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GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY’S NEWSPAPER OF RECORD SINCE 1920 thehoya.com

Georgetown University • Washington, D.C. Vol. 93, No. 38, © 2012

tuesday, march 20, 2012

EARLY EXIT

No. 11 seed N.C. State upset thirdseeded Georgetown Sunday.

ADMISSIONS It’s crunch time for admissions committees in a year with a record applicant pool.

SPORTS, A10

HEALTH Students in the School of Medicine volunteer at a clinic in Southeast D.C.

NEWS, A6

NEWS, A4

SPORTS, A10

St. Mary’s Burglars Arrested

Georgetown Day to Be Scaled Back Mariah Byrne

$7,500 worth of goods stolen; late-night Burleith chase yields two arrests

Hoya Staff Writer

While the lack of a planning committee put this year’s Georgetown Day in jeopardy, students and administrators say a slightly scaled-down version of the annual event will still take place. Organization of the event traditionally begins in the fall semester, but discussions between students and the university about this year’s festivities did not begin until shortly before spring break. The delay in planning was due to a lack of student interest in the fall semester, according to Chris Butterfield (MSB ’12), leader of the informal planning efforts, and Associate Vice President for Student Affairs Jeanne Lord. “The past few years have seen declining participation on the part of student organizations and individual student volunteers in the scheduled activities of Georgetown Day,” Lord wrote in an email. A group of students have begun efforts to arrange funding and logistics for the event and hope to organize an official planning committee to continue the efforts. In a broadcast email to the student body Monday, newly inaugurated GUSA President Clara Gustafson (SFS ’13) and Vice President Vail Kohnert-Yount (SFS ’13) solicited applications for a formalized planning committee that are due Saturday. The majority of the students currently involved are seniors, and the group See PLANNING, A5

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Georgetown won its NCAA tournament opener over Fresno State Sunday.

Upasana Kaku Hoya Staff Writer

YE DOMESDAY BOOKE 2001

Georgetown Day, a tradition since 2000, was threatened this year by a delay in planning efforts.

Payroll System Glitch Leaves Some Unpaid Margaret Viator Hoya Staff Writer

Some student employees have not been paid this semester due to problems with the university’s transition to the Georgetown Management System, a new employee organization portal. Students who work two oncampus jobs or who receive work-study payments have particularly noticed glitches in the new system. Although GMS, which was implemented over winter break, is intended to be more user-friendly, students’

paychecks have been taking a hard hit. “It is an upgraded system. Anytime you transfer that much data there are certainly going to be kinks,” university spokeswoman Stacy Kerr said. “The important thing to note is as soon as university officials were made aware of the problems, we ... devoted [a] significant amount of resources to making sure the students’ problems are corrected.” Kirsten Harris (SFS ’14), who works for the Residence Hall See GMS, A6

Two suspects were arrested late Sunday night in Burleith for allegedly burglarizing St. Mary’s Hall. According to university spokeswoman Stacy Kerr, the search for other suspects is ongoing. Kerr said that members of the Department of Public Safety’s community action team noticed unknown persons leaving St. Mary’s late Sunday night carrying computer equipment and other items. An initial Metropolitan Police Department report on the incident stated that the goods stolen were worth about $7,500. The DPS officers, who were wearing plain clothes and in unmarked cars, were on patrol as part of efforts to boost security at the Georgetown University Medical Center. The Med Center has seen eight burglaries since late January.  DPS officers contacted MPD and followed the suspects as they left campus and headed toward a vehicle on 37th Street. One of the suspects was arrested in the vicinity of the vehicle at 11:07 p.m. A second suspect was detained by  DPS  officers near the intersection of 38th and T Streets around 11 p.m. and arrested when  MPD  officers arrived on the scene shortly thereafter. MPD officers left the scene around 1:20 a.m. Working with MPD, DPS searched Burleith for other suspects. An  MPD  helicopter assisted in the search for about 20 minutes. Some residents said they were told to stay inside and lock their doors. MPD  officers at the scene early Monday morning said that they suspected four individuals were involved in the incident, and a public safety alert emailed to the campus community at 1:53 p.m. stated that additional arrests in the case are expected. Neither the MPD report nor the DPS PSA provided a description of the suspects. It was also unclear how much of the $7,500 worth of stolen goods had been recovered by DPS and MPD. According to Kerr, DPS will continue to work closely with  MPD  on the ongoing investigation.

LEONEL DE VELEZ/THE HOYA

GUSA President Clara Gustafson (SFS ’13) was sworn in on a copy of “The Second Sex” by Simone de Beauvoir at her inauguration Saturday afternoon.

georgetown 101: introduction to spring on the hilltop

New Exec Appoints Staff Sam Rodman Hoya Staff Writer

Georgetown University Student Association President Clara Gustafson (SFS ’13) and Vice President Vail Kohnert-Yount (SFS ’13) were inaugurated Saturday, ushering in a new staff and a new set of initiatives. The pair chose to maintain a similar cabinet structure to that of their predecessors but altered some staff positions to better reflect the unique goals of their campaign platform. The roles of director of strategic development and director of career services were replaced with directors of social justice, academic affairs and special initiatives. The GUSA senate approved the staff and cabinet structure unanimously Sunday.

According to Gustafson, these new positions align with specific projects she and Kohnert-Yount included in their platform, such as the creation of an academic research symposium and the implementation of a permanent director for the Center for Social Justice. Gustafson and Kohnert-Yount also appointed directors to continue many of former President Mike Meaney (SFS ’12) and Vice President Greg Laverriere’s (COL ’12) initiatives. GUSA senator Colton Malkerson (COL ’13), chair of the Finance and Appropriations Committee, will resign from his senate seat to serve as director of student activities fee and endowment implementation.

Newsroom: (202) 687-3415 Business: (202) 687-3947

See GUSA, A6

REBECCA GOLDBERG FOR THE HOYA

Ward 7 sixth graders visited campus Thursday with Georgetown’s Kids2College program. See story on A5. Published Tuesdays and Fridays

Send Story Ideas and Tips to news@thehoya.com


A2

OPINION

THE HOYA

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Founded January 14, 1920

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EDITORIALS

GU Fails to Make Student Pay a Priority For some students who have jobs on campus, hard work for the university isn’t paying off — literally. On Jan. 3, 2012, the university switched to the new Georgetown Management System, which was meant to streamline the payroll and human resources systems. On Feb. 24, Georgetown sent out an email to student employees apologizing to those who had not been paid since the beginning of the semester due to issues caused by the switch. Nearly a month later, problems remain. Many students have still received too little pay — or none at all. While glitches are understandable, letting students go two months without compensation is unacceptable. At this point, some students have yet to receive paychecks totaling hundreds of dollars. While many students have an on-campus job merely for the purpose of picking up some extra spending money, others rely on that income to keep their bank accounts afloat. When the university finally sent its email six weeks after the semester began, it asked unpaid students to contact their supervisor for help; de-

partments were expected to handle requests individually. Students who depend more heavily upon a federal work-study paycheck requested and received emergency loans from the Student Employment Office, but the burden here should not have been on students or on individual departments. System changes of this magnitude are often accompanied by unwanted glitches. The university should anticipate such mishaps and preemptively develop a timely, temporary solution to them. The university’s failure was twofold in this instance: Not only did it fail to react in a timely manner to the obvious problem of students left unpaid by their various departments by waiting until the end of February to address those students’ concerns, but it also failed to implement a suitable fix to compensate students for their time and effort. We can only hope that these issues will soon be rectified. Students work hard for their money, and while they may not be full-time employees, they still deserve the right to a punctual paycheck.

Upasana Kaku, Executive Editor Suzanne Fonzi, Managing Editor Mariah Byrne, Campus News Editor Sarah Kaplan, City News Editor Pat Curran, Sports Editor Steven Piccione, Guide Editor Katherine Foley, Opinion Editor Chris Bien, Photography Editor Stephen Levy, Online Editor Remy Samuels, Layout Editor Samantha Randazzo, Copy Chief Molly Mitchell, Multimedia Editor Michelle Cassidy, Blog Editor

Contributing Editors Kavya Devarakonda, Kathryn DeVincenzo, Meagan Kelly, Shakti Nochur, Eamon O’Connor, Michael Palmer, Mairead Reilly, Glenn Russo, Lauren Weber

Matthew Strauss Rita Pearson Braden McDonald Jonathan Gillis Evan Hollander Ashwin Wadekar Lawson Ferguson Victoria Edel Bethany Imondi Alex Sanchez Hanaa Khadraoui Leonel De Velez Sari Frankel Christie Shely Zoe Bertrand Jessica Natinsky Emory Wellman Nikita Buley Emily Perkins Kendall Ciesemier Martin Hussey

Deputy Campus News Editor Deputy Campus News Editor Deputy City News Editor Deputy Features Editor Deputy Sports Editor Deputy Sports Editor Sports Blog Editor Deputy Guide Editor Deputy Guide Editor Deputy Guide Editor Deputy Opinion Editor Deputy Photography Editor Deputy Photography Editor Deputy Photography Editor Deputy Layout Editor Deputy Layout Editor Deputy Layout Editor Deputy Copy Editor Deputy Copy Editor Deputy Multimedia Editor Deputy Blog Editor

Editorial Board

Where the Leprechauns Are — The Tombs was picked by Readers’ Choice magazine as the best place to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day in Georgetown. Heartbreak Hoyas — The men’s basketball team lost to the North Carolina State Wolfpack Sunday, 66-63, ending their season. In Full Bloom — Washington’s annual National Cherry Blossom Festival kicks off today, attracting many a tourist to the D.C. area. So Happy Together — The National Mall received its first tandem bicycle rental stations. They will be located by the MLK Memorial and the Washington Monument. Birthday Bash — The Corp celebrates its 40th anniversary this week by raffling off prizes like tickets to a Washington Nationals game and a free breakfast for 20 on Georgetown Day.

FROM THEHOYA.COM READER’S RESPONSE

Not that this would necessarily solve the problem or that the two issues are completely linked, but I do think that this can be linked to other partying issues at Georgetown. In the past few years, because of pressures from neighbors toward the university, which caused the university to tighten up on on- and off-campus parties hosted by students, fewer students are hosting parties in their houses and apartments. So instead, Georgetown has become primarily a bar school, which isn’t really a good thing because it puts pressure on minors to get fake IDs and put themselves in danger. Anonymous on “7 Students Arrested for Fake IDs” Posted March 16, 2012

A LITTLE BIRDIE TOLD US ... @WestSacHoya82 March 19 Using my 2,000th Tweet to say Go @GeorgetownHoops ! Beat North Carolina State! @GUAlumni @Georgetown @thehoyasports @georgetownhoyas

@Realpoohbear812 March 19 @thehoya its time to move on from jt3 his style of play will never win a chip so this heartbreak will always happen for hoya fans..lol

would make an individual eligible for forgiveness of his outstanding loan debt after five years of payments instead of 10. Payments already made toward loans would also be credited, likely reducing the repayment period to less than 10 years. For the unemployed, the Department of Education would decide on an appropriate payment plan on a case-by-case basis. Unfortunately, the bill’s future is tentative at best. In a polarized Congress months before a presidential election, the proposed piece of legislation may never even come to vote; let alone be signed into law. As it stands now, student loans create an economic divide in our nation’s education system. The availability of loans — and the chances of ever being able to pay them back — can make the difference in a student’s decision to even apply to a school like Georgetown. A more comprehensive loan repayment plan could serve to level the field and encourage students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds to attend Georgetown, improving the experience of all undergraduates. This bill has the potential to provide a much-needed light at the end of a long and daunting tunnel, and it could change the impact of loans on millions of people and provide muchneeded relief to students.

Connor Gregoire, Editor-in-Chief

THE VERDICT

@LBrookieF March 19 When will this end? COME ON! RT @thehoyasports: For the fourth time in as many appearances, Georgetown loses to a double-digit seed.

Student Debt Forgiveness Could Increase Diversity After four years of rigorous academia, the last thing any graduate wants is to be hounded down by representatives from Sallie Mae. Student loans remain a problem for a staggering number of students. But where our financial aid programs have stretched themselves thin, the federal government has the opportunity to intervene. The Hoya recently reported that Georgetown’s tuition is set to rise by 3.5 percent each year through 2016 (“Tuition Set to Rise 3.5 Percent,” A1, Feb. 13, 2012). As tuition at institutions around the country steadily increases and employment remains low, students and recent graduates face a double-edged sword: Loans are more necessary than ever, but they’re becoming increasingly difficult to pay off. In order to remedy the increasing concern over tuition costs, Rep. Hansen Clarke (D-Mich.), a 1987 graduate of Georgetown Law, introduced the Student Loan Forgiveness Act of 2012. The bill aims to forgive outstanding student loan debt of any citizen who makes payments equal to 10 percent of his discretionary income for 10 consecutive years. If passed, the legislation would also encourage individuals to enter into public service professions. Becoming a teacher or firefighter, for example,

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tuesDAY, march 20, 2012

THE RAW DEAL by Anthony Mastroianni

Jonathan Rabar, General Manager Glenn Russo, Director of Corporate Development Kelly Connelly, Director of Finance Claire Willits, Director of Marketing Michael Grasso, Director of Personnel Bryn Hastings, Director of Sales Michael Vu, Director of Technology Caroline Boerwinkle Catherine Hendren Evan Marks Sara Eshleman Shane Sarver Eleonore Durand Kent Carlson Keeley Williams Mary Nancy Walter Michael Lindsay-Bayley Ryan Smith

Alumni Relations Manager Special Programs Manager Accounts Manager Operations Manager Publishing Division Consultant Public Relations Manager Human Resources Manager Institutional Diversity Manager Local Advertisements Manager Online Advertisements Manager Web Manager

Board of Directors

Katherine Foley, Chair

Carolyn Shanahan, Chair

Sidney Chiang, Laura Engshuber, Danny Funt, Alyssa Huberts, Nneka Jackson

Connor Gregoire, Web Leslie, Jonathan Rabar, Sam Schneider, Lauren Weber, Amanda Wynter

Policies & Information Letter to the Editor & Viewpoint Policies The Hoya welcomes letters and viewpoints from our readers and will print as many as possible. To be eligible for publication, letters should specifically address a recent campus issue or Hoya story. Letters should not exceed 300 words. Viewpoints are always welcome from all members of the Georgetown community on any topic, but priority will be given to relevant campus issues. Viewpoint submissions should be between 600-800 words. Send all submissions to: opinion@ thehoya.com. Letters and viewpoints are due Sunday at 5 p.m. for Tuesday’s issue and Wednesday at 5 p.m. for Friday’s issue. The Hoya reserves the right to reject letters or viewpoints and edit for length, style, clarity and accuracy. The Hoya further reserves the right to write headlines and select illustrations to accompany letters and viewpoints. Corrections & Clarifications If you have a comment or question about the fairness or accuracy of a story, contact Executive Editor Upasana Kaku at (202) 687-3415 or email executive@ thehoya.com. News Tips Campus News Editor Maraih Byrne: Call (202) 687-3415 or email campus@ thehoya.com. City News Editor Sarah Kaplan: Call (202) 687-3415 or email city@thehoya. com. Sports Editor Pat Curran: Call (202) 6873415 or email sports@thehoya.com. General Information The Hoya is published twice each week during the academic year with the excep-

tion of holiday and exam periods. Address all correspondence to: The Hoya Georgetown University Box 571065 Washington, D.C. 20057-1065 The writing, articles, pictures, layout and format are the responsibility of The Hoya and do not necessarily represent the views of the administration, faculty or students of Georgetown University. Signed columns and cartoons represent the opinions of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the editorial position of The Hoya. Unsigned essays that appear on the left side of the editorial page are the opinion of the majority of the editorial board. Georgetown University subscribes to the principle of responsible freedom of expression for student editors. The Hoya does not discriminate on the basis of age, gender, sexual orientation, race, disability, color, national or ethnic origin. © 1920-2012. The Hoya, Georgetown University twice weekly. No part of this publication may be used without the permission of The Hoya Board of Editors. All rights reserved. The Hoya is available free of charge, one copy per reader, at distribution sites on and around the Georgetown University campus. Additional copies are $1 each. Editorial: (202) 687-3415 Advertising: (202) 687-3947 Business: (202) 687-3947 Facsimile: (202) 687-2741 Email: editor@thehoya.com Online at www.thehoya.com Circulation: 6,500.


OPINION

tuesDAY MARCH 20, 2012

THE HOYA

CARDAMOM, SPICE AND HUMAN RIGHTS

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THE STATE OF NATURE

Self-Serving Motives Disguised as Activism

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adonna’s publicist recently sible for me to consider his actions as stated, “She’s focusing on Ma- anything but manipulative exploitalawi. South Africa is Oprah’s tion. The promise tacitly implies that this money is already budgeted and territory.” In response, Mother Jones magazine available to be donated. Even more, published a satirical map of Africa the rapper — whose net worth was showing celebrities’ spheres of influ- valued at $100 million in March 2011 ence, suggesting a major fault with the — could foot the bill. Instead, 50 Cent humanitarian work done by celebrities. capitalized on the humanitarian asAll too often, good intentions are cou- pect of his new energy drink endeavor, pled with hidden agendas for personal which has profits that go primarily gain — whether it is for money, interna- into his own pocket. There are, however, some celebrities tional prestige or personal esteem. The phenomenon of the humanitar- whose paradigms for humanitarian ian celebrity is a symptom of both genu- service are authentic and genuine, such ine interest in the third world as well as as George Clooney. Clooney, whose aid of the insufficient aid supplied by the work has been widespread and enduring, has shown a specific interest in United States and other world powers. Sudan over the past Due to pressing decades. economic issues and His protests at increasing, though the Sudanese emoften exaggerated, bassy this past Frimilitary concerns, U.S. day exemplified an foreign aid comprises appropriate use of just about 1 percent his fame to draw of the nation’s anattention to accusanual budget. Though tions that President America is rhetoricalOmar al-Bashir has ly supportive, tangible Sophia Berhie blocked food and efforts for humaniaid from reachtarian relief remain ing peripheries of stagnant, causing the Celebrities muddy the Sudan and parts neediest recipients of U.S. aid, like victims of purity of the endeavor and of South Sudan. Various aid orgathe famine in Somalia, to suffer. capitalize on personal gain. nizations estimate that a full-scale The humanitarian celebrity comes out of this environ- famine is imminent and will be upon ment of slow government action. Sudan and South Sudan in the comReputable aid organizations, such as ing months if this aid does not reach the World Food Programme and the the southern region soon. Clooney, United Nations’ Goodwill Ambassa- his father, human rights activist John dors, place celebrities at the forefront Prendergast and a slew of Democratic of humanitarian crises to draw atten- congressmen were arrested in the protion. However, though altruistic in tests, which successfully drew the mepurpose, celebrities often muddy the dia’s attention. Such humanitarian efforts are vispurity of the endeavor and capitalize ibly the result of time, research and on the opportunity for personal gain. This past summer, as activists scram- dedication to particular causes. With bled to draw attention to the drought time and experience, 50 Cent’s rookin the horn of Africa and the famine in ie efforts in Somalia will perhaps Somalia, the need for a celebrity with improve. For now, though they may a soapbox became apparent. It was provide aid, the rapper’s tactics are not until this year that 50 Cent, whose morally questionable at best. The responsibility of humanitarcurrent Facebook cover photo features him with an African soldier in the So- ian celebrities is to not compromise mali bush, took up the task, after the the virtue of their efforts by marketing their own goods. They must acworst of the famine was over. The rapper’s fact-finding trip to cept the responsibility to fight for the southern Somalia was planned in affected peoples and use their voices tandem with the release of his new en- to make a difference; it is wrong for ergy drink, “Street King,” which sends them to use these opportunities in portions of its profits to feed children reverse and benefit financially from in Africa. During his trip, 50 Cent the cause itself. Whenever personal pledged that for every “like” his energy gain is associated with humanitardrink’s Facebook page received, he ian efforts, we must question the would donate a meal to Somalia. If the overall objectives and ethics. likes reached one million, he promSophia Berhie is a sophomore in the ised to double the donated meals. The World Food Programme, which School of Foreign Service. CARDAMOM, invited 50 Cent to visit the region, tout- SPICE AND HUMAN RIGHTS appears ed this vow to the media. It is impos- every other Tuesday. 

Our Need for the Nonsensical A

s the mimsy days of winter pass and a frabjous spring arrives, it seems there’s no better time than now to write a column about nonsense. No, the wear and tear of midterms didn’t wreak that much havoc on our brains. Rather, the transition of seasons sparks a flurry of imaginations. It inspires a realization: Nothing makes a wearied mind more beamish than the beauty of babble. In fact, it’s fair to dispute the nonsense label we used at the start. It’s not that the above words lack sense. Instead, they distort sense. They evoke a range of inferences, full of allusions and associations that splash at the surface of meaning. But this isn’t a column meant to stretch your critical reading skills. Rest your brain for a minute. Turn it off. Shutter the constant committee instructing you to churn out another paper, study for a test or fulfill your social obligations at The Tombs or Rhino. Instead, the warm weather reminds us of just how frumious it can be to occupy an analytic space during every waking moment at Georgetown. Aside from the enlightened (though probably job less) English majors with creative writing specialties, not many of us step away from the serious side of the university. We run and push and claw our way to success, with the occasional break to socialize. It’s not much of a surprise that Georgetown doesn’t foster a lightness of spirit. Let’s be honest: We’re not Brown University (despite our “hipster” ranking in College Magazine). Most of us enjoy the satisfaction of an

VIEWPOINT • Tyler Simpson

orderly letter grade or instutionalized majors. It doesn’t need to be that way. There isn’t a strict split between the carefree and the career-driven. You’re allowed to procrastinate without feeling guilty. All of us should, every once in

Meaney & Hoyt

All of us should make light of the serious life of a Georgetown undergrad. a while, enjoy the jabberwocky of life. Nonsensical language and imagination draws from the likes of Shakespeare, the brothers Grimm and — most famously — Lewis Carroll. Those three would hold one hell of a tea party. And, even though they don’t say it enough, the Jesuits love a bit of nonsense as well. None of us will ever quite know what shenanigans go on in Wolfington Hall after 9 p.m. But we do know, as Fr. James Martin, S.J., once wrote, that “humor and laughter are at the heart of the spiritual life.” The beauty of nonce is that it stems from levity of spirit. To create a word with no intent to use it ever again re-

quires lightheartedness. That attitude can be virtuous. When every moment of life isn’t scheduled, directed and driven, you’re free to make the most of any moment. So, with that in mind, outgrabe as you walk around campus. Whistle a little more. Bellow in public. It doesn’t matter how your voice sounds, though you may want to keep your singing to daylight hours for the sanity of light sleepers. Georgetown need not be a school of repressed professionals. We should feel free to express ourselves in places other than office hours, Lau 2 and Red Square. The tulgey life of a doldrum education weighs heavy on the soul. But in ambiguity and uncertainty there’s happiness. All of us, on occasion, should make light of the entirely too serious life of a Georgetown undergrad. All of us should speak a bit of nonsense, just for fun. Not everything is fit for critical interpretation. As Mark Twain wrote at the start of “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,” “Persons attempting to find a motive in this narrative will be prosecuted; persons attempting to find a moral in it will be banished; persons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot.” Don’t risk death. Set aside your analytical mind and — every once in a while — live.

Mike Meaney is a senior in the School of Foreign Service and Matthew Hoyt is a senior in the College. They are the former president and director of communications of the Georgetown University Student Association, respectively. THE STATE OF NATURE appears every other Tuesday. 

THE DISCONCERTED DEMAGOGUE by Daniel Yang

VIEWPOINT • Eric Neidle

GPB Defends Its Autonomy SAC Hears Student Concerns A I fter reading and carefully considering the Student Life Report, I want to offer my commentary on the section that pertains to the Georgetown Program Board. The recommendation to merge GPB and What’s After Dark is understandable. The mission statements of the two organizations are somewhat blurred; in the past, there has been overlap between the functions of WAD and GPB’s Late Night Committee in particular. We occasionally cosponsor events. WAD was created because the amount of late night programming desired by the university exceeded that assumed by existing student groups on campus. If GPB were to take on the programming that WAD is currently responsible for, it would affect the number of events that GPB’s nine current committees are able to offer. The report recommends that this new organization collaborate with the Lecture Fund under a new advisory board. When I spoke with John Gwin, the current chair of the Lecture Fund, we were both hesitant to accept this idea. It is true that at some of our peer institutions, the program board handles lecture events — Georgetown is unique in the sense that these two boards remain separate entities. But, Georgetown is also unique in that it hosts a much larger num-

ber of lecturers than other schools. While we may need to increase dialogue and coordination between these two groups, they should not be merged. The Student Life Report gives a rather accurate account of the challenges associated with concert planning. But perhaps the most significant problem encountered in spring 2011 was that the initial concert headliner withdrew its contract 29 days prior to the concert date. Frankly, I commend last year’s board for impressively handling this setback to put on a smoothly run show with Shwayze, Kevin Rudolf and Dev and the Cataracs. I also noticed that at many points in the report, references were made to concerts in the plural sense. While the spring concert has become an annual tradition, GPB has never been able to guarantee a smaller concert in the fall. Given the funds available and the high cost of staging and lighting, it is difficult to secure an artist that is likely to bring out a significant portion of the student body and make the event worthwhile. Last year’s board made the decision to forgo the event for these reasons. I do not understand the recommendation that proposes a concert fee as a means of improving future concerts. The way I see it, this is essentially equivalent to increasing ticket prices, except that it would

also charge students that may not be interested in attending the concerts that GPB hosts. Students already saw a recent increase in the activity fee as a result of Student Activities Fee Endowment reform. We should question whether a larger portion of these funds should be allocated to concerts if that is where the undergraduate population is placing emphasis. Even though total expenditures on this year’s concert are somewhat higher than they have been in past years, we were still able to keep ticket prices at $20 for students. Finally, GPB’s Executive Board is very conscious of matters relating to marketing and feedback — another issue raised in the report. We have expanded the use of our Facebook page, as well as other media outlets. Admittedly, GPB could improve its collection of feedback, although we have made progress in this area. Committee chairs are now required to complete event evaluation forms; we hope to release a general survey for undergraduates near the end of this semester. We also see enormous potential in the ways that Hoyalink will allow us to more effectively reach out to students and other groups on campus. Tyler Simpson is a junior in the College and the chair of the Georgetown Program Board.

commend the Student Life Report 2012 committee for preparing a detailed, accurate account of student life at Georgetown and for providing important recommendations for improvement. I hope that these recommendations will serve as an impetus for change to enhance the student experience. However, I wish to address the report’s recommendations regarding the Student Activities Commission. As the vice-chair of SAC, it is gratifying to me that the report recognizes the substantial improvements to SAC in recent years, citing some of SAC’s best practices, while also providing additional recommendations. As a result, SAC has appointed a commissioner to oversee the implementation of the report’s recommendations. The report advises that SAC clarify the role of the Center for Student Programs adviser for SAC to ensure that student commissioners have the final say. The CSP adviser, while an important source of guidance and institutional memory for SAC, at present serves the commission in purely an advisory capacity. Nonetheless, SAC supports the recommendation to clarify this relationship. The report further recommends that SAC institutionalize consultation and collaboration between SAC and its student groups. Since fall 2011, SAC has embraced these ideas like never before. Commissioners are required to stay in close contact with their individual student groups and to hold regular office hours. In addition, SAC’s latest budget guide requires that student groups have regular opportunities to evaluate their commissioners. SAC has held a number of town halls over the past year, largely to discuss matters relating to funding reform. We believe that the town halls have been a valuable tool in enhancing communication, and we hope to continue to hold such meetings while also exploring other methods of communication. We recently held our first-ever SAC student leader focus group, and we are in the process of creating an online comment form. In the coming weeks, SAC will explore how it can formalize its communication, collaboration and redress mechanisms. We have already decided that at our next meeting, a 10-minute comment period will be established to

allow students to share their thoughts. The report also advised the use of a digital database to analyze data, with the intent of making funding decisions more objective. SAC strongly supports these recommendations. Under SAC’s new budget system, there is more data available than ever before. The commission already used this data to provide a detailed account of student group needs to the Georgetown University Student Association’s recent budget summit. We have appointed two commissioners to oversee data management and analysis and to explore how we can better utilize this information. It was also recommended that SAC institute a fair, robust appeals process for student groups. SAC currently allows student groups to appeal any decision to the commission and then to the director of the CSP. We recognize that it is not ideal for student groups to appeal directly to the commission that made the decision with whichthey disagree. However, it is also not ideal that decisions are left to CSP, given that CSP’s relationship with SAC should be strictly advisory. SAC aims to codify a fairer and more robust appeals process for student groups in the near future. Furthermore, the report recommends moving advocacy, performing arts and religious SAC groups to more appropriate advisory boards or university offices. We will work with these groups, and with other advisory boards and campus organizations, to reach these decisions. Georgetown’s space-booking procedures, specifically those of the Office of Campus Activity Facilities, were criticized as being too convoluted. SAC has begun evaluating the use of its own spaces to make them more accessible to student groups. We strongly support efforts to streamline and centralize space booking on campus. Finally, the report recommends that club officers have online access to their groups’ financial records. SAC has been working with CSP for some time now to provide online access, and we hope to have such a system in place by next year. Eric Neidle is a senior in the School of Foriegn Service and vice chair of the Student Activities Commission.


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THE HOYA

PAGE FOUR

NEWS

TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 2012

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE MSB administrator Jeffrey Franke was appointed the school’s first associate dean for external affairs Monday. Read more at thehoya.com.

Your news — from every corner of The Hoya.

IN FOCUS

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IN THE GROOVE

“ We couldn’t

get it done without each other.

Colleen Miltenberg, assistant director of admissions, on the relationship among admissions officers during the weeks before decisions are sent See story on A7.

from

WASHINGTONPOST.COM

CHRIS BIEN/THE HOYA

Groove Theory performed Friday evening in its third annual showcase, which also featured the GU Step Team, Flip Dis Funk Dat, GU Break Squad, Major Definition, Dynamic Dance, Kickrocks Crew and Groove Theory’s performance class.

ALL SHOOK UP Looks like that earthquake back in August might be affecting the land around the Washington Monument. blog.thehoya.com

Clinic Provides Students Daisey Apologizes for Fabrications Hands On Experience SARAH PATRICK Hoya Staff Writer

HIROMI OKA

Hoya Staff Writer

For some students at the Georgetown School of Medicine overwhelmed with labs and lectures, a day spent volunteering at Georgetown’s Hoya Clinic in Southeast D.C. can be just what the doctor ordered. “When med school and basic sciences and exams get really frustrating and stressful, doing things like the Hoya Clinic remind us why we’re here and why we love medicine,” Neelam Khan (MED ’15), a participant in the program, said. Open Tuesday and Wednesday nights, the volunteer-staffed Hoya Clinic allows students to gain hands-on experience working with uninsured and homeless patients. The clinic first opened in September 2007 in D.C. Village, a homeless shelter, but relocated to the site of the former D.C. General Hospital when the shelter closed three months later. Since opening, the clinic has served over 1,700 people, according to the clinic’s 2010 annual report. Last year, volunteers saw 784 patients at the clinic. The School of Medicine requires students to engage in at least 20 hours of volunteer service before graduation, and the Hoya Clinic has become a popular way for aspiring doctors to serve their community. Khan, who has volunteered twice at the clinic, noted that first- and secondyear students often have limited opportunities to gain clinical experience, which further attracts them to the idea of volunteering. According to the clinic’s 2010 annual report, the majority of students who helped at the clinic were in their first and second years of medical school. “Hoya Clinic is essentially the place where first-year medical students at Georgetown can get a taste of independence as student physicians in learning to apply [their] skills,” Khan said. Typically, students interview and examine the patient for 20 to 30 minutes and present their findings to third- or fourth-year students or the attending physician, who provides them with feedback. Omar Maniya (COL ’11, MED ’15) described his first stint at the clinic as

nerve-wracking but exhilarating. “That was my first time being alone in a room with a patient,” he said. “It’s different to do it by yourself with no one to ask [for help].” Eileen Moore, a professor of medicine and director of the clinic, supervised Maniya during his sessions at the clinic. She noted that even though students are battling a learning curve, patients are still thankful for the treatment they receive. “I think patients appreciate the fact that everyone is there because they want to be there, and I think that sense of caring very much comes across in the course of the patient visit,” she said. Moore added that the clinic helps ensure that Georgetown students develop an awareness of more general health care issues in the United States. “It’s one thing to teach a medical student about disparities in health care, lack of access to health care, chronic conditions going awry for lack of health care,” she said. “It’s an entirely different matter for that medical student to confront those realities face-toface.” Maniya said that the lack of health care available to uninsured patients can often lead to larger problems later on. “From an overall holistic point of view, this is a lose-lose for the healthcare system because [the patients] are the people who end up in the [emergency room] with preventable things that could have been solved in a much cheaper fashion,” Maniya said. He hopes that the treatment he and his fellow students provide could prevent patients from developing more serious and expensive health issues. Because the number of patients is steadily increasing, the clinic is contemplating adding a third night of service. Even with an increased patient base, Moore said that student support for the clinic highlights the character of Georgetown medical students. “There’s a certain synergy that happens when you take a bright, enthusiastic, energized medical student and put that person in a room with the patient,” she said. “The care of the whole person is not something we put on the wall here; it’s something we really strive to live and breathe in our practice and I think this is the embodiment of that.”

Author and actor Mike Daisey apologized Monday for misrepresenting information in his monologue performance “The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs,” the content of which was recently found to be fabricated. Despite admitting to falsifying his descriptions of working conditions at Apple factories in China, Daisey argued in his talk in Lohrfink Auditorium that his mistakes should not detract from the importance of discussing such issues. “Mike Daisey: A Hammer With Which To Shape It,” sponsored by the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor, The Lecture Fund and Students of Georgetown, Inc., was originally intended to discuss art and the human voice in the global labor struggle. “When we invited Daisey here, we wanted him to help us think about the power we have to make what is invisi-

ble visible, to give voice to the voiceless,” Jennifer Luff, the research director of the Kalmanovitz Initiative, said. However, the event instead largely focused on the recent controversy surrounding Daisey’s monologue. While Daisey’s topic of discussion was altered by circumstances, he still highlighted the importance of discussing factory conditions throughout the world. “The Agony and Ecstasy of Steve Jobs” is based on Daisy’s travels to Foxconn, an Apple factory in China, last spring. During a performance on National Public Radio’s “This American Life,” Daisey said he witnessed guards with guns outside the gates of the factory, spoke with a 13-year-old factory worker and her friends and let another worker with an injured hand hold his iPad. However, all three incidents have since been exposed as false. Daisey opened the event by admitting that the controversy constituted his first scandal. Incorporating humor into his talk, he acknowledged his feel-

ing of discomfort about speaking on the subject, but promised to tell his story openly. “If I am naked, then I am free because I am actually an independent artist. I don’t belong to any corporation … and I am not afraid,” he said. Daisey said his nontraditional reporting method ultimately exacerbated the controversy surrounding his monologue, because others were unable to fact check his notes or interview transcriptions. “I create stories the way I created this story,” he said. “I tell them to people, out loud in front of them. I don’t script in any way. I don’t take notes.” Despite the fabrications, Daisey maintained that the story had the intended effect. “I wanted the story to live. I wanted it to reach people and shake them awake,” he said. “I honestly believe here and now that it was the right thing to do. Nobody checks what’s happening in China, and that was fact checked.”

New Law Might Ease Student Debt LILY WESTERGAARD Special to The Hoya

Students struggling under heavy student loan debt may be able to apply for loan forgiveness within 10 years of graduation, thanks to a new piece of legislation drafted by Rep. Hansen Clarke (D-Mich., LAW ’87). The Student Loan Forgiveness Act of 2012, which was proposed March 8, would create a 10/10 loan repayment plan; graduates could have their loans forgiven in 10 years if they pay 10 percent of their discretionary income each year. Graduates already repaying loans would likely be able to have their loans forgiven in less than that time. The law would also create incentives for graduates to enter public service professions such as teaching and firefighting, and medical professionals would be rewarded for working in underserved communities. In these cases, debt would be forgiven in five years instead of the usual 10. Scott Fleming, associate vice president for federal relations, lauded the proposed legislation. “Anything to reduce students’ debt obligations is very desirable,” he said. Countrywide, student loan debt

currently exceeds credit card debt and is expected to reach $1 trillion by the end of 2012. If the bill passes, Fleming said the proposed bill would have a relatively small effect on Georgetown students because of the generosity of the university’s financial aid packages. Georgetown students also have a strong track record in paying off debts, with a default rate of about 0.8 percent in 2009, the most recent year for which data is available. “Our financial aid office has a policy of trying to hold student loan debt to about $17,000 by packaging in grant aid and work study,” Fleming said. “Georgetown has a very low student loan default rate … which means our students end up doing well and are able to pay off their loans.” However, according to Fleming, the act would be helpful to students facing heavy debt loads and seeking jobs in lower salary industries, such as those in public service. “Incentives that do result in loans being forgiven are obviously helpful to our students who graduate with student loan debt,” Fleming said. “We have a lot of students who do want to do public service work. For those, loan

forgiveness is a particularly important option.” However, Fleming emphasized that the most important objective of the act is creating a long-term plan to keep student loan interest rates low. Interest rates on student loans are currently at 3.4 percent, but when the College Cost Reduction and Access Act expires July 1, rates are set to rise to 6.8 percent. “Congress tends to deal with things at the 11th hour. When it comes to this provision the 11th hour is fast upon us,” Fleming said. Fleming also warned of potential difficulties with such legislation. “There is a cost associated with keeping the interest rate down,” he said. “That would also have to be tackled.” Fleming added that Clarke’s proposal reflects his commitment to helping those in need. “Last Friday, Clarke joined a group of Georgetown students who did an Alternative Spring Break in Detroit working with them at a soup kitchen,” he said. “It is clear that Clarke is serious about doing everything he can about helping needy people in our society, and I think that is reflected in his legislative proposal.”


News

tuesday, march 20, 2012

THE HOYA

A5

Georgetown Kids2College Allows Glimpse of College Life Day Plans Take Shape Kelly Church Hoya Staff Writer

planning, from A1 includes past Georgetown Day planning committee members. “This is a very loose structure. … It’s a very collaborative effort at the moment,” Butterfield, who is also Senior Class Committee chair, said. This year’s event will not include any inflatables or a beer garden but will likely feature other Georgetown Day traditions like student music and dance performances and food and stands around Healy Lawn and Healy Circle. “We will hold on to a few traditions that have always been there, like the Dorothy Brown Award,” Butterfield said. Each year the award is given to a faculty member whocontributes to both the academic and extracurricular advancement of the university and is nominated by students. The abolishment of the beer garden is an attempt to create a more welcoming atmosphere for students of all ages and discourage public alcohol consumption, according to Butterfield. While some aspects of the day are set to change, the students involved in its organization hope to maintain the legacy of the event, which was originally started by students in 2000 to commemorate the death of an undergraduate in an alcohol-related altercation. According to Lord, the event has veered from its original intention. “The mission of Georgetown Day seems also to have lost clarity over the last few years. What began in 2000 as a celebration of the campus community in all its parts has shifted to being a celebration by the community, or more accurately, by the student community,” she wrote in an email. Butterfield noted that the current culture of the day has alienated faculty and staff whose families were previously welcome at the day’s activities. “Faculties and staff don’t bring their kids and don’t want to,” he said. “We’ve seen this day trend toward students.” According to Lord, the administration hopes to promote health and safety on Georgetown Day while still maintaining a celebratory atmosphere. “Student leaders and administrators have been discussing the concerns raised and are developing a plan for the last Friday of classes that seeks to both celebrate appropriately the end of the academic year and address concerns about the scope and mission of the day,” she wrote. Butterfield also emphasized that he wants the day to remain one of festivity. “I think that at the end of the year, we have so much to be thankful for,” he said. “We want this to be a day of thanks, of celebration, of gratitude.”

For a select group of D.C. students, a crash course in college life starts in sixth grade. Kids2College, a six-week program that uses a career-oriented curriculum, partners Georgetown undergraduates with public school students in D.C.’s Ward 7 to introduce them to college and how to prepare for it. The experience, which is sponsored by Georgetown’s Meyers Institute for College Preparation and the United Planning Organization, culminated in a Shadow Day last Thursday that brought participants to campus. “By sixth grade, you really need to start introducing careers and college — otherwise, some kids don’t know what’s out there,” Meyers Institute Associate Director Joy Dingle said. According to Tisha Tyson, program coordinator for MICP, the

introductory program can be an invaluable experience for the students. “For many of them, this is the first time they’ve been taught how to pursue a career,” she said. “For some of them, this may be their first time having exposure to college students.” Six of the Kids2College program’s former students have gone on to attend Georgetown, according to MICP Executive Director Charlene Brown-McKenzie. Over 100 of the program’s participants have gone on to attend other colleges and universities. This year’s class had 131 participants. “So many members of the Georgetown community, whether they’re students or staff or faculty, really look forward to the opportunity to connect with young students,” Dingle said. “It’s very encouraging to see members of the Georgetown community come together in that way around such a positive issue.”

Mariana Hernandez (COL ’14), a student volunteer, said she learns a lot from the students in the program. “I just feel a deep satisfaction every time that I come and I’m able to share what I know with the kids,” she said. According to Dingle, the Kids2 College program for sixth graders is only the beginning of a series of initiatives that the Meyers Institute offers. “Kids2College is one small part of our outreach to D.C. schools,” she said. After entering seventh grade, students are eligible to become part of the Saturday Academy program, which tutors students in math, English and Spanish and focuses on critical thinking. Programs continue through these students’ high school graduation. “This is just the beginning of our relationship,” Tyson said. “I think that’s the greatest part about it.”

REBECCA GOLDBERG FOR THE HOYA

Students in the program toured Georgetown Thursday.

Students Seek Concrete Action on Diversity Omika Jikaria

Special to The Hoya

Still struggling to get many of the recommendations it issued in a 2009 report implemented by the university, the Student Commission for Unity is seeking to revitalize its presence on campus. “Our fight is to make sure that the ideas, recommendations and documents from a few years ago do not go [uforgotten],” SCU President Ryan Wilson (COL ’12) said. The seven-member commission aims to address the status of underrepresented racial groups on campus and in the admissions process, as well as the role of diversity among faculty members. It also advocates for the further development of academic programs such as women’s and gender studies and the possible creation of programs for Asian-American and Latino-American studies. According to Wilson, the university administration needs to focus on diversity in its academics and treatment of faculty. He particularly suggested giving tenure to more minority professors and making diversity issues a bigger topic of conversation with prospective stu-

dents. “We have brought up diversity issues to Hoya Saxa Weekend, Blue & Gray Tour Guides and [the Georgetown Admissions Ambassadors Program] in order … to project the university’s mission to prospective students,” he said. Brian Kesten (COL ’10) and Brian Cook (COL ’10) founded the SCU in April 2008 in the interest of researching the extent to which Georgetown was living up to its Jesuit mission through diversity initiatives. The students were responding to two alleged hate crimes against Georgetown students as well as what they believed to be The Hoya’s minimal coverage of a rally and vigil for the Jena Six, six black students from Louisiana who were tried for attempted murder in a case widely cited as an example of racial injustice. The commission was originally a part of the Georgetown University Student Association because several of its founding members were also members of GUSA. While this initially eased the process of funding allocation, according to current SCU member and former GUSA Senator Stephanie Frenel (SFS ’12), the SCU and GUSA grew

apart because the student government did little to help implement the SCU survey recommendations. In spring 2009, the SCU officially split from GUSA. During the 2008-2009 academic year, the SCU surveyed 1,339 Georgetown students about their perceptions of bias and diversity on campus. It released these findings and resulting recommendations to the university in January 2009. Most recently, the SCU was largely responsible for helping develop the Main Campus Initiative on Diversity and Inclusiveness, a series of working groups created in April 2009 to address diversity issues within admissions and recruitment, student life and academics at Georgetown. According to Frenel, the SCU has also contributed to the establishment of A Different Dialogue, a program focused on encouraging diversity through conversation, and The Doyle Initiative, an effort to include diversity in academic settings. Wilson said that the SCU’s current work has been stalled because of a lack of response from the administration to the recommendations of the commission’s 2009

report. Although the Diversity Initiative led to the hiring of more minority faculty and strengthened the diversity of the undergraduate applicant pool, Wilson felt that very few of the Admissions and the Recruitment Working Groups’ recommendations concerning the culture surrounding diversity in academics and admissions have been addressed. These suggestions included the addition of an additional box on the admission applications that includes forms of gender expression outside of male and female and the provision of funding for students to attend multicultural college fairs and recruitment events as well as the National Campus Pride College Fairs. The report also advocated for providing a means of communication between the appropriate accepted students and current faculty, staff and undergraduates who work with underrepresented religious groups and services that address student disabilities. “We have several diversity working groups on campus. What the SCU wants to do is implement the great work that has been produced,” Wilson said.

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BASKETBALL BLUE CURA PERSONALIS DIGIOIA EAST CAMPUS FOREIGN SERVICE GASTON HALL

GEORGETOWN GRAY HEALEY HOYA JACK JESUIT LAUINGER

LEAVEY POTOMAC SAXA SELLINGER ST MARYS UTRAQUE UNUM WASHINGTON

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS DECODAQUOTE:

We’re all pretty bizarre. Some of us are just better at hiding it, that’s all. -The Breakfast Club

SUDOKU:

Being defeated is often a temporary condition. Giving up is what makes it permanent. -Marilyn Vos Savant

Kate Sciamanna/THE HOYA


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NEWS

THE HOYA

TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 2012

Councilmembers Subpoenaed Student Payments Unstable ZOSIA DUNN

Special to The Hoya

Several D.C. council members were subpoenaed last week as part of a U.S. Attorney’s Office investigation into campaign contributions by prominent D.C. businessman Jeffrey Thompson. Thompson, who has long been among the top political fundraisers in the District, has come under scrutiny for possibly circumventing campaign finance laws through “straw donations,” or giving money to a third party who then submits the donation under his own name. Thompson’s home and offices were searched by federal

agents last month as part of the investigation. At the time, Ralph B. Bazilio, the chief operating officer of Thompson’s firm, Thompson, Cobb, Bazilio & Associates, told The Washington Post that there had been no accusation of wrongdoing. He added that the firm had turned over all relevant documents to the attorney’s office. Last week, council members Jack Evans (D-Ward 2), Phil Mendelson (D-At-large) and Yvette M. Alexander (D-Ward 7) each confirmed their campaign treasurers have received subpoenas and are cooperating fully with the investigation. Mendelson, who most recently confirmed having re-

ceived a subpoena, issued a statement listing the contributions he had received from Thompson during his 2010 campaign. “I regret that this has created yet another controversy around city hall. I believe disclosure is the best course. I am hopeful that the U.S. Attorney’s investigation will uncover the facts as quickly as possible,” he said in the statement. Wesley Williams, spokesperson of the D.C. Office of Campaign Finance, said that his office did not have any additional information and had not been subpoenaed. The U.S. Attorney’s Office also declined to comment because the investigation is ongoing.

New GUSA Staff Appointed GUSA, from A1 Jake Sticka (COL ’13) was appointed chief of staff, and Senator Yupang Chang (MSB ’15) will serve as director of special initiatives. The finalization of the executive cabinet and staff leaves five senate seat vacancies. Other cabinet positions will be announced this week. Jack Appelbaum (COL ’14), chair of the Student Activities Commission, will serve as director of Student Life Report implementation. According to Appelbaum, fulfilling every recommendation by the end of his term is not a realistic goal. Instead, he believes that smaller recommendations can be implemented quickly and that publication of the report is as important as its execution. “It’s about implementing the recommendations but also creating a larger conversation on campus about the importance of student engagement,” he said. Appelbaum plans to first prioritize the recommendations listed in the report and then

LEONEL DE VELEZ/THE HOYA

GUSA Vice President Vail Kohnert-Yount (SFS ’13) hugged former President Mike Meaney (SFS ’12) after being sworn in. delegate them to members of the executive cabinet. He emphasized centralizing the space reservation system and increasing student access to the administration as important goals. Hiring a permanent CSJ director, a process which has stalled over the last two years, was a central focus of Gustafson and Kohnert-Yount’s campaign. One complication that GUSA faces in its pursuit of that goal, however, is that the CSJ direc-

tor reports to the provost, and the search to replace current Provost James O’Donnell, who is leaving at the end of the semester, is ongoing. At the inauguration ceremony, Gustafson expressed her excitement about her term. “Vail and I have an incredible opportunity to really make a meaningful change here at Georgetown and hope that we will serve all of you well in the next year,” she said.

GMS, from A1 Office and for the Office of Campus Activities and Facilities, has been receiving her paychecks but in inconsistent amounts. “The problem is that the system is flawed. I’m getting paid, but things are really messed up,” Harris said. “They can’t figure out where the hours are coming from.” Harris noted that one of her co-workers was only receiving 12 cents an hour earlier this semester. According to Kerr, the Department of Human Resources has increased the training for personnel responsible for related data to address problems for those working multiple jobs and receiving work-study payments. Some students who were hired at the beginning of the semester have also reported problems with the system.

“As soon as the administration became aware of these issues, we immediately augmented the resources, sent out information directly to the students with directions to go to the Student Employment Office and get some of these cases resolved,” Kerr said. However, several students have yet to receive compensation for any hours worked this semester or only recently received payment. Julie Negussie (COL ’14), who works both as a student guard and for the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, said the lack of centralized communication between her two departments was the most frustrating. “Each of the departments I worked at would send over the payroll sheets, and I could never actually get to both offices. They left it all to me as the middle man,” she said. “I kept being told that it was an issue that no one understood.”

Admissions Hits Crunch Time ADRIANNA SMITH Hoya Staff Writer

For members of the admissions review committees, the last few weeks of March are among the busiest of the year. And with a record 20,050 applications received this year, committee members have more work on their hands than ever before. Admissions committees are responsible for reading and reviewing a percentage of undergraduate applications. “Only the most compelling students get sent to committee,” Robert O’Rourke, assistant director of undergraduate admissions said. Each of these committees includes a senior member from the admissions office, a school dean, a school faculty member and a current student in that school. Marilyn McMorrow, a professor in the School of Foreign Service, has been a part of the SFS admissions committee for about five years. “I absolutely love it,” she said. “It is one of the most worthwhile things I do as a faculty member. It is a very labor-intensive process, but I believe it is a very important way to contribute to the school.” With a strict April 1 deadline for the distribution of decision letters, members of the admissions committee work many hours on the applications, occasionally working on weekends to ensure they stay on schedule. The admissions office hopes to mail out their decisions by March 28 or 29 in order to make the traditional April 1 deadline, which falls on a Sunday this year. Although letters are not mailed out until the end of March, the committee sets an internal deadline for final decisions weeks ahead of that. Melissa Costanzi, senior associate director of undergraduate admissions and a member of the admissions committee for Georgetown College, said that there is an enormous amount of work involved in reviewing the applications. “It takes us a long time to make our decisions, but we want to make sure we make the right ones,” she said. McMorrow said that she spends about 20 minutes on each application. “I go over each student’s file very carefully because I know that student worked for a long time putting it together and I want to be fair to the students who happen to be towards the bottom of my pile of applications,” she said.

CHRISTIE SHELY/THE HOYA

The Office of Admissions is in its busiest month as the April 1 decision deadline approaches. Assistant Director of Admissions Colleen Miltenberg added that admissions officers become especially dependent on one another during the final month before decisions are sent out. “While it becomes intense, it is also very much a collaborative environment — we couldn’t get it done without each other,” she said. “Each person’s role is critical.” Currently, the admissions committee is transitioning into the final stages of the review process, which involves looking at the students marked for extra consideration, such as legacies, students of employees and faculty, athletic recruits and first-generation college students. Dean of Undergraduate Admissions Charles Deacon wrote in an email that while the office has already made most application decisions, their job is far from complete. “The work of selecting the class is nearly done, and we are well underway preparing for the aftermath, which will lead to the month of April, which is a very busy time trying to essentially ‘yield’ the students we have now accepted,” he wrote.

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THE HOYA Classifieds LINE AD RATES Regular line classified ads are $0.50 per word. OPTIONAL EXTRAS Bold words: $1.00 per issue. Make individual words or an entire ad stand out. Large headline: $1.50 per issue. One line of 16-point bold, centered and capitalized. Two-line large headline: $2.50 per issue. Boxed ad: $2.00 per issue. Add a one-point box around your ad. DEADLINES & PAYMENT Copy and payment must be received by 12 noon, one business day before publication. All classified ads must be paid in full at the time of placement. Visa, Mastercard, cash or personal checks are accepted. Cancelled ads may be removed from the paper if notification is made before deadline. No refunds will be given, but the unused portion of the payment will be held as a credit. For more information, please email classifiedads@thehoya.com


news

tuesday, march 20, 2012

THE HOYA

A7

Initiative Releases Study on Sustainability at Georgetown Alex Styer

Special to The Hoya

The Visions for a Sustainable Georgetown Initiative has recognized that it is not easy being green on the Hilltop, but hopes to change that with a campus-wide sustainability action plan. A report presented by the group at last week’s Hoya Roundtable consists of a series of recommendations intended to increase sustainability efforts on campus. The core suggestions include developing a Climate Action Plan and creating an official Office of Sustainability, both of which Georgetown

currently lacks. “Moving forward, we want to focus on our two core recommendations, and we want students to actively participate in bringing both to fruition,” Gabriel Pincus (SFS ’14), a member of the team that wrote the study, wrote in an email. The authors hope that the Climate Action Plan will gain traction with the administration, which is formulating an outline for the implementation of the recommendations. “Our hope is that [the plan] will be written by a team of administrators and sustainability experts, and incorporate the student perspective expressed at the Visions for a Sustain-

able Georgetown Workshop,” the report said. The study has been in the works since November, when Georgetown University Student Association Secretary of Sustainability Jesse Robbins (SFS ’12) and former Eco-Action president Claire Austin (SFS ’12) spearheaded a workshop to gather student input on campus sustainability issues. Prior to the development of the Visions initiative, the absence of a unified effort to improve campus sustainability hindered student efforts to effectively collaborate with administrators according to Robbins. While Visions for a Sustainable Georgetown

is guided primarily by student input, the initiative has also enlisted the help of both faculty and staff. “It’s very fragmented, the green community on campus,” Robbins said. “We thought it’d be a great idea to bring everyone together in more of a long-term manner. That became Visions for a Sustainable Georgetown.” Overall, the report is not a strict set of directives for administrators. Rather, it is intended to be a collection of student recommendations for creating a sustainable campus. Other goals include installing water bottle refill stations in residence and streamlineing recycling in dorms and academic buildings.

Although the implementation of the recommendations will require significant cooperation from university administration, University President John J. DeGioia’s recent signature of D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray’s College and University Sustainability Pledge has left students optimistic about their recommendations. “This report is, and I hope it will continue to be, a sort of a static way for [administrators] to look at what students think. Now it’s` all here in one report for administrators to consult any time they’re wondering what students feel should be priorities on campus,” Robbins said.


A8

SPORTS

THE HOYA

TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 2012

BASEBALL

Georgetown Wins Big Once, Loses Twice Against GW KYLE FRANCO Hoya Staff Writer

After starting the weekend with a monstrous 13-2 win Friday, the Hoyas (11-9) dropped the remaining two games of their series against George Washington (6-12) in heartbreaking fashion. On Saturday, Georgetown saw a slim 2-1 lead slip away, leading to a loss in the 10th inning. Sunday’s game went to extra innings after a clutch hit from senior catcher Kevin Johnson, but the Blue and Gray ultimately fell in the 14th. Friday afternoon, the Hoyas put up double-digit runs for the seventh time this season, supporting a lights-out pitching performance from junior Neal Dennison. The first five innings saw little action by both offenses, though the Colonials did manage to run in the second inning. With Dennison spinning a gem on the mound, the offense finally ar-

rived in the top half of the sixth. An RBI double from redshirt junior infielder Mike Garza and a two-run homer from Johnson put the Hoyas on top, 3-1, but they were not done. Over the next three innings, the Blue and Gray would plate eight more runners. In the seventh, the offensive onslaught continued. Junior outfielder Justin Leeson, senior outfielder Rand Ravnaas, graduate student catcher Jim Laufer and Johnson each drove in a run before the scoring spree was capped off with a three-run bases-loaded double from junior infielder Danny Poplawski. Ravnaas and Garza added two more runs in the eighth, and an RBI from freshman first baseman Nick Gianforte in the ninth put the Blue and Gray comfortably ahead, 13-1. Dennison threw eight innings and gave up only one run before being relieved in the ninth by junior James Heine. Over the course of his dominant

day on the mound, Dennison scattered five hits, struck out five batters and walked only one. Heine surrendered a run in the ninth, but that didn’t stop the Blue and Gray from finishing off the easy 13-2 victory. Like Friday, Saturday’s matchup was also a pitching duel. Junior Thomas Polus took the hill for the Hoyas and was a fine follow-up act for Dennison. Over 7.2 innings, Polus gave up only two runs while fanning seven. GW got on the board first in the second inning, but a two-run shot by Poplawski put the Hoyas on top, 2-1. Polus was unable to hold the lead, though, as the Colonials scraped the tying run across in the eighth. The game remained deadlocked until the top of the 10th, when GW scored two runs off of freshman Matt Hollenbeck and redshirt senior Pablo Vinent to pull ahead, 4-2. In the bottom half of the inning, the Hoyas failed to mount

any comeback. The normally potent offense only managed one hit over the final four frames, cementing the 4-2 loss. In the series finale on Sunday, the Blue and Gray saw their offensive woes disappear, but their pitchers faltered. The Colonials and the Hoyas traded runs over the first seven innings, and Georgetown entered the eighth trailing, 6-4. Senior Will Harris was the starting pitcher for the Hoyas, surrendering four runs before sophomore Jack Vander Linden came on in relief and yielded two more. Vinent relieved Vander Linden in the seventh, throwing the first of three shutout innings. Heading into the ninth, though, Georgetown still trailed by two and appeared to be finished after starting the inning with two groundouts. Ravnaas stepped up to the plate and was able to poke a single through the right side. Garza followed with a linedrive single to right field, setting the stage for Johnson once again. Hitless thus far,

Johnson cranked a double to right center to tie the game and send it into extras. With the game on the line, Head Coach Pete Wilk turned to junior reliever Charles Steinman to keep the Colonials off the board. Steinman threw four innings of almost flawless relief before finally running into trouble in the 14th frame. A leadoff double was followed by a string of singles and bunts as the Colonials pushed two runs across against the previously dominant Steinman. Trailing by two in the bottom of the 14th, Georgetown would again need some magic. Poplawski and sophomore outfielder Max Friedman each reached on singles, but neither was pushed across the plate, giving Georgetown an 8-6 loss. The Blue and Gray get one more game to correct their mistakes before heading into conference play against USF this weekend. The final nonconference game is at George Mason at 3 p.m. today.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

TURNING TWO IN THE 202

Yankees Primed for Run Hoyas Fall in Third Round U

nless you live under a rock, you know that we’re now in the midst of March Madness, arguably the most enjoyable tournament in the world. Despite my love for the MLB postseason, nothing compares to the excitement of watching David defeat Goliath and underdogs marching on after buzzer beaters. Even for those who are not so lucky to have their school or alma mater represented in the tournament (or lucky, given the continuously disappointing Hoyas), every person has a vested interest in the phenomenon that is attempting to fill out a perfect bracket. But it’s not just college basketball that’s unpredictable. Few outside of St. Louis expected the Cardinals to win the World Series after sneaking into the playoffs on the final day of the season. But, as evidenced in March Madness, the MLB, or any such tournament, it’s sometimes not how good you are, but how hot you are, that decides playoff games. Although my bracket would be better used as a napkin than anything else in the wake of last weekend’s upsets, I will try to gaze into the crystal ball once again and examine how the 2011 MLB playoffs might play out given personnel changes this offseason. Although the playoff landscape will undoubtedly look different come October, here’s an early glimpse of which contenders improved the most, and who went backwards, heading into 2012. AMERICAN LEAGUE REGIONAL: (1) Texas Rangers vs. (4) Tampa Bay Rays; (2) New York Yankees vs. (3) Detroit Tigers PREDICTION: Rays over Rangers; Yankees over Tigers; Yankees over Rays Tampa Bay has suddenly turned into the Gonzaga/Memphis/Butler/Xavier of the MLB: A small-market club that consistently competes with the giants of the game, but ultimately fails to make the final step to a title. In this scenario, the

Rays may dethrone last year’s runner-up due in large part to their starting rotation — arguably the deepest and most talented in the game — headlined by David Price and James Shields with top prospect Matt Moore ready to take the league by storm. But the Yankees — the Kentucky/Kansas/Duke/North Carolina of the MLB — return one of the best lineups in baseball bolstered with the likes of Hi-

Preston Barclay

The Bronx Bombers appear poised to capture yet another title. roki Kuroda, Michael Pineda, and the return of Andy Pettitte to a squad that won an AL-best 97 games in 2011. While the Tigers made the biggest splash of all the 2011 AL playoff teams by signing Prince Fielder, it’s hard to imagine that Cy Young winner Justin Verlander can duplicate his sensational 2011 season. Losing catcher/first baseman/designated hitter Victor Martinez for the year to a torn ACL will also lessen the impact of adding Fielder in terms of comparative improvement from 2011 to 2012. Although the Yankees’ lineup continues to age, they boast the AL’s best team and have to be considered the team to beat heading into 2012. NATIONAL LEAGUE REGIONAL: (1) Philadelphia Phillies vs. (4) St. Louis Cardinals; (2) Milwaukee Brewers vs. (3) Arizona Diamondbacks PREDICTION: Phillies over Cardinals; Diamondbacks over Brewers; Phillies over Diamondbacks

While all of the 2011 American League playoff squads improved this offseason, most of the National League’s 2011 playoff representatives have taken a step back, much like 2011 NCAA Champion Connecticut after losing Kemba Walker to the NBA. While the Phillies will be without Ryan Howard for a significant portion of the year due to a torn Achilles’ tendon, the Cardinals and Brewers were dealt bigger blows when they lost Albert Pujols and Prince Fielder, respectively, to free agency. Although the Cardinals’ rotation will be boosted by the return of Adam Wainwright from Tommy John surgery, the Phillies still have the more talented rotation and better overall roster and should advance. The other matchup, however, resembles a typical 8-9 battle in the NCAA tournament with two evenly matched teams. While the edge would have gone to the Brewers with Fielder as it did in 2011, the Diamondbacks made several additions to overcome the difference this time around, but still remain inferior to the NL-best Philadelphia Phillies. WORLD SERIES: Yankees over Phillies As a Red Sox fan, picking the Yankees to win the 2012 World Series is like an obsessive Georgetown supporter choosing Syracuse — gut-wrenching, to say the least. But the truth of the matter is that the Yankees boast arguably the most experienced and complete team in the league. Much like in the NCAA tournament, anything can happen and picking the favorite doesn’t always pan out. But based on what we know now, the Bronx Bombers appear poised to capture yet another title. Preston Barclay is a sophomore in the McDonough School of Business. TURNING TWO IN THE 202 appears every Tuesday.

WOMEN’S LACROSSE

Franklin Leads GU Over UNC HEELS, from A10 tough subject for me recently this season, but I knew that if I just focused on the ball, I’d be all right.” She was much more than just all right. Black’s quick-reaction kick-save parried the ball onto the post, where it ricocheted harmlessly away and sealed the win for the Hoyas. “I think today was a big day for [Black] personally,” Georgetown Head Coach Ricky Fried said. “She’s got the physical ability, and today she showed the mental ability to stay calm and composed in tight situations.” Coming off a loss to Johns Hopkins last Wednesday in which the Blue and Gray allowed 10 goals in the first half alone, the eight total goals is a major step forward, especially given the quality of the opponent. “We changed up our defensive game plan for this game,” Black

said. “We did play a lot more of an aggressive, pressure-out style, but [with] Carolina being such a fast team, we knew that we would have to kind of pack it in a little bit and rely more on our strength and our help defense.” It wasn’t all about the defense for the Hoyas, though, as the team also recorded a muchimproved 50 percent (9-18) shooting mark. Interestingly, this game marked the first time this season that the Hoyas were outshot. But as Fried explained, this result can be attributed to a more deliberate, selective offensive strategy. “I think the biggest thing is [that] we wanted to make sure we had really, really good opportunities, not just an opportunity to shoot the ball. We wanted to be really picky about when we took shots,” Fried said. Midfielder Hannah Franklin had a career day for the Hoyas, accounting for four of the team’s

goals on the afternoon. The sophomore tallied Georgetown’s first two goals of the game to open things up offensively and played a big role in the team’s secondhalf comeback with another crucial pair of scores. While the win against UNC was huge, Coach Fried was far from complacent. “I’m not sure what the stats are, but it’s probably the first time in a while [that] we’ve beaten a top-three team, and [the team] can only hear us say that we should be able to do that for [so long],” Fried said. “They actually have to do it to get that confidence, and I think today will go a long way in that regard.” The Blue and Gray will look to keep their momentum going Wednesday night, when the Hoyas head to Philadelphia to take on the University of Pennsylvania. The game is scheduled to start at 7 p.m.

WOLFPACK, from A10 shot. Sims kicked the ball out to freshman forward Otto Porter, who drove left and badly missed a contested midrange jumper. “[Porter] was open, ended up getting a decent shot. The ball just didn’t go in,” Thompson III said. Brown grabbed the rebound and Sims fouled out of the game in order to send him to the line. Brown hit both shots and Clark quickly drove coast-to-coast for a quick layup, but NC State still had the ball and two-point lead. Brown was fouled again, but this time, he gave the Hoyas one last glimmer of hope. He missed his second free throw shot, and the Hoyas had four seconds to attempt a three for the tie. Clark drove down the sideline, appeared to get a good look at the basket, but the shot was a little too strong and sailed over the hoop. “I felt like it had a chance, but it didn’t,” Clark said. Despite the wild final minute of the game, Georgetown’s true opportunity to survive came midway through the second half. NC State took an 11-point lead at the 14:20 mark, and looked to be in control, outscoring the Hoyas 30-9 in a ten-minute run that spanned both halves. Then, Thompson took control. The Los Angeles native hit two free throws, two three-pointers, had a block, an assist and a dunk in a seven-minute span that cut the Wolfpack lead to just three points. Thompson finished with a game-high 23 points, five rebounds and three assists, despite a slow start that saw him go 0-for-3 with two turnovers. The Hoyas just could not capitalize on the momentum Thompson provided. With Clark and Sims effectively shut down and on the bench, and Thompson the new focus of the NC State defense, it was up to the less experienced Hoyas to take some of the scoring load off of Thompson. Sophomore guard Markel Starks, Porter and freshman forward Greg Whittington all took rushed three-pointers that missed, and allowed NC State to up their lead to seven before the final minute.

WEB LESLIE/THE HOYA

Forward Otto Porter had nine points and eight rebounds in his final game as a freshman.

“We had the right guys taking the shots; they just didn’t go in as much as we would like,” Thompson III said. The Hoyas’ struggles began early. After senior center Henry Sims picked up a second foul early in the first half, the Baltimore native was prompted to take a seat on the bench, and watch his younger teammates squander an early 10 point lead. “Like last game, I got two quick [fouls],” Sims said. “But I wasn’t honestly too concerned. Like I said last game, we have a group of guys that don’t depend on me.” A 25-15 Georgetown lead at the 5:17 mark of the first half became a 30-27 lead for the Wolfpack at the end of the half, capped by a steal and transition dunk by sophomore forward C.J. Leslie, one of three NC State players with 14 points. The Hoyas committed five turnovers in the span. “When you turn the ball over against a team that’s good in transition, that opens up a lot of baskets for them,” Clark said. It was a particularly stinging loss for Clark and Sims, who in their final game wearing Blue and Gray, combined to shoot just 4-of-14 for 14 points, grab six rebounds and commit four turnovers. Despite the poor last shot, Porter played another good game, notching nine points, eight rebounds and four steals. For now, it’s another stinging loss for a successful Georgetown squad. NC State had played tournament teams Vanderbilt, Indiana, Syracuse, Duke, Florida State and North Carolina during the regular season and had lost to all of them. They are now 2-0 in the NCAA tournament against higher seeds. The Hoyas played good defense overall, holding the Wolfpack to 37 percent shooting for the game, but the defensive effort was undone by three-point attempts. Georgetown hit four of its first eight attempts but then went cold, making just 4-of-17 from behind the arc the rest of the way. NC State, meanwhile, shot 47 percent from beyond the arc and grabbed 17 offensive rebounds that resulted in 15 points. “I thought for the most part our defense was pretty good,” Thompson III said. “They were just throwing it up and going and getting it, and getting second and third shots.” For now, Georgetown is left to enjoy its overall season, one filled with tremendous victories but even closer losses — by four points to Kansas in Maui, by three at Syracuse in overtime, by two in double-overtime to Cincinnati in the Big East tournament, and now a three-point loss to NC State in Columbus. All were tough losses for a team that that proved everyone wrong yet never bragged about it. Thompson III said all week that seeding and rank mean nothing in March, which is true, but that won’t do much to heal the Georgetown faithful, who have hungered for a return to the Final Four since 2007. The Blue and Gray finished 24-9 on the season. Clark ends his career having started 99 straight games and departs the Hilltop as one


sports

tuesday, march 20, 2012

men’s basketball

THE HOYA

A9

women’s basketball

Loss Ends Impressive Season Hoyas to Take On Ga. Tech Lawson Ferguson Hoya Staff Writer

Senior Jason Clark’s attempt at a game-tying three sailed past the rim, the buzzer sounded and, just like that, it was all over. A season that began with low expectations came to a disappointing end in Columbus at the hands of North Carolina State, as the Hoyas were dominated on the glass and struggled to get the ball into the paint. Despite the loss, it is a testament to how far the team has come since that unexpectedly violent preseason trip to China that a second-round NCAA tournament loss is considered a disappointment. It was an inglorious way for Clark and classmate Henry Sims’ Georgetown careers to end. Both seniors played a huge role in Friday’s rout of Belmont — the first NCAA tournament win of their time on the Hilltop — as Clark poured in 21 points on just 12 shots while Sims scored 15 points and handed out five assists. Against the Wolfpack, though, the team’s elder statesmen struggled. Clark looked set to continue his hot shooting from the win over the Bruins after he hit an early three, but he never quite found the range and finished just 3-of-11 from the field. Sims was limited by foul trouble, playing just four first-half minutes after committing two offensive fouls in the first 3:40 of the game. He hit a big layup with under a minute left and followed that up with two clutch free throws to draw the Hoyas within one, but those four points were all he managed on the game before fouling out with 10 seconds left. Junior forward Hollis Thompson was the star of the game for the Hoyas, who would’ve been dead in the water without his 23 points. Thompson, who drew some criticism for a lackluster sixpoint performance against Belmont, broke the 20-point mark for the first time since Jan. 15th.

WEB LESLIE/THE HOYA

Junior forward Hollis Thompson had 23 points against North Carolina State.

Georgetown’s 9-2 run in the second half that cut NC State’s lead to four was entirely at the hand of Thompson, who single-handedly brought the Hoyas back into the game. The real turning point of the game, though, occurred toward the end of the first half. With about 5 minutes to play, freshman forward Greg Whittington made a layup to extend Georgetown’s lead to 10, and it looked like the rout might be on. But the Wolfpack battled back with a 28-7 run that was marked by the Hoyas’ settling for a lot of long jumpers and struggling to control the defensive glass. Unlike in tournaments past, though, the Blue and Gray battled back to make the game close. The Hoyas were able to cut the lead to three on several occasions but couldn’t seem to put together enough defensive stops and offensive makes to get over the hump. The game appeared to be all but over when NC State’s sophomore point guard Lorenzo Brown — one possession after hitting an improbable 10-foot jumper over the backboard — converted two free throws to give the Wolfpack a seven-point lead with 1:11 left, but Thompson splashed in a long, contested three to give the Hoyas hope. Sims scored his only four points of the game in rapid succession as the Wolfpack struggled to ice the game from the freethrow line, and suddenly the Blue and Gray had life. Down just two points with 35 seconds left after junior forward Scott Wood — a 92 percent shooter from the line — had missed his second free throw of the game, the Hoyas had a chance to take the game’s last shot. Georgetown fans couldn’t have been blamed for having flashbacks to Hollis Thompson’s early-season heroics against Alabama and Marquette. But those memories were fleeting. Thompson didn’t touch the ball on that possession, as freshman forward Otto Porter took a contested midrange jumper with 10 seconds left on the clock that badly missed. Sims fouled out in the aftermath of that shot, and although Clark would get a decent look at a game-tying three as time ran out, the Hoyas’ best chance to win or tie the game had gone by the boards. Despite the loss — Georgetown’s fourth to a double-digit seed in its last four NCAA tournament appearances — the season has to be viewed as an unqualified success. Head Coach John Thompson III took a young, inexperienced squad with question marks at three starting spots and molded it into a team that could challenge the country’s elite. On a more personal level, Jason Clark and Henry Sims leave the Hilltop having finally won a tournament game after a season where few thought the Hoyas would crack the national rankings, let alone earn a three-seed in the NCAA tournament. The pain was visible on Thompson III and his players’ faces after the game was over, and it’s a pain that won’t go away anytime soon. But the team shattered all realistic expectations this year, and the future is as bright as ever.

candid canadian

Soft Cap Destroying NBA I

can’t claim to be a big NBA fan. the league this year with a salary of approximateIn my native Montreal, professional bas- ly $87 million, the Raptors are spending a leagueketball ranks about 41st in the hierarchy of low of $44 million. The salary cap is $54 million, sports, behind the NHL, the MLB, the NFL, col- begging the question: If teams don’t have to abide lege basketball, college hockey, high school hock- by it, what is the point of having a cap? ey, peewee hockey, toddler hockey, curling, moose The bigger problem that this soft cap has crehunting, beaver watching and a sport I just in- ated, however, is the consequence it has for smallvented called  wockey, or hockey played under- market  organizations. With cash-happy teams water. As a sports fan, however, I’ve watched my like the Lakers, Nets and Knicks looking to emushare of NBA games, and I know enough about late the Boston and Miami blueprint and players the league and its product to know that it’s in the seeing the success of the few who have jumped most trouble of the four major sports leagues — ship for greener pastures, it has become nearly imand you can even throw the emerging MLS into possible for cash-strapped teams to compete. New the mix. It starts from the top down, and David Orleans, for example, would never be able to afford Stern is as culpable as any for the part he’s played $80 million of salary, without which they will be in the demise of the NBA. hard-pressed to remain competitive. So why would This summer, Stern vetoed a trade that would Chris Paul have any reason to stay there? have sent point guard Chris Paul to the Los AnTeams also begin to focus on the present ingeles Lakers. The backlash was instantaneous, stead of building for the future.  Because teams with  fans and the media immediately portray- know they can’t get fair value for their stars, ing the commissioner as  an they become reluctant to deal oppressive dictator.  I can unthem and desperate for them derstand the sentiment.  Seeto re-sign — to sell tickets and ing the commissioner medkeep the fan-base interested as dling in team-to-team affairs much as to win games.  This is  frightening, and the act has led to teams like the Magic must have come as a shock to doing something that in any L.A. fans especially. But I can other league — or, let’s face it, also see where Stern is coming any other industry — would be from. unthinkable:  Giving Dwight Arik Parnass A few years ago, I attempted Howard, a player, full power to create a large, successful fanover the future of Head Coach If teams don’t have to Stan Van Gundy and General tasy hockey league. I recruited people to join who I knew had abide by it, what is the Manager Otis Smith.  Hierarvery little interest in the game, chy exists for a reason; no matpoint of having a cap? ter how skilled or acclaimed a and who, when their teams inevitably failed to impress, were newspaper columnist is, he or likely to give away their players she would never be allowed for money, a favor or even just for the heck of it. I to fire an editor.  Small-market teams are being found myself stuck in a situation I had created, forced to break from hierarchy. Because players vetoing trades to attempt to preserve the integrity have thrown loyalty out the window, teams are of what I had created. As expected, the league fell being forced to do the same. In the NBA, the indiapart.  vidual has become greater than the team. That’s As oversimplified as the comparison may be, when you know that your league is in trouble. I think it holds true. David Stern is paying the The NBA needs to realize the path it’s heading price for a mistake — both on paper and in terms down before it’s too late — before Kobe is handed of attitude — that the league made, and he has ownership of the Lakers, Durant is given presidenhad to take drastic measures to try to stop it. cy of the Thunder and Jeremy Lin becomes head So what was this mistake? It dates back to 1984, coach of the Knicks. Players want to win and treat when the NBA’s salary cap was reintroduced for free agency accordingly, fleeing to teams that are the coming season. Unlike a so-called hard cap already established. Unfortunately, the way the that resides in the NHL and NFL, the NBA intro- league is currently structured, there are only a duced a system that could be manipulated in dozen or so teams that can. And there’s nothing many different ways, with a variety of exceptions short  of having the Orlando Supermen play at of which teams could take advantage. Boston ma- the Howard Arena in Dwight, Fla., that any of the nipulated this cap so they could afford their big others can do about it. three of Paul Pierce, Kevin Garnett and Ray Allen, and Miami did the same with LeBron James, Dwy- Arik Parnass is a freshman in the ane Wade and Chris Bosh. While the Celtics lead College. CANDID CANADIAN appears every Tuesday.

BULLDOGS, from A10 “We struggled a little bit, but at the end we were able to just finish it off,” said senior forward Tia Magee, who led the Hoyas with 17 points. The Blue and Gray’s pressure defense held the Bulldogs, a sharp-shooting perimeter team, to just 7-of-29 shooting from behind the arc. Meanwhile, the Hoyas were more judicious in their shot selection, using their size to their advantage and converting five of only 10 attempts from three-point range. “We either want to force teams

to turn the ball over, or we want to force teams to play quicker than they probably really want to play,” Georgetown Head Coach Terri Williams-Flournoy said. “We knew  Fresno State was going to shoot the three. That’s not any secret. The fact that they took only 29 was actually good, because I told my team they would take 40.” The underdogs were held to a season-low point total, but made just enough of their opportunities to put the result in doubt until the waning seconds. The Bulldogs also won the battle of the boards, 34-31, but could not over-

come the costly turnovers they had given up at crucial junctures of the game — including three in the final two minutes of play. The Hoyas had 11 steals, but also committed 14 turnovers of their own. Magee’s game-high scoring effort was supplemented by 11 points apiece from Rodgers and senior forward Adria Crawford. Georgetown is set to tip-off at 7:15 p.m. tonight against Georgia Tech, again in Chapel Hill. The Hoyas defeated the Yellowjackets, 67-58, in November 2010, but six of the Yellowjackets’ eight losses this season have been against teams in the top 10.

men’s lacrosse

Georgetown Closes Out Friars FRIARS, from A10 Hitting the road for the first time, Georgetown quickly eased worries over the absence of Angel — who leads the team with 11 goals and had three straight hat tricks — when senior midfielder Francis McDonough scored just 46 seconds after faceoff. But the Friars answered right back, as senior midfielder Pete Wujciak (the brother of Georgetown sophomore midfielder John Wujciak) found the back of the net a minute and a half later. The Hoyas swiftly responded, however, as goals from freshman midfielder Joe Bucci and junior attack Jason McFadden gave Georgetown a 3-1 lead after the first quarter. Casey’s first goal came less than a minute into the second quarter. The unassisted shot put the Hoyas up, 4-1.

The Blue and Gray’s offense stalled for the remainder of the half, however, as a goal from junior attack JT Weber and two from freshman attack Niall Cahill pulled Providence even at the break. Both teams’ offenses struggled after the intermission, setting up a slow third quarter of play. An early goal from Georgetown junior midfielder Dan McKinney was later matched by Weber’s second goal, which evened the score at 5. Urick’s decision to switch goalies helped the Hoyas’ defense stifle the Friars’ attack. Sophomore Jake Haley, who took over for starter senior CT Fisher, recorded three saves and allowed only one goal in the quarter. Freshman attack Reilly O’Connor snapped Georgetown’s 14:46 scoring drought on Casey’s second assist of the game.

Casey came up big just 36 seconds later, putting his second goal past Providence senior keeper Christian Dzwilewski. Providence sophomore attack Sean Wright tacked on another goal with 6:02 left in the game, but solid Georgetown defense kept the Friars off the board for the remainder of the game, sealing the 7-6 win. Although the offense did struggle to finish plays with goals, it notched 38 shots compared to Providence’s 21. Sophomore midfielder Chris May scooped up eight of Georgetown’s 34 ground balls and won 12 of 17 faceoffs. Haley’s four saves coupled with a strong defensive effort allowed Haley to earn his first college win in net. The Blue and Gray take the field again tomorrow, when they face No. 5 Loyola in Baltimore. Faceoff is at 7 p.m. at Ridley Athletic Complex.


SPORTS

WOMEN’S TENNIS Hoyas (7-4) vs. Richmond (7-2) Tomorrow, 2 p.m. McDonough Outdoor Tennis Complex

TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 2012

RECENT SCORES: BIG EAST MEN’S LACROSSE

@thehoyasports Georgetown plays Georgia Tech in the NCAA tournament second round tonight. Follow the play-by-play on Twitter.

St. Johns Rutgers

7 6

Maryland Villanova

11 5

UPCOMING GAMES: BIG EAST MEN’S LACROSSE

Johns Hopkins Syracuse

11 7

Notre Dame at Ohio State Providence at Syracuse Georgetown at Loyola-Md. Tomorrow, 4 p.m. Tomorrow, 7 p.m Tomorrow, 7 p.m.

“The fact that they took 29 [three-pointers] was actually good, because I told my team Women’s basketball Head Coach Terri Williams-Flournoy on Fresno State that they would take 40.”

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Hoyas Hold On Despite Cold Spell BENO PICCIANO Hoya Staff Writer

Although Georgetown’s shots stopped falling in the end, its defense proved to be just enough. The fifth-seeded Hoyas (23-8) failed to make a single field goal in the final six minutes of their first-round NCAA tournament matchup against the No. 12 seed Fresno State Bulldogs (28-6) but withstood a furious rally from their mid-major opponents to claim a 61-56 victory in Chapel Hill, N.C. With the win, the Blue and Gray advanced to the second round of the tournament for the third consecutive year. Georgetown FRESNO ST 56 advanced to last season’s Sweet GEORGETOWN 61 16, where they dropped a heartbreaker to top-ranked Connecticut. The Hoyas take on fourthseeded Georgia Tech (24-8) in the second round tonight. The Blue and Gray began with a 12-3 lead in the opening five minutes of play and never trailed in the contest, stretching their advantage to 10 points at the half. Georgetown claimed its largest lead — 17 points — when senior point guard Rubylee Wright converted a three-pointer for a 46-29 lead with 15:48 remaining in the game. But with Western Athletic Conference player of the year Ki-Ki Moore leading the way, the Bulldogs fought back hard. The sophomore guard finished with 22 points, including a layup with 4:56 remaining that cut Georgetown’s lead to just three points. This would be the final field goal from either team, however, as each side traded free throws down the stretch. Star junior guard Sugar Rodgers missed from the stripe on consecutive Georgetown possessions, giving Fresno State the ball with 28 seconds remaining and the Bulldogs trailing by three. Georgetown forced its 19th turnover on the ensuing play, though, and senior guard Morgan Williams’ free throw made it a two-possession game with 17 seconds left. See BULLDOGS, A9

WEB LESLIE/THE HOYA

Senior center Henry Sims, senior guard Jason Clark and junior forward Hollis Thompson spoke to the press after Georgetown’s loss Sunday.

NC State Halts Late Georgetown Rally MICHAEL PALMER Hoya Staff Writer

COLUMBUS, Ohio — For the fourth consecutive time, the Georgetown Hoyas have fallen victim to March’s .adness, falling to No. 11 seed North Carolina State, 66-63, after senior captain Jason Clark missed a potential game-tying three-pointer at the buzzer. The loss brings an early end to a season in which the Hoyas, picked to finish 10th in the Big East conference and far from the tournament field, finished ranked in the national polls and earned a No. 3 seed in

It was a roller-coaster of a game, and one that looked to be over well before the buzzer, when NC State took a seven point lead with 1:11 remaining in the game. Then, junior forward Hollis Thompson resuscitated any hope the Hoyas had remaining by hitting a long three with two defenders in his face to cut the deficit to four. After the Wolfpack missed a free throw, senior center Henry Sims got a quick layup for his first points of the game. Sophomore point guard Lorenzo Brown then missed the front end of a one-and-one for the Wolfpack, and Sims knocked

the NCAA tournament. “This team, in spite of whatever downs we’ve had and losses like today, has been a really special group that I think has represented themselves, represented our institution, represented their families, representNC STATE 66 ed each other, very GEORGETOWN 63 well,” Head Coach John Thompson III said in an opening statement. “I don’t know that I’ve ever been as proud to be associated with a group of men, with a team, as much as I am with this team this year.”

MEN’S LACROSSE

down two free throws to cut the lead to one. Junior forward Scott Wood split a pair of freethrows after being fouled on the ensuing inbounds pass, and the Hoyas grabbed the rebound. The Wolfpack faithful could not believe what was happening, and suddenly, Georgetown looked like it could walk away with the comeback. But it was not to be. Out of the timeout, the Hoyas got the ball down to Sims in the post, but the senior elected not to force up a See WOLFPACK, A8

WOMEN’S LACROSSE

GU Wins Hoyas Upset Tar Heels To Break Losing Streak Fourth Straight RYAN BACIC

game but made an impact when her team most needed it, providing Georgetown with its first lead of the Coming off three straight losses game with less than three minutes to high-quality opponents, the to play. women’s lacrosse team faced its Sophomore goalie Barb Black and toughest challenge the well-organized yet when it took on GU defense in No. 2 North Caro- “Today was a big day front of her helped lina (9-1, 1-0 ACC) ensure that the for [Black] personal- to at home on Saturadvantage would day. But on a day ly. ... She showed the stand. The Hoyas that was all about won the faceoff green, Georgetown mental ability to stay after Thomas’s gowas money, com- calm and composed ahead goal and ing from behind to proceeded to burn stun UNC, 9-8, and in tight situations.” the next two mingain a huge confiutes with some nifRICKY FRIED dence- and resumety possession work. Women’s Lacrosse Head Coach builder. A North Carolina Trailing 8-5 with free position with 15 minutes left, the Hoyas (3-3, 1-0 three seconds remaining, though, Big East) buckled down defensively gave the visitors a final shot at tying and pressed hard on the offensive the score. end to come up with a 4-0 run to “I think at that point, it was just finish the game. The game-winning kind of all-or-nothing,” Black said. shot came courtesy of All-American “Free positions have kind of been a junior midfielder Sophia Thomas, See HEELS, A8 who was quiet for much of the

Special to The Hoya

MATT CARLUCCI Hoya Staff Writer

FILE PHOTO: CHRIS GRIVAS/THE HOYA

Junior midfielder Brian Casey came through in the clutch again Saturday, tallying two goals and two assists in the Hoyas’ win over Providence.

With senior midfielder Zack Angel out due to a persistent forearm injury, Head Coach Dave Urick needed someone to step up and lead Georgetown men’s lacrosse team at Providence on Saturday. He found him in juPROVIDENCE 6 nior midGEORGETOWN 7 fielder Brian Casey, who had two points and two assists that enabled the No. 18 Hoyas to squeeze past the Friars in their Big East opener. After a tough loss to Maryland to begin the season, the Blue and Gray (4-1, 1-0 Big East) has surged to four straight victories, including an upset win over then-No. 20 Harvard. See FRIARS, A9

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The Hoya: March 20, 2012