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the carillon

the staff editor-in-chief

król stefan batory

business manager

darth musleh

business@carillonregina.com

cthulhu fhtagn

Happy Halloween, everybody! The Carillon had some pretty sweet access to the big boxing tournament that was held last week.

production@carillonregina.com

copy editor

a&c editor

cover

editor@carillonregina.com

production manager

news editor

The University of Regina Students’ Newspaper since 1962. October 31 - November 06, 2013|Volume 56, Issue 10|carillonregina.com

calling doctor jones

copyeditor@carillonregina.com

peter bohmannsbridge

carillonnewseditor@carillonregina.com

ravencrow neversmiles

And I mean really; what could be scarier than a heavily-muscled person coming at you with the sole intent of rearranging your face?

aandc@carillonregina.com

sports editor

au-tomb mcdowell

op-ed editor

krieg the psycho

visual editor

yolo mcswaggerton

sports@carillonregina.com op-ed@carillonregina.com

Our photo essay of the events can be found on pages 26 & 27.

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king arthur

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news writer a&c writer

sports writer

turn the paige

bearded dragon

“manifest” destiny kaus

photographers

blangcarillon

epitaphs

dark arts & occulture

“I am ready.”

“I should never have switched from scotch to Martinis.”

hellborn klassen specter reid “missing in action”apolline lucyk

contributors this week

aidan macnab, tatenda chikukwa, taylor rattray, dana morenstein, laura billett, logan vanghel, ethan stein, taylor marshall, lauren neumann, taylor sockett, britton gray, braden dupuis, sarah luyendyk, liam fitz-gerald, ravinesh sakaran, john loeppky

the paper

THE CARILLON BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Michael Chmielewski, Shaadie Musleh, Autumn McDowell, vacant, vacant, vacant, vacant

Woodrow Wilson

227 Riddell Centre University of Regina - 3737 Wascana Parkway Regina, SK, Canada, S4S 0A2 www.carillonregina.com Ph: (306) 586-8867 Printed by Transcontinental Publishing Inc., Saskatoon

Humphrey Bogart

The Carillon welcomes contributions.

Correspondence can be mailed, emailed, or dropped off in person. Please include your name, address, and telephone number on all letters to the editor. Only the author’s name, title/position (if applicable) and city will be published. Names may be withheld upon request at the discretion of the Carillon. Letters should be no more than 350 words, and may be edited for space, clarity, accuracy, and vulgarity. The Carillon is a wholly autonomous organization with no affiliation with the University of Regina Students’ Union. Opinions expressed in the pages of the Carillon are expressly those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect those of The Carillon Newspaper Inc. Opinions expressed in advertisements appearing in the Carillon are those of the advertisers, and not necessarily of The Carillon Newspaper Inc. or its staff. The Carillon is published no less than 11 times each semester during the fall and winter semesters and periodically throughout the summer.The Carillon is published by The Carillon Newspaper Inc., a non-profit organization.

rituals

heresies

the manifesto

In keeping with our reckless, devil-may-care image, our office has absolutely no concrete information on the Carillon’s formative years readily available. What follows is the story that’s been passed down from editor to editor for over forty years.

In the late 1950s, the University of Regina planned the construction of several new buildings on the campus grounds. One of these proposed buildings was a bell tower on the academic green. If you look out on the academic green today, the first thing you’ll notice is that it has absolutely nothing resembling a bell tower.

The University never got a bell tower, but what it did get was the Carillon, a newspaper that serves as a symbolic bell tower on campus, a loud and clear voice belonging to each and every student. Illegitimi non carborundum. In other news: There have been times in

the office where we’ve spoken entirely in Simpsons references. With that in mind, thanks for the laughs, Marcia Wallace.Ye shall be missed. In other other news, Metallica wants to play a show in Antarctica.

photos

news comicvine.com a&c listal.com sports nsnn.com op-ed wikimedia.org cover Emily Wright

“I don't believe that I'm going to “Relax - This won't hurt.” be able to speak any longer...” Hunter S. Thompson Branch Rickey

errata

For all of our DiCaprio-loving film majors: last week, we misspelled the name of your idol in Destiny Kaus’ brilliant article, “Film program = irrelevant?” We “regret” the error. Kyle Leitch, production manager, thirdyear film production major


epitaphs The open forum

Editor: Rikkeal Bohmann news@carillonregina.com the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013

Research, liberal arts and transparency were hot topics at the forum

rikkeal bohmann news editor

U of R President Vianne Timmons held an open forum on Oct. 24. This forum was to be used to address concerns brought up at the Sep. 27 Council Meeting. Timmons opened the forum by updating the campus on what’s happening and of the successes the U of R has had in recent years. Record enrolment was a significant success Timmons discussed, citing the new Faculty of Nursing, increase in international students, more self-declared Aboriginal student and students with disabilities being up over the past four years. Research, another key area to universities, was also brought up. Timmons stated that $150,000 as a one time monies would be used towards graduate students this year. Next year, this will depend on government budgeting. This past year, the U of R has garnered a lot of negative press as well. The overtime scandal in the Faculty of Education was a hot button topic. The Liberal Arts Foundation of the university was also questioned. Timmons repeatedly asked for the campus to work with her on

Arthur Ward

Concerns from September’s Council meeting were to be addressed at the forum

what needs to be changed on campus throughout the forum, asking for open dialogue. Since the Special Council meeting, she said about 10 people have come to meet with her and discuss issues on campus. The forum had a low student turn out as well. Timmons was unhappy, but remained optimistic about this. “I was disappointed in the turnout, I wish more had showed, but I’ll talk to

how many people I can.” About half as many people showed up to this forum as the last Council meeting. Hardly any students attended. English Professor Susan Johnston, who had initially been key to bringing forth the September Special Council meeting, was unhappy with the results of the forum. "Well I was very sorry to hear that

What the frack?

the President has walked backwards on her commitment that she made publicly to the media to release the operating line-by-line fund. I think it is disturbing to hear that that is only possible going forward, and not looking backward. I’m glad they’re devoting resources to discovering good ways to release that information, but the fact of that of the matter is that we have presented them with

a number of examples.” Transparency was brought up as an issue at the forum. Radio-Canada had asked the U of R to disclose “travel expenses of the President, Vice-Presidents, and Associate Vice-Presidents since 2010.” The university responded that it would cost CBC $13,760 to acquire all of them. When asked about this by the Carillon, Timmons responded with, “They asked me for every expense that we have for the President, Vice-President and AVPs, and we took it literally. They wanted all the expenses and supporting documents, so we said this will be expensive to compile. Can you narrow your scope? Can you bring it down so that it’s something that’s more manageable for us? And we sent it back to them and we didn’t hear from them.” Timmons’ travel expenses have been starting to become available. She pledges all her travel expenses since she became President in 2008 will be made public.

Protests against proposed fracking heat up in N.B.

alec salloum news writer

Protests against Southwestern Energy (SWN) and proposed fracking developments came to a head on Oct. 17 near Elsipogtog, New Brunswick. The clash was between members of the Mi’kmaq First Nation and RCMP. Protests against SWN have taken place over the course of 2013. Demonstrations manifested with routes to exploration sites being blocked, protestors chaining themselves to equipment, frequent marches, theft of SWN vehicles, and makeshift blockades being established. On the morning of Oct. 17, the RCMP was moving to blockades outside of Rexton near SWN storage to enforce a court ordered injunction, essentially a cease and desist order, against the protestors. The blockade was established on Route 134 that restricted SWN reaching prospective sites for seismic testing. When the protestors did not comply, rubber bullets and tear gas was fired into the crowds, forcing dispersal. The events of that morning saw 40 Mi’kmaq arrested, six of who were jailed and face 37 charges. These men were all members of the Mi’kmaq Warrior Society, who have been responsible for establishing blockades. So far, two of the six

were released on bail with the others waiting for Nov. 1 for a chance to appeal. The RCMP used substantial force when raiding the barricade that consisted of peaceful non-aggressive participants. Photos from the day surrounding the event are startling. Sniper divisions were deployed. Heavily armored riot patrols were sent. When questioned on the usage of force, Constable Jullie RogersMarsh explained that the RCMP was walking into an “extremely high risk” situation. Going on to say, “We were informed of firearms at the protest camp, hundreds of rounds of ammunition and even improvised explosive devices. The situation was extremely dangerous.” The protestors did, however, set fire to several police cars; used Molotov’s and recently have set fires outside the N.B. RCMP detachment. An APTN reporter was in the thick of the encounter and reported on the tense and racially charged encounter. One camoclad officer allegedly shouted, “Crown land belongs to the government, not fucking natives.” This occurred while officers advanced on the blockade, adorned in riot gear with dogs in tow. There are also allegations that private security was hired by SWN in days leading up to the

tion of groundwater in Cold Lake, Alberta. Quebec has recently outlawed fracking, given its environmental impact. The protestors have received an outpouring of support through social media. In fact, the hacktivist online collective Anonymous has pledged their support of the Mi’kmaq people and their aims, beginning #OpFrackOff. The Mi’Kmaq are only one of the many First Nations demanding determination of mineral exploration and extraction on their territory. Ottawa, Winnipeg, Hamilton and South Ontario have seen acts of solidarity in support of First Nations rights to determination over mineral rights. This has seen a major resurgence with the Idle No More movement. As of Oct. 24, Elsipogtog Chief, Aaron Sock, has announced his plan to go to court in an effort to definitively determine who own the land. In statements made to CBC he said, “Let’s settle it once and for all. Let's go to court."

sacredfirenb.files.wordpress.com

Protestor stands against advancing police forces.

clash. The protesters are concerned that if SWN finds natural gas under shale fields that they will begin fracking. This raises concerns over the environmental impacts of this dirty method of

extraction. Fracking is a controversial method of mining as it utilizes an absurd amount of chemicals that can pose threats to air quality and especially water supply. Recently a fracking incident resulted in the contamina-


The liberal arts dilemma 4

epitaphs

the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013

The U of R was originally built on liberal arts.

rikkeal bohmann news editor

Vianne Timmons hosted an open forum Friday, Oct. 24 to address concerns brought up at last month’s council meeting. One major concern being what is happening to the liberal arts. In 1963, Regina Campus, the predecessor to the University of Regina, had a group of faculty members that drafted the “Education Policy for Liberal Arts,” known commonly as “The Regina Beach Manifesto.” This was intended to make clear the campus’ firm commitment to its liberal arts beginnings. A half-decade later, the fate of the liberal arts is a major topic of conversation at the U of R. In its beginnings, Regina College, which had started as a high school, had a “strong focus on the liberal arts,” according to the President’s Liberal Arts Advisory Group. Over time, other professional programs joined, as the campus evolved into the U of R. Kathleen Wall, a professor in the Department of English, thinks

beyond.customline.com

There are many challenges the liberal arts face.

the current situation for the liberal arts is not good; “That in attempting to cope with budget crisis, the administration is simply letting the budgets get balanced through retirements.” Wall believes the university needs to hire more professors,

The hustle

stating they are short staffed in the English Department because faculty who have retired, have not been replaced. She also believes the university is over-administrated. “I think we are spending more budget serving students, seeing

them as consumers... instead of teaching them.” To tackle issues liberal arts are facing, Timmons outlined three things the university is doing. In June, the Liberal Arts Advisory was set up. The deans of professional programs are looking at

ways to highlight liberal arts too. As well, federated college presidents are looking at ways to revitalize liberal arts. Wall says that the problem goes beyond the university level though. “I see the university as the canary in the mineshaft. That our culture as a whole has become very purpose-driven, job-driven, end-driven… the humanities and social sciences, though, teach us how to live, how to communicate; they teach us how to think critically.” Timmons agrees that the liberal arts are essential to the university. “The liberal arts and science are the foundation of this university. Even if professional programs grow, business for example, 50 per cent of the courses in the business degree are liberal arts and science.” The Faculty of Arts is the largest on campus. As of Fall 2012, there were over 2,500 undergraduate students enrolled.

Bank of America has been found liable of fraud

alec salloum news writer

On Oct. 23, a Manhattan jury found Bank of America liable of fraud after a civil suit that lasted a month. The initial civil suit was filed in 2010, by the United States Government against the bank. It largely pertained to the subprime mortgages which crippled America in 2008. This is the first time the US government has successfully gone against a bank and had a jury give a guilty ruling. In addition to these charges the jury also found Rebecca Mairone liable of fraud. Mairone is the former senior executive of Countrywide, a company acquired by the Bank of America in 2008, which specialized in loans and mortgages. Mairone is currently working at JPMorgan Chase, America’s largest bank by assets. The verdict of Bank of America and Mairone has been seen as a tremendous victory. The popping of the ‘housing bubble’ was a major factor in the recession and now two figures directly involved in the financial catastrophe have been tried and accused. US Attorney, Preet Bharara, and top Federal prosecutors, accused the Bank of America of defrauding the American public of approximately $1 billion with what is termed a “High Speed Swim Lane”, or “Hustle”. Bharara explained the ploy as such, “Borrowers did not have to get their income verified, and loan processors put the data into an automated underwriting system with few checks

business.blogs.starnewsonline.com

Prosecutors accused the Bank of America of defrauding the Americans of about $1 billion.

and balances and widespread falsification… The lawsuit claims Countrywide executives were aware of what was going on, that one review in 2008 showed that 57 per cent of these loans went into default.” The “Hustle” supposedly started with Countrywide, who once held $490 billion in loans in 2005. These funds were largely collected during the mid 2000s with the housing market swell experienced by the US. These are among the 57 per cent defective loans mentioned by Bharara. These loans were then sold off to Fannie Mae, Federal National Mortgage Association, and Fred-

die Mac, Federal Home Loan Mortgage Cooperation, both of which are government sponsored agencies. During this time of selling off loans to a Federal Agency Countrywide eliminated several of the procedures and steps taken to ensure that loans were sound and secure. One example of this practice was the elimination of underwriters from loan contracts and instead relied on incompetent and unqualified clerks. These clerks were permitted and encouraged to accept almost all loans, despite being high or low risk. This resulted in $850 million in losses, while Countrywide made

profits in excess of $165 million. Effectively, tax payers ended up paying this deficit and the downturn contributed to the 2008 finical recession. As such the government is now seeking implementation of a fine in the area of $1 billion to recuperate their losses associated with Countrywides Hustle. One piece of evidence in the case was an email between Mairone and the head of Countrywide underwriting process, stating “The name ‘Hustle’, probably won’t play well in front of a jury”. This shows that higher ups at Countrywide were aware of the scheme and did nothing to stop it.

In fact, Mairone was the director of the hustle and tied company bonuses to how fast clerks could move loans. These events did happen before Bank of America bought Countrywide but charges are still levied against them. The bank plans to appeal the recent verdict but has already been subject to $10 billion settlement with Fannie Mae. In response to the verdict Bank of America has stated that 3,000 of its employees working in the mortgage department will be fired in the coming months.


CETA agreement made

the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013

epitaphs 5

With tariffs removed, Canada’s trade will change.

cbc.ca

Some don’t agree with Harper on this one.

aidan macnab contributor

Negotiations have concluded on The Canadian-European Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement (CETA). According to the Globe and Mail, Prime Minister Stephen Harper and European Commissioner Jose Manuel Barroso, announced they had reached an “agreement in principle” on Friday, Oct. 18. The trade pact will not come into effect for another two years. It will be subject to legal overview. Given that 29 different countries are parties to the deal, the text needs to be translated into 24 different languages, as well as ratified by all governments involved. The Prime Minister is confident that this process will unfold smoothly. As for what’s in the deal, the details, in their entirety, have not been released to the public. According to the Globe, the pact reduces tariffs on goods, allows European companies to bid on municipal and provincial public contracts, raises quotas on Canadian goods like agricultural products, and makes it easier for Canadian professionals to work in Europe and vice versa. The deal also allows European Pharmaceutical drugs an up to two-year extension on patent protection. Not only do Canadians not know the details, no substantive changes can be made to the bill while it’s debated and voted on in Parliament. This may sound undemocratic, but is necessary, according to the University of Regina Professor of Economics, Dr. Jason Childs. “You never want to negotiate in public because that then gets political and nothing happens… It’s impossible for someone to back down or compromise, particularly a politician in that environment.”

The CBC reported on Oct. 21, that the government would like to see the deal put into effect as quickly as possible, as it gives Canada access to a market that is “the largest in the world,” with “500 million consumers, (and) $17 trillion GDP.” The Harper Government has also claimed that Canadians stand to gain 80,000 jobs and add 12 billion to the GDP as a result of CETA. These claims may “be optimistic,” says Dr. Childs, but are, “not impossible.” Dr. Childs cautions that the job numbers probably aren’t taken into consideration the jobs that will be lost. “That’s probably a gross number not a net number. That’s a standard game [for politicians]… If you like the deal you talk gross, if you don’t like the deal you talk net.” Liberal Premier of Ontario, Kathleen Wynne, supports the deal and expects Ontario will add 30,000 jobs, as the manufacturing sector will have unprecedented access to European markets. Wine producers in her province are not as excited. With the Government’s claim that CETA will remove 98 per cent of all tariffs, it will be great for those who want to buy European wine, but not so great for those who’ve been producing Canadian wine while relying on their trans-Atlantic competitor’s product to have an inflated price, due to tariffs.

The Globe has reported that, when the agreement takes affect, the EU will also be allowed to export an extra 17,000 tonnes of cheese, tariff free, to Canada per year. This portion of the deal has the Dairy Farmers of Canada claiming that, “Canada would lose its small, artisan and local cheese makers and a world-leading industry with top quality products”. The dairy farmers also call CETA a “giveaway” to Europe. They claim that the pact won’t benefit Canadian consumers “as the vast majority of EU cheese already comes into Canada with little or no tariffs.” Dr. Childs cautions that not all businesses benefit from free trade. “The question is how much and how should you compensate those who are harmed by moving from a system of tariffs, to a system of international competition,” Dr. Childs said. “There is going to be opposition to removing tariffs from those who are protected [by tariffs].” Those currently being protected are Canadian cheese and wine producers. Prime Minister Harper has said that the Government would consider compensating those who “will be hurt by the deal.” This includes possible compensation for provinces, which may deal with higher health-care costs due to CETA’s extension of patent protec-

tion for European Pharmaceutical drugs. An upside to CETA is that one can expect to pay less for European cars, which generally have a tariff of around ten percent. Cars, according to Dr. Childs, are a product that has become much less expensive due to a similar free trade agreement signed by a previous Tory government, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The Carillon spoke with Conservative Member of Parliament for Palliser, Ray Boughen, who says he will be voting in favour of CETA, and said also that NAFTA has benefited the average Canadian consumer in that “they probably gain an extra thousand dollars more a year.” Boughen also thinks that gains from CETA will be even larger because Canada will join 28 countries instead of just two. When asked who among the Canadian public have been hurt by NAFTA, Dr. Child’s responded, “we have lost a lot of those fairly repetitive manual assembly line type jobs. That work has gone, a lot of it, to Mexico because they’re willing to do it cheaper.” But there is more included in the agreement than just opening up borders for trade. There is also a controversial portion of the document that deals with investor rights. Inclusion of an investor-state dispute settlement mechanism in CETA

You never want to negotiate in public because that then gets political

and nothing happens… It’s impossible for someone to back down or compromise, particularly a politician in that environment. Dr. Jason Childs

has ignited opposition from groups such as the Council of Canadians and Canadian Union for Public Employees (CUPE). CUPE claims on their website that Canada should follow Australia’s lead, who stopped “the practice of including investorstate dispute settlement in their trade and investment agreements,” in 2011. Including these dispute settlement arrangements in trade deals, according to CUPE, creates a situation where democracy is undermined, and where human and Indigenous rights and environmental protection are compromised. The Huffington Post reported on an example of one such dispute: Lone Pine Resources is suing the Quebec government under NAFTA, for a moratorium on hydraulic-fracturing or fracking. Lone Pine had leased land for development in Quebec prior to the ban, and is claiming damages of $250 million. Lone Pine is a Calgary-based company, but is registered in Delaware. The attitude of CUPE and the Council of Canadians and other opponents of this parallel legal system for trade-disputes is that if Quebecers want to ban fracking, they ought to be able to. But Dr. Childs says, “It’s changing the rules midway through the game, that’s when you get sued.” “The European rules around investors rights… aren’t going to be completely nuts. They’re not worth panicking about,” he said. On Friday, Jeffrey Simpson of the Globe and Mail wrote an editorial pointing out that trade deals like CETA usually don’t live up to the expectations of those advocating for and celebrating them, but also don’t become the disasters that the deals’ opponents foresee. As for what CETA’s affect will be on Canada, it will be a long time before we’ll know for sure.


Senate scandal 6

epitaphs

the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013

Time may be up for certain senators. tatenda chikukwa contributor

It could be the end of the line for Senators Patrick Brazeau, Mike Duffy and Saskatchewan’s very own representative, Pamela Wallin. It is predicted that the Senate will make its final decision to suspend the Senators’ without pay before they head to the Conservative national policy convention in Calgary. If the motion is passed, the Senators will lose their seats and any hope of being reinstated after the 2015 election. Allegations of expense abuse began last November when the Senate’s internal economy requested an audit of Sen. Brazeau’s housing allowance, which then led to an inquiry of Sen. Mac Harb’s and Sen. Mike Duffy’s housing expenses. Sen. Brazeau, who is already under investigation for domestic assault and sexual assault, was found to have inappropriately used his housing allowance on a secondary housing property and was asked to repay $49,000. Brazeau refused to pay on the grounds that it would be an admission to guilt, leaving the Senate no option but to withhold 20 per cent of his annual salary of $135,200 over a 21-month period. Former PEI Senate representa-

o.canada.com

Where the magic happens. It’s a surprise that it’s full.

tive, Mike Duffy’s, fall from grace began when an investigation was launched into the status of his primary residence. Duffy has a home in both P.E.I. and Ottawa. The Senate sub-committee had cause to believe Duffy’s main residence to be in Ottawa and not P.E.I. Duffy also faces problems regarding the $65,000 he paid his friend, Gerald Donohue, ‘for little or no work’, according to court documents filed by the RCMP and then there’s that dreaded personal cheque from the Prime Minister’s former Chief of Staff, Nigel Wright. Duffy shocked everyone at Tuesday’s Senate hearing when

he admitted that the Prime Minister personally told him to repay the expenses he owed, thus implicating Steven Harper in the Senate scandal. Harper’s former Chief of Staff was fired for allegedly making the decision to give Sen. Duffy a personal cheque of $90,000 to repay his travel expenses. Harper remains adamant that he knew nothing of the cheque, but Duffy has other views, “Pay the money back. End of discussion. Nigel Wright was present throughout. Just the three of us,” said Duffy on Harper’s involvement in the cover up. Now, lest we forget the third party of this motion, Pamela

Slavery in Thailand

Wallin, whose troubles with the Senate began when auditing firm, Delloite, was hired to review her travel expenses. The firm found only 11 of the 94 flights Wallin took from Ottawa to Saskatchewan were direct flights; therefore the $138, 970 in travel expenses billed to the Senate were improper. Wallin was scrutinized for numerous layovers to her Toronto residence because the Senate only pays for direct flights from Ottawa to a Senator’s home province. Wallin was found to have abused this privilege and told to repay the Senate or be removed from it. The three senators remain res-

olute that the accusation of “gross negligence” by Senate leader Claude Carignan is highly inflammatory and that they are being singled out by fellow senators. Duffy has since resigned, Wallin has recused herself, and Brazeau has been barred from the Senate even though the RCMP hasn’t formally charged them with any crime. CBC legislative reporter, Stefani Langenegger, says that there is a serious need for Senate reform. “It seems to me that Canadians are getting sick of this.” Canadians are divided on the motion to suspend but they are not divided on the issue of government transparency. The scandal has re-opened the debate of abolishing the Senate and, according to Wallin, the suspension is a strategy to quell public concern. “This charade is supposedly about preserving the reputation of this place – but the real intent is to remove a perceived liability – namely me”. The Senate scandal started off being about misuse of government funding, but now it has grown to become litmus test of conservative cohesion and growing public awareness of government spending. As the Carillon went to press, the story is still developing.

The Land of Smiles is one of 10 nations accounting for 75 per cent of slavery dietrich neu

foreign correspondent

Thailand is one of 10 countries that account for 75 per cent of the world’s slavery, according to a recent report by the Walk Free Foundation. 2013 was the inaugural edition of the report, titled the Global Slavery Index. The index ranked 162 countries across the globe based on an “estimated prevalence of modern slavery by population, a measure of child marriage, and a measure of human trafficking in and out of a country.” The Walk Free Foundation recruited hundreds of researchers for the project, which it says will be an annual report from now on. The document states that Thailand has the seventhlargest enslaved population in the world. Despite being one of the wealthiest nations in Southeast Asia, Thailand is suffering from the most prominent slavery culture in the region, the study says. The report even goes so far as to call the country a “hub of exploitation in the region,” and

SeaDave

A low unemployment rate has fishing companies looking for migrant workers.

states that human trafficking is a major problem for the Land of Smiles. “Thai women are particularly vulnerable to trafficking into the forced domestic and sex industries in countries all over the world,” the study reads. “Lured by seemingly genuine job offers, but often exploited via debt bondage.” These slaves, predominantly women, are shipped all over the world. In addition, the country faces a unique problem within its fishing industry. Thailand is one of the world’s top exporters of seafood. However,

an extremely low unemployment rate (forth lowest worldwide) mixed with a growing seafood industry has lead many fishing companies to look for migrant workers from surrounding regions like Burma, Cambodia, and Indonesia. “Many fishers find themselves in situations of debt bondage due to costs occurred during transfer and placement with employers,” the report says. “Given that boats are often in the deep sea for lengthy periods of time, the ability to escape poor working conditions is significantly

harder. Reports suggest that in addition to extensive working hours, poor and often withheld pay, there is a high level of violence experienced by migrant workers on fishing vessels. Of 49 Cambodian fishers surveyed by UNIAP SIREN, 59 per cent had witnessed a murder by the boat captain.” The index estimates there are around half-a-million slaves in Thailand based on the criteria outlined by WFF, and notes that human trafficking is a particular problem for the country. The United States Department of State also gave the

country a poor rating. The US 2013 Trafficking in Persons Report has ranked the country as a “Tier 2 Watchlist” nation, the second lowest ranking possible. To qualify for a Tier 2 ranking in the TIP report the “absolute number of victims of severe forms of trafficking [has to be] very significant or significantly increasing,” and “there [must be] a failure to provide evidence of increasing efforts to combat severe forms of trafficking in persons from the previous year.” As bad as Thailand’s ranking is, the Global Slavery Index highlights a problem that is worldwide. “Most governments don’t dig deeply into slavery for a lot of bad reasons,” said Kevin Bales, lead researcher on the project.” There are exceptions, but many governments don’t want to know about people who can’t vote, who are hidden away, and are likely to be illegal anyway. The laws are in place, but the tools and resources and the political will are lacking. And, since hidden slaves can’t be counted, it is easy to pretend they don’t exist.”


College campus renewal

the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013

epitaphs 7

The old college campus has been around for over 100 years

taylor rattray contributor

The University of Regina’s historic campus is located just off College Avenue, near downtown Regina. While existing for over 100 years, this campus is currently undergoing what is known as “Building Knowledge – The College Avenue Campus Renewal Project”. On this campus, The College Building, The Conservatory, and Darke Hall will be restored and collectively known as the University of Regina Leadership and Outreach Centre (LOC). The person in charge of the College Avenue Campus, Wanda Deschamps, U of R Associate Vice-President of Development, says, “The goal is to transform the campus into a renovated, revitalized, and vibrant and accessible center for learning. It’s really the place where the university and the community really come together due to the nature of programming. It’s not accessible currently and that’s a real barrier.” Deschamps says that the College Avenue campus “was

Zach Almond

The old campus is in need of a renewal.

founded as Regina College in 1911 and has a long and varied history, and Darke Hall is a really important part of the history associated with Regina College, [including] the generosity of the Darke family, through which Darke hall was built. Part of the restoration is to restore Darke Hall back to the kind of performance venue it once was.” She also states that, “the buildings will also be updated to current learning

standards.” On Oct. 18, the U of R launched the community phase of the project. This is “when we invite the general community to participate in the project. So far we have focused on leadership gifts, nature gifts, and [gifts from] our family,” Deschamps articulates, “[These were] gifts over a quarter of a million, gifts over one hundred thousand, and gifts from our family members,

Shelters in winter

faculty, staff, senate. So by launching the community phase, we’re inviting the public to join and support the project and bring us our ten million dollar goal to conclusion” This $10 million goal is the fundraising goal portion of the estimated $58 million dollar total cost to revitalize the College Avenue Campus. As for the fundraising portion, Deschamps articulates, “we’ve al-

ready received private donations totalling close to four million, including a million dollar gift from an anonymous alumni, and a variety of other gifts.” She says they “will raise the balance through a variety of fundraising meets, and have a number of gifts currently under consideration and will be moving those to close.” The rest will be through other means, such as a mail campaign and some other varieties of methods that will reach out to the broader community. The buildings on the College Avenue campus will “continue to be the home for the Center for Continuing Education and the conservatory…and the programming that delivers through [those buildings] will continue to be offered” states Deschamps. These programs include the Lifelong Learning Center and Distance Education. College Avenue will also be the central home to the Public Policy School, which is currently spread out between Research Drive and College Avenue.

Warm clothes are needed by shelters as winter begins. paige kreutzwieser staff writer

It is inevitable - winter is coming. For most of us, we have the luxury of turning on our furnaces, sitting in front of a fire, or commandstarting our cars from inside our house. But not everyone is as fortunate. Although certain preparations are changing for shelters around Saskatchewan, gearing up to help the homeless prepare for the frosty winter months ahead doesn’t actually change many logistics. “Our shelters operate the same way 365 days a year,” stated Rebecca Cochrane, Director of Development and Programs for Souls Harbour Rescue Mission. “Our numbers fluctuate throughout the year, but not necessarily because of the weather.” The same goes for Regina Transition House, who stated that their numbers do not necessarily change because of the winter weather. “We are busy no matter what time of year it is,” said Maria Hendrika, Executive Director of the emergency shelter for women. The biggest demand these shelters have is the need for clothing. “We always need socks,” said Melissa Donaldson, Administrator at Riverside Mission, a men’s shel-

commons.bcit.ca

Things are going to get cold quickly

ter located in Moose Jaw. “Toques, scarves, mittens, jackets, anything donated we start stocking up.” Food also gets donated (like turkeys for their Christmas dinner), which Donaldson is appreciative about as they are looking to increase their meals in the soup kitchen. “We find we are getting more people coming out for meals [in the winter], which is weird because I thought it would be the

opposite,” said Donaldson. But there is a different peak time that Donaldson really noticed. “The closer it gets to welfare cheque days the more people we have, and then after welfare cheque day we don’t have as many people. So I found we can kind of judge [peaks in numbers] that way.” The amount of beds can also become a problem.

“In the winter, we do prepare to sleep people on the floor if the weather gets extremely cold,” said Cochrane. For Riverside, although they also claim a constant busy state throughout the year, ten beds can fill up pretty fast – especially in the winter. And not all are reoccurring faces. “A couple guys we’ve seen in the past have shown up, but there are a lot of new guys as well,” said

Donaldson. None of the men living at Riverside were enthusiastic about commenting on their life in the shelter, but there was a general thankfulness for the opportunity to have a place to go. “I find we get a lot of people that say, in Regina, had bad friends so they are trying to get away from those friends and start a new life,” explained Donaldson. With frigid weather also comes that increased likelihood of health issues. “For the staff we are a little more careful come flu season about washing our hands and using gloves and that kind of thing,” said Donaldson. “But it’s up to the [residents] to take care of themselves.” So, despite the increased need for clothing, food, and health precautions, all shelters echoed Cochrane words of Souls Harbor’s open door policy. “We continue to remind people that we are available if they do not have a safe place to stay.”


dark arts & occulture

Editor: Robyn Tocker aandc@carillonregina.com the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013

Normal, level-headed individuals The Fugitives mellow out while on tour.

destiny kaus a & c writer

Not all bands need to have incredibly significant band names, and not all bands need to create an entire album based on one overall theme. I did not realize this before I wrote this article. No, I’m not stupid or sheltered; I just didn’t think of these concepts until I spoke with The Fugitives, an indie folk collective band from Vancouver, led by songwriters Brendan McLeod and Adrian Glynn. These champs came up with their band name when they first got started in the music industry. McLeod says, “We were just going on tour one day when we first started, and we didn’t have a band name, so we just made it up at the time. And then we were just like ‘Ah well we’ll just come home in three weeks and it doesn’t matter, we’ll rethink it,’ and it just kind of stuck. We’re not running from anything except low self-esteem maybe.” Apparently, even musicians suffer from low self-esteem on occasion. But, this did not hold The Fugitives back when they created their newest, full-length album Everything Will Happen. “I don’t think it’s a conceptual

Killbeat Music

Songwriters Brendan McLeod and Adrian Glynn make powerful music

record. It doesn’t have a theme. It’s a series of songs. I guess there are themes within it. They include everything from death and dying to [being] out late at night having fun drinking,” McLeod explains. Sounds to me like a pretty solid album, which deals with subject matter relevant to life

such as the reality of death and the joy of having loads of fun. My guess is The Fugitives added some audience interest by including songs about drinking. Like their previous albums, The Fugitives have put together a unique, diverse, track-list in Everything Will Happen. This

album showcases the technically sound vocal harmonies and powerful musical combinations between instruments, such as the drums, violin, banjo, bass, and acoustic guitar. In my opinion, there’s no way this album will fail. Listening to The Fugitives’ music is like eating a hot fudge sundae:

everything melts together into one, unified, bite of goodness. The Fugitives are currently touring across Canada and will be stopping to play a show at 8 p.m. on Nov. 19 at The Artful Dodger. Sadly, The Fugitives likely won’t make it into The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame anytime soon. Not many indie folk bands do. But, they do have high hopes for their new album as they promote it on tour. “The best thing that can happen is that people other than your mom like the record ‘cause your mom is obviously biased,” says McLeod, who hopes the public will enjoy the new album as much as he does. “It’s my most favourite thing I’ve ever done … that’s nice for me to be able to say and hopefully [the public] likes it as well.” During tour, McLeod spends countless hours looking through his vehicle’s window and watching season five of Sons of Anarchy. “It’s the absolute worst show you could possibly ever watch, but I can’t stop watching it because every show someone dies and you need to know who’s going to die next.” McLeod’s down-to-earth activities just go to show that some bands do, in fact, include levelheaded, normal individuals.

Regina reaches its Boiling Point Barb Parcholik talks cold cases.

dana morenstein contributor

What would have been going through his mind, as he sat along the train tracks, waiting for an oncoming freight? He knew what he wanted to do that day. It was intentional. So when police found him, after the conductor had been unable to stop, they were told that the young man had been seen along the tracks at Courtney Street and Thirteenth Avenue, sitting in wait, before putting his head down in front of the oncoming locomotive. “I wanted to know, a little bit more specifically, what was in his backpack,” journalist and author Barb Pacholik says, referring to the bag found with him at the scene. “He was carrying a book called Under the Volcano. It’s a backdrop to a story that takes place in Mexico, and part of that story takes place on the Day of the Dead, which is a day in celebration of people who have passed on. I found it really interesting that this fellow, who was thinking of taking his life, was reading a book like that in the days leading up to him making his decision.” Pacholik has been writing about crime for 25 years, first as a re-

www.oocities.org

CSI eat your heart out

porter for the Regina Leader-Post and now as an author. Her most recent true crime book, Boiling Point & Cold Cases: More Saskatchewan Crime Stories, includes the story “Day of the Dead”, in which Pacholik pieces together few known facts about a man who, in 1995, committed suicide. He remains unidentified, despite the Regina City Police’s best efforts at finding someone able to give John Doe back his name.

“There is sometimes a sense, by people who get caught up in the criminal justice system, that these are private family matters. But privacy is not private. When a case goes to court, it is the state vs. the accused. It is not a civil matter, it’s not a family who sues an accused for someone’s death, it is the state who prosecutes the person; and in that way, crime isn’t private.” Pacholik is passionate about

what she does. Her extensive research has resulted in historically accurate stories directly from archives, court transcripts, and meetings with law enforcement. The opening story in Boiling Point details the case of Bryan McMillan, a Regina man who went missing in 1978. Through way of archived newspaper articles and with help from a veteran police officer, Pacholik is able to give readers a hauntingly honest look at life in Regina during the 70s, while chronicling the quiet desperation of a family searching for their lost son. “When I first started doing crime reporting, I remember hearing this amazing story about a dedicated cop, who had solved a cold case ... this was in the 80’s, before CSI television shows, and you didn’t really hear a lot about cold cases,” Pacholik recalls. “[The cop] was at my book launch and we got to talking. I sort of cornered him, and said, ‘Rick, I want to hear this story. I want you to tell me exactly how you solved that case’.” The result is the first story in Boiling Point, entitled ‘The Key.’ “What was so sad about this case, is sure, it’s fantastic that Rick Mitchell was eventually able to bring that closure. He cracks the case, he gets people to testify— and that’s no small feat, we’re

talking seven years after the fact. He finds people who are willing to talk and say what happened the night Bryan McMillan disappeared. Eventually, because of people coming forward and being willing to testify about what occurred, the killers eventually take the police to find that body. And when they find the body, it’s buried on the outskirts of the city. So for seven years, this body has laid in this bluff of trees, which is remarkable in itself, that a body can lay in the open for seven years, and no one ever finds it.” Pacholik continues, “So, they lead the police officers to these trees, and there they find the body. By that point, there was very little left, we’re talking bone. But the skeleton was still wearing the pants ... so one of the police officers reaches in the pocket, and he finds a set of keys. Later, when they’re trying to tie up all the loose ends, they go back to the house where Bryan grew up and they put the key in the lock, and it still opens the door.”


Tis the season to be slutty? the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013

Halloween is here and so are short skirts. robyn tocker a & c editor

I walk into the Halloween City costume store, turn left then right. There it is. The costume wall. Pictures of costumes for people from ages baby to adult line the high wall. Parents search with their children to find something that will fit overtop (or underneath) their winter jackets. Young adults linger near their section, scanning the pictures for something that won’t blow their meager budget. While I stand there, I see a trend appearing. Low cleavage lion costume, short skirt “Queen of Thrones”, short skirt for the Big Bad Sexy Wolf, a combo of short skirt and cleavage for the referee costume. When I spot the nun with thigh highs, that’s when my jaw drops. Seriously? Are these the options I have for Halloween? Where are the pants? Oh, there they are. Can we call Katniss’ “Catching Fire” costume pants? I wonder if my thighs would be able to breathe in that so called “police uniform”. This isn’t anything new for me, and other women, unfortunately. When shopping for a costume, there’s very little to choose from if you don’t feel comfortable showing off a lot of skin. Rachel Galbiati, a worker at Halloween City, says she has seen parents complaining about the length of skirts many times. “A girl was trying on a costume today and it barely came down to her [private area].” Galbiati, who has experienced

Emily Wright

So many choices, not enough fabric!

issues buying costumes regularly, says she would like to see a section for women who want to show more skin, and another section for those who don’t want to. “I’ve had people say to me the clothes are too skanky and they don’t want to wear it.” Galbiati knows that is may not happen, seeing as “sex sells,” and a lot of people want it because it grabs more attention, especially for the bar scene. “Men like to see it.” On campus, when asking if they have experienced issues buying costumes, Amber Fournier says that is does limit what women can wear and that men have the option of full coverage where ladies, most of the time, do not. “If enough people put forward the idea and said they did not want to dress sexy, [costume makers] may start making more modest costumes.” Bailey Janson agrees with Fournier.

“I can’t find female costumes that are not provocative, which influences my costume choice.” She also says that women can dress up in funny costumes, but that is hard to do. When asking for a male’s perspective, one answered, who wishes to remain anonymous, saying he doesn’t mind at all and that even he would dress in a skimpy costume. He also points out that many women in the market for a costume may just buy what’s on the self. “[Women] do have options but most gravitate to the skimpy ones because they are [the] pre-made costumes. It’s not hard to make your own.” To give some figures, when rummaging through the Halloween City flyer, I counted only nine out of the 99 costumes shown for women included pants (if we can call them that). If you do some quick math, that equals out to 0.09 per cent of female cos-

tumes with pants as an option. This addition does not include tights, leggings, or knee-high socks. On the younger girls’ side of the flyer, only 1 out of 98 costumes have pants as a required part of the costume. Again, I’m not including tights or leggings here. I won’t go into detail about what I found in the men’s section, but I can assure you there were no short skirts or cleavage. Pat Miller-Schroeder, a Women’s and Gender Studies professor at the University of Regina, says she’s enjoyed Halloween, especially when her children were growing up, but there is obvious gender stereotyping in costumes. “That goes with clothing in general. There’s a lot of gendered expectations right from when kids are born. You know, pink and blue, and you’ve got to have the right colours when they’re born.” Schroeder says this stereotyping can be harmful with the ex-

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pectations they bring along, for both women and men. “I don’t hate Halloween or dressing up. It’s just like weddings, there’s a lot of baggage that goes with that . . . Also in the costumes we see the effect of media. It used to be there was a much more limited range of what we could buy, say, for my kids thirty years ago. There wasn’t the huge range of what you dress up today. And some of what you dress up as today isn’t Halloweeny at all. These tend to show ideals that are movie stars or things like that.” How do we change what options there are for women to dress? “We’re a very consumer-driven society. Costume companies will make what they think people will buy. A lot of people go out and buy costumes; they don’t make their own costumes, so people who don’t want to have stereotypical costumes they may want to look more at dressing in a way they feel makes them feel happy and good about themselves. I would suggest you don’t dress in ways that make you feel uncomfortable about yourself.” That’s really what Halloween should be all about. Dressing up in a way that you feel comfortable and having fun, whether that be going to a bar or trick or treating. If a person feels comfortable wearing something that shows more skin, awesome! But I know that not everyone does and that’s when things start to get annoying. Perhaps next year there will be a wolf costume with a pair of pants?

Challenging conventional theatre It’s what the U of R does best. laura billett contributor

With 18 playwrights, 19 scenes, and anywhere from two to 22 actors, Back Story is not your usual production. It tells the story of Ainsley and her younger brother, Ethan, and the strong relationship they maintain as they experience life's challenges. With a cast potentially as large as 22, Ainsley and Ethan are surprisingly the only speaking roles. So while the play only explores the lives of the brother and sister, the audience sees the characters' portrayal done by many different actors, all in one show. It is like getting to see multiple casts in one night. In the University's production of Back Story, there is a cast of nine: five women cast as Ainsley, and three men and one woman cast as Ethan. Hayley Taylor and Robyn Sanderson are two of the five women cast as Ainsley. When asked how it was to share a role within a play, they both described it as a very interesting experience. “It is very helpful, and very con-

Landon Walliser

Back Story makes me wish I had a brother

fusing,” says Taylor. The actors were encouraged to watch and adopt each other's nuances. “It's interesting working with ... the Ainsley's, trying to have your interpretation, but also picking up what the other Ainsley's are doing,” says Sanderson. The work is far tougher than you'd imagine. These actors aren't just running speech drills and

reading from a script; they are really delving into the characters' personalities, thoughts, and even inner energies. They begin reading the script as a cast, and then slowly bring it alive through exercises that draw out the nuances and energies of both characters, and how they interact. “We worked a bit on how [we can] express our characters within our different inner ener-

gies,” Sanderson says. Ethan has “lots of energy, he's very extroverted. Whereas Ainsley is very introverted. She is very graceful. She is very smooth in almost everything she does,” Taylor says. Ainsley and Ethan's relationship is quite normal in some respects; they have their disagreements like all siblings. However, there is something ex-

traordinary in the strength and closeness of their bond. “She absolutely adores her brother ... her life is about her family and her love for her brother, and protecting him and the bond that they have,” Sanderson says. Ainsley has been the one holding the family together since their Father left them when she was seven. “She is more of a mother than their Mother is ... Ainsley is the one who takes care of everything,” says Taylor. She even turns down her dream of attending the Boston Conservatory of Music in order to take care of Ethan. Their relationship is extraordinary. “These two siblings ... are always there for each other ... She is always looking out for him, and he is always looking out for her,” says Taylor. Back Story runs from Oct. 31 to Nov. 2, then again from Nov. 6-9 in the Shu-Box Theatre. Admission is free for students, so there is no excuse not to experience this inventive story.


Five-and-a-half years a cinema slave 10 da & o

the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013

A movie addict shares his obsession.

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This is one obsession I doubt they have rehab for.

logan vanghel contributor

There's plenty of evidence to suggest we're living in a resurgent era for television. Critics and viewers alike constantly sing the praises of Breaking Bad, The Walking Dead, and Game of Thrones, the Netflix model of simultaneous full season release. It's hard to deny that it's a wonderful time to be a TV fan, but personally I don't give a shit; I'm not a TV guy. I'm of the belief that you get one true passion in your life. The one thing that consumes all of your thoughts, and pounds with every beat of your pulse. And mine is not so dissimilar to television, especially what television has attempted to become in recent years. But TV is not for me, because I prefer my character arcs and plots to be contained in neat 120minute packages. I don't have 120 hours to commit to a single show, I'm sorry. No, I am wholly and completely addicted to movies. “Oh, yeah, I watch a lot of movies too!” you chuckle as you read this. No. I'm not a casual watcher. I'm not a “smoke a joint with friends on the odd weekend” user. I'm a passed-out-stone-coldin-the-alleyway-on-a-winternight-bloodshot-eyes-and-trackmarks-looking-like-sleeves-type of movie addict. It struck me in 2008. Five and a half years I've battled with the compulsion. In June of that year I began collecting my theater ticket stubs, placing them in albums alongside a 4x6 print of the movie poster and keeping a word document full of statistical proof of my insanity. Since attending the U of R—two years down, two more to go—my statistical record keeping has fallen off, unfortunately, but my movie watching has not, despite

the establishment's best efforts both financially and in terms of free time available. I'll dispense some of the statistics here, to assert my true position as the sick, compulsive movie-watching psychopath that I am. Between June 6 2008 and today, Oct. 22, 2013, I have watched 469 movies in theater. That's only in theater. I unfortunately haven't kept track of DVDs, movies on TV and Netflix, and I regret that, but such as it is. 469 movies in theater, 129 of those were on opening Friday, a Thursday sneak peek or a onetime only showing. That's 28 per cent of everything I've watched. 111 more movies I caught on opening weekend, that is to say the Saturday or Sunday following its release, which amounts to 51 per cent of everything I've seen. And 63 more I watched within 7 days of it being release. So that means 65 per cent of the 469 movies I've seen in theater in the past five and a half years I got to before they were a week old. The longest I've gone between two movies in the theater since June 2008? 26 days. And that's an oddity. The average amount of time between two shows is closer to seven or eight days. At my peak I was seeing (mathematically) 2.23 movies per week. My current number is closer to 1.5 movies per week. Between Nov. 6, 2010 and Jan. 22, 2011, I had my best spree of opening weekend viewings, seeing 21 movies within 2 days of re-

lease. I've seen approximately 15 movies outside of Canada. Because I keep the tickets in an album, I prize those tickets that don't come from my usual haunts. The most common question, and the one I'm sure you're asking is, “Boy, how much dough have you injected directly into Hollywood's veins?” And I can give you that number: $3,949 on movie tickets alone. That doesn't include concession, which would likely double that number at least. And I don't regret a single penny. I relish every single cent and minute I've spent in a movie theater, I really do. I bet a couple of you are saying “You sure are a sad, lonely man, Logan Vanghel. I pity you and everything you stand for.” But the truth is, 75 per cent of my 469 movies I've seen with friends, family, lovers, or casual encounters. That's the upside to my addiction! Like alcoholism, I can imbibe among acceptable company on weekends as well as alone in a dark room on a Wednesday. For a long time, my friends said to me “You should work at the theater, man! You're there enough, you may as well get paid to be there.” And I laughed, and I told them “Don't shit where you eat” but I finally broke down in October 2012 and got a job at the Galaxy. And you know what? I highly recommend shitting and eating in the same spot. Simultaneously, if the whim strikes! In the year I've worked there,

I've snagged 44 free movies. Double that, because I get to bring a friend. Multiply that by 12 (the cost of a movie ticket, ish) and I'm saving $1000 every year I work at the Galaxy. Best decision I ever made, brah. So that's the numbers, mostly. But any sports fan knows numbers aren't the whole story. So I'll give you some anecdotes, too, shall I? Like how my addiction has affected some of personal relationships. Back in December 2010 I was dating a girl; we'd been together maybe a month and half. It was my first real, even semi-serious relationship. On the 20 and 21 of the month, I planned to see 4 movies in theater: Tron: Legacy, The Fighter, How Do You Know, and Black Swan. Well she texts the morning of the 20 wondering if I want to hang out. I say “Sure! Come to the theater!” She declines, wonders about the next day. I say “Sure! Come to the theater!” It was at this point she accused me of caring more about movies than I did about her. And it was at this point I realized that was the truth. We broke up a couple of weeks later. A month after that I started bringing different girls to the movies. It was this unfortunate turn of events that led me to see such terrible excuses for movies as Gnomeo & Juliet and Mr. Popper's Penguins. I see pretty much everything, but I sure as hell wouldn't have seen those. I was able to use my powers for

It's been an interesting ride, one that's led me to majoring in film pro-

duction here at the U of R so that someday maybe I can bring joy to the unappreciative masses texting in their seats at the Cineplex, and maybe recoup that $3,949 I've pumped into the studio system.

Logan Vanghel

good once, after watching Street Fighter: Legend of Chun-Li. A critic once said of Chris Klein's performance as Charlie Nash, by the way, “The first time I've seen an actor unconvincingly walk into a room.” That's just the beginning of the movie's problems. Anyway, a day after seeing it, I overheard a Street Fighter fan talking to his friend about seeing it, and I strongly advised him not to, for the sake of his inner SF fan, and for his sake as a thinking human being. I'm still proud of robbing that movie of 11 bucks. So that's pretty much my journey. Movies great and terrible, separated by countless mediocre films. That's all I ask for. These days my current girlfriend, thankfully, loves the theater almost as much as I do (and loves me almost as much as I do) so that makes feeding the addiction easier. It's been an interesting ride, one that's led me to majoring in film production here at the U of R, so that someday maybe I can bring joy to the unappreciative masses texting in their seats at the Cineplex, and maybe recoup that $3,949 I've pumped into the studio system. I'll leave you with one last anecdote, to prove just how insane I am. In late 2009 I found out my brother and his wife snuck into Brothers (Tobey Maguire and Jake Gyllenhall) doing a “double feature” as it's called. I was so outraged (the movie deserved their 20 dollars, damn it) that the next day I went into the theater and purchased two tickets for Brothers and tossed them in the trash.


Deviants, you say?

the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013

Why we love Rocky Horror. ethan stein contributor

The Rocky Horror Show is unique in that its execution is overshadowed by its identity. In my experience, discussions about TRHS (or its feature film counterpart) focus on the passionate fan base, the rituals and activities done throughout the show (i.e. throwing objects during specific scenes), or the work’s focus on transvestites and the resulting legacy in a culture that’s (mostly) welcoming of the LGBT community. People rarely discuss how these elements unite to create an experience that’s one part talk show, one part viewing party, and pure fun. The plot follows newlyweds Brad Majors and Janet Weiss, whose car breaks down during a rainstorm. While walking through the storm to find shelter and a telephone, they come across a castle housing enigmatic and deviant individuals who relish the opportunity to corrupt the sheltered married couple. From there, as Brad and Janet gradually indulge their sexual temptations and become more corrupt, the narrative gradually veers develops into a hazy, sex-fueled trip that ends with space travel. The production has an air of uncertainty and deviance permeating everything, even the preshow. A strange haze surrounds the stage. There’s a strangely routine atmosphere amongst the au-

Bruce Vasselin

Almost serious, but not really.

dience, as men and women clad in lingerie and pale make-up shuffle throughout the theatre finding seats. Some of the audience honk horns in response to one another. The crowd grows increasingly giddy. The lights dim, the crowd cheers, and the lone figure on stage is the narrator of the play. Rocky Horror’s narrator serves the dual roles of narration and banter with the audience. He tells sexual jokes of every variety. He acknowledges the playful barbs

from the audience, telling one member “if I wanted my comeback I’d scrape it off your mother’s teeth!” and generally acts as a talk show host delivering an opening monologue. This role is ripe with pressure to keep the audience engaged, but Chris Mooney is more than suited for the role. Another standout is URSU President Nathan Sgrazzutti as Brad. He plays the straight-laced (and wound too tightly), self-obsessed goofball role with enthusiasm and

no signs of stage fright. If you ever wanted to see Sgrazzutti parade around in an impromptu lingerie show, your strangely specific interest is entertained here. The chances of our student body president gallivanting in women’s underwear again are considered somewhat unlikely. Really, all the actors proved fit for the heavy lifting demanded of their roles. Zane Buchanan is fabulous and slightly deranged as Frank N Furter, capable of working under any conditions (when his stage mic came loose he re-attached it and claimed in character that he was adjusting his sex toy). Braeden Woods proved he had the both the singing and acting chops to breathe life into his role as the hunchbacked Riff Raff. One of TRHS’ defining traits is the Amazing Phantoms. For those unfamiliar, the Phantoms act as lingerie and leather-clad extras serving various functions in the play. They do everything from interact with the characters (terrorizing Brad and Janet) to acting as scenery (Phantoms will line up to act as a giant door, shuffling to the side when a character opens the makeshift door). The Phantoms add to the show’s identity as a unique, genuinely intriguing theatrical piece rather than a humorous celebration of sexual deviance. Audience participation acts as both communal bonding and an unexpected level of immersion for the play. Actions like the audience snapping rubber gloves in unison

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serve as playful participation that contribute to the show’s tone. Other moments like the audience spraying water guns to simulate rain, or blowing bubbles during a wedding scene act as moments of surprising immersion that elevate audience participation beyond mere gimmickry. TRHS’ reputation as an infamously strange spectacle is not incorrect, but there’s far more to the show than it is credited. Although the production ended on Oct. 27, everything I’ve examined can apply to previous and future productions alike. The show never strays too far from its giddy, sleazy, sardonic tone and it’s this self-effacing, “almost serious but not really” tone that earns the play its reputation. The production’s greatest strength however is its stalwart efforts to entertain and immerse first time viewers while enticing them to come to the party next year. TRHS is a machine intricately arranged gears working in highly refined unison. TRHS is method masquerading as madness.

Give me something good to eat! Doesn’t matter the age, we still want candy. destiny kaus a & c writer

“Trick or treat! Smell my feet! Give me something good to eat!” Does there ever come a time in life where individuals should not chant this line at a stranger’s doorstep? Perhaps when kids hit high school or when adults bear their own children? According to a variety of university students, adults, and parents in and around Regina, Canadian culture doesn’t necessarily set a specific age. “Generally I think people should quit trick or treating when they are about the grade six age.” “I stopped going out once I hit grade ten, so I guess about 15.” “Personally, I don't think you're ever too old to dress up and go trick or treating especially if you do it in a group, or as a family, and you dress up with your kids and go have fun.” “I think as long as they’re willing to actually put in the effort to dress up and go out to get candy, I’d give them candy.” One particular father of two admitted to trick or treating well into his thirties. “The last time I went out I was over 30 years old and I did it just for the fun of it. I was not a tall

insidenanabreadshead.wordpress.com

Another good thing about Canada: we don’t age limit our trick or treaters

man by stature, and I dressed up so that the folks wouldn’t recognize me. I remember one of the things I wore was a real gas mask, and I had a blast going to the houses of people I knew and ‘tricking’ them into giving me treats.” This champ of a man is my hero. My goodness gracious, if society had half the guts to trick or

treat up to and past age 30, the world would be a happier place. Sometimes, I think adults forget what it’s like to be kids. As per usual, children love Halloween. When I asked four kids ranging in age from two to ten, “What’s your favourite part of Halloween?” I received these answers: “Being a princess!”

“We get to see all the costumes and everyone decorate their houses.” “Candy!” “Getting candy from the door.” Such sweet, little gems. Kids clearly know what’s up when it comes to Halloween. To my surprise, parents didn’t view Halloween (AKA: Go-out-and-get-as-much-candy-

as-possible) as a potential health risk. Sandy Sargent, a mother of a two-year-old, eight-year-old, and ten-year-old, states that “It’s once a year. My children are not fat. And one night of candy isn’t going to make a person fat.” I concur. One night of excessive overdosing on sweet treats will not sincerely affect a young child’s health. But, what about the fact that parents let their kids go knocking on strangers’ door asking for candy? While parents realize this potential risk, they also have their feet firmly planted in the reality that on Halloween, most kids go out in groups or with their parents. Sargent also says that “Kids don’t just go down a deserted road with one house on it.” All in all, I believe that the risks of Halloween are overrated. Kids and adults alike should feel free to just dress up, go get some candy, and have some fun.


the film cellar

the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013

The Crow (1994)

Beetlejuice (1988)

This supernatural revenge action flick packs, well, maybe not a creepy punch, but it’s a great Halloween movie on merit of its dark plot line, intense visuals, and controversial on-set death of lead actor Brandon Lee. One year after rock star Eric Draven and his fiancé’s death, he is resurrected, sent to avenge their murders. To add to this movie’s tantalizing (or cheesy) sense of creepiness, is the real life myth of a curse. Brandon Lee was fatally shot during filming, fuelling myths of the “Lee family curse.” I would suggest The Crow to anyone who wants an alternative or unique movie. /taylor marshall

While over twenty years old, and amidst the gaudy film effects of the late eighties, Beetlejuice remains a constant contender in the search for comedic, yet thrilling, late-night October movie sessions. Beetlejuice, in his black and white striped suit and mildly disturbing make-up, remains the reason why adults of the now twenty-something age category, still refuse to speak the thrice-uttered name in remembrance of their first ghostly experience. /taylor rattray

Basket Case (1982) Duane is a little like Forrest Gump, in that he’s a simpleton, and is carrying a mysterious allegorical box. Whereas Forrest Gump’s box contains stupid chocolates, Duane’s box contains his inhumanly deformed Siamese brother, who has decided to take vengeance on those who separated them. When Duane finds true love, and his brother escapes, bloody hilarity ensues. /kyle leitch

Frankenweenie (2012) Shockingly, this is not a terrible movie, but wow, is it ever creepy. Frankenweenie tells the story of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein with unique twists. Instead of Victor Frankenstein creating a monster out of human parts, young Victor (an aspiring young scientist), attempts to bring his dog back to life. The story itself is rather predictable, especially if one is familiar with the original. The beginning of the movie is boring but the plot picks up so it’s not a complete waste of time. It would definitely interest English and Science buffs out there who parallel this movie with the original Frankenstein. /destiny kaus Halloween: The Curse Michael Myers (1995)

of

The movie starts out with a decent story line, but is quickly ruined once the characters begin dropping like flies, as Michael Myers (the boogieman) kills them in a variety of fashions. I found myself chuckling at ol’ Myers, because he doesn’t run after his victims. He simply walks after them. How on earth is this even scary? As cheesy horror music plays in the background, characters channel their stupidity and let Myers catch up to them. If they would’ve just left town right off the bat, they would have saved the time of millions of viewers who had better things to do than watch another terrible horror flick. /dk

Night of the Living Dead (1968) This independent, neo-noir horror film has a plot that that is pretty much summed up in the title of the movie. Blonde ingénue gets chased by zombies into a house. Stud hero keeps her quarantined in the house, fighting off painfully slow-moving zombies. Over-dramatic acting, brain eating, useless damsels that trip on nothing when they run away every damn time and a group of intoxicated-looking zombies that look like they came out of the video for that dreadful new Arcade Fire song. Endearingly awful but way too entertaining not to watch. /lauren neumann

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Troll II (1990) As if the first Troll wasn’t bad enough. A family with a ghostly psychotic grandpa in tow face vegetarian goblins in a backwater town. The horrendous acting and flat-out bad soundtrack make my teeth itch. Highlights include Grandpa telling little Joshua to burn the house down and the popcorn sex scene. Lesson learned: never trust vegetarians. /farron ager

Snow Shark (2012) As if the first Troll wasn’t bad enough. A family with a ghostly psychotic grandpa in tow face vegetarian goblins in a backwater town. The horrendous acting and flat-out bad soundtrack make my teeth itch. Highlights include Grandpa telling little Joshua to burn the house down and the popcorn sex scene. Lesson learned: never trust vegetarians. /fa

[REC] (2007)

Despite what the [REC] franchise has turned into, the first film was so genuinely unnerving; I had to rewatch it for this feature. The gist is that a camera crew is locked inside an apartment building while on a fire station ride along. Shit hits the fan when a firefighter is dropped from eleven stories onto his head, and a peculiar disease starts spreading through the residents like wildfire. Of particular creepiness is in the last 5-10 minutes when the night vision comes on. Those who know what I’m talking about just shuddered collectively. If you were not amongst them, put down that shiny turd Quarantine, and pick up the film that started it all. /kl


the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013 Videodrome (1983)

Evil Dead (1981)

Who doesn’t love Cronenberg? Small time CEO of a television station starts tripping balls after watching a scrambled tortureporn TV show. Make sure you put your children to bed before watching this – hell, even put yourself to bed too because you’re going to trip balls as well. Lesson learned: never watch VHS tapes again. /fa

This horror flick isn’t that scary. Stick five friends in a cabin in the woods and you know something is going down. We’ve got your flesh-possessing demons, but it’s not the screams that get you, it’s the gore. So much blood in so little time! And if I recall correctly, a tree raped a girl in the first 30 minutes? Either way, Evil Dead might make you vomit, but there’s worse out there. /robyn tocker

Donnie Darko (2001) This Halloween, don't settle for that predictable slasher flick with a lack of plot, they are all the same! Watch a movie that makes you think a little, like my Halloween-themed favourite, Donnie Darko. It’s a mind-bending film that features serious issues like schizophrenia and time travel. Lightened up a bit with dark humour, it is entertaining and thought-provoking. At the very least, it is iconographic; I mean, if you picture a pink onesie when I say “bunny suit”, and a clunky machine when I say “time travel”, you have a lot to learn. /laura billett

The Funhouse (1981) When he wasn’t directing entries in the Texas Chainsaw Massacre series, Tobe Hooper made films in the same vein as Roger Corman; hilariously awful. One such film is 1981’s The Funhouse, a delightful romp in which four oversexed teenagers decide to spend the night in a carnival funhouse. They are then killed off one by one by a deformed child wearing a Frankenstein mask. Some of the visual effects aren’t bad for the time, but you really need to like Bmovies to stomach this one. /kl

Scary Movie (2000) It starts off as any bad scary movie, accidental death and all, but it only gets worse. With a group of dumb, horny teens and a fumbling serial killer, this movie plays the part of a parody movie. I will admit it does get a few laughs, especially when the killer gets high with his victims. And the ending is a twist, despite its mediocre plot. Suddenly it doesn’t surprise me how this has a handful of sequels./ rt

Chopper Chicks in Zombietown (1989)

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approved.

/Shaadie

Gas! -Or- It Became Necessary to Destroy the World in Order to Save It (1970) Speaking of Roger Corman, what Halloween movie list would be complete without a Corman entry? In a directorial filmography that has about as many entries as the average porn star (a lot), Gas stands out as a particularly awful film. The Earth is flooded with a poisonous gas for some reason that kills anyone over the age of twenty-five … for some reason. Honestly, I can’t even really recommend it or not, because I don’t remember much except for that plot. I guess it couldn’t have been that bad, then. /kl

Dark Floors (2008) Heavy Metal and Horror on their own are great, not so much when put together. A father-daughter combo tries to leave a hospital when all hell breaks loose. Guest starring Lordi in what is essentially an extended promotional video. I don’t know what the hell is going on, for all I know, it’s the kid’s fault. Lesson learned: don’t ever have kids. /fa

The Shrine (2010) Americans lost in “Poland,” what could go wrong? You’ve got three plucky journalists versus badly accented, crossbow-wielding cultists and a demonic statue. That being said, it’s not actually that bad of a movie and has a pretty interesting twist to it. Lesson learned: never go to Europe. /fa

film cellar

13


rituals

ROUNDTABLE

Editor: Autumn McDowell sports@carillonregina.com the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013

anaesrock.blogspot.com

Every day is Halloween, when you’re a Rider fan.

taylor sockett, paige kreutzwieser, autumn mcdowell, britton gray, braden dupuis, brady lang crawled out from the depths to become this week’s roundtable

If you had to dress up as one professional athlete for Halloween this year, which one would it be and why? Sockett: Alex Ovechkin, mainly because he’s the scariest looking athlete I can think of – a face only a mother could love.

Kreutzwieser: Anthony Davis, because a unibrow is a really cheap and easy costume.

McDowell: I could go as the female MMA fighter, Cyborg, but she’s far too scary and I don’t want to have nightmares. So, in that case, I think I would go as Calgary Stampeders butt wipe Jon Cornish. All I would need is a cone head mask really.

Gray: If I had to dress as a professional athlete I would go as Dennis Rodman because he already looks like he is out of a really bad B-Budget horror film.

Dupuis: I would dress as Zdeno Chara because Halloween is supposed to be scary and I’ve had nightmares about that God-awful mug with its hideous, gap-toothed smile and ancient fish breath. The guy is straight out of a book of ancient Halloween folklore.

Lang: As much as I hate the Stamps I could go as Jon Cornish, but I’d be afraid of how cold my ass would be after a night of it hanging out.

Which professional athlete would you say most resembles Frankenstein’s monster?

Sockett: Jon Cornish. That big old melon he sports on top of his shoulders possibly could have been a dug up buffalo head, however Frankenstein’s monster was much less of a douche bag.

Kreutzwieser: Anthony Davis, obviously.

McDowell: I think I would have to go with Washington Capitals forward Alexander Ovechkin. Mostly because that is one ugly mug, and also because he walks just like the real monster – almost as if he has a stick up his ass.

Gray: I would say that the athlete that most reminds me of Frankenstein’s monster is Taylor Hall, a few years ago when he got sliced across the face with a skate. Did you see that scar? Scary stuff. Dupuis: I’m pretty sure that Zdeno Chara actually is Frankenstein’s monster. Have you seen that face? His eyes aren’t even fucking level. Someone definitely rushed that job while they were reanimating his monstrous Slovakian corpse. Maybe they were too busy trying to bang the hump out of Lucic’s disgusting, unnatural back.

Lang: Zdeno Chara comes to mind, he definitely has the height and the facial structure.

If it was your job to pick the costume for your favourite professional athlete. What would you make them be? Sockett: I would dress Matt Ryan up as Tom Brady. Maybe then my Falcons will stand a chance of winning.

Kreutzwieser: I’d make Joe Carter dress up as FrankensteinAnthony-Davis because I think that would be amazing.

McDowell: I think I would make Edmonton Eskimos offensive lineman, Tyrone Novikoff, dress up as Fat Bastard from Austin Powers. One, because he was the biggest guy I could find on the Eskimos roster, of whom the Riders will crush this weekend. And, two, because I find Fat Bastard funny.

Gray: Well I would try to dress them up as something ridiculous, such as the pink energizer bunny. The funny part is that I think Erik Karlsson would actually go along with it.

Dupuis: I would put a mask on Zdeno Chara. Any mask. Because he’s ugly.

Lang: In spirit of the World Series and Big Papi, I think I’d need a few gallons of green paint and a white ripped XXL t-shirt to make him the Hulk. Which professional athlete do

you think could eat the most candy in a single sitting?

Sockett: Since sports editor McDeezy is not a professional athlete, I’ll have to go with Riders offensive lineman Ben Heenan. He looks like he could pack away candy like it’s his day job, which it kind of is. Kreutzwieser: You thought I was going to say Anthony Davis didn’t you. Charles Barkley, circa 2010.

McDowell: The obvious answer is some type of sumo wrestler, but then I remembered that the person needed to be an athlete, so that’s out. My next answer would be any offensive lineman on any team. Perhaps they are still not an athlete, but at least it’s essentially their job is to eat. Gray: Is there even a debate about this? Zdeno Chara looks like he can eat more than 20 normal humans, so some candy wouldn’t even be a problem for him.

Dupuis: Judging by his teeth, Zdeno Chara eats all the candy at every Halloween party ever. Zing! Lang: San Francisco Giants first basemen Pablo Sandoval looks like he’s crushed a few Reese’s in his day. Couple pillowcases would do him well. Which professional athlete’s house would you most want to go trick-or-treating at?

As much as I hate the Stamps I could go as Jon Cornish, but I’d be afraid of how cold my ass would be after a night of it hanging out.

Brady Lang

Sockett: Any one would do, they’re rich, and money equals copious amounts of candy.

Kreutzwieser: Always got to throw a Brian Wilson answer in wherever I can – A) he would have the most outrageous costume and decorations and B) is officially insane, so he’d probably have some interesting candy.

McDowell: They’re all filthy rich, so any of them would be pretty great, except for maybe Chicago Blackhawks forward Patrick Kane. I fear he would beat me up if I tried to take two candy bars instead of just one. Just to be on the safe side, I think I would want to go to former boxer George Foreman’s house. With a net worth of $250 million, surely he would be giving away those delicious looking grills. Gray: I would want to go to Patrick Kane’s house because he would probably be throwing a raging party and I would hopefully get invited in and then just get drunk that night.

Dupuis: Kory Sheets stars in this year’s must-see Halloween spookfest, The Arrogance. When an egomaniacal demon possesses the star running-back, he devolves into angry, childish outbursts and a series of blatantly misogynistic tweets. Can Kory Sheets save his soul, and overcome The Arrogance? *Spoiler: No.

Lang: Alex Rodriguez’ house, could get PED’s in my treat bag and then egg his house for good measure afterwards.


Rams players say good-bye the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013

rituals 15

Five players don the horns for the last time.

Graduating players career highlights: Kolton Solomon

After signing with the Saskatchewan Roughriders for a second time in 2013, Solomon returned to the Rams for his final year of eligibility – something Rams fans were extremely grateful for. This year with the Rams, Solomon earned the most all-purpose yards on the team with 622, while averaging 95.4 yards per game. He also tied for a team-high four touchdowns and easily earns the award for most swag. Solomon will always be remembered for his clutch plays and incredible athleticism.

Taylor Wandler

Arthur Ward

Brady Aulie takes to the field for the last time.

brady lang sports writer

The Rams season is now all but a memory after a 33-15 loss to the No. 10 CIS ranked inter provincial rival, the University of Saskatchewan Huskies. After a long, grueling season for the Green and Gold, the Rams now have to focus on next season while saying goodbye to numerous veterans around the football club. The Rams will be saying goodbye to fifth-year players wide receiver Kolten Solomon, punter/kicker Taylor Wandler, slotback Mark McConkey, defensive back Brady Aulie and defensive lineman Logan Brooks. These five veterans will be missed greatly around the young club. While these players have shared many memories together, for slotback Mark McConkey, he believes that he will miss the lifelong relationships made within the locker room the most. “Being in the locker room and hanging out with the guys will be the toughest part for me, being around the team even in the offseason doing workouts with the guys,” he said. “Building those lifelong friendships will be tough to walk away from.” McConkey spent five years with the Rams and was chosen as a Canada West All Star in 2011. In 33 games with the club McConkey caught 180 passes while amassing 1991 yards in his time with the squad. “It’s hard to pick one, but if I had to choose it would probably be back in 2008 catching a touchdown from Teale Orban in the endzone,” said the slot back when

asked about his best moment as a Ram. “Guys on the team realized this young kid can actually play.” McConkey ended his tenure as the all-time receptions leader in Canada West history and 21st in career receiving yards in the Canada West history books. When

Greenall and just moving on with teaching with my life. Someday I’d like to coach whether it’s with the Rams or in High School, that’s the lifelong plan.” McConkey along with the four other Rams will be missed, yet there is definitely optimism for

Arthur Ward “...those lifelong friendships will be tough to walk away from.” – Mark McConkey

asked about what’s next in his lifelong plans the Calgary native says he plans to continue on with teaching. “I think I’m done with football. I don’t think I’ll have a chance to play in the CFL or anything like that, which is fine for me. I’ve known that for a while now,” said McConkey. “I’m interning now in

the future of the club. The young offensive line now will have another year of experience under their belts and firstyear CIS quarterback – and fourth-year quarterback – Caymon Shutter will be used to the Canadian game after seven games with the club in 2013. Leading receivers Addison Richards and slot

back Jared Janotta will be entering their fourth and fifth years respectively. The young Rams can take positives from each and every game this season and use the experience for the upcoming years of the program. The squad’s 2-6 record could have been improved early on after two tough losses against Saskatchewan and Calgary, so the clubs record definitely wasn’t a direct indication of how the team played. Although it’s easy to pick and prod at what could have been done differently for the club, the truth is that 2013 is now history and that fans and players can look forward to the 2014 edition of the Regina Rams. Here at the Carillon and students around the University would like to thank Kolten Solomon, Taylor Wandler, Mark McConkey, Brady Aulie and Logan Brooks that are now graduated out of the football program and wish them luck in their future endeavors.

After spending his first three years shadowing former Rams star punter Chris Bodner, Wandler was able to come into his own this year. Wandler lead the team in points with 46, while averaging 39.1 yards per punt – including three that were greater than 50 yards. Wandler’s successor is likely to be Zach Schmidt, who will be heading into his fifthyear with the Rams.

Brady Aulie

Finishing the season with 23 solo tackles and assisting in 12 others, Aulie was constantly a defensive force this season. In addition to his presence on defence, Aulie also took over the teams returning duties for a period of time, which was highlighted by a 45-yard kick return against the Calgary Dinos in 2011. Aulie will be remembered for laying out the opposition, and for being that guy on the team with a famous family member. His cousin is currently a member of the Tampa Bay Lightning in the NHL.

Logan Brooks

Heading into his final year with the Rams, Brooks was riding an impressive string of 32 consecutive conference games played. This year he lead the Rams with 3.5 sacks and two forced fumbles, while also registering one fumble recovery. Possibly the greatest highlight will be his interception against UBC on Oct. 13, 2012, which he then carried for 38-yards. Brooks will leave the Rams holding a place in their history books as he currently holds the top spot in the school in multiple categories including tackles for a loss with 27.5, quarterback sacks with 14 and yards from sacks with 94.


Pretty damn proud 16 rituals

the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013

Regina Thunder make history with an upset over defending champions paige kreutzwieser staff writer

It’s official – the Regina Thunder stopped the four-peat. In the Prairie Football Conference (PFC) Championship, Regina’s junior football team upset the three-year defending champions Saskatoon Hilltops in a 21-16 win on Oct. 27. Head coach Scott MacAulay was positive going into the game. “The last time we played the Hilltops was in Saskatoon and we were able to beat them,” said MacAulay, stating that the only loss the Hilltops had throughout the season was from the Regina squad. “It’s definitely going to give us a little more confidence going into the game, that [Saskatoon] can be beaten.” In his first year as head coach, MacAulay was confident with the team this season. “We’ve got 77 great guys in the locker room and they all seem to be backing each other up, on and off the field,” he said. MacAulay stated it was an easy transition going from specialteams co-ordinator and linebackers coach to the head coaching position, stating the Thunder organization laid down the ground work for him coming in. “They allowed me to take it from where [previous head coach Erwin Klempner] had left it, and

rodpederson.com

So many lips have touched that. Ew.

build on past successes and stay the course,” MacAulay added. However, MacAulay did want to see a couple changes. “We had to make sure we tidied things up a little bit as well,” he said. “The biggest thing I’ve seen the team improve on this year is that we are a lot more united, talking about accountability both on and off the field and taking ownership and trying to make the team a better team.” And better they are. The Thunder’s record was 5-21 going into the playoffs, improv-

ing from their 4-4 record in 2012. The junior team also boasted five PFC All Stars this year – all which are current U of R students: defensive back Chris Tunnicliffe, receivers Mitch Thompson and Will Heward, offensive lineman Max Ziegler, and quarterback Asher Hastings. Hastings was also named Most Valuable Player for the PFC, sharing the award with quarterback Ryan Marsch of the Winnipeg Rifles. “[Hastings] is tall, he’s got a really strong arm and he under-

Future champions

stands the game of football,” said MacAulay of his starting QB. “But, I think the biggest asset with him is he’s a true leader and the guys look up to him.” Tunnicliffe was the only defensive player to clinch an all- star spot but “it doesn't portray our defense the way it really is,” stated MacAulay. “There should easily be two or three other guys that should have been all stars on the defensive side and maybe our guys can use that as a little bit of energy or motivation for the upcoming game.”

The defence proved themselves in the championship game, holding the Hilltops to a total of 15 first downs and 213 passing yards. Hastings was able to connect with 25 of his 37 passes dominating over the Hilltops 13 for 32. Heward topped both teams with 167 receiving yards, and Thunder running back Nick Brown went for 108-yards rushing, with Jared Andreychuck of the Hilltops coming in second with 64 yards. MacAulay joked that the reason many players chose playing junior football over university ball is likely because of the “good coaching.” However, as a Thunder alumni himself, MacAulay knows that the opportunity to play in the PFC is a great place to grow as a player. “It’s an opportunity to get bigger, faster, stronger and more experience playing at a high level,” he said. “It also gives them an opportunity to figure out what they want to do in life.” The boys should be happy with the decision to play junior football. They now have Regina’s first PFC title under their belts, and will be heading to the national championship. They will be taking on the Vancouver Island Raiders in Regina on Nov. 9 for the Canadian Bowl.

Sports writer Brady Lang predicts the World Series outcome brady lang sports writer

An old baseball coach of mine once said, “If you can individually outplay the other teams player at the same position, and we can all do that as a team, you’re going to win baseball games.” For that reason, and that reason only, the Boston Red Sox will win the 2013 World Series. I know you’re opening up the paper right now and you’re either saying “this guy is totally wrong” or “this guy hit the nail on the head” as the World Series will likely be completed at this time. Right now, I’m just watching the last few outs of game four, and there it is, the Red Sox have tied the series at two. Positionally, the Red Sox definitely have the upper hand in the series. No other team in the Majors works harder defensively; this can be seen before games when the Red Sox go through their defensive drills – something no other team in the Majors does. Offensively, the club has come up with timely hits – see David Ortiz’s grand slam in the American League Championship Series or Shane Victorino’s grand slam to send the team to the World Series. The Red Sox are also always a threat to score, powered by the

wbur.org

He’s ripping his shirt open. That’s odd.

likes of Ortiz, Victorino, Xander Bogaerts, Mike Napoli, and of course team veteran Dustin Pedroia just to name a few. Shortstop Bogaerts has been phenomenal for the Red Sox thus far in the MLB post season, hitting .316 in the playoffs including four extra base hits. The rookie only played 18 games during the 2013 season, but became a mainstay with the team during their postseason run. But individual play hasn’t brought the Red Sox this far. This team is built to win a

championship. The team chemistry the Red Sox possess is something that can’t be taught and honestly could not have been predicted at the start of the season. After last season’s sub-par effort with manager Bobby Valentine at the helm, the Red Sox made numerous moves during the latter of last fall and all throughout the off-season including the firing of Valentine and the acquisition of former Red Sox pitching coach and two-year manager of the Toronto Blue Jays, John Farrell, which turned out to be the perfect

fit for the Red Sox team. Farrell gave the Red Sox a stable, even-tempered manager that was a huge change over from the high-tempered Valentine. Farrell is also a lot like former team manager Terry Francona who lead the team to its first championship since 1918 in 2004 and then again in 2007. The two worked together from 2007-11 and their temperament definitely helps the team succeed. On the other hand, the St. Louis Cardinals pitching staff is stellar and one of, if not the best, in the

game today. Pitcher Adam Wainwright is the perennial ace of the staff and 19-game winner this season. For lack of a better word, this man is scary when he gets on the mound. He has the ability to dominate games, much like a lot of the rest of the Cardinals staff. The rest of the Cards staff features rookie Michael Wacha, Joe Kelly and Lance Lynn. The Red Sox are countering with John Lester, John Lackey, Clay Buchholz and Jake Peavy. All in all, as the Carillon heads to press, this series is now sitting at a best of three, first one to two wins get the title. Unpredictability makes baseball the greatest game on Earth and let’s be honest, this World Series is all up in the air, let the best team win.


the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013

rituals 17

A woman’s guide to surviving hockey season Female journalist attempts to help women. lauren murphy the ryersonian

TORONTO (CUP) – Ladies, I know some of you are as crazy about hockey as your significant others, if not more so. But if you’re like me, the sound of those skates on the ice is like nails on a chalkboard. If you’re part of this sisterhood of women attached to men who, in late September, turn into jersey-wearing, beer-chugging, hockey-obsessed bros with the onset of the NHL hockey season, and don’t feel that same passion yourself, we’re here to help. We’ve compiled a list of tips, tricks and facts to get you through

this painful time. You’re welcome.

1. Do not, under any circumstances, talk about last season’s playoffs. My partner reminds me of why fan is derived from the word fanatic. He broke down last year after the ‘Buds’ lost to the Boston Bruins in Game 7 of the first round of the playoffs in a game where they were up 4-1 in the third period. I’m talking full-on, lying-on-theground, face-down moping. I had the same reaction to the end of the Harry Potter books, so I sympathize. Regardless, I’d avoid any jokes

about ‘choking’ or asking questions like, “When was the last time they actually won the Stanley Cup?” They likely won’t remember anyway. (Zing!) 2. Venturing into the belly of the beast: The ACC

Some like to take their support for their partners team to a next level and actually go to a game. Power to you. We advise anyone going to the Air Canada Centre to eat beforehand. Poutine might be calling your name, but don’t cave in unless you are looking to stock up on empty calories while your partner guzzles beer and fights off feisty fans with finger-licking-good and

greasy chicken wings. Basically the healthiest thing you can buy is the water. And even then you’re shelling out $5 for something you could get out of the bathroom taps at halftime. Once the game ends, prepare for the subway swarm. The construction at Union Station provides the best platform for meeting unknown drunken strangers that are most likely going to be extremely irritable when the Leafs end up losing the game. Funnelling through Union Station with crowds of unknown and inebriated strangers could be fun if you like being stuck inside a sardine can. The highlight is the unpredictable sights you see sleeping

on the subway. It’s a three-dollar hotel for some. 3. Finally, don’t cancel the cable.

I tried this, thinking that it would mean I would never have to again hear a commentator scream “HOLY MACINAW” from the television three or more nights a week. I was wrong. Streaming is now an option, and coupled with the pun-filled official commentary, you’ll hear endless griping about the speed of the internet. Just bunker down people. Go Leafs Go….I guess.

I don’t need a guide, thanks

blogs.thescore.com

Autumn’s getting upset.

CUP article demeans female hockey fans. what the puck? autumn mcdowell sports editor

I chose to write my column this week in response to an article, which appeared on the Canadian University Press, which claims to be “A woman’s guide to surviving hockey season.” I believe that this article is very demeaning to female hockey fans and portrays all women as mindless humans which are set to cater to their partners needs – albeit heterosexual partners. While I understand that this is just one person’s opinion, and that there is mention that some women may be as intense or rather “as crazy” about hockey as their counterparts, it still makes my blood boil. This article blatantly states that the writer has come up with tips and tricks “If you’re part of this sisterhood of women attached to men” who like hockey. Immediately, this article is heteronorma-

tive and assumes that women are not only mindless beings “attached” to people – as if women are unable to get away and think for themselves – but they are only going to be with men. Homosexuality is not an option, apparently because either no women are homosexual, or no women like hockey. After revealing its heteronormativity, this article then proceeds with saying that if a woman actually decides to go to “take their support for their partners team to a next level and actually go to a game. Power to you.” According to this, women are not only abnormal for liking

hockey, they also deserve kudos for taking an interest in what their partner enjoys – because no relationship is about compromise. It is people like this who make my life extremely hard. Since this article was written by a female, and was then selected by another female to receive national coverage, I would expect them to be supportive of women who like hockey, and saying “more power to them,” rather than giving more power to those who graciously go to the game, not because they want to, but because they are attached to their male partner. If I can’t even count on my fellow females to support me, then I am

not quite sure who I can count on. I believe that articles should be written in support of women who are trying to make their own place in a gentleman’s club, and showcase female talent on the court, field or ice rather than promoting a guide designed especially for women. Since judging by this article, women are too dumb to know about the playoffs and too stubborn to enjoy the greasiest food at the game. After all, at the sight of a delicious poutine, women shouldn’t “cave in unless you are looking to stock up on empty calories while your partner guzzles beer.” Women also inherently do not

Since judging by this article, women are too dumb to know about the playoffs and to stubborn to enjoy the greasiest food at the game.

Autumn McDowell

enjoy tipping back a tall one at the game apparently and shouldn’t take in unnecessary calories that may ruin their physique. Speak for yourself. Instead of supporting female hockey fans who try find their own place in this male-dominated society and work hard to fit in amongst the crowd at the rink, this article gives people more of a reason to not trust a female’s opinion and not be taken seriously. After all, women need to have a guide written in order to be able to survive a sport. Although this guide is demeaning to any woman who dreams of having a career in sports journalism, or who simply enjoys hockey for that matter, it is now getting national recognition on the Canadian University Press website and is considered a top example of student sports journalism because of this.


In honour of Alice Munro’s historic reception of the Nobel Prize in Literature, the Carillon has put together a list of great works in Canadian Literature. As you will see on the next page, this includes anything from novels to lyrics. Essentially, we were tired of people saying, “there’s no good Canadian lit” or “I don’t like reading Canadian literature” without being able to name a couple works. This feature will change that. We haven’t mentioned everything here, not nearly all the great works. Send us the works we didn’t mention: this is will show the extensive nature of the Canadian body of literature.

thestar.com

Alice Munro has toast with Margaret Atwood. This was “news.”

The hope here is recognition, and if we recognize our past literary tradition and achievement, it’ll pave the way for the future of Canadian literature. P.S when I first heard that one Bret Easton Ellis said Munro was overrated and the Nobel Prize a “joke,” I first asked “who?” and “he must have won the prize a while ago to judge it being a ‘joke’, no?”

michael chmielewski editor-in-chief

Now that your pictures in the paper being rhythmically adm i r e d N o w that your pictures in the paper being rhythmically admired And you can have anyone you have ever desired, All you gotta tell me now is why, why, why. Now that your pictures in the paper being rhythmically admired And you can have anyone that you have ever desired, All you gotta tell me now is why, why, why.Now your pictures in the paper being rhythmically admired And you can have anyone that you have ever desired, All you gotta tell me now is why, why, why. Welcome to the workin week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope kill you. You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. All of your family had to kill to survive, And they're still waitin for their big day to arrive. But if they knew how I felt theyd bury me alive. Welcome to the workin week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope kill you. You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. Ilook. hear you sayin, hey, the citys alright, When only read about it in books. Spend all your money the Carillon: gettin so convinced That you never even bother to Sometimes I wonder if were livin in the same land, Why dyou wanna be my friend when feel like a juggler Running out of hands? Welcome to the workin week, oh, welcome working week. celebrating Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope kill you. Welcome to the workin week. You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. All of your family had to kill to survive, And they're still waitin for their big day to arrive. But if they knew how I felt theyd bury me alive. Welcome to Canadian literature the workin week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope kill you. You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. Ilook. hear you sayin, hey, the citys alright, When only read about it in books. Spend all your money gettin so convinced That you never even bother to since 1962 Sometimes I wonder if were livin in the same land, Why dyou wanna be my friend when feel like a juggler Running out of hands? Welcome to workin week, oh, welcome the working week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope kill you. Welcome to the workin week. You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. All of your family had to kill to survive,Now that your pictures in the paper being rhythmically adm i r e d N o w that your pictures in the paper being rhythmically admired And you can have anyone you have ever desired, All you gotta tell me now is why, why, why. Now that your pictures in the paper being rhythmically adm i r e d N o w that your pictures in the paper being rhythmiNow rhythmically admired And you can have anyone that you have ever desired, All you gotta tell me now is why, why, why. Welcome to the workin week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope kill you. You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. All of your family had to kill to survive, And they're still waitin for their big day to arrive. But if they knew how felt theyd bury me alive. Welcome to the workin week. Oh itI don't thrill you,I Iknow hope kill you.


the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013

N o w h a t y o u r p i c tmired u r e s in the paper b e i n g rhythm i ca a l l y a d mired N o w ty h a t y o u r p i c u r e s in the paper b e i n g rhythi cm a l l y d A n d o u a n h a v e n y o ty h a t e v e r d e sired, A l l o u g o t t a e l m e now is w h y , why. N w h a t y o u r p i c tmired u r e s in the paper b e i n g rhythi cm a l l y a d A n d y o u a n h a v e n y o tp h a t e v e r d e sired, A l y o u g o t t a e l l m e now is w h y , why.N o w tmired h a t y o u r i c u r e s in the paper b e i n g rhythm i co a l l y a d A n d y o u a n h a v e n y tA h a t e v e r d e sired, l l y o u g o t t a e l m e now is , w h y W e l cwhy. o m to the worki n eek. Oh I n o w ik d o n ' t tyou. h r i l l you, h p e i l W e l ckill o m to the worki n w eek. Y o u g t t a do it te i l l you're throu gh so you better get to it. All of y o u r family had sthey'r u r vive, A n d still waitin o tfBut h e i r b i g day to arrive. if h e y k n e w how I e l t eyd u r m e alive. W e l cn o m to the worki w eek. Oh I n o w ik t o n ' td h r i l l you, h p e i l you. W e l cy o m to the worki n w eek. Y o u g t t a do it tright, i l l you're throu gh so you better get to it. Ictsayin, hear o u h e y , h e i t y s a l When o n l y rtin e a d about it in books. Spend a l l y o u r mone getso cvince n d T h a t o u never e v e n bothe rSometo look. tIw i m e s wonder if evfeel e ld in the sfriend ayh m land, W h y oeribe u wann a m n Iw

can. lit. 19

tell us about your favourite Canadian literature at www. carillonregina.com

extraordinarycanadians.com

Mordecai Richler

Beatrice and Virgil Beatrice and Virgil is the better of Yann Martel’s two famous novels. It comes from arguably one of Canada’s greatest present novelists. The book is allegorical, it has a great narrative, and is refreshing to read. Life of Pi also deserves an honourable mention, but Beatrice and Virgil takes the cake. /michael chmielewski

Water For Elephants While reading Sara Gruen’s novel Water For Elephants, you’ll enjoy a well written Canadian novel while learning Polish swears. A true win-win. It’s better than the screen adaptation because you don’t have to see Robert Pattinson, but which also stars Christoph Waltz. A truly tough decision. So just read the book./ mc

Anne of Green Gables Anne of Green Gables is a masterpiece, enjoyed equally by children and adults. The book was written by Canadian author Lucy Maud Montgomery with a backdrop in Prince Edward Island The main character is Anne Shirley, a young orphan girl with red hair, freckles, a lively imagination and a vivacious personality who is raised by Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert. Anne’s antics create an enjoyable story, with humor, adventure and romance. The book is exceptional, as Lucy Maud Montgomery possessed a keen insight into human nature, creating colorful and relatable characters. /sarah luyendyk

Lyrics of “Wheat Kings” Gord Downie of the Tragically Hip is a national treasure. The song that resonates the most with me is “Wheat Kings,” from Fully Completely. Chock full of Canadian and prairie imagery, it tells the story of David Milgaard, wrongfully convicted of murder in 1969 and imprisoned until 1992. The lyric "the walls all lined yellow, grey and sinister, hung with pictures of our parents’ prime ministers" evokes the passage of Milgaard's 23 years behind bars; the entire generation and six prime ministers that came and went during his incarceration. Downie and the Hip have found themselves in a place in music that can only exist in Canada. There's always been something intangible about certain Canadian music that American audiences can't grasp that the Hip seems to embody. /neil adams

goodreads.com

JPOD In this rather humorous book, Douglas Coupland examines everyday life at a Vancouver Game Design studio combined with social commentary on various issues. The protagonist, Ethan Jarlewski, and his co-workers (who all have names with the letter J in them) face different and sometimes strange challenges in everyday life. Written like a sitcom, this is definitely a book to lose yourself in when life's travails become a bit much. /liam fitz-gerald

Three Day Road This is my absolute favourite work of Canadian literature. It’s long overdue for a rereading, and should be near the top of your list if you haven’t read it yet. Joseph Boyden’s tale recounts the journey of two young Aboriginal men from Canada fighting in the First

Sara Gruen

fight in the civil war. At times, Jake is lost in his own fantasy. While the plot is a bit complicated at first, Mordecai Richler creates a story with memorable characters that interchanges at times with humor and tragedy. /lf-g

Other Canadas Other Canadas, edited by John Robert Colombo, is an anthology of 38 Canadian-centric science fiction and fantasy from a wide spectrum of literary mediums. There’s really something for everybody in this anthology, from Algernon Blackwood’s horrific short story, “The Wendigo,” to A.E. Van Vogt’s interstellar narrative, “The Black Destroyer,” to Margaret Atwood’s critical essay, “Canadian Monsters.” An excellent, if perhaps a bit dated, anthology for those interested in science fiction and fantasy with a decidedly Canadian perspective. /farron ager

do so much in literary world while privately battling mental health and substance abuse issues for decades. /allan hall

The Diviners Once a banned book, Maragret Laurence’s 1974 publication is an intricate read and one of my favourites. The character’s leading lady, Morag Gunn, is a writer who, throughout the book, covers her life growing up in a small town and how it led her to her life in a prairie farmhouse with her eighteen-year-old daughter. With stunning imagery, it’s easy to see how this book is considered one of Canada’s classics. /robyn tocker The Wars I remember reading this book, Timothy Findley, in grade 12 and wondering what the hell was

90-year-old woman, through her last days of life. This book is depressing, but the fact that it is written so beautifully surpasses the miserable tone. Laurence showcases her creative imagery and attention to detail in all of her descriptions. With smatterings of allusions to the Biblical story of Jacob’s ladder, Laurence displays her ability to intelligently craft this mind-blowing novel. /destiny kaus Crow Lake In Crow Lake, Mary Lawson takes readers through the journey of a young family that faces immense tragedy. Right from the first chapter, Lawson tugs at her readers’ heartstrings when she introduces the main character, Kate, and the bond between the Morrison family. Lawson weaves together an incredible story by piecing together Kate’s past and present life. She makes readers emote with all the characters. /dk

The Blind Assassin Margaret Atwood’s award-winning historical fiction novel published in 2000 presents the reader with a stylistic treat, as Atwood craftily spins an intriguing and chilling tale of two sisters, a fugitive, and betrayal, along the backdrop of post-world war society in Southern Ontario. Atwood’s captivating voice combined with her use of roman à clef, weaving a story within a story, makes this novel a Canadian literary gem. /taylor marshall

abclifeliteracy.ca

Robert Munsch

World War. Throughout the novel the two young men deal with addiction, war, and identity. /mc

St Urbain's Horsemen In this sort-of-but-not-really sequel to The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz, Jake Hirsch— a Montreal college dropout turned filmmaker, facing midlife crisis— faces legal trouble while living in the UK. In the midst of all this, he re-invents his cousin Joey as a warrior who sailed off to Spain to

The Works of Robert Munsch Robert Munsch, who is best known for writing Love You Forever and The Paper Bag Princess, is arguably Canada’s most culturally significant children’s writer ever. He’s authored more than 50 books and has been entertaining Canadians of all ages with a poignant mix of zaniness and loving warmth since he began writing in 1979. He’s an amazing Canadian author that managed to

going on, but this book is simply amazing. It’s got action, drama, romance, and some intense scenes that make you wonder what you’ve gotten yourself into. Robert Ross, the main character, is a Canadian soldier during World War I, so if you’re a history fan, this book will give you a new perspective. /rt The Stone Angel In The Stone Angel, Laurence follows the main character, Hagar, a

The Englishman’s Boy Guy Vanderhaeghe’s work is a historical fiction novel pertaining to the Cypress Hills massacre of 1873. The novel has two separate narratives, Shorty McAdoo and the band of cowboys he rides with, and Harry Vincent, a Saskatchewan-born Hollywood film writer tasked with finding Shorty and learning his story. The novel showcases the brutality of the lawless Wild West and the opulence of early Hollywood. /alec salloum


heresies

Aaron, where art thou? My knees went weak as I felt a wave of emotions hit me like rain of bullets piercing through my skin, numbing almost all of my senses; I could not believe my eyes as the breaking news flashed on my iPhone screen: Aaron Swartz, Internet Activist, dies at 26. I learnt of Aaron Swartz during my first year of college in the US; he was more like a folk hero with a huge following among the IT circles. He was most famous for leading the charge against the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), a legislation proposed in congress to censor the Internet. SOPA was devised to give the government excessive power to regulate the Internet, most importantly the power to shutdown websites in the name of copyright law. Many of you might still recall on Jan. 18, 2012, when Wikipedia staged a blackout with the famous quote “Imagine a world without free knowledge.” The protest grew larger when tech giants such as Google, Facebook, Twitter, Yahoo, Amazon, AOL, Reddit, Mozilla, LinkedIn, eBay, and PayPal joined the protest. SOPA eventually did not pass Congress. If it weren’t for Aaron Swartz and his group of activist friends who spread the awareness of this draconian bill, this bill would have passed Congress silently as mainstream media failed to highlight and focus the merits of this bill, which deeply infringe their first amendment rights. Websites that lurk in the grey area of copyright law such as Wikipedia and Reddit, would have definitely been shutdown. SOPA was a bill that evolved from a bill called Combating Online Infringements and Counterfeits Acts (COICA) and later on into Preventing Real Online Threats to Economic Creativity and Theft of Intellectual Property Act (PIPA). The entertainment industry lobbied immensely by spending millions of dollars to pass the bill, and even going to great lengths of modifying the semantics of the bill to deceive Congress and the people. Aaron Swartz caught wind of COICA in 2010 and started an online petition, which led him to establish demandprogress.org, the catalyst that would bring about the downfall of COICA and the subsequent bills. Aaron Swartz was a computerprograming prodigy. At the age of 14, he played a pivotal role in inventing the RSS feed that is widely used to administer what people read on the Internet. He dropped out of high school but managed to get into Stanford University before dropping out again after his first year to co-found Reddit, the highly popular social networking site. He sold the site for an undisclosed fee, estimated to be around $10m and $20m. Although achieving legendary like status as at a very young age, he wasn’t swayed like many young dot.com millionaires to continue making more and more money. He was an idealist. At the age of 24, he became a Harvard Research fellow, conducting re-

Editor: Farron Ager op-ed@carillonregina.com the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013

Boston Herald

search on political corruption. A relentless advocate of the open access movement, a movement that promotes free and easy access to world’s knowledge on the internet, because as a social activist, he was perturbed by the corrupting control of corporations over institutions. “He was a voracious reader, he would take information and analyze it at a rapid rate and he was thirsty for knowledge about how the world worked and how it could be made better. I’ve never

met anyone so single-minded about changing the world,” says Stinebrickner-Kauffman, Aaron Swartz’s girlfriend to the Guardian. On the Jan. 11, 2013, it would be Stinebrickner-Kauffman who found Aaron Swartz dead in the Brooklyn apartment that they shared together. Aaron hanged himself with his own belt. Why would he commit suicide? One could go with the standard explanations of depression and etc. but the reality is according to

friends and family it was an enormous federal investigation that drove him to commit suicide. He was facing 13 felony charges and facing up to 50 years in prison. My god, what did he do to receive that kind of a punishment? He plugged in his laptop in a comcloset in MIT and speedily downloaded academic papers from this site called JSTOR, an online publishing company that distributes scholarly articles written by academics, and sells them at a high price to subscribers. None of the

money went to the academics but instead goes to the publishers. Swartz was unhappy of this system as it not only charged large fees to access these articles, did not remunerate the authors, and worse; it assured that many people were denied access to the academic writing produced by American colleges and universities This was such an ‘atrocious’ act that JSTOR did not want press criminal charges, on top of that JSTOR did not even want to pursue civil charges. JSTOR didn’t think it was a big deal. No, the government decided that he deserved 50 years of jail time! The charges were ludicrous, even armed robbers got a maximum sentence of 25 years. Keep in mind that Aaron Swartz did not hack into JSTOR; he already had access to those journals, as he was a Harvard fellow. The only crime that government could prove was that he had violated the terms of service of his contract with JSTOR for downloading mass academic papers at a high speed and intending to make them free. The prosecutorial team led by Carmen Ortiz refused to back down. She offered him a plea deal for 6 months in jail, with Aarron agreeing to 13 felony charges that somehow included wire fraud. According to the Huffington Post, Lawrence Lessing, a law professor at Harvard and who was also a mentor to Aaron Swartz said, “Anyone who says that there is money to be made in a stash at academic papers is either an idiot or a liar.” He then went on to decimate Carmen Ortiz’s office by saying, “I get wrong, but I also get proportionality. And if you don't get both, you don't deserve to have the power of the United States government behind you.” In my opinion, I believe that Aaron Swartz was maliciously bullied, intimidated, and this was aimed at breaking him because the government is scared of internet activists like Aaron Swartz, Bradley Manning and Julian Assange. They are not able to control and monitor them, so they throw the book at them and use the law not for justice, but for vengeance and to make an example out of them, so that they do not even dare to question the government. Aaron didn’t deserve this. He could have been living the high life with his vast amount of wealth and status in society, but he decided to fight ever-so-selfishly for his noble cause. Aaron Swartz was such an open-data crusader, he actually wrote a blog post designating his buddies to make the contents of his hard drive public. He concludes the post with, “Oh, and BTW, I’ll miss you all.” We will miss you too. R.I.P. Aaron Swartz.

ravinesh sakaran contributor


Lights, camera, people

the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013

heresies 21

One of the reasons why I love photography so much is because it allows me to work with and meet new and interesting people. Someone once told me that photographers are the most anti-social individuals because they calculate all the shots in their head and all they do is direct poses from behind their camera. I thought about this for a while and in doing so, it had an impact on my photography. Here I am in a new city, with not as many friends as I had back home and a slight accent to my speech, which adds to the communication barrier. The last thing I wanted was to be labelled as a socially awkward photographer. This is when I began to look at photography from a more human perspective rather than a technical one. You could have the best lighting and camera equipment there is, but if you are lacking those people skills, there’ll be no action! What I’m referring to is action is not necessarily the physical action of the subject, but the action or feedback you get from your subject or audience following the shoot. Ideally, what you need is a client returning for another shoot or making referrals to your work. Event photography is a niche that is highly dependent on candid photos, and to be successful you have to be able to create what are called controlled candids. These are simply shots where the subject is having a drink, dancing, walking, having a conversation or just simply laughing, all as a result of your actions.

ing to them. Now it will be easier to get your subject out of their comfort zone and experiment with different poses and expressions that they typically wouldn’t do when getting a photo taken. This adds to the spectacle of you being the event photographer. So far, this seems like a very long process to get a smile out of someone, but it certainly pays off in the long run. When others see how much excitement your subject is having in front of your camera, they will gravitate towards you looking to get in on the fun. Your subject then becomes part of your increasing audience as you, the photographer, become the center of attention. Stopping now, even for a second to change the settings on your camera could interrupt the flow, causing you to lose momentum and the attention of your audience. It also important is to show some of the images to your subject. Some photographers frown at this idea as it slows down the process, but people love to see themselves and will appreciate you more for doing so. This builds your momentum and keeps your audience wanting more photos. Showing an image straight out of the camera with no editing or retouching shows your confidence as a photographer and makes you look good!

Marc Messett

The first mistake you can make is to just jump right behind your camera and begin shooting away. If the event is one where you have to be discrete and are limited by time, this may be the only way to work. However, if the event is a social mixer, at a night club, or private party, have a conversation with a few people, first. The objective here is to let yourself be seen as a ‘regular’ person and not a photographer. As soon as someone sees a professional looking camera pointed toward them, they usually get defensive and self-conscious, which can be a disastrous way to start the evening. Before you pull the camera out, you have to create the image that you are there for the event first and foremost, which means you

should have done your homework on the band that’s playing or some other key point that’s relevant to the occasion. After you’ve established this, then let it be known that you are the photographer for the event and will be taking photos. The majority of the time, that person will be more than willing to let you take that pivotal “first photo.” The first photo is exactly what it says, your first photo of the event with an actual subject. This is your small window of opportunity to set your camera’s settings, making sure that you have the type of image that you want while simultaneously continuing the conversation you started. At first, the sight of you fiddling around with your camera may not be an

issue, but later on throughout the evening, people’s attention spans fade and their patience usually withers away after a few drinks, so it’s important to set your camera and forget it. Now that you’ve been having a conversation with your subject for a while, you should know what you could say to make them laugh or smile. As this happens, your subject is not smiling because they are in front of a camera, but in response to whatever you are talking about. This is usually the big difference between a fake and genuine smile, which often times make or break a shot. At this stage, you should have gotten some candid-looking photos, because you discretely directed and posed your subject by simply talk-

Unwritten code of conduct

I understand journalism is a competitive profession, I really do, but what happened on Oct.10 in the visitor’s locker room in Vancouver crossed the line. Two days off of a historic night for San Jose Sharks rookie Thomas Hertl, Sharks captain Joe Thornton was caught up in “locker room talk” and a Vancouver journalist jumped on Jumbo Joe’s quote, sending it into the Twitterverse and eventually blowing up the social media site. This sparked a debate which journalists around the country quickly jumped in on. Thornton’s comments were not directed at this particular journalist, nor was this journalist interviewing Thornton in the first place, yet he tweeted it anyways. For background knowledge of the quote and its meaning, the aforementioned Sharks rookie, Hertl, scored four goals in a 9-2 win over the New York Rangers two nights earlier and celebrated quite profoundly after his fourthand ninth for his team- goal of the game. The journalist was interviewing Sharks winger Patrick Marleau and Thornton’s comments were logged after the journalist turned away after concluding his interview with Marleau. I won’t include the direct quote in this article, but as any athlete –

arthur ward technical editor

ton could have held off on that comment until in was just the Sharks in the room. At the same time it, seemed that Thornton wasn’t fazed by how the comment became such a big deal. He shrugged it off and kept on with his day. As a hockey fan however, I really don’t want to be watching the game where Jumbo Joe nets four in one night, could make for some interesting highlights in the morning on Sportscentre.

thehockeywriters.com

no matter what sport you play or what level you played your given sport- knows what’s said in the locker room stays in the locker room. To paraphrase Thornton’s comments, the Sharks star said, “I would have my (hoo-ha) out if I scored four goals, I’d have my (rooster) out, stroking it.” Now, anyone that’s involved in sport knows that there is a sense of brotherhood on a team and the dressing room is a place of team bonding and a place you can say almost anything. I guess the journalist didn’t get

the memo. In my opinion, the comments made in that respect shouldn’t be taken to the press or even to Twitter. Twitter has become such a useful tool in journalism in the sense that you can say whatever you want, whenever you want and it is broadcast to your followers and to the rest of the world. It is a double-edged sword in a way that it could come back to bite you – just like this journalist figured out. I’ve played the game of hockey since I was four years old, and be-

lieve me, there are things dropped in the dressing room that stay in the dressing room. There is no place out of the dressing room for those comments at any time. When you join a team, whether it is professional or recreational, there is an unwritten code of conduct once you step in the dressing room with your teammates. Joe Thornton knows this rule; if he didn’t then the Sharks forward definitely wouldn’t have said what he said. When playing the Devil’s Advocate, I do believe that Joe Thorn-

brady lang sports writer


The land of ice and snow 22 heresies

the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013

Kyle Leitch

It’s all coming to a head. It’s truly disgraceful. It hasn’t produced anything substantial in a while, since around the time I was born. No, I’m talking about the Senate or myself; I’m talking about Metallica. One of the founders of thrash metal, one of the most successful artists in history, is washed up. Why is this? No, they haven’t released another musical failure, and no, haven’t set themselves on fire. Rather, they’re playing a show in Antarctica.

Truly crossing another frontier. Metallica wants to play this show because Antarctica is the only continent on the Earth they haven’t had a gig on. The CocaCola sponsored concert will not be amplified either, because instead it will be played to the audience through headphones. A pretty cool achievement, but apparently a band has already done it: a band named Nunatak was the only group to play in 2007’s Live Earth Antarctica. Why the gimmicks? Why I can’t I get a good straight up Metallica

album like the first few? As a musician I understand that maybe not all your releases are going to be Master of Puppets, but you won’t have any good releases unless you focus on the music, not frivolous pursuits. I’m not here to criticize the albums after …and Justice for All like most people. The song “The Day That Never Comes” is how I feel about their next good release. They haven’t had a good album in a long time. The album Lulu makes no sense, and Death Magnetic would have been an okay release had Rick

Rubin not fucked it up. Rubin also destroyed Black Sabbath’s new release, 13. As Corey Taylor of Slipknot said in an interview with Blabbermouth.net “the Rick Rubin of today is a thin, thin, thin shadow of the Rick Rubin that he was. He is overrated, he is overpaid, and I will never work with him again as long as I fucking live." Rubin is known for contributing to something called the “loudness wars” where albums are made to sound louder than they should be. Rubin’s latest feat is standing around in Eminem’s

newest music video. Metallica needs to cast aside the strange albums, the shitty producers, the infantile gimmicks, and do what made them the band they are: sit down, just the four of them, and hammer our another great metal album that people will respect them for. Until that day, Metallica is not worth the hype.

michael chmielewski editor-in-chief

Now that your pictures in the paper being rhythmically adm i r e d N o w that your pictures in the paper being rhythmically admired And you can have anyone you have ever desired, All you gotta tell me now is why, why, why. Now that your pictures in the paper being rhythmically admired And you can have anyone that you have ever desired, All you gotta tell me now is why, why, why.Now your pictures in the paper being rhythmically admired And you can have anyone that you have ever desired, All you gotta tell me now is why, why, why. Welcome to the workin week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope kill you. You gotta do the Carillon: it till you're through it so you better get to it. All of your family had to kill to survive, And they're still waitin for their big day to arrive. But if they knew how I felt theyd bury me alive. Welcome to the workin week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope kill you. You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. Ilook. hear you exit light, enter sayin, hey, the citys alright, When only read about it in books. Spend all your money gettin so convinced That you never even bother to Sometimes I wonder if were livin in the same land, Why dyou wanna be my friend when feel like a juggler Running out of hands? Welcome to the workin week, oh, welcome working week. night, turn the Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope kill you. Welcome to the workin week. You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. All of your family had to kill to survive, And they're still waitin for their big day to arrive. But if they knew how I felt theyd bury me alive. Welcome to the workin week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope kill you. page, fade to You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. Ilook. hear you sayin, hey, the citys alright, When only read about it in books. Spend all your money gettin so convinced That you never even bother to Sometimes I wonder if were livin in the same land, Why dyou wanna be my friend when feel like a juggler Running out of hands? black, gimme Welcome to the workin week, oh, welcome working week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope kill you. Welcome to the workin week. You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. All of your family had to kill to survive,Now that your pictures in the paper being rhythmically adm i r e d N o w that your pictures in the paper being rhythmically admired fuel, gimme And you can have anyone you have ever desired, All you gotta tell me now is why, why, why. Now that your pictures in the paper being rhythmically adm i r e d N o w that your pictures in the paper being rhythmiNow rhythmically admired And you can have anyone that you have ever desired, All you gotta tell me now is why, why, why. Welcome to the workin week. Oh I know it fire, and don't thrill you, I hope kill you. You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. All of your family had to kill to survive, And they're still waitin for their big day to arrive. But if they knew how I felt theyd bury me alive. Welcome to the workin week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope kill you. nothing else You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. Ilook. hear sayin, hey, the citys alright, When you only read about it in books. Spend all your money gettin so convinced That never even bother to Sometimes I wonder if were livin in the same land, Why dyou wanna be my friend when feel like a juggler Running out of hands? Welcome the workin matters, since week, oh, welcome to working week. c a l l y admired And you can have anyone that you have ever desired, All you gotta tell me now is why, why, why. Welcome to the workin week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope kill you. You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. All of your family had to kill to survive, And they're still waitin 1962. for their big day to arrive. But if they knew how I felt theyd bury me alive. Welcome to the workin week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope kill you. You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. Ilook. hear you sayin, hey, the citys alright, When only read about it in books. Spend all your money gettin so convinced That you never even bother to Sometimes I wonder if were livin in the same land, Why dyou wanna be my friend when feel like a juggler Running out of hands? Welcome to the workin week, oh, welcome week. And working you can have anyone


You will get caught

the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013

I’ve been on this campus for a full seven years now, going on my eighth, and working on my second degree here. For the last three and four years, I’ve been working on campus as a teaching assistant in the English Department and as a tutor with the Student Development Centre (now Student Success Centre). During this time, I’ve seen varying extremes of student motivation and student apathy, from actually being excited to write an assignment and getting it done two weeks early, to slapping something together the night before just to “get it over with.” Now, this is not going to be a rant about how lazy students seem nowadays – I’ve just come to accept that as a generational thing. Rather, it’s in that student apathy that some students feel that they can’t get an assignment done and then tempt fate by deciding to plagiarize an essay and submit it as their own. Plagiarism is one of those things I sure hope your ENGL 100 professor told you about. And if they didn’t, shame on them. There’s a lot of different ways to commit it, some even unintentionally. Sometimes there are finicky rules such as self-plagiarism where you submit a piece twice for two different classes. In instances like that, I would hope that the student wouldn’t be aware that they’re doing it and it then becomes a case of unwitting plagiarism. Sometimes you make an honest mistake. While these things irk me, they’re not really things that make me lose sleep at night. No, the kind of plagiarism I am referring to are the people who know damn well what they’re doing and yet seem to have no moral fibre to stop themselves from doing it for one reason or another. We’ve all been there: it’s midnight, you’re on your second or fifth or even ninth cup of coffee, staring blankly at even blanker screen and the words just don’t seem to come to you. It doesn’t matter if it’s an honours level thesis on the inner workings of some niche in microbiology or an essay on Hamlet, the words fail you. You know that you need to hand in something tomorrow and you know you can’t simply just fail this assignment. Your grandmother’s died one too many times for the professor to let you off the hook. Then a wicked thought worms its way into your mind. It is at this point you have two options: you can either attempt to write something to hand in tomorrow, disregarding its quality, or you can commit the most unholy academic sin. Should your perfidious thoughts take hold, you, as my one professor would say, go on hands and knees worshiping “Almighty Google” to save the day. You may remember seeing a website offering “academic quality” papers, and, wouldn’t you know it, they have just the kind of paper you need. You either shell out 60 dollars or nothing, depending on your current bank account balance, and then begin to do what little work you will be doing for the rest of the night. You edit a few things here and there, particularly the name at the top and maybe you were smart enough to

op-ed 23

fatesdarkhand.deviantart.com

change some choice words by flipping through a thesaurus. The next day, you hand in the paper and promptly proceed to forget about it, stuffing it on the back burner of your brain. However, after the paper is in your professor’s hands, your problems are only starting to begin. For those with a remnant of a conscience, guilt will ultimately take hold. You may try to find ways to absolve yourself of your sin. “It’s one paper out of forty or eighty or two hundred. There’s no way the professor has time to check over everyone’s work. I’m sure they won’t notice. And, you

know, it’s really the professor’s fault because they’re expecting way too much of us anyways. Damn them all and the money I pay them to be here! This is an outrage.” After your little tirade, you may or may not have been able to console yourself. All you can do at this point is wait and pray you don’t get caught. Problem is, though, that there’s a pretty damn good chance you’ll be caught. Catching a plagiarist isn’t fun. It’s not fun for the TA. It’s not fun for the professor. It sure as hell won’t be fun for you when you get found out. As soon as you plagiarize, you ruin everyone’s

day. Thanks a lot, you soulless prick. The thing with plagiarism is that, really, it devalues not only the plagiarist’s degree, but also everyone else’s degree, the folk who actually write their own content, for better or worse. If I found out a classmate of mine was plagiarizing while I plugged away at my work, doing my own research and writing my own words, you’re damn right I’d want that person kicked out of school. Now herein lies the problem. While we have a formal policy detailing how plagiarists should be treated, how professors react to

plagiarism can vary wildly. Some professors will brush the deed off as a product of stupidity and have the student re-write the work with little or no consequences attached. Others will make sure that your life will be made a living hell the entire time your inquisition is underway. Even the academy can’t consistently decide what to do with students who have broken this most sacred of trusts. Whatever the response from professors, and whatever the action taken against these students, it doesn’t seem to be containing the issue of rampant plagiarism. The problem isn’t solely limited to the professors either. As a student body, plagiarism is something we shouldn’t stand for and, for the most part, I would say we have been good with that. I don’t think I’d be able to find a student going on record that condones plagiarism. Yet, while most are against it, there is still an unwholesome amount of students getting caught plagiarizing works with each passing semester. When someone plagiarizes, everyone is affected – the student plagiarizing, the professor, other students in the class. If something isn’t done to curb this epidemic, our degrees will be about as useful as toilet paper: it might cover your ass at one time, but you can bet it won’t be around for a second time.

farron ager op-ed editor


the gallows

the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013

Don’t feel bad, Dick

I write this in honour of Dick Cheney. Recently, he revealed that he had, at one point, tasked his doctor with disabling the wireless function on his pacemaker. You know, in case the “terrirists” (spelt the George Bush way) hacked into his pacemaker. What would they do? He already sent himself on a “hunting accident”. And so we have a list of things that should (for hilarity’s sake) be hacked into. Cue the theme for The Matrix: The Prime Minister’s Twitter Account

RAMS football

Haley Klassen

Sung to the tune of Lanigan’s Ball

An excerpt from Drinking Songs of the Academy

In the town of Regina, one Ronnie Lancaster Brought the Riders to a state of good fame And grandson Mueller played, raised the Rams e’en faster! Plays on a field and ten bleachers for games He gave a grand party to friends and relations Who did not forget him and would join a brawl If you'd only listen, I'll make your eyes glisten At the rows and ructions of Rams Football Myself a student got free invitations For the last game versus hated U Sask In less than a minute both friends and relations Were dancing around and sharing a flask Mugs of Pilsner and Bud for the plastered Chicken wings, dips, there was burgers on trays There were Muellers, McCrystals, and Lancasters Counting the yards and dancing away CHORUS: Six long months I spent in KIN School Six long months doing nothing at all Six long months I spent in KIN School Learning to play for Rams Football They were doing all kinds of nonsensical polkas Round the field in a whirly gig But Landon and I soon banished their nonsense And tipped them a twist of a real football jig Oh how the schmo he really got mad and we Danced that you'd think that the endzone would fall For I spent three weeks at KIN Academy Learning to dance for Rams Football CHORUS + additional lines:

And I stepped out - and I stepped in again And I stepped out - and I stepped in again And I stepped out - and I stepped in again Learning to play for Rams football The girls were as merry, the boys without shame Dancing around and maintaining the drive Till an accident happened and lost the bloody game Missing the first post-season since oh five. Frank McCrystal threw his hat and yelled “I’m fired.” And called for his red shirts and told to prepare We swore Sheldon Neald’s voice couldn’t go higher At least we’re not as bad as the Golden Bears

Just spoke to my wigmaker. Going to wear a red one for the throne speech this year. #allhailtheredheads You jealous @mulcair? @thepontif Hey I just met you/ and this is crazy/ Steve’s my name/ pray for maybe?

Just re-watching my election win, eating chocolate, and drinking martinis. #allthefeels How come when I show up @agribition they all throw shit at me? I now know how you feel @paulmcallum Do you think if I drove a Prius BC people would like me more? @ElizabethMay

child support. If you are someone who enforces the law and is looking for said child support, can you lend me $190,000, I’ll pay you back next year. If you added to my status as a laughing stock by producing another son of a former semi-mediocre NFL running back, I don’t want to know. Lastly, if you are trying to reach me otherwise: help meeeeeee, I’m broke. The German Chancellor’s Cellphone Oh wait…

Error 404: The democracy you were looking for was not found. Travis Henry’s Voicemail

Here is the replacement for the voicemail of Mr. Travis Henry, a former NFL running back who has fathered 11 children by 10 different women:

john loeppky contributor

Now that your pictures in the paper being rhythmically admiredNow that your pictures in the paper being rhythmically admired And you can have anyone that you ever desired, All you gotta tell me now is why, why, why, why. Now that your pictures in the paper being rhythmically admired And you can have anyone that you ever desired, All you gotta tell me now is why, why, why, why.Now that your pictures in the have why. Welcome to the workin week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, Itheir hope it don't kill you. You gotta do itit till you're through so you better get to it. All of your family had to kill to survive, And they're still waitin for big day to arrive. But if they knew how I felt theyd bury me 12 Angry Socialists #badmovietitles @NDP Don’t you just hate when your dog

If you are the mother of one of my children, press the number that your child is in the order of their birth. If you can’t remember you don’t get

the Carillon: the thing that goes bump in the night since 1962

CHORUS Boy, oh, boy now this was destruction Myself got a kick from big Aaron Picton And I soon replied to his kind introduction And kicked him most heartily in his left shin Taylor the punter was nearly being strangled They squeezed up his pipes, bellows, chanters and all And the girls in their split jumps they all got entangled And that put an end to Ram’s football CHORUS +

farron ager & autumn mcdowell of the academy

and your senate act the same. #shiteverywhere

Simon Fuh


the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013

the gallows 25

more fun with jack o’lantern stencils.

Now that your pictures in the being rhythmically admiredNow that your pictures in the paper rhythmically admired And you can have anyone that you have ever desired, All you gotta tell me now is why, why, why, why. why, why.Now that your picif anyone gets around to making these, send us a tures in the paper being rhythmically admired And you can have anyone that you have ever desired, All you gotta tell me now is why, why, why, why. Welcome to the workin week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope it don't kill you. You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. All of your family had to kill to survive, And they're still waitin for their big day to arrive. But if they knew how I felt theyd bury me alive. Welcome to the workin week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope it don't kill you. You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. IWelcome hear you sayin, hey, the citys alpicture. it’ll golike in the next issue, and we’ll love right, When only read about it in books. Spend all your money gettin so convinced That you never even bother to look. Sometimes I wonder if were livin the same land, Why dyou wanna be my friend when I feel a juggler Running out of hands? to the workin week, oh, welcome to the working week. to the workin week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope it don't kill you. You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. All of your family had to kill to survive, And they're still waitin for their big day to arrive. But if they knew how I felt theyd bury me alive. you forever. Welcome to the workin week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope it don't kill you. You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. IWelcome hear you sayin, hey, the citys alright, When only read about it in books. Spend all your money gettin so convinced That you never even bother to look. Sometimes I wonder if were livin the same land, Why dyou wanna be my friend when I feel like a juggler Running out of hands? to theworking workin week, oh, welcome to the week. to the workin Oh I know ityou. don't thrill week. you, I hope it don't kill kyle “i’ll put the fucking leeches on you.”


graphic violence

the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013


the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013

27

the Carillon: float like a butterfly, roll Now that your pictures in the paper being rhythmically admiredNow that your pictures in the paper being rhythmically admired And you can have anyone that you ever desired, All gotta tell me now is why, why, why, why. Now that your pictures in paper being rhythmically admired Andyou you can have like Yahtzee since 1962 anyone that you ever desired, All you gotta tell me now is why, why, why, why.Now that your pictures inthe the


28 obituaries the carillon | October 31 - November 06, 2013

Now that your pictures in the paper being rhythmically adm i r e d N o w that your pictures in the paper being rhythmically admired And you can have anyone you have ever desired, All you gotta tell me now is why, why, why. Now that your pictures in the paper being rhythmically admired And you can have anyone that you have ever desired, All you gotta tell me now is why, why, why.Now your pictures in the paper being rhythmically admired And you can have anyone that you have ever desired, All you gotta tell me now is why, why, why. Welcome to the workin week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope kill you. You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. All of your family had to kill to survive, And they're still waitin for their big day to arrive. But if they knew how I felt theyd bury me alive. Welcome to the workin week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope kill you. You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. Ilook. hear sayin, hey, the citys alright, When you only read about it in books. Spend all your money gettin so convinced That never even bother to Sometimes I wonder if were livin in the same land, Why dyou wanna be my friend when in his spare time, feel like a juggler Running out of hands? Welcome the workin week, oh, welcome to working week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope kill you. Welcome to the workin week. You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. the Carillon’s All of your family had to kill to survive, And they're still waitin for their big day to arrive. But if they knew how I felt theyd bury me alive. Welcome to the workin week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope kill you. You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. former editor-inIlook. hear you sayin, hey, the citys alright, When only read about it in books. Spend all your money gettin so convinced That you never even bother to Sometimes I wonder if were livin in the same land, Why dyou wanna be my friend when feel like a juggler Running out of hands? chief feeds Welcome to the workin week, oh, welcome working week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope kill you. Welcome to the workin week. You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. All of your family had to kill to survive,Now that your pictures in the paper being rhythNicholas Cage cubs mically adm i r e d N o w that your pictures in the paper being rhythmically admired And you can have anyone you have ever desired, All you gotta tell me now is why, why, why. Now that your pictures in the paper being rhythmically adm i r e d N o w that your pictures in the paper being rhythmiNow rhythmically (happy halloween, admired And you can have anyone that you have ever desired, All you gotta tell me now is why, why, why. Welcome to the workin week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope kill you. You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. All of your family had to deets) kill to survive, And they're still waitin for their big day to arrive. But if they knew how I felt theyd bury me alive. Welcome to the workin week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope kill you. You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. Ilook. hear you sayin, hey, the citys alright, When only read about it in books. Spend all your money gettin so convinced That you never even bother to Sometimes I wonder if were livin in the same land, Why dyou wanna be my friend when feel like a juggler Running out of hands? Welcome to workin week, oh, welcome the working week. c a l l y admired And you can have anyone that you have ever desired, All you gotta tell me now is why, why, why. Welcome to the workin week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope kill you. You gotta do it till you're through it so you better get to it. All of your family had to kill to survive, And they're still waitin for their big day to arrive. But if they knew how I felt theyd bury me alive. Welcome to the workin week. Oh I know it don't thrill you, I hope kill you. You gotta do it till you're through it so


the Carillon - Vol. 56 Issue #10