMurrey has studied everything from ballet, modern, and jazz in France to movement therapy in California. He earned a BA at the American University of Beirut, an MA at CalState Long Beach in Dance Education, and a Lifetime Credential in Dance from the state of California. The esteemed Professor has both danced in AND choreographed for theater, television series, and major motion pictures; He has won awards and recognition from the US, France, China and Belgium. Classes will take place Wednesday & Thursday, April 11-12, 2012, from 5:30-7:30pm at the Centre de Danse, #1-3254 Prospect Street NW, Washington, DC 20007. Each class is $25. Some ballet background required. Please call 202.337.0268 or visit www.centrededanse.info for more information.

Line Ad Rates Regular line classified ads are $0.50 per word. Optional Extras Bold words: $1.00 per issue. Make individual words or an entire ad stand out. Large headline: $1.50 per issue. One line of 16-point bold, centered and capitalized. Two-line large headline: $2.50 per issue. Boxed ad: $2.00 per issue. Add a one-point box around your ad. Deadlines & Payment Copy and payment must be received by 12 noon, one business day before publication. All classified ads must be paid in full at the time of placement. Visa, Mastercard, cash or personal checks are accepted. Cancelled ads may be removed from the paper if notification is made before deadline. No refunds will be given, but the unused portion of the payment will be held as a credit. For more information, please email classifiedads@thehoya.com

Live close to Healy Hall! 5BR house, 2BR & 3BR apartments for 2012-13. HoyaHousing.com or Facebook “Georgetown Rentals” Charles Sullivan, Re/Max Metropolitan Realty 301-526-7894

Sitters Wanted. $12 or more per hour. Register free for jobs near campus or home.


sports

friday, march 30, 2012

men’s basketball

THE HOYA

men’s tennis

GU Readies for Bison Match Celee Belmonte Special to The Hoya

FILE PHOTO: WEB LESLIE/THE HOYA

Junior forward Hollis Thompson, Georgetown’s only rising senior, will not return next year.

Thompson’s Departure Leaves Class of 2013 Vacant THOMPSON, from A1 Hoyas’ dominant long-range threat. Unlike Freeman, Thompson had the length to be a presence on the boards as well. It was a quick turnaround for the forward, who had struggled at times during his sophomore year. In his final match as a Hoya, Thompson recorded a game-high 23 points, catching fire in the second half to keep Georgetown alive until the final seconds of a heartbreaking loss to No. 11 seed North Carolina State in the Round of 32. The Los Angeles native is currently listed as a potential late second-round pick, although some draft sites indicate that he may end up undrafted. Thompson arrived on the Hilltop as a top-100 recruit in 2009, choosing to forgo the spring semester of his senior year of high

A11

Despite winning the doubles point, Georgetown’s men’s tennis team will have to wait to get a crack against University of Maryland-Baltimore County after their Wednesday match was postponed due to rain. In the meantime, the Hoyas will take on Bucknell this afternoon. The Hoyas won all three doubles games to secure the doubles point before the match was rained out. That point will carry into the resumed game when it is rescheduled sometime within the next two weeks. “It is always a close match against UMBC,” Head Coach Gordie Ersnt said. “We started singles play but then it started to rain. It’s going to continue to be a close match.” Although they are in a holding pattern for that contest, the Hoyas must now switch gears and focus on the Bison. Bucknell (5-8, 0-1 Patriot League) most recently traveled to Villanova on Wednesday and lost, 5-2. But despite that margin,

Ernst knows that Friday’s match will mean more tough competition. “Bucknell is just like Lehigh or Navy,” Ernst said. “They always have guys that can play and they all want a piece of us. It is going to be a tough fight.” In last year’s meeting, the Blue and Gray crushed the Bison, 6-1. Senior Andrew Bruhn, senior Brian Ward, junior Charlie Caris and sophomore Casey Distaso have a chance to defend their 2011 singles wins. And while that showing makes Ernst hopeful, he wants to make sure his squad does not overlook Bucknell. “I am feeling good about this match,” Ernst said. “I hope the boys do not just think ahead to our Big East competition against UConn.” The Hoyas will play host to Connecticut (5-5) Saturday at home. Although rain on the Eastern seaboard also postponed UConn’s Wednesday match against Bryant, the Huskies will take on St. John’s in New York Friday before heading to the District to face the Hoyas.

“UConn is definitely a rival of ours,” Ernst said. “It is always a close match when we meet.” With leadership from Bruhn and Caris, Ernst is confident that every match will get the attention it needs. “As a senior captain, Bruhn needs to keep carrying the team,” Ernst said. “Even though Caris is only a junior, he has played a lot of matches. We expect a lot of big things out of these guys at this point.” Still, Ernst knows that solid play at the top has to trickle down to the underclassmen for the team to succeed. Five of the nine players on this year’s roster are sophomores and freshmen. “We need experience and leadership, because the younger guys respond well when they are made to feel more confident and comfortable,” Ernst said. Confidence will be key in Friday’s match against Bucknell. The match is set for 2 p.m. at the McDonough Outdoor Tennis Complex. Saturday’s match against Connecticut will begin at 11 a.m.

women’s lacrosse

school to enroll a semester early at Georgetown and practice with the Hoyas. Thompson is scheduled to graduate in May alongside Sims and Clark. Thompson’s departure leaves the Hoyas with no senior scholarship players for next season and opens up two scholarships that Georgetown could potentially offer to center Nerlens Noel, the top recruit in the class of 2012, and to 6-foot-7 forward Devonta Pollard, a Mississippi product ranked No. 32 in the 2012 ESPNU 100. The loss of Thompson means Georgetown once again loses its three leading scorers for next season, as Clark, Thompson and Sims accounted for 56 percent of the team’s scoring. It will be the second time in four seasons that Thompson III coaches a team without any seniors, the last being in 2009-2010.

CHRIS bien/THE HOYA

Freshman attack Caroline Tarzian scored three goals in Tuesday’s win over American.

Hoyas Resume Big East Play Ryan Bacic

Hoya Staff Writer

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It’s been an up-and-down season for the Georgetown women’s lacrosse team (5-4, 1-1 Big East), which has experienced huge triumphs over top-ranked teams (North Carolina, Penn) as well as losses that shouldn’t have been (Johns Hopkins, Loyola). Through all the ups and downs that the women’s lacrosse team has faced this year, it has focused on maintaining level-headedness about upcoming matches. Despite the roller coaster, the Hoyas are hoping for smoother sailing when they take on UConn at home Friday. The last time out for the Blue and Gray was just that, as the team coasted to a 17-11 victory over American Tuesday night. However, whether Georgetown’s play earlier this week is a meaningful step in the right direction or just a midseason fluke remains to be seen. “I think the biggest key takeaway [from the win against American] is that when we actually put our minds to something, we can accomplish it,” Georgetown Head Coach Ricky Fried said. “It’s just a matter of staying engaged for the entire 60 minutes to make sure we’re playing the way we’re capable of playing.”

One player who has played to her potential over the last couple of games is junior midfielder Kelsi Bozel. The Maryland native stepped up big toward the end of the Loyola game in winning draws to give her side a much-needed possession, and she also tallied four goals in the Hoyas’ most recent outing against AU. Bozel, who noted that she’s found more confidence in recent matches, expressed her team’s disappointment after the Loyola heartbreaker. “It was definitely really tough,” she said. “We knew that if we fixed little things [in] our playing, then we could have won, and we can do better going forward.” Coach Fried, meanwhile, felt as if his team’s reaction to the Loyola loss manifested itself for both better and worse in Monday’s game. “I think in the first five to 10 minutes of the game, we acted like we were just going to walk on the field and win because we were better. We stepped up the focus and scored nine goals in 10-anda-half minutes, and then we kind of went back to feeling like we were pretty good,” Fried said. “And I think the biggest piece is just us focusing on what we’re doing the entire time.” With conference play starting in earnest with Friday’s

match at home against UConn, the Hoyas will have little margin of error . Fried pointed out that, because Georgetown has either won outright or earned a share of 11 of the last 12 Big East titles, conference opponents are sure to circle the Hoyas as a focal point of the season. Bozel stated that she and her teammates were well aware that their foes will be gunning for them. “[UConn is] going to go hard because it’s [the] Big East, and we always have a target [on our backs],” she said. Still, Coach Fried said that if his team just focuses on fundamentals — specifically, on limiting turnovers — they’ll be able to rise to the challenge when they take on the scrappy and offensively potent Huskies. “I think going with our strengths … we want to stay and play fast, because we’re athletic,” Fried said. “I think they’re going to have a hard time running with our numbers, so we really want to wear them down and force them to make plays.” Every time the Hoyas have won a game this season, another W has immediately followed. So if history is any indication, Fried’s squad should be ready to play Friday against UConn. Faceoff is set for 4 p.m. at MultiSport Facility.


SPORTS

WOMEN’S LACROSSE No. 13 Hoyas (5-4) vs. Connecticut (6-2) Today, 4 p.m. MultiSport Facility

FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 2012

WHAT’S INSIDE Wednesday’s men’s tennis match was rained out after the doubles point. Read our preview of Friday’s Bucknell match.

RECENT SCORES: BIG EAST WOMEN’S LACROSSE Louisville 18 Cincinnati 7

Lehigh Villanova

12 8

UPCOMING GAMES: BIG EAST WOMEN’S LACROSSE

American Georgetown

11 17

UConn at Georgetown Tonight, 4 p.m.

Notre Dame at Rutgers Tonight, 4 p.m

California at Villanova Tonight, 7 p.m.

“I grew up watching them do what they were doing, and it just came naturally to me.” Junior midfielder Brian Casey, whose older brother also played lacrosse at Georgetown

WOMEN’S LACROSSE

BASEBALL

Bullpen Collapse Sinks GU KYLE FRANCO Hoya Staff Writer

helped anchor the defense, notching two ground balls and forcing one turnover. “I give a lot of credit to Barb. [Her saves gave] us a lot of momentum on the defensive end,” Fried said. “Ashley played really well in the second half. She was picking up ground balls, clearing the ball, and she even got a shot.” Georgetown opened the scoring with a goal by sophomore attack Jody Cumberpatch but fell behind

Georgetown baseball jumped out to a 2-0 lead against Navy Wednesday afternoon but was unable to hold the slim advantage and slumped to their seventh consecutive loss. The Hoyas’ record stands at 11-14 after the 6-3 defeat, while the Midshipmen improved to 11-12. Sophomore pitcher Alex Baker started for the Blue and Gray, giving up just five hits and striking out three over NAVY 6 five scoreless innings. The GEORGETOWN 3 Georgetown offense mustered little in support of his effort though, going scoreless until the bottom of the fifth inning. In that frame, though, the Hoya hitters finally picked their starter up. Senior catcher Nick Geary led off with a single, got to second on a bunt single by junior left fielder Paul Bello and advanced to third on a sacrifice bunt from senior second baseman Andy Lentz. A wild pitch allowed Geary to score the game’s first run before junior centerfielder Justin Leeson laced a single up the middle to score Bello. Leeson then stole second as the Hoyas threatened to break the game wide open, but the visitors were able to escape without any further damage. The Hoyas’ lead was short-lived though, as Navy jumped on Georgetown’s relievers in their next at bat. Junior James Heine was the first Hoya out of the bullpen, and loaded the bases with no outs before being pulled by Head Coach Pete Wilk for Matt Hollenbeck. The freshman couldn’t escape the jam, giving up a bases-clearing double to the first man

See AMERICAN, A9

See NAVY, A10

CHRIS BIEN/THE HOYA

Junior midfielder Kelsi Bozel scored four goals in Georgetown’s 17-11 win over American Tuesday night. She has 14 goals on the season.

Georgetown Offense Explodes Against Eagles LEONARD OLSEN Hoya Staff Writer

With its offense firing on all cylinders, the No. 13 Georgetown women’s lacrosse team (5-4, 1-1 Big East) defeated visiting American (65, 2-1 Patriot League), 17-11, Tuesday night and moved above .500 on the season. The Hoyas scored eight straight goals in a nearly perfect first-half stretch, which proved to be the difference maker. “Overall you have to give Ameri-

can a lot of credit. They played hard until the very end,” Georgetown Head Coach Ricky Fried said. “[But] offensively I thought we shot really well, and I feel like defensively in the second half we really stepped it up.” Fried has stressed all season that the Blue and Gray were capable of shooting better than they had been. The team clearly picked up on the message against the Eagles — 23 of their 30 shots were on net. “We moved the ball, we played at speed, we were aggressive and we

played the way we were capable of playing,” Fried said of the scoring streak. But it wasn’t just the offense that carried the Hoyas to victory under the AMERICAN 11 lights. The defense GEORGETOWN 17 was strong throughout, forcing 21 American turnovers on the night. Sophomore goalie Barb Black posted an impressive 10 saves, arguably her best showing of the year. Junior defender Ashley Hunter also

MEN’S LACROSSE

TOP OF THE KEY

Casey Name Still Alive on Hilltop Pitino-Calipari: The Battle for Kentucky T MATT CARLUCCI Hoya Staff Writer

There’s something about being around a beloved sport since childhood that seems to predict a career of athletic excellence. Prince Fielder spent his youth taking in batting practice in Detroit where his father played for the Tigers. Dale Earnhardt Jr. watched his father drive lap after lap on Sundays. Peyton and Eli Manning grew up watching their father under center for the Saints. And a young Brian Casey came to Georgetown every weekend to watch his brother play lacrosse. Junior midfielder Brian Casey has been coming to the Hilltop since he was 13 years old to watch Georgetown lacrosse take the field. His brother Trevor Casey (COL ’07) was a standout attack for the Hoyas between 2004 and 2007, playing every game of his college career and earning the Eastern College Athletic Conference rookie of the year award in 2004. Watching his brother lead the Hoyas to victory after victory imbued Casey with a desire to play lacrosse for Georgetown and Head Coach Dave Urick. Today, that early exposure to Urick’s coaching tactics is paying dividends for Casey. Urick has led winning teams in 20 of his 21 seasons at Georgetown, and Casey believes watching his brother’s victorious teams helped him grow as a player.

FILE PHOTO: CHRIS GRIVAS/THE HOYA

Junior midfielder Brian Casey leads the Hoyas with 19 points seven games into the season. He scored 20 points all last season. “Probably the biggest way [Trevor] prepared me was that I was here every weekend watching him play and I just got to know the system a little bit better,” Casey said. “At a young age, I was watching him play just to see what they were doing. I grew up

watching them do what they were doing, and it just naturally came to me.” After scoring only three goals his freshman year, Casey came on strong See CASEY, A10

he Louisville Courier-Journal three years in a row. His methods summed it up best with the are controversial though, and have banner “Civil War” on its Mon- caused the NCAA to vacate two Fiday front page. Despite a rivalry that nal Four trips he made during stints has been renewed each year since at Massachusetts and Memphis. these teams met in a 1983 regional Some of that controversy, accordfinal, Louisville and Kentucky have ing to a 2011 Sports Illustrated arnever met with ticle, stems from more on the line. his rivalry with Fans of the tomorrow night’s winner will glow opponent, Rick with anticipation Pitino. Calipari of cutting down blames Pitino the nets Monday for rumors over night and earn Calipari’s recruitbragging rights ing tactics when for the foreseethey coached in able future. The the Big East — losers can expect Pitino was the Evan Hollander at least a year of head coach at taunts from their Providence, while Louisville and Kentucky friends, co-workCalipari was an ers and even famassistant at Pitt have never met with more ily who back the — three decades other squad. ago. on the line. But it’s not just After decades Cardinals and on the national Wildcats who scene, Pitino can appreciate this game’s drama; was said to be past his prime only from a national perspective, this a few weeks ago. Now he’s back to game is as compelling as it is in the college basketball’s championship weekend for the ninth time. The Commonwealth. Two larger-than-life coaches will fact that three of those trips came pace the sidelines. Kentucky’s John at Kentucky, where he coached Calipari has brought the nation’s top recruiting class to Lexington See HOLLANDER, A10

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The Hoya: March 30, 2012  

Friday, March 30, 2012