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In this issue: Growing Circles, K-12 Houses Launch, Aligning Schedules to Philosophy, Learning the Stories of Place 1

2019


EDITOR

Katie Walker Associate Director of Communications DESIGN

Vanessa Butler I L L U S T R AT I O N

Rici Hoffarth CONTRIBUTORS

THE BUSH SCHOOL

Percy L. Abram, Ph.D.

3400 East Harrison Street Seattle, Washington 98112 (206) 322-7978 alumni@bush.edu communications@bush.edu

Head of School

Polly Fredlund Director of Enrollment Management and Communications

Sharon Hurt Director of Development

E D U C AT I O N A L F O U N DAT I O N S

Critical, independent, and creative thinking Ethical judgment and action

Jo Ito

Intercultural fluency

Athletic Director

Local and global citizenship

Libby Singer Assistant Director of Development PHOTOGRAPHY

Sheila Addleman Will Baber ’00 Christina Buonomo Polly Fredlund Frances Gaul Hilary Kaltenbach Libby Lewis Katie Walker Rachelle Weymuller

EXPERIENCE

VA LU E S

Trust • Collaboration • Curiosity Inclusivity • Challenge S T R AT E G I C P R I O R I T I E S

People: A Supportive and Inclusive Community Program: Comprehensive Experiential Education Place: Intentional, Diverse Environments

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Please contact communications@bush.edu with any corrections, errors, or updates. Corrections will appear in the next issue. ON THE COVER

Rici Hoffarth is a St. Louis based artist, illustrator, and designer. She studied Printmaking & Drawing at Washington University in St. Louis’ Sam Fox School of Art & Design. Rici especially enjoys drawing the human figure, using color and pattern to create imaginative worlds. Keep up with Rici’s illustrations on her instagram, @rici_illustrates. “Gibran’s quote immediately sparked a mental picture for me—the language is so visual and captivating. I’ve noticed that young people seem to intuitively understand self-discovery and beauty. Kids spend a lot of time exploring their relationship with the world around them, and that journey doesn’t always extend into adulthood with the same fervor. I wanted the cover illustration to remind us of the magic of childhood, beauty, and self-exploration.”


“The sciences as well as the arts may be taught creatively. Even in the abstract field of arithmetic children experience a genuinely creative pleasure in discovering new truths for themselves.� H E L E N TAY L O R B U S H , FOUNDER

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1.

MAP TO THE METHOW CAMPUS In our third year at the Methow Campus, I have seen how powerful place-based education can be. Moving beyond the walls of the classroom allows students to create meaningful intellectual, personal, and community connections.

2. RUBIK’S CUBE TO FIDGET WITH In the past few years we added hours in the Support Services department in all three divisions and changed titles from Learning Coordinators to Learning Specialists, to ensure that we’re supporting a diversity of learners. 3. PRONOUN PINS Continuing our focus on making Bush a more accessible and inclusive community, we adopted a comprehensive policy for trans and gender-expansive students, faculty, and staff in all three divisions and the employee handbook this school year. 4. DANCE CARDS Our school’s past is remarkable, and its future is limitless.

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5. BOTTOM’S MASK BY HANK ’20, FROM THE UPPER SCHOOL PRODUCTION OF A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM In my 2019 convocation speech, I quoted James Baldwin’s The Fire Next Time: “love takes off the masks that we fear we cannot live without and know we cannot live within.” My hope in writing this year’s convocation speech was to convey a message to students that they should embrace and celebrate their differences, their uniqueness. 6. TREES, LASER-CUT BY BILL BABER, REPRESENTING THE K-12 HOUSES In the past five years as Head of School, I have realized that the more I learn about Bush, the more I love it. 7.

THESE HANDS, BY MARGARET H. MASON There is no activity more joyful than reading to Kindergarten students; it’s impossible to have a bad day if you’ve done that.

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8. THE MOOD METER APP I am so proud of the adoption of a K-12 social-emotional curriculum (RULER) and bringing Human Relations to all students in the Middle School. Our students are taught the skills to recognize and manage their emotions so that they can build healthy, productive relationships. 9. NOTEBOOK TO PLAN THE NEXT EXPERIENCE Spending time in classrooms always reminds me that students have great admiration and affection for their teachers. The faculty is highly engaged, committed, daring, and perspicacious. They are great teachers and even better role models. 10. MASK FROM CELEBRATE BUSH 2019: MARDI GRAS I am evergrateful to our parent volunteers, who make a difference by running events such as Parent University and Simply Cultural, leading admissions tours, volunteering in classrooms, organizing affinity groups, and, of course, organizing Celebrate Bush.

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EXPERIENCE

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From the

BOARD PRESIDENT

A

s I write this note to you, we have begun to

for many, many years to come. In many of our

look towards the renewal of spring and the

discussions at the Board of Trustees meetings, we

end of another school year. The 2018-2019 school

ask ourselves: “Is this sustainable?” and “How will this

year has been full of exciting adventures, unexpected

last and take us towards a healthy future?”

events (like the snow!), lots of flexibility, progress towards forward-looking goals and a steady cadence that reminds me of the strong foundations on which the school was founded and continues to build upon each year.

There are many planning activities and forwardlooking endeavors that the Board considers and works on each year. Our Strategic Framework leads us forward and reminds us about what is important along the way.

From our inception as a school in 1924, sustainability has been a core principle. When Helen Taylor Bush

Some of our goals for this year and the next few

imagined what a progressive education looked like,

years include two important task forces: Faculty

she incorporated sustainability into everything our

Compensation and Financial Aid. These task forces

school does. Who knew that this foundational tenet

are investigating how we can attract and retain the

would become such a buzzword in everything that

best educators and how to make a Bush education

we do?

accessible to all who would like to be here. Our goals

The term “sustainability”, can take on many meanings.

The Bush School can continue to deliver the best

One might think of the natural world and how

experiential education to our current student body

also include the Education Master Plan and how

biological systems can remain diverse and productive over time. Others may think of our ability to preserve and renew energy and water, while still others may think about business processes and methods used to endure and thrive in the future. These are just a few notions of a very comprehensive and subjective term. At The Bush School, I believe that we use not only the word, but also the complex topic and ideas, in so many aspects of how we run the school today and how we would like the school to be positioned

and families, as well as to new children and families in future years. We have embraced an inspirational plan that will help us be in the right place, at the right time, and for the long-haul. I am looking forward to the beauty and new growth of spring and summer and to the bright and sustainable future that we have worked towards during this year and beyond. Thank you and Go Blazers!

KAREN MARCOTTE SOLIMANO PRESIDENT, BOARD OF TRUSTEES

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The Bush School Administration 2018–2019 Percy L. Abram, Ph.D.

Ethan Delavan

Jo Ito

Head of School

Director of Technology

Athletic Director

Pri Alahendra

Jay Franklin ’90

Sally Maxwell, Ph.D.

Lower School Director

Middle School Director

Academic Dean

Robin Bentley

Polly Fredlund

Jabali Stewart, Ph.D.

Assistant Head for Finance and Operations

Director of Enrollment Management and Communications

Director of Intercultural Affairs

Leslie David ’85

Sharon Hurt

Executive Assistant to the Head of School

Director of Development

Ray Wilson Upper School Director

The Bush School Board of Trustees 2018–2019 Karen Marcotte Solimano President Becky Guzak Vice President Reed Cundiff Treasurer

Emily Alhadeff ’94

Chris Jones

Kevin Baker

Daniel Pak

Atul Bali

Barbra Richardson

Steve Banks ’94

Steve Rosen ’84

Stephen Caplow

Ian Sands

Lisa Carroll

Peggy Skinner

Chris Chickadel ’93 Maggie Finch Secretary

Sergio Chin-Ley Mike Galgon Alden Garrett ’73 Brandon Gillespie ’93 C’Ardiss Gleser Salone Habibuddin Allison Harr Patricia ’Patti’ Hearn

EXPERIENCE

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Mary ’Sis’ Pease ’41 Life Trustee Percy L. Abram, Ph.D. Head of School Tracy Amin Interim President, Families Association


OLIVER

DARA

BILAL

KINDERGARTEN

GRADE 1

GRADE 2

LUCY

GIA

SIMON

GRADE 3

GRADE 4

GRADE 5

GIANLUCCA

JULIET

ARMAAN

GRADE 6

GRADE 7

GRADE 8

MEI MEI

SARA

JACK

GRADE 9

GRADE 10

GRADE 11

In each issue of Experience Magazine, we feature some of the incredible humans at The Bush School. This year, the magazine showcases one student from each grade, each of whom were nominated by a community member.

INDIANA GRADE 12

The Humans of Bush project was started by alumni Kevin ’16 and Gabriella ’16, and is based off of the Humans of New York project.

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2019


From the

EDITOR

T

hank you for reading Experience Magazine! Each year, we publish Experience to connect you to what is happening on campus and

deepen your understanding of The Bush School. For alumni who live in far-from-Seattle corners of the country and the globe, I hope that you

Contents THIS YEAR IN TEN B E A U T I F U L O B J E C T S  4

dive into Experience and spend some quality time with your alma mater. For current families, I hope that the magazine illuminates programs that you aren’t as familiar with and showcases some of your favorite parts of

F R O M T H E B OA R D P R E S I D E N T   6

the school.

A R O U N D C A M P U S   31

The theme for this school year is Beauty, one of the three original “ideals”

G I V I N G   71

of Helen Bush’s school. As we have explored “beauty” as a school this year, we have widened our understanding to incorporate love, belonging, and creativity into our collective definition. Student art has taken center stage in visual art classes, drama, and music. We launched K-12 houses which foster community and cross-division friendships with a fall party (see page

A L U M N I   81 I N M E M O R I A M     88 C L A S S N O T E S     89

36) and followed up with our houses on Valentine’s Day, creating tokens of our care for each other, the school, and members of the Seattle community at Seattle Children’s Hospital and Aegis Living. In classrooms, students have explored fundamental questions about the nature of life and their places in the world. Each of these moments of recognition and each of these moments of wonder make Bush beautiful. This school year is also Head of School Percy L. Abram’s fifth year at Bush. After five years, most of us in the community feel like we know Percy—how

ALUMNI PROFILES IAN ANDREEN ’12 Absorbing All You Can   20

D E N N I S E VA N S Hooked on the Cosmos   22

well he writes letters on hard topics, about his preference for bowties, his

CORRIE DURYEE ’77

commitment to lifelong learning, or his deep and abiding affection for the

Deep Exploration of the Life of the Mind   24

music and message of Prince. As a relationship-based school, we want to strengthen your relationship with Percy by letting you in on his life, leadership, and vision for the school in our feature article, which begins

SAM ’96 & AUGUST ’93 COLE Storytelling with Creative Confidence   26

on page 12. In my conversations with Percy, I discovered that he truly considers Bush his perfect fit. Not only is it the school in which he imagines his younger self would have thrived, but it’s a place where, as he gives his all, it gives back to him in the form of growth, learning, and human connection. I hope you find your own moments of growth, learning, and connection as you page through the 2019 issue of Experience Magazine, and I hope you have a beautiful year.

F E AT U R E S Bush is Remarkable   12 Growing Circles at The Bush School    32 Education Master Plan    42 Helping Superheroes Come to Life    50 Methow Campus: Learning the Stories of Place    56

KATIE WALKER

Pathways to Giving   72

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS

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ON HOW LIFE LOOKS AF TER FIVE YEARS AS HE AD

hen Head of School

Percy L. Abram first stepped

onto The Bush School campus, he recognized the

school he had heard and read about over his nearly twodecade career of working in independent schools. He encountered a dynamic school in which engaged students were passionate about learning, and curious about the world around them. He knew immediately that, in his words, “this is the community that I want to lead, and this is the type of education that I want for my children.” In 2014, Percy was appointed Bush’s ninth head of school, and inherited Helen Bush’s vision. “Helen said that the foundation of the school is the trust that teachers have in students. We afford our students a high level of trust at a very young age by exposing them to the wonder and complexity of the world around them. In return, this trust gives them the freedom to pursue learning earnestly and eagerly,” Percy explains. But how would Percy expand Helen Bush’s vision to meet the challenges of the twenty-first century?

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B Y K AT I E W A L K E R , A S S O C I AT E D I R E C T O R O F C O M M U N I C AT I O N S

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“There is a part of me that wonders how my life would have been enriched if I had been educated in an environment like Bush. It wasn’t possible for me. I am grateful that my children won’t have to wonder.”

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“My family has an ethos that valued education, hard work, and giving back to our community. My ancestors struggled in order to give us opportunities that they could not have even imagined when they were alive.”

While the core tenets of Helen Bush’s promise continue to be

was really affirming. As I was leaving, I was saying goodbye to him

relevant, today’s world looks dramatically different. Helen knew

and the class and he asked, ‘Well, why are you doing this? Why are

that relationships are at the core of learning. Today, young people

you visiting our class?’ and I said, ‘Because I want to get a better

must learn to manage relationships across digital landscapes, as

sense of what your days are like,’ and he said, ‘Well, you should do

well as in person. America is becoming more ethnically and racially

it more often!’ I looked at him and I said ‘You’re right, I really should.’

diverse—projected to have no single ethnic majority by around

Moments like that sustain me through the difficult parts of the job.”

2050—so Bush graduates, the leaders of tomorrow, must be interculturally fluent and at ease in a world that will look and feel much different than what they experience today. Percy knows that Bush today must take on the challenge of preparing young people

For Bush and for himself, Percy finds ways to make quick connections. He seems as comfortable in front of a crowd of 1500 students and parents as he is sitting down with five-year-old students or meeting

to solve problems that don’t yet exist.

with a prospective teaching candidate. Whether it’s through

Percy believes that delivering a great progressive education is

we make draw us in and spark relationships, which allow students

active, collaborative, and, most of all, relational. While the essence

to feel enough comfort and trust to learn. “From the minute that

humor, big ideas, or common interests, those connections that

of Bush has always been in the relationships that are built between

I interviewed with Jabali Stewart, Susanne Eckert, Peggy Skinner,

teachers and students, today research backs it up by showing that

and Janet Bisignano, I just felt so at ease,” Percy says, reflecting on

emotional relationships are at the core of great learning. “If students

what brought him to Bush and what keeps him here. “I feel really

don’t know that you care about them—where they’re from, who

fortunate to be here.”

they are, what they’re interested in, what they’re afraid of, where they’re insecure—then they won’t be willing to trust you,” Percy says. “I think about how powerful it is to see a child get excited about learning how to read, how impactful it is traveling to watch students at state semifinals. The time that we spend investing in and caring for our students is what makes this school so dynamic and remarkable.”

In order to build one-on-one connections, The Bush School creates an intentional community that celebrates differences, allowing genuine relationships to flourish. Percy’s work—both before and at Bush—centers around cultivating belonging, while simultaneously holding space for the many intersecting communities that families are a part of. “My community was critical to my understanding of what it means to be American,” Percy says, speaking to an early

“I try not to take for granted what we’re trying to do and build here at

understanding of how important community would be in his life.

The Bush School,” Percy says. “And I try to not take for granted the

Growing up, Percy was often one of only a few black students in

time spent with students, because that time spent together matters.”

his neighborhood or school. “While teachers did not spend much

Each moment with students stays with Percy. He talks about making

time focusing on the history and stories of people who looked

a connection with a student in Nancy Bowman’s United States

like me,” he says. He takes pride in the history and contributions

History class, who was writing a paper on Paul Volcker’s influence

of African-Americans in this country, despite members of his own

on the Federal Reserve. “He was so animated and excited. Being

family historically being treated “in a way that was fundamentally

able to engage with him on what it was like to live through that time

un-American.”

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Percy with faculty: Third Grade Teacher Dana Zulauf, Lower School Technology Teacher Jeffery Adjei, Lower School Spanish Teacher Angélica Camargo, and Percy.

Percy’s vision for the school expands Helen Bush’s vision by committing to bring a Bush education to more students, no matter their background. When he was a young teacher in independent schools, Percy saw the need to have adults of color in prominent roles. Regardless of his position or the school, Percy counseled and mentored students and young faculty of color to ensure that they felt connected to the institution. He found that he could give voice to “that kid who was sitting in

“I try not to take for granted what we’re trying to do and build here at The Bush School. I try to not take for granted the time spent with students, because that time spent together matters.”

the back of the classroom, who didn’t feel

Houston, then ultimately to Walnut Creek, CA—Percy learned to quickly bridge differences, showing up at school as the new kid, ready to take on new adventures. One morning, Percy paid a visit to Bush’s newest and youngest students. Inside the classroom, Kindergarten Teacher Janet Bisignano, Third Grade Teacher Dana Zulauf, and Lower School Assistant Emily Halley explained an activity. The Third Grade students and their Kindergarten buddies were creating posters for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, on the topic of

seen or heard.” He says that he focused

peaceful protests. The students outlined their hands, drew inside

on diversity early in his career “to make sure that marginalized

the hands, then pasted the hands together onto a poster, and wrote

students know these institutions are theirs too, that they can

a word inspired by Dr. King: the students chose love, equal, peace,

elevate their voice, and they can feel connected.”

fearless, and friendship. Percy sat down and helped a Kindergarten

In his youth, Percy was that kid sitting in the back of the classroom. “Difference has always been a part of my life,” Percy says. “I’ve always felt different than those around me, whether that is the

student cut out an outline of his hand. A few minutes later, the Third Grade student from that buddy pair also asked Percy to cut out his hand drawing.

uniqueness of being left-handed and how quirky that feels, being

“It’s incredible,” Percy commented, “that these students will hear Dr.

African-American in a predominantly white environment, or growing

King’s message, normalize it, go out into the world, and set the

up with cerebral palsy and a pronounced limp.” Because his family

expectation that inclusivity and equity are going to be an important

moved every few years—to Pittsburgh, Houston, Baltimore, back to

part of life. It’s really powerful. I find it beautiful too.” Percy was

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WHEN HE’S NOT AT BUSH OR WITH HIS FAMILY,

I started running a year before I moved to Seattle. After a visit to the doctor, she advised that I needed to make some significant lifestyle changes—more exercise, fewer french fries. My colleague Kurt had just began running, and he invited me to join him. So, in 2013 we started running together along West Cliff Drive, a meandering path along the Monterey Bay. The first time we went out, I couldn’t run a mile. My friend was so patient with me. He said, ‘We’ll just go at your pace. I’m not in a hurry.’ His kindness literally changed—and likely saved—my life. Now, I run at least three half-marathon races a year, and achieved a personal record in March of 1:47. I run four days a week, with a goal of twenty-five and thirty miles each week. I remember all the miles logged, all the routes, and the multiple playlists—mostly hip hop with a dollop of Prince. It wasn’t until recently that I admitted to myself that I like running. And I owe that all to Kurt (and my doctor). I find it incredible that in five years, I now consider myself a runner.. Last year, I set a goal of running 1,000 miles in a year. I actually completed my 1,000th mile on my birthday in November, so I kept going. On December 31, 2018, on a beautiful day sunny day in Pasadena, I ran my 1,200th mile that year. Running has given me a new outlook and a new lease on life.

Pictured: Track & Field, Class of 2018

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drawn to The Bush School because it is a place that believes in the

what brought Percy’s family to Bush, and part of what keeps them

value of community, where children can explore passions and seek

here. “Even though my children Claudia and Carlos approach their

their true selves. He describes the school as warm and accepting of difference.

work differently, the school has really met their needs,” Percy says. “And it has shaped how I parent because I see them as individuals

Helen Bush’s school was founded to inspire a love of learning. Her visionary education encouraged young people to delve into

and let them chart their own course for success.” Since he first stepped onto campus and found his community,

topics, sparking passions, finding purpose, and ultimately learning

Percy has been dedicated to The Bush School. Reflecting on the

to solve the problems of the future. Percy comes from a family that

differences that he has felt throughout life, Percy says, “What I really

believed in education, and Percy took the idea to heart. His family saw education as the key to social and economic mobility. Early on, he discovered a love for learning that sustains him. As a young person, Percy always enjoyed wrestling with big ideas and having

love about Bush and what I love about working and leading this school is that there’s just so many ways that you can be a student here. There are so many ways that you can express yourself.”

conversations around broader theoretical contexts. Percy pursued

Head of School Percy L. Abram thinks often about Helen Bush and

education because it was in schools that he found his intellectual

the course that she set for The Bush School nearly 100 years ago.

community.

He considers her brave—for upending gender norms of the time by

Percy’s favorite author, James Baldwin, said, “The purpose of education… is to create in a person the ability to look at the world for himself, to make his own decisions.” Education did that for Percy. Now Percy leads a school that does this for hundreds of young people each year. “For me,” he says, “going to work every day is a pleasure and I’m honored to be here.” Education is the field he loves, and Bush is the school he loves.

running a business and for teaching progressive education during the time of the philosophy’s conception. He also thinks often about the school’s next 100 years, understanding that the enactment of Helen Bush’s vision must evolve to meet the needs of a changing world. Percy’s school prepares young people for the future with increased financial aid, with an increasingly diverse student body, and with updated facilities by centering intentional relationships, a love of learning, and the opportunity to find their true selves.

As a parent, Percy chose Bush because of the values set in place by founder Helen Bush. “I know that here, without a doubt,

Perhaps what’s most remarkable about Head of School Percy L.

teachers have all children’s—including mine—best interests at

Abram is not how many roles he juggles or how many decisions he

heart,” he explains. The school’s educational philosophy aligns

makes, but that he truly believes that love is at the core of education.

with his parenting philosophy: “to give kids access to a myriad of

He believes in the power of this year’s theme. And when asked

diverse and distinct experiences to cultivate a desire for and love of

about Beauty, Percy said: “Bush students will change the world, and

learning that will ultimately sustain them throughout life.” In this way,

that is serious work. That we do this with a smile, and we do this

dedicating himself to a career with children at its center is part of

with love, and we do this with pleasure—that’s beautiful to me.”

“I value each relationship as sacred. At Bush, they are bountiful and affirming.” EXPERIENCE

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Percy’s family: Nina, Carlos ’24, Percy, and Claudia ’21


Juliet ’24 H O U S E : Y E L LO W M A P L E S I N F LU E N T I A L T E AC H E R : M R . JAC K S O N B U S H S H O U L D N E V E R C H A N G E : The amount of times

we (as students) get to choose or decide on things. Some examples of this are being able to choose which language to study, picking options for our E-Weeks and E-lectives, and having multiple food choices in the cafeteria! I think having the element of choice is really nice, and makes school a bit more fun and entertaining.

“Frankly, beauty is complicated. Some people might say that beauty is purely physical, but I don’t think that’s true. Actually, it’s not that I don’t think that’s true, it’s that there has to be more. For me, beauty starts with something inside. The reason I got into robotics was because of Sixth Grade technology class. We did a short unit on robotics, and I loved programming, building, and watching the robot do it’s assigned task. I also loved the challenge of a problem we had to solve, and my elation when it worked out. I decided to choose robotics as my fall E-lective because I wanted to do it again.”

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B Y J O N AT H A N S H I P L E Y, C L A S S O F 2 0 2 1 PA R E N T

Absorbing All You Can

Y

ou can find Ian Andreen ’12 on

favorite teacher, Esther Reiquam, or

Facebook. You can find him on

getting called out by Don Hillard, the

Instagram. Twitter, too. He’s on LinkedIn.

security officer, for parking where he

You can retweet his tweets, heart his

shouldn’t have, Ian has nothing but fond

Instagram photos, and like his Facebook

memories of his schooling. “Bush taught

posts. He likes his life right now. He’s a

me that sometimes the best education

production assistant and coordinator for

isn’t in books, but in embracing the

the IndieFlix Group. “I find beauty in the

environment around you and absorbing

film work I do,” he says, “because I love

all you can.” He continues, “Bush was

storytelling.” The story Ian wants to tell now is a documentary that just wrapped up called LIKE. He is the producer, director of photography, and editor for the movie, which explores the impact of social media on our lives. The movie delves into the effects of social media and technology on the brain, on our lives, and in our civilization and how to safely navigate it.

most importantly, myself, because I had the freedom to pursue what interested me. I had the freedom to follow my passions.” Those passions led him from Bush to Whitman College, where he graduated in 2016. From there he did production work on commercials for companies like

Ian is also at work on a film called The

Amazon, Microsoft, and Alaska Airlines.

Bully Factor. It’s a documentary, slated

He’s been with IndieFlix since February

for release soon, about individual acts

2017. “Every day I celebrate beauty.

of courage and the impact of peer power

Whether it’s stringing together multiple

to eradicate bullying. The film highlights

shots and interviews to form a cohesive

new laws and programs that have already

story; to the actual color grading of a

proven effective in reducing bullying in all

single shot to incite some emotion.”

its forms. It wasn’t long ago when Ian was still

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a place that helped foster healthy relationships with teachers, friends, and

The emotions Ian’s been currently feeling are good ones. He is excited about his

walking the school hallways of Bush.

burgeoning film career. For that, there’s

Whether it was taking classes from his

plenty to like.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF IAN ANDREEN ’12

Ian Andreen ’12

PROFILE /

2019

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PROFILE /

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Dennis Evans


B Y K AT I E W A L K E R , A S S O C I AT E D I R E C T O R O F C O M M U N I C AT I O N S

Hooked on the Cosmos

F

ormer Bush art teacher Dennis

“This piece is all about the multiverse,”

Evans, who taught a generation of

Dennis says, and leads into the story

Bush art students and worked with many

of how he came to make scientifically-

generations of Seattle artists, makes a

themed dimensional paintings about

difference everywhere he goes.

natural phenomena. “The first time I went to college, I wasn’t an artist. I came from

When he and his wife, Nancy, bought

Yakima, my dad was a butcher, my mom

their house, they planted trees all along

was a mom. We didn’t know anything

the street to beautify the neighborhood.

about art, but I was born an artist. I

Now, they host art shows and holiday

was making stuff from the time I was a

sales, and maintain an altar for wishes

little kid. Just twelve years old, I built a

and a small sidewalk park. Walk inside

full suit of armor for a little figure I had

“Utopian Heights”—as Dennis and Nancy

made. When I went to college I was the

have named their home—and you’ll enter

first person to go to college in my whole

eccentric rooms showcasing paintings,

family—I couldn’t go to art school.” After

sculptures, and more from his former

graduating with a chemistry degree,

students, studio assistants, teachers,

Dennis was drafted and spent two years

colleagues, and friends. The stairway

in the Marine Corps in Vietnam. Older,

down to their kilns and metalworking room is full of valentines Dennis and Nancy have made for each other, the stairway up to Dennis’ studio has openings which lead to cat passages built into the house.

with more experience and able to pay his own way. Dennis finally went to art school at the University of Washington. “But I still am a scientist. In 2012 on the Fourth of July CERN Switzerland announced that they had found the Higgs-Boson. I heard it in my little earplug, lying in bed, and I

“In 1980, I had a very fast ride out of

grabbed Nancy’s leg and I said, ’I’ve just

art school,” Dennis explains. “I started

heard the rest of my life’s work’. I started

showing commercially—I showed in New York and I was in the Whitney Biennial. So we decided to build this house for ourselves in 1980. We both loved art. We started trading with all of our friends, as

re-teaching myself physics, and I read every book that’s written about the HiggsBoson and quantum mechanics, and now dark matter and dark energy, and that’s what I’m making art about.”

young artists do. We realized that we

Dennis wants his paintings to teach, and

wanted bigger art so we started buying.

even more than that, he wants them to

We have about 600 paintings. In the past

hook people—young and old alike—on the

five years we’ve started giving them away.”

big topics, the big questions. “I’m hooked

Dennis plans on giving Bush paintings

on the cosmos,” Dennis says. “The whole

that, as he says, “make sense for you to

idea is you gotta have fun, and if you’re

have,” including pieces by former teacher

not having fun, you’re probably not doing

Fred Goode and by Dennis himself.

it right.”

23

2019


B Y J O N AT H A N S H I P L E Y, C L A S S O F 2 0 2 1 PA R E N T

Deep Exploration of the Life of the Mind

“T

he point of everything I do is beauty,” says writer, film director,

Shakespeare Company as a casting

and producer Corrie Duryee ’77. “For

director. She also was a zombie killer

decades, while filming, I have called

with a baseball bat in Zombies of Mass

people to order on set by yelling ‘Alright.

Destruction, a 2010 film that was screened

Let’s make some truth and beauty.’”

at the prestigious Seattle International

A truth—it was Duryee’s godmother who

Film Festival.

turned a young Corrie onto screenwriting.

“I do my best to create beauty when I

Corrie’s godmother was Madeleine

make a film, even if the subject is very

L’Engle, the award-winning author of A

dark,” Corrie says. “I believe one of my

Wrinkle in Time. L’Engle handed Corrie a

main jobs in this world, as a human, is

stack of play scripts and said she wanted

to notice, appreciate, and celebrate the

her to turn them into something. Corrie

beauty that God has created. And what

dropped out of seminary at Seattle

follows naturally from that appreciation is

University, entered film school, and never

to try to help others do the same, through

turned back.

my work, if I can.”

A beauty—for the past sixteen years,

It’s been a long road for Corrie since

Corrie has worked at Kairos Productions.

taking James May’s “Intro to Film Class”

Kairos, according to their website is “a

at Bush. Bush was a place that gave her,

reverently irreverent Seattle-based

as she says, “a creative nest. It challenged

film production company dedicated to

me, enlarged me, and enlivened me.”

the creation of vibrant, idiosyncratic

The school catapulted her to where she

celebrations of life through filmmaking.”

is today. “I would not have become an

Corrie just locked the cut of her fifth

artist without the powerful inspiration of

feature length film, Language Arts. It’s

the people at that school. She mentions

currently in post-production. She

Midge Bowman ’51, James and Virginia

enthuses, “There is much rejoicing!”

May, Meta O’Crotty, Sally Pritchard,

It wasn’t until Corrie was forty when she got into filmmaking as a career, though storytelling has been a part of her life from the get-go. She’s performed as an actor with Book-It Repertory Theater, Taproot Theatre, and other

EXPERIENCE

the seven original co-founders of Seattle

George Taylor, and more, as those that inspired, and continue to inspire her. “The teachers and students at Bush honed my spirit and called me to a deeper and deeper exploration of the life of the mind and the heart and the eyes.”

local theater organizations. She was a

It was Madeleine L’Engle who said, “We

founding member of the Shakespeare

can’t take credit for our talents. It’s how

Workout in New York and was one of

we use them that counts.”

24


PHOTO COURTESY OF CORRIE DURYEE ’77

Corrie Duryee ’77

PROFILE /

2019

25


B Y J O N AT H A N S H I P L E Y, C L A S S O F 2 0 2 1 PA R E N T

Storytelling with Creative Confidence

A

ugust Cole ’93 is writing techno-thrillers about the next world war. His brother, Sam ’96, is making films

in New York City. “I’m constantly looking for inspiration,”

August says. “When I feel inspiration and love,” Sam says, “I see beauty.” These two brothers are inspired to do the work they do because it’s not work when you love what you do. “My Bush education gave me a creative confidence that I couldn’t have developed anywhere else,” August says. “Bush gave me the confidence to strike out into the world,” Sam says. Both brothers mention the Bush teachers who gave them the opportunities to discover the world. More so, gave them the chance to find out who they were themselves. Teachers like Carmine Chickadel, Joel Dure, Gardiner Vinnedge, Lois Fein, and Lori Hall inspired them and helped shape them into the men they are today. Today, August is based in the Boston area, where he focuses on writing fiction; he travels globally to speak and consult on the future of conflict. He also works on creative foresight at SparkCognition, an AI company based in Austin, Texas. His breakout was co-writing the 2015 thriller Ghost Fleet: A Novel of the Next World War, heralded by the USA Today as “A modern-day successor to tomes such as The Hunt for Red October.” “The more I chart my own professional path as a writer focused on using my fiction to better understand the future, the more I look back at my experiences at Bush,” August says. After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania,

Sam Cole ’96

and getting an MPA at Harvard Kennedy School with a focus on national security and foreign policy, August has worked as a defense industry reporter at The Wall Street Journal, a non-resident fellow at West Point’s Modern War Institute, and directed the Atlantic Council’s Art of the Future Project,

EXPERIENCE

26


PHOTOS COURTESY OF AUGUST COLE ’93 AND SAM COLE ’96

which explores narrative fiction, visual media, and other art for insight into the future international security environment. “My work increasingly focuses on writing fiction and I made more changes last year to confirm that. I want to pick my own path in making this writing life.” August is currently wrapping up another novel with his Ghost Fleet co-writer Peter W. Singer.

PROFILE /

The Coles

Sam works in New York City as a filmmaker and photographer for brands like Nike, Timberland, and G-Shock. In 2012, he completed Danchi No Yume (Dreams of the Projects), a feature documentary exploring the life of legendary Japanese hip-hop artist Anarchy. Rated four stars by The Japan Times, Kaori Shoji writes, “Mukaijima is depicted as a terrifying fortress that nevertheless holds a certain allure. This is where Anarchy scribbled poetry on cheap notebooks and met up with friends to make hip-hop and shook his tattooed fists in fury at the fate that brought him here.” Sam says, “My desire and will to create a feature documentary in Japan was derived from my foreign language experience and travel at Bush. I would have never made Danchi No Yume without my Bush experience.” Sam is currently working on a pro-bono short documentary film for Warrior Camp—a unique experience for military veterans suffering from PTSD and moral injury. Aside from working with the likes of Duckie Brown, Visionaire, and Excel Sports Management, Sam founded Make Believe LLC in 2006—a full service video production company. He says, “My love and appreciation for my subjects comes through in the final product.” Storytelling is important to the brothers, and it touched both of them during their formative years at Bush. Now the two are passing stories down to their own children. “I usually spend twenty minutes reading with my youngest daughter before she goes to bed; each of us absorbed in our own books,” August says. “The other night, I was so content I completely lost track of time, which is a great shared experience and a feeling I strive to give readers with my own writing.” In New York, Sam walks his son, Otis, around the streets of Brooklyn. “Watching him grow and learn is beautiful. Every day, I take Otis for a walk and I see all these little pockets of history.” Sam’s latest interest in regards to beauty is admiring nineteenth-century brownstones in his neighborhood. “I love taking photos that look as if they could have been taken a hundred years ago.” The brothers expand the world through their lives and through

August Cole ’93

their work. Sam says, “You’re more equipped to handle what the world throws at you after you’ve had the Bush experience.”

27

2019


“Beauty is happiness. A beautiful thing that happened this year was in P.E. when we played Mission Impossible and had to work together as a team to cross the gym on different objects. My best part of the year was Thanksgiving break when I went to Mazama and I got to ride horses a few times. I took a risk this year when I tried out for a solo in choir. At Bush, I like the

Lucy ’28

different activities such as Field Day and Fall Festival.”

H O U S E : Y E L LOW M A P L E S I N F LU E N T I A L T E AC H E R : I ’ V E LO V E D A L L O F M Y T E AC H E R S . I C A N ’ T P I C K A FAVO R I T E .

EXPERIENCE

28


“Beauty is not just a sensation that pleases your eyes, it’s also an emotion that you can feel and imagine. Each person has their own standards of beauty. You can perceive it with touch, hearing, taste, and all the other senses. For me, the tingling sensation I feel when I imagine delivering a perfect assist that develops into a stunning goal—that’s beauty!”

GianLucca ’25 HOUSE: GREEN GIANT SEQUOIAS I N F LU E N T I A L T E AC H E R : L E S L I E LO P E R B U S H S H O U L D N E V E R C H A N G E : Its good natured

and friendly faculty. I think that those components are crucial in a great school like Bush, and they should never change that. At Bush, the teachers inspire me to be curious, and to have fun learning.

29

2019


Middle School Drama Production of The Visit by Joanne Keegan

EXPERIENCE

30


A ROUND CA MPUS

32

36

42

46

50

56

62

Circles

Fall Festival

Master Plan

New Schedule

AMP

Methow

Athletics

31

2019


EXPERIENCE

32


Growing Circles at The Bush School

33

2019


THE CIRCLE:

B Y E M I LY W A R R E N , A S S I S TA N T D I R E C T O R O F I N T E R C U LT U R A L A F F A I R S

A SAFE SPACE TO COME TOGETHER In Indigenous societies, coming together in a circle has been as natural as sitting around a fire and reflecting on shared concerns. It inspires a different quality of conversation. People tell stories and share experiences. We are more likely to speak from our hearts and listen from our hearts as well. We want to experience each other not as adversaries but as fellow human beings. We find a place where we can share what is going on with us, whatever that may be. The Circle process brings these qualities into modern experience. Circles offer a different way of dealing with the challenges of everyday life as well as of responding to the larger challenges we face. Circles help us learn how to “be in a good way” with each other, and they give us a place and time to practice this positive way of being. Circles draw on our best values

hree and a half years ago when I interviewed

Circles help participants respond from one’s best self

at Bush to become an Upper School Math Teacher, I knew almost immediately that I had found my landing place in Seattle. Despite

Circles build community

having great experiences at other schools during the interview

Circles create a space for deep listening and being heard

process, Bush just felt like home: a place of deep comfort, but also, ironically, a place of discomfort—the kind that facilitates

Circles generate mutual understanding and respect

growth. Nothing encapsulated that more perfectly than my

Circles honor all voices equally

We talked about nearly everything diversity/equity-related;

interview with Dr. Jabali Stewart, Director of Intercultural Affairs. while it felt like we were speaking different languages, I knew

Circles make decisions by consensus

that our visions were aligned. I remember him talking skillfully about the power of Peacemaking Circles, a process I both knew

Circles cultivate mutual support Circles honor the gifts, knowledge, talents, and experiences that each participant brings Though participants may not realize it at first, Circles offer a structured form of dialogue. The idea is that we can engage in difficult conversations most fruitfully when we first nurture our shared values. Setting aside time up front to build relationships based on what we have in common, Circles create a safe space for participants to express different viewpoints and strong emotions as they discuss difficult issues later on. The process is useful for both communicating and making decisions. Participating in Circles is inherently transformative, because we experience the world from more perspectives than our own. Drawing on diverse knowledge and experiences, Circles generate options and solutions that are often outside the box of conventional thinking and that often go beyond what one person could generate on their own.

and didn’t know. Growing up, I regularly sat in circles with my family, but circles... in schools? I have to admit, I was skeptical. Circles reappeared in my life at the right moment, and I paid attention. Circles have become as meaningful to me as teaching. After joining the Bush community, I studied under Jabali while also teaching. I became excited about how circles could be used in the classroom. I sampled and experimented, and saw the real and tangible results of circle work with students. In those first two years, I learned the main components of circle (Talking Piece, Centerpiece, Opening Ceremony, Values, Guidelines, Rounds, and Closing Ceremony) and how to use them. I have also begun to understand the nuances of power and creation in the circle. I watched how Jabali worked to integrate circle in Administrative Group work, Human Relations classes, Third Grade, Fifth Grade, Seventh Grade, Eighth Grade, and into some of the Upper School classes. I also began to use circle in my advisory, and Susanne Eckert, Jabali Stewart, and I used circle once a week in an interdisciplinary math and history course called Seattle, Statistics, and Social Justice. I felt as if something really exciting

Description from Living Justice Press

EXPERIENCE

34


me confidence that circles can hold so much more than I could have imagined. Most importantly for my learning, I have thought deeply about power differentials

(RE) BUILD SCHOOL COMMUNITY

in circle and the role that the keeper plays when a circle goes out of balance. This apprenticeship is coming at the perfect time. Jabali has invested seven

(RE) STABILIZE SCHOOL COMMUNITY

years working to embed circle practice into the culture of The Bush School. As I have learned from Kay, shifting an institution’s culture is the best way to support higher-stakes circle work, such as re-entry and discipline circles. Of course Jabali knew this, and has put in the time and effort to make that happen. With the circle process rooted in the

was taking off, both for myself and for

But what would it mean to step away

the school.

from teaching math, into which I had

I knew that it was time for me to invest in this kind of work in the world. Last spring, I attended a training on the East Coast with Kay Pranis, who is known lovingly in the circle community as the

invested nearly twenty years of my life and I love with all of my heart? I’m not sure there is an answer to that quite yet, but I suspect that it will reveal itself slowly over time.

school community, we now have the support to move to a more restorative framework for discipline, which is beginning to emerge. And, as my work with Kay has continued to develop, I am able to bring back my learnings to support this work. The Bush School is ripe for a glorious blossoming of the labor that Jabali, along with faculty and

‘Grandmother of Peacemaking Circles.’

So this year, I have continued to work

Kay started her work with circles in the

part-time in the Office of Intercultural

1990s when she was working for the

Affairs, allowing me the flexibility in

I am truly honored to call both Jabali

Minnesota Department of Corrections

my schedule to travel with Kay. I have

and Kay teachers. Both embody wisdom,

as the Restorative Justice Planner. I

traveled to New York City, Raleigh,

levity, confidence, humility, flexibility,

students, have put into circle work.

immediately felt a connection with her

North Carolina, and Cedar Rapids, Iowa

and a deep honoring of each person in

work, partially because of Kay’s story-

to assist and learn from Kay. It has been

their presence. I have learned so much.

telling, dry wit, and clear instruction,

an honor to learn from someone with

but also because she had majored in

such deep roots in Peacemaking Circles

math and I recognized the mathematical

(twenty-five years worth!), particularly

undertones of her work. After that

in a context other than schools. There

training, I wrote Kay a six-page letter,

are a wide range of circles that can

exploring some of the connections of

be used, ranging from talking circles

Peacemaking Circles with mathematical

to healing circles to problem-solving

concepts. For example, what does it

circles. What is useful about learning

And, after twenty years of teaching, it is time for me to tip the balance from teaching to learning, so I can give back to a line of work—teaching—that nourished me for all of those years. And the more I learn about circles, the more I want to learn.

mean for our circle work that circles in

from Kay is that she learned circles and

math are unbounded yet finite? What

worked with them in one of the most

join us in making this a cornerstone of

is the metaphor? At the end of that

challenging combinations: in prisons and

the school. Attend a training, ask a Bush

six-page letter, I sheepishly asked if

with sentencing circles. My exposure

student what they last talked about

she might have the time and energy to

to circles up until that point had been

in circle, brainstorm ways you could

take me on as an apprentice. I could not

talking circles—mostly community

incorporate circle into your own spaces—

believe it when she emailed back and

building and teaching/learning. Hearing

we would love to have you as part of this

agreed to take me on.

the stories and wisdom from Kay, it gave

transformative process.

35

I invite you to join us on this journey;

2019


EXPERIENCE

36


K–12 Houses Launched at Fall Festival Celebrating our unique K-12 community, The Bush School created a new house system to bring together students, faculty, and staff. We rolled out the Bush house system on the day of the K-12 Fall Festival. We unveiled the house names, house colors, and themes for the year. The afternoon served as a way for each house to meet and mingle, acquire their house t-shirts, and begin the process of establishing their identity as a house. FAMILY GROUPS: Family Groups at Bush are a way for students to maintain a strong sense of K–12 community. Each group is made up of around fifteen students and two faculty/staff from across divisions. Family Groups meet three times a year. HOUSES: The Bush School’s K-12 house system brings together family groups and builds connections across Lower, Middle, and Upper School. There are five houses, each composed of nine Family Groups. Every house has a unique name and color.


WESTERN CEDARS

Leader: Director of Technology Ethan Delavan l

MAPLES

Leader: Academic Dean Dr. Sally Maxwel

GIANT SEQUOIAS

Leader: Lower School Director Pri Alahendra

MADRONAS

Leader: Upper School Director Ray Wilson


SUGAR PINES

Leader: Middle School Director Jay Franklin


“A beautiful moment was when I had trouble with math, and nobody teased me or made me feel bad about it. They actually helped me and now I feel way better about it. I really like to write. I like writing stories because I think it’s really fun to make up characters that have their own lives.”

Gia ’27 H O U S E : R E D W E S T E R N C E DA R S I N F LU E N T I A L T E AC H E R : J U L I E BARBER, MY FOURTH GRADE T E AC H E R , A N D K R I S T I N F E E N E Y, M Y T H I R D G R A D E T E AC H E R . T H E Y A R E R E A L LY W O N D E R F U L A N D R E A L LY S W E E T A N D I R E A L LY L I K E B E I N G WITH THEM.

EXPERIENCE

40


Jack ’20 H O U S E : Y E L LOW M A P L E S I N F LU E N T I A L T E AC H E R : J I L L WA N G S G A R D B U S H S H O U L D N E V E R C H A N G E : How approachable

teachers are. It’s always nice to be able to talk to a teacher during lunch when you have questions.

“I’m an active person, so for me, beauty is more about experiences than appearances. It could be skiing for a whole day or teaching one of my guitar students a new song, but I always love the sense of accomplishment I feel when I reach my goal. The best part of my year so far has been seeing how much I have grown as a musician since the fall. I am practicing more than ever and seeing the results. In the past year, I have had to audition for several music programs. Auditions are scary, because, even though I always prepare hard for them, I don’t know for sure what they will involve until I walk through the door. I’ve learned how I best prepare for them though, so it is getting easier each time.”

41

2019


Camp u s News

EDUCATION M ASTER PL AN:

Connecting to Place

UPPER SCHOOL CAMPUS UPDATE Just as new insights into the science of learning inform teaching practices, school campuses evolve over time to reflect students’ needs and a school’s strategic vision. The most recent campus improvements at The Bush School took place in 2006, with the construction of the Lower School building, Mag Gym, library, and underground parking structure, and in 2000, with the addition of Wissner Hall on the Upper Campus. Our current Education Master Plan (EMP), established in 2017, is comprehensive and presents the next iteration of our campus, including an additional Upper School building, a new Middle School building and Center Campus, and remodeling Gracemont to address updates to the city’s policy for retrofitting masonry on historical structures. Given the scale and integrated scope of the plan, the Board recently made the thoughtful decision to begin implementation and start construction of the Upper School building in May 2020, following the steps laid out in the EMP. One of the key drivers behind this decision was generous philanthropic commitment from members of the school community. As conversations continue, broader community participation in the project will launch by spring 2020.

EXPERIENCE

42


RENDERINGS COURTESY OF MITHUN

ACCESS

SUSTAINABILITY

OUR COMMITMENT TO FINANCIAL AID

O U R R E L AT I O N S H I P TO T H E E N V I R O N M E N T

The new Upper School building will provide space for new

The following is a statement that was adopted by the Board of

students, which creates opportunities for more diversity in the

Trustees in October 2018 and represents the school’s commitment

classroom. With more students, a Bush education will change

to sustainability. The Education Master Plan process created

more lives, creating a world impacted by more Bush alumni. As

an opportunity to establish principles and practices around

an organization that provides transformational experiences, we

environmental stewardship. This statement will guide planning

are committed to increasing access to The Bush School. A new

and construction decisions throughout the process and beyond.

building represents a place to hold our vision for the school.

As a school community, we believe we have a moral and

This strategy will relieve pressure on common spaces around

ethical obligation for the preservation and care of the natural,

campus, allowing us to provide enhanced opportunities for

non-human world. We will use a lens of environmental

social, socioeconomic, and geographic diversity at Bush through

sustainability as new buildings are designed and constructed,

increased enrollment, thus enriching the classroom experience

new programs are conceived, and as the school culture evolves.

and our community overall. The timely completion of this first phase of the EMP gives our community the opportunity to celebrate a significant achievement that will positively impact Bush’s future.

We recognize that this is a process and that resources may limit our ability to fully implement every idea and best practice in this moment, but we will continue to strive for making our campus and planet a safer place for our students and the natural world.

EMP: A LOOK AHEAD

One of our four educational foundations is “ethical judgement and action.” As a guide for the future, our work is based in three primary areas: People, Program and Place, as defined in

A new Middle School building and Center Campus are the

our strategic plan. The Bush School has fostered a strong sense

next projects in the EMP sequence. Planning is underway,

of place​through its deep roots in the Seattle community, its

and the timeline will be determined by community

commitment to place-based learning, and its outdoor education

readiness and investment in the project. The scope of this portion of the EMP is the largest the school has ever undertaken. The question is not whether or not the project

program. As we continue to grow our program, our campus, and our school, it is the right time to exercise “ethical judgement and action” regarding our relationship to the environment.

will happen, but when. The Board is fully committed to the new Middle School and Center Campus as are many members of our community. Regular updates will be shared with the school community.

Gracemont and new Upper School building, viewed from Wissner Hall

43

2019


Oliver ’31 H O U S E : Y E L LOW M A P L E S I N F LU E N T I A L T E AC H E R : JA N E T B I S I G N A N O

“My favorite thing about Bush is technology. I made a background on my computer and sometimes Mr. Adjei helps us when we’re doing morning meeting. I also like Choice Time. I do different things every Choice Time.”

EXPERIENCE

44


Sara ’21 HOUSE: GREEN GIANT SEQUOIAS I N F LU E N T I A L T E AC H E R : JA B A L I S T E WA R T BUSH SHOULD NEVER CHANGE:

It is hard to pick one thing, but I think that Convocation is really important to the culture at Bush. Having a coming-together ceremony is a really nice way to start of the year, and it’s nice to be able to be with the entire school.

“I think that true beauty is created when an oppressed or silenced group is able to push through the societal pressures put upon them, and express themselves as they wish. When people are able to present themselves in the way they view themselves, rather than how others view them, they are able to share their true beauty. Something that makes me really happy right now is learning new things. I have a lot of classes where we read some really interesting articles, books, and speeches, and even though I don’t tend to be the biggest fan of reading, I have really enjoyed these readings. I think that a lot of the things we read are related to many things I see in my life today, so being able to see those connections has really allowed me to push my thinking.”

45

2019


BY ALI SMITH ’20

The Bush Upper School student newspaper, The Rambler, publishes articles on student life, as well as opinion pieces, reviews, and interviews. After following The Rambler’s comprehensive coverage of the Upper School schedule change, we asked them to write about it for Experience Magazine. Club leader Ali Smith ’20 took on the task.

2018-2019

Da ily S chedule Tues day

Monday Arrival

8:00-8:15

F

C

8:20-9:50

8:20-9:50

Wednesday

Fr iday

Thu rsday

Arrival 8:00-8:15

Faculty Collaboration & Professional Development 8:00-9:20

E

B

8:20-9:50

8:20-9:50

Aligning

Break 9:20-9:30

A

9:30-10:10

Break 9:50-10:05 Advisory 10:05-10:15 Senate/Clubs/ Collaboration 10:15-11:00

MMM/Class Meetings 10:15-11:00

Break Advisory 10:05-11:00

Passing

B

9:50-10:05 Advisory 10:05-10:15 Forum 10:15-11:00

10:20-11:00 Passing

E

11:10-11:50

D

A

11:10-12:40

11:10-12:40

11:10-12:40

F

A

11:10-12:40

Schedules & Philosophy

Passing

D

12:00-12:40

Lunch

12:40-1:20

Conference 1:20-1:40 E

B

1:40-3:10

1:40-3:10

C

1:40-2:20

C

1:40-3:10

D

1:40-3:10

Passing

F

2:30-3:10

Conference

3:10-3:30

8/22/18 3:15 PM USschedule.indd

L

1

ast year, when Upper School

purpose behind the change. In an email

Teacher and Ninth Grade Dean Raleigh

Director Ray Wilson unveiled the

from August of last year, Ray wrote that the

Werberger says that semesters foster a

new schedule at an assembly, it launched

schedule will allow “more time for advisory,

“sense of completion,” while Upper School

a flurry of conversation and questions.

clubs, and reflection, as well as increased

English Teacher Dan Osar reports that this

Students wondered how teachers would

opportunities to delve deeper into course

year he has “more time to breathe” and

adapt to teaching mostly long blocks, how

material, discover new passions, and create

feels “less rushed” in comparison to last

Wednesday’s schedule would work, and

meaningful projects.”

year. Raleigh describes seeing “less anxiety

what the replacement for AMP (now called “Cascades”) would look like. Although the Upper School schedule has changed multiple times in recent years, this is a far more profound shift than prior ones. It’s also

Additionally, in his interview with The Rambler, Ray said that he wants to “slow down the pace” of school so that students and faculty can take time to “digest” and

from students,” which is backed up by the data from the survey that all Upper School students took earlier this school year: 52.7% of students—excluding the Ninth Grade,

“reflect” on their experiences. The switch to

who lack previous experience in the Upper

been a long time in the making: a member

semesters is meant to alleviate the pressure

School—report that this schedule feels less

of the schedule committee, which was

for faculty to rush to end a term, finalize

stressful than last year’s, and only 15.6%

dissolved last year, told me that discussions

grades, and begin the next term all at the

report that it feels more stressful.

around switching to semesters have “come

same time.

up at faculty meetings for fifteen years.”

Several teachers told me that the new

My interviews with teachers indicate that

schedule has encouraged them to cut back

Luckily for curious students, the school

they are generally feeling the intended

on homework, especially because of the

administration has been open about the

positive impact. Upper School History

rule prohibiting assigning assignments for

EXPERIENCE

46


Upper School Director Ray Wilson talks with a group of Upper School students in the Urban Courtyard

Challenge Success

Daily Schedule

During the Upper School’s work with Challenge Success,

The goals of the new schedule are to provide a more

a Stanford University Graduate School of Education

balanced student academic experience, foster meaningful

affiliated program which provides tools for helping

connections between students and teachers, promote

students lead more balanced and academically fulfilling

teacher collaboration and curricular planning to benefit

lives, it became clear that adjusting the schedule will help

student learning, and increase access to the city of Seattle

create a more balanced learning environment for all Upper

as part of our learning environment.

School students and faculty.

In 2018–2019 and beyond, the Upper School schedule:

Yearly Calendar In 2019–2020 and beyond, The Bush Upper School’s yearly calendar will consist of two semesters and two three-

increases the length of classes from fifty- and eighty-fiveminute classes to ninety-minute classes and forty-minute flex periods;

week-long Cascades terms. Benefits of moving from three

reduces the number of classes taught in a day from five to three*;

terms to two semesters include reducing overlapping

reduces the number of transitions within a day;

peaks in coursework, ending the term before winter break

builds in more community and conference time; and

to afford students a work-free break, reducing time spent in setup and wrap-up of each term, and supporting our curricular goals around deeper learning.

offers a late-start collaboration period one day a week. * In a normal week, on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays, students will attend three classes; on Wednesdays students will attend all classes.

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actually been fully implemented yet: the two three-week Cascades will begin next year. In The Rambler’s interview with Ray, he explained that he designed this year’s transition schedule because “the faculty need a little bit more planning time to really roll [Cascades] out thoughtfully.” Looking forward, the teachers I spoke to expressed excitement about the Cascades Wednesdays, when all classes meet. Upper

survey, 44.1% of non-freshman say that their

Immersion Program. Upper School History

School Math Teacher Alban Howe says that

long blocks are “engaging most of the time,”

Teacher and Twelfth Grade Dean Susanne

he has been able to reduce “busy work.”

and 58.7% of freshman agreed. Only 2.1% of

Eckert is eager to focus on “experiential

Upper School Science Teacher Brooke

students said that their long blocks failed to

components in a more significant way,”

Krolick appreciates that her students can

be engaging most of the time.

while Upper School Art Teacher Marilyn

now conduct a lab and analyze the results

Smith anticipates the freedom to “do a really

in one period, instead of having to finish the

However, both students and faculty report

questions as homework. Students seem

that the Wednesday schedule, where

to have felt these changes: According to

classes meet for forty-minute periods, is

the school’s survey, 54.9% of students

stressful and tiring. It is possible that this

agreed that their “homework load feels

aspect of the schedule will be reconsidered

manageable this year.”

in the future. However, when asked about

Overall, the new schedule represents The

the opportunities Wednesday’s late

Bush School administration’s tangible effort

start provided for extra sleep or time for

to further integrate experiential, progressive,

In regards to long blocks, the teachers I interviewed told me that the longer periods encourage them to go deeper into a subject.

big range of activities.” She says intensives will be “very project-based” and incorporate “student say and voice” in their planning and direction.

homework, the freshman The Rambler

project-based learning into the Upper

talked to were generally enthusiastic. As

School’s curriculum and schedule. It is also

Abby Goodfried succinctly put it, “I love the

an attempt to minimize student and faculty

late start.”

stress. Although the schedule is still in a

reports that, because of the new schedule,

When talking about the new schedule,

testimony suggests that it is succeeding in

her animal behavior class can take field

it’s important to remember that it hasn’t

those goals.

Dan says that long blocks allow him to probe the facets of a subject through “more variety and choice with activities.” Brooke

stage of transition, preliminary data and

trips to the zoo every Friday. Upper School French Teacher Esther Reiquam says that she likes the “rhythm” of the long blocks and that they allow her classes to “move forward a bit organically.” Freshman Abby Goodfried ’22 appreciates that “teachers do a really good job of filling [the long blocks].” While fellow Ninth Grade student Addie Zamudio ’22 says, “I think the ninety-minute blocks are really nice for getting work and projects done.” According to the official

Cascades Mission & Philosophy The Bush School divides the Upper School program into two semesters in the Fall and Spring, and two three-week Cascade terms in winter and spring. Cascades will begin in the 2019-2020 school year. During Cascades, students take a single interdisciplinary course of study, led by interdepartmental teaching teams. These thematic immersive experiences are comprised of students across all grade levels. Cascades are academically engaging, challenging, and require students to solve complex problems and face real-life challenges both on and off campus.

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Indiana ’19 HOUSE: PURPLE SUGAR PINES I N F LU E N T I A L T E AC H E R : CHELSEA JENNINGS BUSH SHOULD NEVER CHANGE:

People always change, and that’s what I love most about Bush: the people, the teachers. And it’s okay that they change, because even though I love Chelsea Jennings and Paula Dowtin and Bill Baber right now, I also love that they’re changing, that they’re growing, and that I get to grow with them, too.

“To me, beauty means order, structure, cleanliness. The perfect hanging indent of a bibliographic entry. Calm, serenity, peace. Watching the sunrise bloom over the Gracemont lawn on a chilly December day. Most importantly, it means shared smiles, hugs, fuzziness, warmth. I’ve been making a list of book recommendations from my best friends, favorite teachers, and cool people I meet. I get to read what they’ve read and have kept in their minds to ponder or cherish. I get to listen to them share the chapters that have stuck with them and the lines that repeat themselves in their heads. I get to listen to them go on and on and talk about the things they love.”

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IN THE CLASSROOM

Helping Superheroes This January, the students in the Superhero Design Challenge

AMP

representation

in

analyzed

world-building

Superhero

comic

books,

and helped

the Fourth Grade comic book club develop their own superhero identities, explored some new corners of the city of Seattle, and developed their own comic books. Together, they ate dim sum and asked complicated questions such as: “Who gets to be a hero?” and “Who gets to be a creator?” using the comic book form.

Comic by Eva ’22 and Addie ’22

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TEACHERS: Academic Dean AKA “Academio” DR. SALLY MAXWELL & Upper School Spanish Teacher AKA “Lady Lengua” MONICA GARTMAN

MONDAY:

Use the design-thinking process to design a power object for a Fourth Grade superhero.

TUESDAY:

Work session; Analyze how allies and enemies are represented in World War 2 Comics

WEDNESDAY:

Work session; trip to Fantagraphics to meet a comic book publisher and artist and learn about Seattle’s role in the comic book industry.

FRIDAY:

THURSDAY:

Work session; trip to see Into the Spiderverse

Trip to the International District for observational drawing, guided “Heroes” tour at the Wing Luke Museum, pinball museum, and dim sum.

he

Superhero

Design

Challenge AMP students started a

one-day

the

design

week

with

challenge:

to build an object or wearable costume element for a member of the Fourth Grade comic book club. The Fourth Grade students had been working with Academic Dean Dr. Sally Maxwell, one half of

llenge erhero Design Cha The Bush School Sup

the dynamic teacher duo offering the Superhero Design Challenge AMP. Comic book heroes like Batman and Wonder Woman are dramatically different from average people, and so is their stuff. Tony Stark built Captain America a shield, and Shuri built Bucky a new arm out of Wakanda’s secret resource: vibranium. Playing the role of employees of Stark Industries, the Upper School students used the design-thinking process to design a power object for a Fourth Grade superhero client. They considered: What would have symbolic and practical value for their superheroes?

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In preparation for design day, the students in the Fourth Grade comic book club identified their personal strengths and turned those into superpowers. They wrote origin stories and designed costumes for cool new heroes like “Splarm” and “Sports Dude.” When the Upper School students and their Fourth Grade client heroes met, the Upper School students interviewed the Fourth Grade students about their superhero identities and then sketched multiple design objects. After making a final decision with their clients, the Upper School students went to Goodwill where they had thirty minutes and $20 to buy materials for their projects. Back at Stark Industry Labs (also known as the Bush Library Makerspace), the Upper School students designed the power objects and presented them to the Fourth Grade clients. While the Superhero Design Challenge AMP is over, the Upper School students and the Fourth Grade students have all begun comic books, so it’s really...THE BEGINNING

Comic by Emma ’21

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“I see beauty in reading poems and stories and in arts, such as kung fu and music. I see beauty in people—in their character and in relationships. I am currently working on my EIP (Experiential Independent Project). For my EIP I am building my own watch from scratch and learning the beautiful art of horology. This is an awesome experience and it was a big risk choosing my project. I have been fascinated with watches, but when I came up with the idea I did not know if it would be possible for me to build a watch from scratch by myself.”

Armaan ’23 HOUSE: GREEN GIANT SEQUOIAS I N F LU E N T I A L T E AC H E R : S TACY B E L L & S A R A H C O H E N B U S H S H O U L D N E V E R C H A N G E : The experiential

learning such as the outdoor adventures at Bush. Because of this I get to experience new and fun things that I usually have not done before. At Bush when we do this, we create bonds with new people as well as strengthen the bonds and experiences with people that we know.

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Mei Mei ’22 H O U S E : R E D W E S T E R N C E DA R S I N F LU E N T I A L T E AC H E R : S U S A N N E E C K E R T B U S H S H O U L D N E V E R C H A N G E : The way

that the adults give weight to the students’ opinions and ideas. This allows the school to have a balanced curriculum of rigorous academics and light-hearted activity between students and teachers.

“A quality that I find undeniably beautiful is when some one is true to themself, real. It is when someone feels comfortable enough to be in their own skin and is willing to be vulnerable. I am currently working on welding a metal lily out of copper. Creating this lily has made me appreciate and respect the craftsmanship that goes into tools I use daily.”


Bilal ’29 H O U S E : R E D W E S T E R N C E DA R S

“Beauty means you have beautifulness inside of you and you can be nice to everyone and you have freedom.”

I N F LU E N T I A L T E AC H E R : M R S . M E T Z G E R

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Methow Happenings 20 18-2019 Class Retreats Middle School Wilderness Trips Middle School E-Weeks Middle School Family Camp Week Upper School Winter AMPs Upper School Spring AMPs Senior Projects Nordic Team Weekend Cross-Country Team Retreat Athletic Student Council Retreat Faculty Workshop Sixth Grade Faculty Program Planning Trip Regional ISEEN Faculty Workshop Family & Alumni Weekends Community Soup Nights Local Schools Events Local Non-profit Board Retreat Local Non-profit Visiting Student Group Local Summer Camps

This year marks The Bush School’s third year with student programming on the Methow Campus. This campus, located on the east side of the Cascade mountains, offers opportunities to integrate wilderness, cultural, and academic experiential learning. At the Methow Campus, we connect mind, passion, and community through rich, immersive programs. In this article, Methow Program Coordinator Hilary Kaltenbach describes the magic of placebased learning by sharing stories from this year’s programming. —HEAD OF SCHOOL PERCY L. ABRAM

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B Y H I L A R Y K A LT E N B A C H , M E T H O W C A M P U S P R O G R A M C O O R D I N AT O R

BUSH METHOW CAMPUS

Learning the

Stor ies of Place hat do you think happened here? Faces press closer to the level of the snow, as the local Methow naturalist, Mary Kiesau, steps back. “Something came out of the bushes,” one voice suggests. “I think it had flippers!” says another. “No, it had little feet,” Mary explains. She harnesses enthusiasm and prods young minds to think through their ideas until they realize that wings, too, could make paired imprints in snow. With this, our young snowshoers review the tracks from beginning to end: small prints leading from the bushes, then perfect pairs of wing impressions, first deep, then shallow, then gone. “A bird!” a student exclaims. There is triumph in the knowing. “A bird ran from the under bushes and flew away!” In the stillness of the snow and frozen lake, we can almost see the quail bursting from the underbrush and taking flight, its wings beating the snow for traction before finding the air.

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Naturalist lesson by Mary Kiesau

So how can an independent school 180 miles away from this valley help its students connect to the Methow community and landscape—and bring those skills back to Seattle? The answer lies in the relationships we forge, how we enter that web of community, and what we create and experience together. This winter, The Bush School hosted monthly community soup nights on the Methow Campus. The concept is simple: neighbors show up, eat together, and learn together through a speaker or short program. In January, students from Upper School PE Teacher and AMP Coordinator James Batey and Upper School Math Teacher and Math Department Chair Christine Miller’s AMP hosted the month’s event, from envisioning its program to ladling soup. The vision for the evening came from Eleventh Grade student

When we engage in a place, we begin to see a myriad web of connected stories, and we realize that all people have room to add their own voices.

Rayna Simons ’20, who proposed that we create art together. Local Twisp artist Perri Howard designed a program focused on drawing winter landscapes. After bowls of soup and homemade sourdough bread, neighbors gathered around tables in the classroom, with photographs of the Methow and blank sheets of paper. When Perri opened with the question, “Who here can’t draw?” half the room raised hands. But then they did draw—nine-year olds next to sixtynine year olds. Perri guided each artist’s eye to the details of the landscape in the photo before them, the anchor of a ridgeline, the angle of a descending slope. Moments of silence naturally followed laughter and small conversations. We were creating together, side by side, bringing the surrounding world in, and finding skills within ourselves we didn’t know we had. Will these students and neighbors go home and fill sketchbooks

This is the heart of place-based learning: learning the stories of a

with impressions of their wanderings? Perhaps, but that wasn’t

place. When we adopt a mindset of awareness and curiosity, clues

really the goal. The larger hope is that these students will return to

reveal themselves. We take note, ask questions, press further,

Seattle and look at their own neighbor in a new light—as a partner

until the narrative takes shape and we glimpse a perspective

in creation, as someone they can sit down with at a table and share

other than our own. Why did this quail leave the underbrush? Did

laughter or soup, as someone with whom they share a connection.

a coyote find its hiding spot? Did it hear a call from its covey? Each question nudges our senses awake, gives reason to pay closer

This is another vein of place-based learning. When we engage in a place, we begin to see a myriad web of connected stories,

attention.

and we realize that all people have room to add their own voices. The Methow Valley holds many stories. Flanked by mountain

These shared experiences create acceptance and belonging. We

ranges and anchored by the Methow River, the valley is home to

contribute our passions and talents to the narrative. Rayna, whose

a community of five thousand people. Within those five thousand

sketchbooks showcase her love of drawing, demonstrates this. Her

are families who came on homesteading claims, and others who

passion shaped an evening of discovery and togetherness, and so

were drawn by the adventure promised by rocky crags and a

her voice was woven into the story.

unrivaled network of trails. It takes some effort to get here, even forty-six years after the opening of the North Cascades Highway.

Does this magical web of connection exist only in the Methow?

Perhaps it is this remoteness that solidifies the sense of community

Of course not. These interconnected stories of place are around

so palpable here, where residents rally to protect the Methow

us, wherever we are. Yet sometimes, we need the nudge of the

Headwaters and where, if you have pulled over on the side of the

unfamiliar to jar our senses awake. This is the wealth the Methow

road in winter, someone will stop to be sure you’re okay. This too

Campus has to offer: space to disconnect from daily routines in

requires awareness, of others and of a web of connectedness that

order to fully connect to our surroundings, to our community, to

includes each individual.

each other.

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Community Soup Night hosted by Bush students

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Spotlight on STEM

LOWER SCHOOL MAKER NIGHT The Bush School holds an annual Lower School Family Night themed around “Maker Madness� as part of a monthly series of family nights in the library. The Maker Movement is rooted in the fields of engineering and design; at Bush, the goals are to foster skills in creative thinking, problem solving, artistry, craftsmanship, and design.

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SEVENTH GRADE SCIENCE: CELL PROJECT Seventh grade is a pivotal year in which to explore the natural world of life science. Children at this age exhibit a balance between the wonder of exploration and the sophistication of understanding and expressing multifaceted concepts. The Seventh Grade Science curriculum takes full advantage of this developmental stage. Students are given the opportunity to explore their natural world, ranging from single-celled organisms to large populations of diverse creatures that interact within their environment to form ecosystems.

UPPER SCHOOL STEM CENTER The STEM Center was created as a peer-to-peer tutoring center to help students of all grade levels with math and science. This year, tutors paired up with teachers to help with nearly all Bush math and science classes. STEM Center is made up of teacher-nominated juniors and seniors who have displayed competence in STEM classes, as well as a drive to help better others’ understanding of those fields. The student tutors are dedicated to helping others understand complex ideas and work through challenging problems. They say: “We know the work that comes with these classes—we’ve all taken them, and we love to help others.”

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Scarves Up! Joshua ’20 Wins

Competition to Design Sounders Scarf Joshua’s winning design was distributed to all Alliance Members as part of their 2019 season ticket package. To capture the creativity of Sounders fans, the Alliance Council began sponsoring this scarf design contest back in 2012. These scarves have become a symbol of the passion and loyalty of Sounders fans. AT H L E T I C S

Coach John Ganz retires after a twentynine year run This year, Upper School Counselor John Ganz has been to athletic competitions as “just” a Blazers fan for the first time in his tenure at Bush. He coached track and field for twenty-nine years, cross country for twenty, and bowling for at least

“I’m a Sounders fan and I’ve done a bit of graphic design, so when I read about the contest online, I figured I’d give it a shot. I was pretty surprised and excited when my design was selected by the Alliance and my fellow fans! My scarf showcases the orca from the 1990s USL-era Sounders logo, with the Olympic Mountains in the background. I hoped to celebrate both the team’s history and the natural beauty of the Puget Sound.”

six years. John decided that after a great 20172018 season, he was ready to step away from coaching while continuing his counseling role. As a coach, John’s philosophy was studentcentered. He focused on developing skills and tracking personal records closely— sometimes daily. John says that he’s still in touch with athletes, and that sports are “a way to connect alumni to the school.” He continues, “When alumni come back, there are three areas that they will bring up as a touchpoint: wilderness programs, performing arts, and athletics. It’s those connections that are why I coached.” He also mentions how much he has learned from new coaches during his time at Bush, citing bringing in new talent as highly important to the programs he’s been a part of. John finishes the conversation by telling the story of the bowling team. “There were two throwers on the track team, and as the season was ending, we talked about what they were going to do in the winter. They decided to start a bowling team. And so we started a bowling team, and it ran for about six or seven years. Kids can do those kinds of things here. It’s unique to this place.” Bush is grateful to John for his many years of coaching and for his continued work as a counselor.

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Middle School Girls Cross Country Team wins League

PHOTO BY SHANNON GOODING


Ethan ’18 - ECL Cross Country and Track & Field All League First Team, 3200m School Record Holder: 09:43.62

Deven Goel and Ben Kopstein - Varsity Boys Basketball

Sophie ’18 - ECL Girls Ultimate MVP & All League First Team

PHOTO BY MIGUEL DECAMPOS

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PHOTO BY TOM NICKELS

2019


ECL Girls Ultimate Coaches of the Year: Claire Thallon, Husayn Carnegie, and Kate Kingery

AT H L E T I C S

Season Highlights

ECL Girls Volleyball MVP, All League First Team, All State Honorable Mention Julia Deegan.

Three-time ECL & two-time Bi-District High Jump Champion Eleanor ’18 with Coach Floyd Webb

Lower School Runners and Families at Seattle Kids Marathon.

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ECL All League First Team - Noah ’19 and Taylor ’19, ECL Rookie of the Year: Kaito ’22.

Varsity Girls Basketball team, including ECL All League First Team Abby ’19 (center left, back row), All League Honorable Mention Aniyah ’22 (center right, back row), and ECL Coach of the Year Sara Fischer (front right)


SPRING 2018 BOYS SOCCER: The team took fifth place in the Emerald City League, with Kanish Puri ’18 making All League First Team and Brandon Nowbar ’19 making All League Second Team.

in 2019), she also made All League First Team. Sabine Blumenthal ’19 achieved an honorable mention, and coaches Kate Kingery, Husayn Carnegie, and Claire Thallon were honored with ECL Coaches of the Year. The team won the Emerald City League Sportsmanship Award.

GIRLS TENNIS: The girls tennis team took second place in the league, with Mia Parrish ’19, Lili Randolph ’19, and Gabby Pratt ’19 qualifying for Bi-Districts, and Gabby Pratt ’19 advancing to the State Championships. All three athletes also made All League First Team. TRACK & FIELD: The track and field team had a great season. Highlights included Eleanor

FALL 2018 CROSS COUNTRY RUNNING: Congratulations to the Blazers Cross Country team for their strong showing at the State Championships! Ela Nickels ’19 placed thirteenth and Noah Cape ’19 placed sixteenth. Both runners had the top times for Bush and earned a medal!

Hulse ’18 taking first place in the high jump at Bi-Districts and League Championships with

All League Girls First Team:

a jump of five feet zero inches, and Ethan

Ela Nickels

Widlansky ’18 setting a new boys school

Lolo Dederer

record for the 3200m race with a time of 09:43.62. Additionally, nine athletes made

Girls Team qualified for state championships:

All League First Team and five qualified for

Ela Nickels (Medalist, 13th Place)

the state championships.

Lolo Dederer (46th Place)

Liya Miskovsky (112th Place)

Dalia Cape (123rd Place)

Dylan Cundiff (127th Place)

Sabine Blumenthal (148th Place)

All League First Team: •

Mia Agostini GIRLS 4X400R

Oona Dederer GIRLS 4X400R

Chase Habu-Chinn BOYS LONG JUMP

Eleanor Hulse GIRLS HIGH JUMP

Tori Kippes GIRLS LONG JUMP

Ela Nickels GIRLS 800M, GIRLS 1600M, GIRLS 4X400R

Sam Thompson BOYS 400M, BOYS 800M

Ethan Widlansky BOYS 1600M, BOYS 3200M

Jasmine Young GIRLS 4X400R

State Championship Qualifiers: •

Ethan Widlansky BOYS 1600M (Medalist, 7th Place)

Ethan Widlansky BOYS 3200M (Medalist, 5th Place)

Ela Nickels GIRLS 800M

Ela Nickels GIRLS 1600M

Sam Thompson BOYS 400M

Eleanor Hulse GIRLS HIGH JUMP (Medalist, 7th Place)

Tori Kippes GIRLS LONG JUMP

GIRLS ULTIMATE: The girls ultimate team took second place in the league and qualified for the DiscNW State Championships, with Sophie Redila ’18 achieving the honor of All League MVP. Along with Anika Quon (graduating from United World College

Noah Cape

Taylor Cundiff

Kaito Hikino

Boys Individual State Championship Qualifiers: •

Noah Cape (Medalist, 16th Place)

Kaito Hikino (39th Place)

Taylor Cundiff (55th Place)

BOYS ULTIMATE: The boys ultimate team took fifth place in the league, and Hayden Ratliff ’19 earned All League First Team honors. VOLLEYBALL: The Blazers Volleyball season ended with a loss at the Bi-District Tournament against a tough Nooksack Valley team, after taking second place in the league. This was the most successful season for the Blazers Volleyball Program in many years. Sophie Stephenson ’22 and Julia Deegan ’20 made All League First Team. Julia was also selected as the League MVP and received an All State Honorable Mention.

GIRLS BASKETBALL: Led by Coach of the Year Sara Fischer, the girls basketball team finished third in the league and made its first appearance in the Bi-District Tournament in many years. The team finished with an overall record of 14-7 and Abby Parrish made All League First Team honors, while Aniyah Grant received an All League Honorable Mention.

ECL Boys Rookie of the Year: •

BOYS TENNIS: The boys tennis team took fifth place in the league. Congratulations for this strong showing.

WINTER 2018 – 2019:

All League Boys 1st Team: •

medaling in each of the Blazers golf matches in the fall season. Wesley also qualified for Bi-Districts along with Ryan Gow ’20.

GIRLS SOCCER: The girls soccer team took fourth place in the Emerald City League and first place in their division, qualifying for the Bi-District Tournament. Congratulations to Addy Ferris ’21 for making All League First Team and Claudia Abram ’21 and Lyla Barrett ’20 for making All League Second Team, as well as Elle Jones ’22 for being named ECL Rookie of the Year.

BOYS BASKETBALL: The Blazers Boys Varsity Basketball Team capped off a successful season by qualifying for the ECL tournament with a victory over Eastside Prep in the regular season finale. Unfortunately, due to snow and school closures, the league tournament was cancelled. The team played with a high level of competitiveness throughout the season, peaking in the last few weeks, with Kai Osaka receiving All League Second Team honors.

GOLF: Congratulations to Wesley Saliman ’21 for making All League First Team and

CROSS COUNTRY SKIING: The Cross Country Ski Team had a fantastic season including an exciting experience at the Race of the Methow. Everyone skied hard, whether it was during four classic sprints on Saturday, an afternoon group ski to the Mazama store, a skate race on Sunday, or a quick rip down the Methow Community Trail.

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SPRING 2019 8


#BUSHArts At Bush, we like to say that creativity is in our DNA. We are celebrating #BUSHArts, and hope you will join us in posting your pictures capturing the arts at Bush using the hashtag #BUSHArts, whether you are a current student, parent, or alum.

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HERO PROJECT

“My hero is my kindergarten teacher, Janet. She has been teaching for thirty years. She is my hero because she is patient and kind. If I tried to spend twenty minutes teaching a kindergartener, I’d give up. Spending five hours with them must take a lot of patience. Also, who gets kindergarteners to learn without being kind? Thanks to Janet, I love to read, write, add, and subtract. She was, and is, an amazing teacher.” — ADA M. ’26

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Simon ’26 HOUSE: PURPLE SUGAR PINES I N F LU E N T I A L T E AC H E R : I F I ’ M F E E L I N G C R E AT I V E , M R . JAC K S O N , A N D I F I WA N T TO G E T S T U F F D O N E , I T ’ S ROSEMARY WHEELER. BUSH SHOULD NEVER CHANGE:

The freedom that it gives you.

“The best part of my year at school was when I was on the basketball team. It was my first time playing basketball. It was also a risk, because before that I’d had very bad experiences with team sports. But this year was so fun that I’m planning on playing sports in Middle School too. I think beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it’s something that makes you happy. If, let’s say in basketball, someone scores a goal, it’s beautiful to one team, but it’s a lot harder to think it’s beautiful on the other team. A beautiful moment for me this year was when I got 100% on my math test!”

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Dara ’30 HOUSE: GREEN GIANT SEQUOIAS I N F LU E N T I A L T E AC H E R : B U S H R A JAW E D & C L A I R E W I L S O N

“At Bush, friends make me happy. My favorite thing that I get to do at school is science. We touched birds once. We were learning about them and we picked our favorite bird. Then we got to draw it. I picked the Cooper’s Hawk. I like that it’s black, and I like the beak.”

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A R T W O R K B Y: U P P E R S C H O O L D R AW I N G C L A S S

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GI V ING

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74

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Philanthropy

Team 1924

Annual Fund

Celebrate Bush

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B Y S H A R O N H U R T, D I R E C T O R O F D E V E L O P M E N T

Pathways to Giving In the last issue of Experience, we explored the value of writing a personal or family philanthropic mission statement. The process helps clarify what’s most important to you and begins to articulate your values. This next feature in the series gives families tools to develop a giving strategy.

Now that you have defined the “goal posts” for giving, it’s time to explore the next steps of the journey. There are several things to consider as you work towards developing a giving strategy. Keep in mind, this is a fluid process. What may be a clear focus today, may shift over the years. A practice of asking yourself questions and reflecting on your philanthropic journey will always serve as a faithful guide. Philanthropic Advisor and parent of an alumna and current student, Stephanie Ellis-Smith of Phila Engaged Giving starts with “why” questions with new clients: “Why do you give? Why are you looking to be more purposeful with your giving now?” This serves as a great start for their work towards an intentional giving plan based on her client’s values and beliefs. There are several studies that prove over and over and through a variety of variables that giving creates long-lasting personal happiness. A Harvard Business School study showed that those who

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spent more money on others as opposed to themselves rated their happiness levels much higher. More recently, a team of researchers from the University of Zurich analyzed brain activity of donors and non-donors through MRI readouts. Those who were told to donate their money had much greater activity in their ventral striatum—the reward center of the brain—than those that weren’t. While these are only two studies, the results consistently prove that charitable intentions, regardless of the amount, are the drivers behind the happiness phenomenon. Depending on your personal situation and needs, it may be very beneficial to work with professionals to help define and document a giving structure, tools, and intentions. The benefits of giving apply to anyone who leans into a philanthropic journey. In the blue sidebar you will find some questions you can ask of yourself and, depending on your goals, of your partner and/or family.


t starting is is a grea h T ? s n io n my pass point whe What are reference 1. d o o g a e will b ing plan. point and of your giv s il ta e d e th getting to tivators ? Your mo e iv g to t ou wan ards Why do y 2. e you tow id u g lp e h can nthropy. for giving your phila r fo ls a o g g identifyin e most g areas ar in w o ll fo the st closely Which of 3. r align mo o u o y to t vations? importan s and moti n io s s a p r ducation, with you d safety, e n a h lt a e H le: an and For examp urity, hum c e s ic m o ent, econ ritage environm ure and he lt u c , rt a , and civil rights make? ou want to y o d e c n e r What diffe 4. pics you sues or to is e th e r ecision What a 5. me your d a fr to y lo p u most want to em ple, are yo m a x e r o F making ? ystems or dressing s d a in d te security interes rs to food ie rr a (b s e ic direct serv bank)? g to a food n ti a n o d . s v g�? Think is “ workin it w o n k u yo question How will 6. wered the s n a u nd o y to make a about how you want e c n re fe if td to you. about wha s success e b ri sc e d ry that write a sto

Philanthropy is personal and powerful. The issues you care about are likely ones that are emotionally evocative and meaningful. This journey may challenge your own set of assumptions, and push you in directions you have not been before. I encourage you to be open, to partner with organizations doing the work you care about, to get involved, and to start in a familiar place where the partnership makes space for everyone to learn and grow as a person, a member of the community, and a philanthropist.

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A N N UA L F U N D

Team 1924 Team 1924 is a special event held each year to thank donors at the Team 1924 level and above, and to celebrate philanthropy at The Bush School. We extend our

01

deepest gratitude to our 20172018 Annual Fund donors for their

02

leadership and support, and to Hilary and Aaron Richmond for generously hosting this event. 1.

Hilary and Aaron Richmond

2.

Dan and Takayo Ederer

3.

Phil Welt and Ray Wilson

4.

Mili Welt

5.

Julia and Rod Diefendorf ’89, Ken Schubert ’89, and Mark Okerstrom

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04

EXPERIENCE

05

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The fall Annual Fund Parent Campaign, chaired by Phil Welt and supported by a fifty-member parent volunteer team, once again broke records and resulted in the highest levels of participation yet. On behalf of every student, teacher, and staff member at Bush, thank you to our parent 01

community for supporting the

02

school in record numbers! 1. 2. 4. The Annual Fund Kickoff 3.

Annual Fund Volunteer team Standing: Director of Development Sharon Hurt, Josh Samson, Head of School Percy L. Abram, Susan Feeney, Phil Welt, Judi Yates, Kelli Martin, Suzanna Westhagen, Assistant Director of Development Libby Singer Seated: Shirley Chow, Kate Hinely, Gloria Tzuang, Yoshie Fields

03 04

A N N UA L F U N D PA R E N T C A M PA I G N

By the Numbers Every gift matters, and has a positive impact on every student, teacher, and staff member at Bush. Annual Fund gifts go directly to the school’s operating budget, and help fund experiential programs, performing arts, athletics, teacher salaries, professional development, classroom supplies and equipment, financial aid, and so much more.

OVERALL PARENT PARTICIPATION:

UPPER SCHOOL:

91%

MIDDLE SCHOOL:

95%

LOWER SCHOOL:

96% 99.5% 75

2019


01

C E L E B R AT E B U S H

Mardi Gras 02

Mardi Gras: Celebrate Bush 2019 was an Ênorme success! Highlights of the evening included live and silent auctions, a delightful family style meal, remarks from Head of School Percy L. Abram and Co-Chairs Alyson Scadron Branner and Jessica Wray, and a vibrant afterparty. Generous support, through Raise the Paddle, and Online, Live, and Silent Auctions helped us raise a record $568,218 for financial aid. Please join us in thanking Co-Chairs Alyson and Jessica, along with the entire volunteer team. Your generosity supports our commitment to making a Bush education accessible to all students, regardless of a family’s ability to pay.

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EXPERIENCE

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04

05 07

08

09

06

1.

Jared Wray, Co-Chair Jessica Wray, Co-Chair Alyson Scadron Branner, Eric Branner

2.

Judi and Andy Yates

3.

First Grade Teacher Anna Belknap

4.

Gretchen Boehm and Tracy Amin

5.

Erin McMonigal ’90 and Ted Corbett

6.

Steve and Allison Harr

7.

Head of School Percy L. Abram

8.

Adrien Hefta-Gaub, Lisa Carroll

9.

Lora and Omar Shahine (Krewe Leader Sponsor-Pacific NW Fertility)

10. John Friedman and Marshal

McReal (Krewe Leader Sponsor-Garde Capital)

10

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2019


11 11.

Celebrate Bush Volunteer Team: Erin McMonigal ’90, Kate Pollock, Alyson Scadron Branner, Jessica Wray, Julie Okerstrom, Piper Salogga, Karen Naggar, Tracy Amin, Adrien Hefta-Gaub, Emily Alhadeff ’94, Phil Welt, and Head of School Percy L. Abram

12.

Karen Marcotte Solimano and Jim Solimano

13.

Kevin and Julia Baker

14. Jay Franklin ’90 15.

12

Front Row: Nina Maisterra, Keisha Wilson, Lora Shahine. Back Row: Emily Alhadeff ’94, Aaron Alhadeff, Chris Jones, Omar Shahine, Chris Ruettgers, Allie Ruettgers, Percy Abram

16.

Silent Auction and Cocktail Reception

17.

Kindergarten Teachers Claire Wilson and Janet Bisignano

18.

Fifth Grade Teacher Rosemary Wheeler and Ross Wheeler

19.

Kelly Evans, Maneesh Batra ’90, Amy and Daniel Pak

13

20. Anastasia and Nicholas Vasilius 21.

Keisha Wilson and Upper School Director Ray Wilson

22. As she introduced the Raise the Paddle video, Lower

School Director Pri Alahendra shared remarks about the beauty and power of education. 23. Hoda Mohamud and Sitina Sahle 24. Lower School Technology Teacher Jeffery Adjei and Administrative

Assistant to the Head of School’s Office Tammy Gyapong

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EXPERIENCE

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16

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17

18

20

21

19

22

Celebrate Bush Volunteer Leads CO-CHAIRS

Alyson Scadron Branner & Jessica Wray AUCTION A D M I N I S T R AT O R

Lisa Carroll DÉCOR

Piper Salogga PROCUREMENT

Julie Okerstrom B U Y- I N E V E N T S

Tracy Amin 23

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CLASS ART PROJECTS

Tracy Amin

VOLUNTEERS

Julia Baker Carolyn Lathrop Erin McMonigal ’90 Karen Naggar Kate Pollock Judi Yates CLASS ART VOLUNTEERS KINDERGARTEN

Shaina Akidau Julie Freise FIRST GRADE

PROMOTIONS

Kate Hinely

Judi Yates SECOND GRADE

RAISE THE PA D D L E V I D E O

Steve Rosen ’84 R E G I S T R AT I O N

Suzanna Westhagen THIRD GRADE

Shirley Chow

Andrea & Aaron Ostrovsky

SPONSORSHIP/ AD SALES

FOURTH GRADE

Emily Alhadeff ’94 Phil Welt

Tracy Amin Kate Pollock Josh Samson FIFTH GRADE

Julie Freise Arpana Goel

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A R T W O R K B Y: K I N D E R G A R T E N C L A S S O F 2 0 3 1

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EXPERIENCE


A LUMNI

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84

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89

Class of 2019

Alumni Events

BushTALKSArt

In Memorium

Class Notes

81

2019


Mia Agostini

University of Redlands

Farhan Amin

University of Rochester

Eleanor Antezana Wellesley College

Alex Bamberger

Willamette University

Catherine Bennion Davidson College

Sabine Blumenthal Haverford College

Olivia Bright

Whitman College

Abigail Carter

Oona Dederer

University of California Los Angeles

Columbia University

Lucy Cavener

Loyola Marymount University

St. Olaf College

Ariana Christakis Yale University

Sivan Cooperman New York University

Taylor Cundiff Trinity College

Chloe de Campos Brown University

Nina de Marcken

Princeton University

Dylan Diggdon

Morgan Dougherty

University of Edinburgh

Esrom Fessehaye Seattle University

Phineas Fox

University of Denver

Doran Goldman

Stanford University

Charlotte Gong Vassar College

Jonah Goodfried

Indiana Huey

Western Washington University

Pomona College

Max Gray

Lafayette College

Anna Greenstein

University of Rochester

Aaron Hamburg

Seattle University

Isabel Hawkes

Brown University & RISD

Destiny Henderson-Lewis

Wesleyan University

Kenta Hikino

Washington University in St. Louis

Occidental College Macalester College Tufts University

College of William & Mary Paul Quinn College Carleton College

DJ Jackson

Edward Kineke Cole Kippes

Healey Koch

Fletcher Levy

Shira Lyss-Loren

Noah Cape

Williams College

Welcome to the Newest Bush Alumni! EXPERIENCE

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Amiya Marshall

Pierce Ortiz-Williams

Jackson McCloskey

Kai Osaka

St. Olaf College

Apprenticeship

Colorado School of Mines

Chapman University

Flora Medina

Victoria Park

Drexel University

Johanna Mergener

University of Washington

Abigail Parrish

Gap year

Claremont McKenna College

Elena Miller

Margaret Parrish

Stanford University

University of Southern California

Eve Muratore

Columbia University

Phillip Person

University of British Columbia

Ela Nickels

Pomona College

Brandon Nowbar

University of Southern California

Gabriella Pratt

New York University

Katherine-Lilian Randolph

Bennitt Sands

Hayden Ratliff

Chapman University

Northeastern University

Christopher Stamper

William Watson

Bryn Mawr College University of Virginia

Pratt Institute

Max Schoening

Etienne Reche-Ley

Occidental College

Tara Reddy

University of Chicago

Ivan Repin

St. Olaf College

Isabel Russak

Pacific Northwest College of Art

Danielle Salomon

Chapman University

Stanford University

University of North Dakota University of Southern California Haverford College Whitman College

William Stroupe Agnes Tan

Mark Tarutis

Dylan Wahbe

New York University

Daniel Wang

Bates College

Samuel Wilson

Chapman University

Kalan Woods-Torrez

California Polytechnic State University

Alina Zatzick

Middlebury College

Gabriella Vaughn

CLASS OF 2019 This year, we will send seventy-one seniors from the Class of 2019 off to outstanding colleges, universities, and new learning opportunities across the country and the world. There, they will continue their studies to become the next generation of engineers, opera singers, journalists, researchers, artists, educators, composers, and leaders, contributing to their communities and striving to change and improve the world. PICTURED ABOVE: The Class of 2019 along with Director of College Counseling Melissa Lanctot and Associate Director of College Counseling Jim Sargent. Not pictured: Gabby Pratt, Tara Reddy, and Will Stroupe

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2019


01 EVENTS JUNE 16, 2018

02

03

Alumni Day Alumni returned to campus to celebrate their Bush experience. Alumni and friends enjoyed touring the campus, playing lawn games, and reconnecting with each other. 1.

Jane Stremic, Alden Garrett ’73, Devra Hayes ’73, Renee Sidman ’73

2.

Paul Beyrouty and Isabelle Xinyi Leung Beyrouty, family of Philberta Leung ’98

3.

Head of School Percy L. Abram, Upper School Director Ray Wilson, Midge Bowman ’51

4.

Reynaldo Redmond

5.

Chick Chickadel, Ellen Ferrin ’03, Laura Robinson ’03

6.

Mateaa Redmond ’00 and her daughter

7.

Roger Nelson ’98

EXPERIENCE

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07

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06

04


01

BACK ROW: Director of Admissions Adam Choice, Dillon Emry ’10, Ben Ryan ’97, Jackson Blume ’13, Jack Davidson ’14 MIDDLE ROW: Abigail Formella, Director of Development Sharon Hurt, Karla Maloof Andrianos ’85, Bobby Hausman ’13, Alexis Faerber ’14, Sonja Haroldson ’13 FRONT: Upper School Director Ray Wilson, Brandon Ford ’16, Executive Assistant to the Head of School Leslie David ’85, Head of School Percy L. Abram, Middle School Director Jay Franklin ’90

E V E N TS JA N UA RY 2 4 , 2 0 1 9

NYC Reception 02

Bush alumni and friends gathered in New York City to reconnect. They enjoyed drinks and appetizers, heard updates from campus, and learned about the school year’s theme: Beauty. Head of School Percy L. Abram reflected on the event, saying, “I enjoyed hearing about alumni’s favorite teachers and memories from Bush. Our faculty continue to be at the heart of the Bush student experience. Our NYC alumni are a diverse and talented group including a graphic designer, banker, jewelry designer, Chief Technology Officer, growth strategist, entrepreneur, journalist, and more. It is clear that the ways in which they 03 04

05

engage with the world—their empathy, passion, critical thinking, vision, and philanthropy—were shaped, in part, by the inspiring faculty and friends they encountered daily during their time at Bush. I am grateful that, despite the distance, alumni continue to reunite with one another and with faculty and staff to share our common affection for The Bush School.” 1.

Executive Assistant to the Head of School Leslie David ’85, Karla Maloof Andrianos ’85

2.

Bobby Hausman ’13, Jack Davidson ’14, Dillon Emry ’10, Jackson Blume ’13, Sonja Haroldson ’13

3.

Upper School Director Ray Wilson, Sonja Haroldson ’13, Alexis Faerber ’14, Head of School Percy L. Abram, Bobby Hausman ’13, Jackson Blume ’13

4.

Ben Ryan ’97, Director of Development Sharon Hurt

5.

Middle School Director Jay Franklin ’90, John-Eric Nader ’13

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2019


E V E N TS JA N UA RY 1 1 , 2 0 1 9

BushTALKS Art The 2019 installment of BushTALKS was an inspirational evening focused on the arts. The event kicked off with the annual alumni winter gathering, New Year, New Cheer. More than seventy alumni, parents, faculty, and friends gathered for a night of education and community. Our panel featured artists of Bush’s past, present, and future, who shared their own journey as artists and reflected on pathways to creativity. Moderator: Chick Chickadel, former teacher and English Department Chair at The Bush School from 1989 to 2001, Chick Chickadel’s career spans the

01

sciences and the arts. Focusing on poetry as his medium, Chick’s work has appeared in The Paris Review, Philadelphia Poets, Prosdodia, Signs of Life and many other journals. 01

Dennis Evans, former teacher and Art Department Chair at The Bush School from 1975-2000, Dennis Evans is a local multimedia artist with a national following. His work may be viewed at various sites across the country from MOMA in New York City to outdoor installations on the I-90 Mt Baker Tunnel Lid. Dennis shared memories of his time as a young art faculty member and the profound impact The Bush School community has had on his art journey. Kate Neckel is an artist who earned her BA from University of Maryland at College Park, and her MFAs from the Maryland Institute College of Art and the School of Visual Arts in New York. Her collaborators include Zac Posen, Ace Hotel, Cole Hahn, The New York Times and the Seattle Seahawks. Kate is represented by Winston Wächter Fine Arts. Mike McCready is the lead guitarist for and one of the founding members of Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inducted Pearl Jam. He has also been a member of Temple of the Dog, Mad Season, The Rockfords and Levee Walkers.

02

Additionally, McCready plays with friends in Flight to Mars, a UFO tribute band that hosts charity events for the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation’s Camp Oasis program and the Jennifer Jaff Care Line. When not performing live, McCready scores TV and film projects, which have included The Glamour & the Squalor, Shameless, Fat Kid Rules the World, Hawaii Five-O, We Bought A Zoo, Horrible Bosses & Fringe. In 2013, McCready founded Hockeytalkter Records, a small vinyl record label and media outlet specializing in limited edition seven-inch singles with releases from Brandi Carlile, Star Anna, Danny Newcomb, Stereo Embers and Thunderpussy. In late 2018 Kate Neckel and Mike McCready started collaborating and co-founded Infinite Color & Sound, a new art and music project. During the panel, they shared their creative process of exploration. (See more on Instagram @InfiniteClrSnd) Li-Ting Hung, Bush Lower School Art Teacher, inspires creativity in our youngest students. She believes that the power of art is “the humanity that trickles into the lesson.” Li-Ting Hung has shown her own artwork in galleries and museums in Seattle, Everett, Chicago, and Cincinnati.

EXPERIENCE

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03


04

05 07

09

06

1.

Mike McCready and Kate Neckel

2.

Art from Mike and Kate’s collaborative project, shown by Ashley McCready

3.

Lower School Art Teacher Li-Ting Hung

4.

Middle School Director Jay Franklin ’90 and Lisa Black ’88

5.

Chick Chickadel

6.

Stephanie Stein and Yolanda Stein

7.

Kate Neckel and Dennis Evans

8.

Head of School Percy L. Abram

The Bush School’s BushTALKS series brings community leaders from diverse fields to campus to discuss how learning occurs in their discipline. The series provides a forum for Bush parents, students, faculty/staff, alumni, and community members to learn more about how collaborative working environments allow individuals to grow and innovate. Speakers share what trends they are watching, how they identify talent, what skills are most useful to success in their field, and how they build a culture of learning, growth, and innovation.

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2019


In Memoriam We honor and celebrate the lives of Bush community members who we lost this past year. 1930s Marillyn Watson ’39 Elizabeth Biesiot ’38 1940s Helen Buschmann Belvin ’44 Virginia P. Kitchell ’43 Cynthia McNaughten ’45 1950s Sally Nunan ’53 This list reflects the alumni who have passed away between May 2, 2018 and March 31, 2019. Please accept our deepest apologies if someone is inadvertently missing from this list, and contact alumni@bush.edu. If you would like to share a memory or treasured story of your friend or colleague, please do so by emailing us at alumni@bush.edu.

E. Peter Garrett, FORMER BOARD MEMBER Edward Peter Garrett, a true gentleman of the Greatest Generation, died peacefully during twilight on the winter solstice at his family’s home. He was 101. Born in Seattle on December 7, 1917, Peter grew up near Volunteer Park and attended Lakeside School. In the early 1930’s, he enrolled at The Hotchkiss School, travelling cross country during the summers by train. He earned a chemistry degree from Yale in 1939, followed by a business degree from Harvard. His passion was downhill skiing, and in 1940 he was selected as a member of the U.S. Ski Team. Peter served in the U.S. Navy at Naval Air Station Glenview in Illinois as a flight instructor during World War II, having previously learned to fly. Peter began a career in his family’s businesses, eventually assuming the leadership role of Merrill and Ring, then a third generation timber company. In 1960, he also founded Welco Lumber Company. Evolved forms of both companies are still operated by his family today. Peter was a true sportsman of the era, ardently pursuing skiing (well into his 90s), bird hunting, flying, and golf. But he is best remembered as a loving father, grandfather, great-grandfather and loyal friend to many, both near and far. Deeply involved in the Seattle community, Peter served on numerous boards. A great story teller, with a wry wit and a mischievous sparkle in his eye, his magnetic presence will be dearly missed by those he has left behind. Peter is survived by his wife, Hope Garrett; his four daughters: Hope (Richard) Stroble, Leslie Garrett, Deborah Garrett and Alden Garrett (Charlie Eriksen); his step-daughter, Hope (Garrison) Belles; his four grandchildren: Peter (Diana) Stroble, David Stroble, Porter (Rachel) Stroble, and Liliane Eriksen; his stepgrandchild, Beau Belles; and nine great-grandchildren.

Brooks G. Ragen, FORMER BOARD PRESIDENT Brooks Geer Ragen, investment banker, civic leader, historian and author, died peacefully at his home of congestive heart failure on April 15, 2018 with his wife at his side. Despite a diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis three years ago, he remained full of intellectual vitality until his last morning. He was a man of principle and purpose who enjoyed every one of his 84 years. Born in Portland, Oregon on July 6, 1933, Brooks developed a lifelong attachment to the Pacific Northwest. After graduating from Lincoln High School, he attended Yale. During his sophomore summer, he had the incomparable good fortune to meet Suzanne Munk, on a blind date. The week after their graduations in 1958, they were married in Portland. For the nearly sixty years of their devoted partnership, he delighted in saying, “The best decision of my life was to marry Susie.” The young couple moved to New York where Brooks attended NYU Business School and worked as a research analyst with Dominick & Dominick. In 1961, Brooks opened a Seattle office for Dominick and the couple relocated permanently to the Pacific Northwest. He co-founded two investment firms, Cable Howse & Ragen in 1982

EXPERIENCE

88

which incorporated into Ragen MacKenzie in 1987, and McAdams Wright Ragen in 1999. Brooks led the successful merger of McAdams Wright Ragen with Robert W. Baird & Co in 2014. Deeply gratified by the merger and the collegial atmosphere of the firm, Brooks continued as a Vice Chairman of Baird, working in the office until this past February, seeing clients and friends in his home until the day before his death. For more than 50 years, Brooks embraced roles of civic leadership. He served as board president of many Seattle institutions, including The Bush School. He is survived by the joy of his life, his wife Suzanne, his children Matthew Ragen (Amy), Lisa Ragen Ide (Arthur) and Cameron Ragen (Tori) and grandchildren: Jake and Josh Ragen, Maisie, Tessa, Roscoe and Nellie Ide, and Jackson, McKenna and Carly Ragen, his brother Ron Ragen (Lee), sister Janis Harrison (Bob), many wonderful nieces and nephews and his beloved dogs, Emma and Sherman.

Virginia Price Kitchell ‘43 Virginia, or “Ginny” as she was known to her friends, was born in Seattle to Virginia Wiley and Andrew Price Sr. The youngest of three children, Ginny was raised in Seattle and on Bainbridge Island where her family joined a close community of friends on Restoration Point (The Country Club of Seattle). She graduated from The Bush School in 1943 and then attended Pine Manor College for two years before graduating from Mills College in 1947. In 1949, she married Frank Kitchell, whom she met shortly after he moved to Seattle, following his graduation from law school in Boston. Ginny & “Kitch” were married at St. Mark’s Cathedral and raised four children, Sally, Wiley, Robert and James, in Seattle’s Washington Park neighborhood. In 1950, Ginny & Kitch moved to South Carolina for a year during Kitch’s naval service in the Korean War. Following the war, they returned to Seattle for the remainder of their 65 years of marriage. Ginny was a strong, elegant and modest woman, deeply committed to her family and her community. She created a fabric of closeness in the home and welcomed neighbors and new friends who never forgot her kindness. She took particular joy in the time her family spent together on Bainbridge Island - in a community where many of the families have remained neighbors over 5 generations. She was a natural athlete and a true outdoors woman, enjoying canoeing and sailing on Puget Sound and hiking in the mountains of the Northwest. She was a member of the Sunset Club and the Seattle Tennis Club and a long time parishioner at Epiphany Church. Ginny was active in numerous civic and charitable organizations throughout Seattle, including including The Bush School. Virginia died peacefully at home with her three sons and daughters-in-law, several grandchildren and her amazing caregiver, Lorena Rogness, at her side. She is predeceased by her husband, Frank, in 2015, and her daughter, Sally, in 1982. She is survived by her three sons, ten grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren.


Class Notes We want to know what you’re doing! Send news and pictures to alumni@bush.edu.

80s

00s

Steve Rosen ’84 I am so happy to have two daughters who are attending Bush in Eighth and Tenth Grade and can’t believe how fast this experience flies by. Most recently my wife Jill and I opened Rocket Taco on Whidbey Island and Capitol Hill as well as bought Whidbey Island Ice Cream. So, between tacos and ice cream, we are trying to be squarely in the business of making people happy. :)

Ben Ahroni ’00 In early 2017, a friend from the computer science program at Carnegie Mellon and I co-founded a game studio called MeeWow Games. We spent the last two years designing and developing a game that launched globally on September 26, 2018! We landed a publishing partnership with Flaregames, who were eager to get on board due to our game’s innovative design that combines map-based progression (popularized by match-3 games like Candy Crush Saga and Toy Blast) with idle/clickerbased gameplay (AdVenture Capitalist, Cookie Clicker, Clicker Heroes, etc). The game is available worldwide now for both iOS and Android, and localized into six languages.

90s Benjamin Lukoff ’93 Ben, along with his wife Jenni Ross and their daughter Ivy, welcomed new son and brother, Lev Elbert Ross Lukoff, to the world September 22, 2018. They are in love. Lev’s middle name is in honor of Jenni’s father, who passed away in July.

Will Baber ’00 When I almost lost my own father, I realized I couldn’t go through life without fostering the same relationship that he has with me with another human being. It was at this moment, I knew without a doubt, that I wanted to be a father. Several years later on July 20, 2018, Flora Augusta Baber was born into this world and it has been the most uplifting wonderful experience to watch her grow and bring us closer as a family.

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Alessandra Gordon ’05 For Seattle jam maker, the plum didn’t fall far from the tree. The Seattle Times published an article on the work of Alessandra and her making and selling of jam that she learned from her mother who grew up in Japan. From her career in the restaurant industry and hospitality, to jam production and customer service, the article highlights Alessandra’s art. Josh Pemberton ’06 Josh is a winner of an international sci-fi and fantasy illustrating contest. This spring he will attend a weeklong professional workshop, an awards event and his art will be published in the anthology, L. Ron Hubbard Presents Writers of the Future Volume 35.

10s Megan Bang ’15 I have been studying fashion business in Hong Kong for a couple years now and I wanted to update on how amazing it is! I intern with Lane Crawford (luxury department store) at their Luxarity (luxury charity) division which promotes sustainability. I also have been volunteering at a local animal shelter to contribute to the local community. Hong Kong has been amazing and I am excited to continue living/ studying/working there.

2019


PA R E N T

PA R E N T

UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY

Educating

Seattle-Area Families

SECONDARY MARK

PA R E N T UNIVERSITY

In its fourth year, Parent University is The Bush

LOGO

School’s signature parent education event. This annual half-day workshop is open to the community and provides actionable insights for

SECONDARY MARK

Keynote Speakers How We Are Creating A Generation Of Stressed Out, Materialistic, And Miseducated Students

Raising Healthy, Happy, and Successful Children

parents by connecting them with educators and researchers working in child development.

PA R E N T UNIVERSITY

Total Attendance

PA R E N T UNIVERSITY

2016 Denise Clark Pope

2017 Marc Brackett

Challenge Success Stanford School of Education

RULER (Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence)

SECONDARY MARK

Community Attendance

2019 Julie Lythcott-Haims New York Times Bestselling Author

(NON-BUSH)

2018 Dan Siegel Mindsight Institute UCLA School of Medicine The Yes Brain: How to Cultivate Courage, Curiosity, and Resilience in Your Child

EXPERIENCE

90

How to Raise an Adult


© The Bush School 2019 / www.bush.edu

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NONPROFIT ORG. US POSTAGE CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

PAID SEATTLE WA PERMIT NO. 983

3400 East Harrison Street Seattle, WA 98112

@thebushschool

EXPERIENCE

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Profile for The Bush School

Experience Magazine 2019  

Featuring Head of School Percy L. Abram's first five years at Bush, Peacekeeping Circles, K-12 House Launch, Aligning Schedules to Philosoph...

Experience Magazine 2019  

Featuring Head of School Percy L. Abram's first five years at Bush, Peacekeeping Circles, K-12 House Launch, Aligning Schedules to Philosoph...

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