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DIOCESE OF FALL RIVER

FRIDAY, OcrOBER

20, 2006

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Young and old share in Provincetown By MIKE GORDON

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church will be a great thing for the commuof the original church 132 years ago. Standing nearby was parishioner Bertha nity and I couldn't be happier." The ceremony included song and ScripPROVINCETOWN - Parishioners from Adams who said, "This parish has been a big St. Peter the Apostle were all smiles during part of my family history. Rebuilding this ture readings as well as a blessing of the site an October 12 groundbreaking ceremony marking another phase in the rebuilding process for their parish. The former house of worship was destroyed in a fire on Jan. 25, 2005. Bishop George W. Coleman was on hand. He joined pastor Father Henry J. Dahl and several visiting priests, along with local politicians and town manager Keith A. Bergman, to mark the event. When the bishop, Father Dahl, Deacon Thomas P. Palanza and building committee member Marilyn Downey buried their symbolic shovels into the ground and tossed dirt into the air there was a loud smattering of applause from excited parishioners who have . ..... ~ _.:'''been attending Masses in the parish hall since y..• the fIre. "This is a wonderful day for our parish," PROVINCETOWN GENESIS - Bishop George W. Coleman, left, takes part in the parishioner Patricia Meads said. "The fIre recent groundbreaking ceremony for the new St. Peter the Apostle Church i.n was devastating to all of us and this is a new Provincetown. With the bishop, are: Marilyn Downey, a member of the building con)beginning." She noted that the ceremony was mittee; Father Henry J. Dahl, pastor; and Deacon Thomas P. Palanza, coordinator being held on the same day as the dedication of the design and structure of the new building. (Anchor/Gordon photo) ANCHOR STAFF

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by Bishop Coleman. A model of the proposed church stood nearby and many flocked to see the design. Father Dahl spoke to the gathering and was pleased so many turned out to share in the event: "This is a historical event for our parish and we're grateful to have Bishop Coleman here with us today. I am excited and thrilled that we are taking this positive step for our parish and I'm thankful that so many could be with us today and share in this momentous time." The new church will have a 400-person capacity and will be approximately 7,000 square feet. It will feature shrines to Santo Christo and St. Peter and plans will incorporate many of the same nautical themed scenes featured in the stained glass lost in the fire. Although most of the windows could not be salvaged, artists will use pictures of them to recreate similar designs. "I'm excited for the people here who can see their church built again," said Deacon Palanza, who is coordinating the design and structure of the new building. "It's a great day and this is an opportunity for us to incorpo-

Turn to page 18 - Provincetown

Mission Sunday all about people, not geography By DEACON JAMES N.

DUNBAR

NEW BEDFORD-For many people, the word "missions" conjures up thoughts of far-away continents. And in many fi- . nancially comfortable suburban Catholic parishes the "missionary" outreach is handed to a committee -leaving the average man and woman in the pew to think it's not theirs to be concerned about. :'Beyond the diffe.ren~~ qtp~ .. ,JJ"guage,~, culture and natIon, we must re~w~~,,? '. urn.... family," Msgr. John 'ocesan Office of the J. Oliveira, director 0t1h~alJ,~.\ Propagation of the F"t~>!. ti1.,fc.~•.{.r.'hit"~1wr as World Mission Sunday - October 2 .' 1'\"•.)". /.:U -.I

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"Also, we are give thrAtSJ..»· to evangelize at bap&airning the Gospel is part tism and being mission es of that," Msgr. Oliveira, p tor St. Mary's Parish in New Bedford, added. "Mission Sunday, held worldwide on the next to the last Sunday in October, reminds the whole Church to be sensitive to the needs of our brothers and sisters, and the promulgation of the Gospel of Jesus Christ." In an overview of what is done by the diocese's office of the Propagation of the Faith to assist people worldwide, he said an Turn to page 14-Missions

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RENEWED AND REFRESHED - Diocesan priests recently gathefed at La Salette Center for Christian Living in Attleboro for the annual Priests Retreat. This year's five-day event was themed "Return to Me With All Your Heart." Many agreed the retreat provided them with an excellent opportunity to renew their commitment to their ministry and their love of the people they serve. Front, from left: Fathers George C. Bellenoit, Barry W. Wall, Edward E. Correia, Richard R. Gendreau, Thomas C. Lopes, and Henry S. Arruda. Rear: Fathers James H. Morse, Daniel W. Lacroix, Mark R. Hession, John A. Gomes, James W. Fahey, Bishop George W. Coleman, retreat director La Salette Father Mickey Genovese, Fathers Maurice O. Gauvin, Michael R. Nagle, John A. Raposo, Bento R. Fraga, and Tim Goldrick.


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20, 2006

Vatican source reports pope to expand' use of Tridentine Mass By JOHN THAVIS CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE VATICAN CITY - Pope Benedict XVI is preparing to expand permission to use the Tridentine Mass, the pre-Vatican II rite favored by traditionalist groups, said an informed Vatican source. The pope is expected to issue a document "motu proprio;' or on his own initiative, which will address the concerns of "various traditionalists," said the source, who asked not to be named. The source said the new permission, or indult, was a papal decision, but was being done in cooperation with agencies of the Roman Curia. He would not elaborate on the extent of the indult, when it would be established or how it would work. The Tridentine rite is currently available to groups of Catholics who ask and receive permission for its use from their local bishops. The old rite is celebrated in Latin and follows the Roman Missal of 1962, which was replaced in 1969 with the new Roman Missal. Among those who have strongly pushed for wider use of the Tridentine rite are the followers of the late Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre, who was excommunicated in 1988. Canadian Archbishop James Weisgerber ofWinnipeg, Manitoba, told Catholic News Service October 10 that Cardinal Dario Castrillon Hoyos, head of the Congregation for Clergy, had spoken briefly to Canadian bishops about the expected step. Archbishop Weisgerber said the new indult was apparently motivated by a desire to bring comfort to older people who may miss the old rite. But in his archdiocese, he said, the few people asking for it are "young people who never experiencedit." Pope Benedict has made new efforts to reconcile with leaders of the Lefebvrite religious order, the

Society of St. Pius X. In a meeting last year with the pope, Bishop Bernard Fellay, head of the society, asked for the restoration of the Tridentine rite as a sign of good will. Bishop Fellay later told CNS that he thought the Vatican should simply declare that the Tridentine rite can be used freely because it was never really abrogated. Bishop Fellay also said wider use of the Tridentine Ma,>s would not solve all the problems the Lefebvrites have with the Second Vatican Council. The pope discussed potential reconciliation terms with the Lefebvrites in two meetings earlier this year, one with heads ofVatican curial offices and one with the world's cardinals. In both meetings, sources said, there were mixed views on wider use of the Tridentine Mass. In 1984, Pope John Paul II first made it possible for groups of the faithful to worship according to the old rite under certain conditions. In 1991, the Vatican established more liberal guidelines, encouraging bishops to grant permission and retaining just one basic condition: that those seeking the old Mass form must also accept the validity of the new rite. Pope Benedict has long questioned the wisdom of the liturgical changes made after the Second Vatican Council. As Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, he was sometimes outspoken about what he considered the dismantling of the Church's liturgical tradition. "I was dismayed by the ban on the old missal, since such a development had never been seen in the history of liturgy. The impression was given that this was completely normal," he wrote in a 1997 book. In the same book, he said it was important for the faithful to understand that for liturgy and other areas, Vatican II was not a break but a "developing moment."

TRADITION - Father Edward Hathaway, pastor of St. John the Baptist Parish in Front Royal, Va., c~lebrates the parish's first Tridentine Mass August 6. In March, Bishop Paul S. Loverde of Arlington, Va., decided to allow the Mass once a week in two diocesan locations. (CNS photo/Gretchen R. Crowe, Ar/ington Catholic Herald)

HISTORICAL IMAGE - The tombstone of a child is seen in a necropolis discovered beneath Vatican City. The necropolis was discovered in 2003 when the Vatican began digging foundations for a parking garage. The tombs date from the time of Augustus in the early first century to the time of Constantine in the early fourth century. (CNS photo/courtesy of Vatican Museums)

Visitors now can see Vatican City necropolis, tombs unearthed in 2003 By JOHN THAVIS CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE VATICAN CITY - The partly uncovered skeleton of a small child lies in the ground where it has been buried for some 2,000 years. Next to the right hand is an egg, thought to be a symbol of rebirth. The infant's burial place, touchingly simple, is one ofmore than 250 tombs discovered beneath Vatican City and now on display to visitors for the first time. The necropolis -literally a "city of the dead" - was unearthed in 2003 when the Vatican began digging foundations for a parking lot. The area containing the tombs was carefully excavated, with results that surprised the experts. "We discovered what might be called a small funerary Pompeii," said Giandomenico Spinola, who oversaw the archaeological work for the Vatican Museums. Spinola explained to reporters that many of the tombs were preserved in a mudslide that occurred on the Vatican hill in ancient times. When the tombs were excavated, they still contained the decorations, ritual furnishings, mosaics and frescoes from 2,000 years ago, he said. "This is the type of complex that is usually lost over time. It contains the tombs of rich families, middleclass families and even some slaves," he said. Those buried at the site included noblemen, scribes and a horse trainer who worked the chariot races. Throughout the cemetery archaeologists found a wealth of altars, urns, ceramic cups and bowls, oil lamps, statues and obituary inscriptions. One area is scattered with terra cotta tubes leading into graves; rela-

tives of the deceased would pour ritual offerings of milk or wine for the dead through the tubes. The tombs date from the time of Augustus in the early first century to the time of Constantine in the early fourth century. The excavated area, located not far from the papal apartments in the northeastern comer of Vatican City, was part of the "Via Triumphalis" (Triumphal Way), a major road leading out of ancient Rome that was lined with tombs. It is unconnected with the cemetery on the other side of the Vatican hill, believed to hold the tomb of St. Peter. As of mid-October, visitors can make an appointment to see the new necropolis, walking on a catwalk above the site where workers are still completing the excavation. The area has been walled and roofed and equipped with an air-monitoring system. "It's a work in progress. We have tried to 'museum-ize' an archaeological site," said Francesco Buranelli, director of the Vatican Museums. One of the most intriguing new

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finds was in a family tomb chamber that contained five beautifully sculpted marble sarcophagi. On one wall is a frescoed peacock, and on the floor a mosaic showing an intoxicated Dionysus being held up by a young satyr. The sarcophagi also have pagan themes. But the latest sarcophagus, that of a young Roman man who died at age 17, bears a relief of a praying woman. Vatican experts believe it is probably a Christian symbol that illustrates, within one family grave site, the growing influence of Christianity in Rome late in the third century. Another tomb that has piqued historians' interest is that of a certain Alcimus, who worked for the Emperor Nero as the set director for the most important theater of the period, the Theater of Pompeii, located in downtown Rome. The discovery of the necropolis meant the Vatican's covered parking lot is a little bit smaller than planned. It operates next to the archaeological site, divided by a thin wall from the ancient tombs. OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE DIOCESE OF FALL RIVER ~~~~

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Meml:iet:C4tbuUc Press Association, Catholic News Service PQbIiS6edWee~el(cept tor two weeks in the summer and the week after Cliristmasby the CatholiCPress Ofthe DiocElSe of fall River, 887 Highland Avenue, F~I River. MA 0~720j Telephone 508-675-7151 - FAX 508-675-7048, email: tl\leanehor@anChOrTlews,org. Subscription price by mail, postpaid $14.00 per year. §end addreSS eh,anges to P.O. Box 7, Fall River, MA, call or use email address '" " PU$LIStlER'~ Most Reverend George W. Coleman EXECUTIVE EDITOR- Father Roger J. Landry fatherroger1andry@anchornews.org OR David B. Jolivet davejolivet@anchornews.org EDITOR ~QOnJames N. Dunbar jimdunbar@anchornews.org Mike Gol'don

mikegordon@anchomews.org marychase@anchornews.org

ANAGEfi .:l\IIaryChase

t,~. ,", Send t.etteriltO the EditOr to: fatherrogerlandry@anchomews.org 1p,QS'l'MA,STERSsendaddress ~ to The Anchor, P.O. Box 7, Fall River. MA 02722. I". ",'~ANca:O~(USI'S-545-OZO) Periodical Postage Paid at Fall River, Mass. ,,_,,_'

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Second Look Project launches 'Supreme Court Countdown' campaign on partial-birth abortion WASHINGTON -As the United States Supreme Court prepares to hear oral arguments in cases challenging the federal partial-birth abortion ban November 8, the SecondLook Project hopes to raise public awareness ofthis issue with afive-week campaign titled "Supreme Court Countdown: PartialBirth Abortion:' "Six years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court invoked its Roe v. Wade decision to strike down state laws against partial-birth abortion:' said Deirdre McQuade ofthe U.S. bishops' Secretariat for Pro-LifeActivities, who oversees the Second Look Project. ''Now that the court is taking a second look at the horrendous pmctice of partialbirth abortion, this new campaign will help remind the public and ourelected officials how much is at stake." In early October, when the Court opened its new term, the Second Look Project began sending a fact or quote on partial-birth abortion each weekday to Congress, news media, and opinion leaders, and will end November 8 when arguments are scheduled. Building on the Project's "Roe Reality Check" postcard campaign of 2005, which educated Congress and

others on critical facts regarding the Roe v. Wade abortion decision, the new Supreme Court Countdown campaign will send 27 "e-cards" by email. These facts will also be posted on the Project's Website. The Second Look Project helps people make informed decisions based on fact mther than emotion. While abortion has been legal in the U.S. for three decades, polls continue to show that many people do not have very basic information about abortion, such as· when during pregnancy it is legal, or why it is generally performed. For information on the Second Look Project._visit secondlookproject.org. From the Second Look Project Website: "On Novem~r 8 the Court . is scheduled to take a second look, hearing arguments on a federal partial-birth abortion ban. As that day approaches we will offer information showing why it is important for the Court to get it right this time. Federal Appellate Judge John M. Walker Jr., commented on the U.S. Supreme Cowt's 2OO:l decisioninStenbeJE v. Carl1art striking down a state ban on partial-birth abortion: 'The Stenberg Cowt'sholdingistlawedinatleastthree

Pope Benedict calls a meeting of the synod of bishops for October 2008 VATICAN - The 12th ordinary assembly of the worldwide synod will be held October 5-26, 2008. This will be the second meeting of the Synod during this pontificate; Pope Benedict presided at the October 2006 meeting of the synod, dedicated to the discussion of the Eucharist. That synod had originally been called by Pope John Paul n; Pope Benedict confirmed the plans shortly after his election. The pontiff's apostolic exhortation on the Eucharist, summarizing and concluding the work of the 2006 synod, is expected soon. Meeting early in June, the council for the synod of bishops finished· a fmal draft document on the Eucharist, which was submitted to the pope as the basis for his apostolic exhortation. At the same time the council proposed three possible themes for the next full meeting of the synod. The pope chose the theme on the "Word of God." At theirnext meeting, the members ofthe synod council will begin preparations for the October 2008 meeting. The first major task is to compose the lineamenta: the preliminary document sketching the main lines ofdiscussion forthe meeting. The lineamenta is then c~ulated among the world's bishops for comments and suggestions, and the Synod council then prepares the instrumentum laboris that is the working document for the Synod discussions. Pope Paul VI established the synod as a "permanent council of bishops for the universal Church,"

with his motu proprio Apostolica Sollicitudo in September 1965. The first general assembly of the synod, meeting in 1967, drew 197 bishops to discuss the preservation and teaching of the Catholic faith. Subsequent meetings of the ordinary assembly during the pontificate ofPaul VI were devoted to the priesthood and social justice (1971), evangelization (1974), and catechesis (1977). During the long pontificate of John Paul n there were six meetings ofthe ordinary assembly, devoted to discussions ofthe family (1980), reconciliation and penance (1983), the laity (1987), priestly formation (1990), consecmted life (1994), and the duties of bishops (2001). The October 2008 session will be the 12th ordinary assembly, but the 22nd synod meeting since 1965. In 1969, Pope Paul VI called a special session of the synod to discuss the role of episcopal conferences. Pope John Paul n convened an extmordinary synods in 1985 to review the 20 years since Vatican n. He also called eight extraordinary synods to discuss the work of the Church in particular countries or regions: the Netherlands (1980), Europe (1985 and again in ~999), Africa (1994), Lebanon (1995), the Americas (1997), Asia (1998), and Oceania (also 1998). Pope John Paul indicated that he planned to convene a second extmordinary synod forAfrica In June 2005, Pope Benedict confirmed that plan, and preparations for that meeting are underway.

respects: (l) it equates the denial of a

potential health benefit (in the eyes of some doctors) with the imposition of a health risk and ... promotes marginal safety above all other values ...; (2) it endorses a rule that permits the lower courts to hold a statute facially invalid upon a speculative showing of hann, even if, in the vast majority ofcases, the statute's application would not lead to an unconstitutional result; and (3) it establishes an evidentiary standard that all butremoves the legislature from the field ofabortion policy.' Concurring opinion, National Abortion Federation v. Gonzales, 437 F.3d 278,291 (2d Cir. 2006):'

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Concluding Prayerfrom the Gospel ofLife

o Mary! bright dawn ofthe new world, Mother of the living, to you do we entrust the cause oflife: Look down, 0 Mother, upon the vast numbers of babies not allowed to be born, ofthe poqr whose lives are made difficult, ofmen and women who are victims of brutal violence, of t~e elderly and the sick killed by indif!i'rence or out of misguided mercy. Grant that all who believe in your Son may proclaim the Gospel ofLife with honesty and love to the people of our time. Obtain for them tlie grace to accept that Gospel as a gift ever new, the joy of celebrating it with gratitude throughout their lives and the courage to bear witness to it resolutely, in order tb build, together with all people ofgood will, the civilization oftruth and love, to the praise and glory ofGod, the Creator and lover oflife. John Paul II

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U .5. $ OCTOBER 20, 2006 Construction of Ave Maria University, town under way

THE CHURCH IN THE

By HEATHER FELTON

"The progress has been staggering over the last 12 months," Don Schrotenboer, project manager for Ave IMMOKALEE, Fla. - Driving south from Maria University, told The Florida Catholic, newspaImmokalee along Camp Keais Road, it's doubtful most per of the Venice diocese. "We really believe this university will offer trementravelers know a town and university are under development just behind the scrubby oaks and weeds that dous incentives to the people in Collier County," added Blake Gable, vice president of Barron Collier Cos. line the two-lane road. But tucked down a side road, on what were once "We're pretty excited about the lifestyle component pepper and tomato fields and areas with palmettos and of what we'll have to offer here." That component, he said, includes a water park, ball wetlands, Ave Maria University and the surrounding parks, and hiking and town of Ave Maria are . . . . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - . . , walking trails, all of quickly rising. which are expected to The future 5,000open in 2007-08. Potenacre community was tial retail tenants include conceived by Tom a coffee shop, a MexiCan Monaghan, Domino's restaurant, an Italian resPizza founder and taurant and women's chaiJ.man of Ave Maria clothing retailers, all in Foundation, who the town center. wanted to build a major Ave Maria and Catholic university. Barron Collier also anUltimately bringing nounced that Florida about $285 million to Community Bank and the project, Monaghan NCH Healthcare Syspartnered in 2002 with tems will open banking Barron Collier Cos., a and medical offices, remajor southwest spectively, in the town Florida real estate and center next summer. agriculture company, to Originally planned to build his dream in east be 180-feet tall, the town Collier County, south of center's oratory was a farming town on land scaled back in size already owned by twice, fmally to 100 feet, Barron Collier. Schrotenboer said, to For the first time since the official IN THE WORKS - This 100-foot oratory under con- keep it in scale with the groundbreaking cer- struction is set to be a centerpiece of Ave Maria, Fla., a surrounding buildings. It will still hold about emony in February, Ave 5,OOO-acre, 11 ,OOO-home community being developed Maria officials invited by Ave Maria University founder Tom Monaghan. The 1,100 people at capacity, the media to visit the oratory will be framed in steel girders which will be vis- he said. Plus, the develible on both the interior and exterior. (CNS photo/ opers state they will peuniversity and town in Heather Felton, Florida Catholic) tition the Venice diocese the mid-stages of construction. With construction beginning in April 2005, to designate the oratory as a Catholic parish for the the crews from Ave Maria University and Barron town for the celebration of the sacraments, and for Collier Cos. have made significant progress in a little Masses, weddings and funerals. When completed, Schrotenboer said, the town will more than a year. Phase one of construction includes the university's contain some 11,000 dwellings with a wide variety of library, student activity center, science/math/technol- price ranges, as well as a building for on-site fire, sheriff ogy building and undergraduate housing - all de- and emergency medical services. Although Ave Maria plans 'to complete the private signed in the Frank Lloyd Wright-style with copper roofs - and a private school for kindergarten through kindergarten through high school by next August, con12th grade and a commercial town center. This phase struction on the public schools isn't planned until a is scheduled for completion between May and Decem- later phase of the project. The first residents are scheduled to begin moving ber 2007. The jewel in the crown of the town center will be into the community in mid-2007 and classes on the the oratory, a '100-foot steel and stone cathedral-like permanent campus, with about 600 students, are structure facing down the square through the main . planned to begin in fall 2007. A temporary campus, serving about 450 students this fall, is housed in Naples. university and across a large lake. CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

SPECIAL VISIT - Nigerian Cardinal Francis Arinze, who heads the Vatican Congregation for Divine Worship and the Sacraments, meets students Loveline, left, and Martha Nwachukwu during a visit to St. Benedict the Moor School in Pittsburgh recently. The two students are natives of the cardinal's home country of Nigeria in West Africa. Cardinal Arinze was in Pittsburgh to visit the Extra Mile Education Foundation schools, which include St. Benedict the Moor. (CNS photo/Douglas Kaup, Pittsburgh Catholic)

Companies turning to chaplains to encourage workplace spirituality

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LOS ANGELES (CNS) . Though workplace spirituality might seem to be an oxymoron in a country in which many try to regulate spirituality to the private sphere, many U.S. workers and companies are benefiting from corporate programs that nurture the soul. It is a phenomenon that has accelerated in a post-Enron world, said Jesuit Father Mark Bandsuch, a Loyola Marymount University business law and ethics professor who has been watching this development since the movement took off in the 1990s. As co-author of''IDtegrating Spirituality Into the Workplace: Theory and Practice," Father Bandsuch said the national corporate environment is more amenable to workplace spirituality practices than ever before. ''There's this movement to try to counteract. society's scandals with values-based solutions," said Father Bandsuch. With such a high percentage of Americans professing belief in God, he pointed out, values in this country are based on a person's spirituality which usually comes with a moral code differentiating between right and wrong. ''We may not agree about everything that we consider right or wrong, but there's probably a threshold level of things we agree on," he said. That threshold is spurring a revitalization of interest in integrating spirituality into the workplace. According to Father Bandsuch, a number of factors are contributing to the growth of workplace spirituality, including the fact that many baby boomers have reached middle ageoften a time of self-reflection and reordering of personal priorities. In society in general, there's also been a trend over the past few decades for greater spiritual understanding and self-fulfillment. Coupled with Americans' proclivity to working so much, the normal avenues of nurtur. ing spirituality - church affiliation,

retreats and opportunities for study - are often difficult to fit into hectic schedules. "So people are bringing the spiritual dimension into the workplace," Father Bandsuch told The Tidings, Los Angeles' archdiocesan newspaper. With studies showing that up to 60 percent of working Americans unaffiliated with any church - some because ofa disenchantment with organized religion - people are seeking to express their personal spirituality within their own workplace and with groups that bring people together from the same industry but different companies. Some companies allow employees to voluntarily gather for spiritual fellowship; they include Coca-Col~'s Christian affiliation groups and the American Stock Exchange's Torim Group. One cross-industry groq.p where executives meet to share failh and figure out how to apply it in the business world is the Catholic organization Legatus, established by Domino's Pizza founder Tom Monaghan. Successful workplace spirituality requires sensitivity and structure, said Father Bandsuch. "You need a system within the company that respects different perspectives of spirituality while developing a common spirituality that helps people work together," the priest said. "It's not just about co-workers; it involves how you treat your con~ sumers, your suppliers and how the company relates to all stakeholders. It requires support from management which needs to model it an4 support it in fmancial ways, too," he said. Surprisingly, noted the priest 1 more companies are implementing workplarespirituality than one would think. Just as religious denominations have beliefs, rituals and community, so do companies with a commitment to developing workplace spirituality, he explained.

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Cardinal leaves hospital after fatal crash in Italy BALTIMORE (CNS) ...:.- Cardinal William H. Keeler of Baltimore was released from a hospital in Terni, Italy, October 10, three days after he suffered a broken ankle in a car crash that killed one friend and injured another. Father Bernard Quinn, 78, was killed and Msgr. Thomas H. Smith, 75, broke several ribs in the October 7 accident. Another vehicle struck the passenger side of the car in which the three vacationing American clerics were riding.

Father Quinn was a retired priest of the Diocese of Harrisburg, Pa., and Msgr. Smith, also a priest of that diocese, is pastor of . St. Joseph Parish in Lancaster. Sean Caine, Baltimore archdiocesan spokesman, said that following his release from the hospital Cardinal Keeler was recuperating at the Pontifical North , American College, the U.S. seminary in Rome. He told The Catholic Review, archdiocesan newspaper, that the cardinal is expected to be wearing a cast on his ankle

for 30 days. In a news release late October 10, the Harrisburg diocese said Msgr. Smith was also released from the hospital and was staying at the North.American College. Funeral arrangements for Father Quinn were still to be determined. According to an Associated Press report on the a~cident in Terni, Msgr. Smith was driving, Father Quinn was in the back seat and Cardinal Keeler in the front passenger seat when their car was hit.

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How should Catholics vote? It is an indisputably positive development that Catholics in general areredis-

covering that faith and life go together and that our relationship with God and our desire to please him should inform all our moral decisions, including how we vote. After having endured for three decades the scandal of Catholic politicians' pronouncing that they were "personally opposed [to the evil of abortion] ...but" would not allow their personal convictions to influence their public service, many Catholics have begun to see and denounce that sophistry for the hypocrisy it is. They want to be people of integrity, whose faith informs all their moral decisions, including what they do at the polling booth. It's no surprise, therefore, that, in response to this need, Catholic voting guides have become popular, to help Catholics make decisions in accordance with our faith. Some of these voting guides -like the Vatican's 2002 "The Participation of Catholics in Political Life," the 2003 document of the U.S. Bishops' Collference Faithful Citizenship and the recently-reissued "Voters Guide for SeriousCatholics by Catholic Answers" - focus on the general principles that should guide Catholic voters in weighing the importance of various issues that often come up in the choice of candidates. Other guides apply these principles to the specific voting patterns or positions of candidates for public office, to allow Catholic voters to see at a glance how a candidate's values stack up against truly Catholic values. As the importance of Catholics' voting according to their faith in recent national elections has notably grown, and Catholics became much more sensitive to secularists-in-Catholic-clothing manipulating their baptismal status for political gain, it was only a matter of time until the "personally opposed ... but" crowd sought to craft another strategy or slogan. They think they've found it in a new organization and a new deceptive voters' guide. But Catholics should not be fooled. "Voting for the Common Good: A Practical Guide for Conscientious Catholics" published by Catholics in Alliance for the Common Good - which is led by former religious advisors to Senators John Kerry and Hillary Clinton - is not\iing other than a well-funded attempt to try to persuade Catholics that it is morally OK to continue to vote for "personally opposed" pro-choice candidates who have swindled them in the past. . The guide notes that there can be "no litmus test" for Catholic voters, that there is "no Catholic voting formula," and states, "since we seldom, if ever, have the opportunity to vote for a candidate with the right positions on all the issues important to Catholics, we often must vote for candidates who may hold the 'wrong' Catholic positions on some issues in order to maximize the good our vote achieves in other areas." Then it applies those half-truths to the question which is really at the foundation of the guide: "Is it OK to vote for a prochoice candidate?" The guide responds, "When confronted with this question in 2004, Cardinal Ratzin~r .(now Pope Benedict responded that it could be acceptable for a Catholic to vote for a 'pro-choice' candidate if 'proportionate reasons' exist, and if the voter is voting based on those reasons and not the candidate's 'pro-choice' . beliefs. It is never acceptable to vote for a 'pro-choice' candidate merely because of that candidate's position in favor oflegal abortion. Here Cardinal Ratzingeris speaking abou~ prudence. Many 'Pro-Life' candidates talk a good talk on ending abortion-but don't produce results. On the other hand, there are candidates who don't believe in making abortion illegal, but who support effective measures to promote healthy families and reduce abortions by providing help to pregnant women and young children. Catholics must look at a candidate's position on other life issues. Can one really claim to be 'Pro-Life' and yet support the death penalty, turn a blind eye to poverty, and not take steps to avoid war? Our Church teaches that the answer to this question is 'no.'" . The guide first takes Cardinal Ratzinger's comments out of context, both specifically and generally. . Specifically, the future pope, writing in 2004, never discussed the "acceptability" ofvoting for apro-choice candidate butdescribed the conditions under which aCatholic who voted for a pro-choice candidate would still be admitted to holy Communion. He wrote, "A Catholic would be guilty offormal cooperation in evil, and so unworthy to present himself for holy Communion, if he were to deliberately vote for a candidate precisely because of the candidate's permissive stand on abortion and/or euthanasia When a Catholic does not share a candidate's stand in favor of abortion and/or euthanasia, but votes for that candidate for other reasons, it is considered remote material cooperation, which can be permitted in the presence ofproportionate reasons." He does not describe what the proportionate reasons for participating in the politician's evil would be, but it would have to be to prevent an evil proportionality greater than that of the destruction of innocent children in the womb. When Cardinal Ratzinger's comments are viewed within the general context of all his declarations, it's clear that he thinks few justifications would suffice to outweigh participation in the evil of the politician's pro-choice position and votes. In an address to European politicians on March 30 of this year, Pope Benedict stated, "As far as the Catholic Church is concerned, the principal f~us of her interventions in the public arena is the protection and promotion of the dignity of the person, and she is thereby consciously drawing particular attention to principles which are not negotiable. Among these the following emerge clearly today: the protection of life in all its stages, from the first moment of conception until natural death; recognition and promotion of the natural structure of the family as a union between one man and one woman based on marriage - and its defense from attempts to make it juridically equivalent to radically different forms of union which in reality harm it and contribute to its destabilization, obscuring its particular character and its irreplaceable social role; and the protection of the rights ofparents to educate their children." To say that there are"not negotiable" principles is to say that a "litmus test," a "Catholic voting formula" in all but extreme circumstances proportionally worse than abortion, is foreseen. We must legitimately raise the question, raised by the deceptive voters' guide, about why Pro-Life candidates "do not produce results." One 'reason is clearly because pro-choice legislators, executives and particularly judges, thwart the progress Pro-Lifers have achieved. Lastly, the guide attempts to downplay the evil of a pro-choice position by saying that pro-choice candidates may promote using tax dollars to favor pre-natal, family, or other social programs and be against the death penalty and the war. Pope John Paul II effectively answered this argument in his beautiful document on the laity, "Christifideles Laid": "The common outcry, which is justly made on behalf of human rights - for example, the right to health, to home, to work, to family, to culture - is false and illusory if the right to life, the most basic and fundamental right and the condition for all other personal rights, is not defended with maximum determination." As Christ said there are "false prophets" and "blind guides:' terms that can be justly predicated of Catholics in Alliance for the Common Good and the Voters' Guide they produced.

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OCTOBER

20, 2006

the living word

BISHOP GEORGE W. COLEMAN, CENTER, RECENTLY CELEBRATED A RED

MAss AT ST.

MARY'S

CATHEDRAL IN FALL RIVER. HOSTED BY THE DIOCESE OF FALL RIVER EACH YEAR, THE RED

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ASKS GOD'S BLESSINGS ON THOSE WHO WORK IN THE LEGAL SYSTEM. RECEIVING THE ST. THOMAS MORE AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED SERVICE WERE, FROM LEFr: JUDGE BERNADETTE SABRA, NEY ANASTASIA WE~SH PERRINO, JUDGE MALCOLM JONES AND ATIORNEY ROBERT

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1. MARCHAND.

(PHOTO BY ERIC RODRIGUES)

''I delight to do your will, 0 my God; Your law is within my heart" (psalm 40:8).

Standing at the foot of the cross During this month of October, the Church annually turns her attention and her prayers to Mary, and focuses more closely on the power of Mary's intercession. It is also a time to reflect more deeply on the unique role Mary played in the history of salvation and on the example she gave us to follow. Among the many reasons that we revere and honor the Blessed Mother is the fact that she participated more closely than any other person in the salvific mission of Christ. In particular, Mary united herself most intimately to the redemptive suffering of her Son. From the very beginning of Christ's life, Mary participated in the drama of redemption by offering her own sufferings to those of her Son. The fulfillment of Mary's participation in Christ's mission of salvation took place, of course, at the foot of the cross: "standing by the cross of Jesus were his mother, and his mother's sister, Mary the wife of Clopas, and Mary Magdalene" (In 19:25). Standing at the foot of the cross is where Mary was found at the height of her Son's suffering, and it's where she invites each us to be with her. When the Second Vatican Council reflected on the role of Mary in the history of salvation, it recalled how she was present at the crucifixion and "stood, in keeping with the divine plan,

grieving exceedingly with her only begotten -Son, uniting herself with a maternal heart with his sacrifice, and lovingly consenting to the immolation of this viCtim which she herself had brought forth" (Lumen Gentium, 58). Together with God the Father, Mary offered her Son for the life of the world, and together with her Son, she accepted the Father's will and united her own suffering

to the sacrifice on the cross. Mary's participation in our Lord's passion is one of the theological truths of which Pope John Paul the Great often reminded us. In one of his general audience addresses, the Holy Father explained that Mary was willing to share in her Son's redeeming sacrifice by joining her own maternal suffering to Christ's priestly offering. With constancy and courage, she stood Ql the face of unthinkable suffering, and ' joined her Son in enduring and forgiving the blasphemous insults hurled at the crucified one. The Holy Father also pointed out that Mary's "consent to Jesus' immolation was not passive acceptance but a genuine act of

love, by which she offered her Son as a 'victim' of expiation for the-sins of all humanity" (April 2, 1997). The.lesson for us in Mary's example is to accept and offer our sufferings to God willingly, and not reluctantly. Sometimes, when the cross lands in our lives, we might summon the faith and courage to accept the 'cross and carry it as an offering to God, but we do so half-heartedly, or even resentfully, because we feel we have no other choice. But the example of Mary heroically standing at the foot of the cross invites and encourages us to offer our sufferings willingly and even eagerly, as cooperators with Christ in God's plan of salvation. As Pope John Paul the Great taught us, Mary tr:usted with hope in the mysterious future that began with the death of her crucified Son (General Audience, April 2, 1997). She put into the deep, trusting that her maternal suffering was not in vain, and she taught us how to unite our own sufferings to the sufferings of Christ on the cross, for the salvation of the world. Holy Mary, standing at the foot of the cross, pray for us. ~ . Father Pignato is chaplain at Bishop Stang High School in North Dartmouth and is secretary to Bishop George If. Coleman.


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OCTOBER

20, 2006

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Living the intent of the mission The trip to the village Joya de Quebracho takes about three hours

that were donated from the former St. Michael's Church in Swansea. Dan Redgate, Herman Lapointe, in the pick-up truck, providing that and Ted Dingly, worked long hours it hasn't rained much and the re~sembling and adjusting the mountain road is passable. There benches to fit in St. Rose of are approximately 300 Lima Church. They were people who live in this able to fit benches in the very tranquil aldea and chapel of the Blessed most of them live in Sacrament and fashion two extreme poverty. On this tables on which we will now particular day, our visit to By--Fath&r Craigi,A. be able to place a casket for Joya de Quebracho is to the Misa con cuerpo celebrate Mass during the r~'-"r-';' 19"", __ ,,/ presente, Mass with the nine-day novena for a body present. Until now, young woman who died the casket was carefully from cancer. Since she balanced between two metal was buried without a , funeral Mass, the family chairs in front of the altar. When Ted saw the arrangehas gathered to offer this ment, he committed to memorial Mass for her. making something more Mario, the Delegate of suitable. the Word of God, or The tables'proved worthy "Delegado:' was waiting last week as we used them to receive us when we for a funeral Mass. It entered the village and happened that as we told us that the folks were returned to town from the already gathered in the Mass in a village, we heard chapel, practicing the songs for Mass. Flowers the church bells tolling - a and pictures of the young notice to the town that someone had died, and by woman had been placed in front of the altar. The the unique ringing of the TRANSPLANTS - Dan Redgate and Ted Dingly bells, that the procession chapel itself is a small, work on pews from the former S1. Michael's was on its way to the simple cinderblock Church in Swansea, to be used at the diocesan church. structure with a dirt floor mission in Guaimaca. The funeral customs are and a tin roof. The different here. In the ensuing hours community has recently added celebration of the Word or for the the family would have gathered at some wooden pews that were made celebration of the Eucharist. in the village at the cost of about Recently, a team of "carpenters" the home of the deceased to view the casket and bring flowers from home. $1.50 each. Although the chapel is came to our diocesan mission in All light they keep vigil at the rather rudimentary, the community Guaimaca to help install the pews is proud of tl1eir place of worship. Many of the villages have a small chapel, or house of prayer, that is used by the Delegado to gather the community for the

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It was good for me to be there There have been times in my life when I've truly felt the presence of Jesus. I know he's wi,th us always, but it doesn't always feel that way. Periodically though, there are those awesome times. I felt him at my wedding and at the births of my four children. I felt him when my youngest son waged a three-day battle for his life. I felt him when my son lost that battle. I've felt him at Mass sometimes and I've seen him in the eyes of parishioners receiving the Eucharist when I'm serving as an extraordinary minister of holy, Communion. But I've mostly felt Christ in the presence of the most vulnerable of God's children. I've been bowled over by his presence on confirmation retreats when teenagers who never really felt unconditional love encounter him in the words and actions of team members. It seems to me that Jesus also likes to hang around young adults searching for him on an Emmaus weekend. I can't count the times I've witnessed a young man or

woman encounter Christ in all his compassionate glory for the first time. And once in a while, Christ appears seemingly out of the blue. My recent experience at St. Francis Residence in Fall River

falls into this category. I went to the residence to cover a donation to the house from the Bristol County Sheriff's Office. But I came away from that visit with a sense I had to do more. I returned the following week to hear the stories of the women residents there for an Anchor Person of the Week feature (see page 10). Listening to the women, I immediately felt Christ's presence. These were women who made mistakes, atoned for them, and made the decision to accept God's call to be healed.

7/

The Anchor ,

I hung on every word from each of my sisters in Christ. I marveled at their courage and conviction to become what God wants them to be. I was inspired by their honesty and by their accepting responsibility for their actions. While with them, Ithought about the story in Matthew when Jesus is transfigured in the sight of Peter, James and John. Peter says, "It is good for us to be here." Sitting with the residents and graduates of St. Francis Residence I knew it was good for me to be there. I met Christ in persons who are often misunderstood and scorned. Often times people look down on women such as these, thinking they get what they deserve. How wrong that way of thinking is. These women and many like them are human beings worthy of respect and kindness. They've fallen and can get up. To my sisters atSt. Francis Residence, thank you for letting the Christ in you radiate forth. ~t warmed my heart.

davejolivet@anchornews.org.

home, offering the rosary, other prayers and the celebration of the Word. Then, at approximately the same time the following day, the casket is carried to the church for the Misa con cuerpo preserlte. Although it is simplified, the ri~ itself offers comfort and consolation.

The Mission Team continues to work in the areas of education and medicine, however we continue to live the original intent of the mission. We are here not only to share our resources but to walk with our brothers and sisters in faith. www.HonduranMission.org

Truth and freedom "If you hold to my teac~g:' Jesus said, ''you are really my disciples. Then you will know the truth, and the truth will ~t you free" (In 8:32). ' Imagine a huge arena. :Jesus is standing there, and.he prbsents these questions: "My dear brothers and sisters, are you following my teachings? Do you know the truth and are you free?" What would we say? How would we answer? What follows are three possible answers: "Yes, Jesus, you, and! what you have taught us, is at the denter of my life. I constantly look to you for direction and try to live in your truth. Prayer ' c; ( !X ' and faith in you ; keep me strong : i f,/.'J'''I.路O' " il,'LI"l !'~lfi and I am at peace. With your inspiration I Ii Ij L' ' and loving ;~_ ~yQr~ta

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that Jesus is speaking about Pope John PaullI wrote about truth and freedom a lot, and said that real freedom is the capacity to give oneself to God, who is the truth. Since we can only give what we have, in order to give ourselves to God, we first need self-mastery, which develops through cutting off the slavery of sin and living according to the truth he reveals to us. Freedom is the capacity not to do whatever we want but the ability to do what we ought to do: that's the connection between truth and freedom. The truth sets us free when we freely give ourselves to the truth. Jesus teaches us how to be truly

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example, I try to ......oiio路...':-I:-......- - - - - - - serve others." Ii "Sometimes, I do JesUs, but often free not just by his words but by I get distracted from youi- teachings in showing us how freely to surrender to my day-to-day life. Oth~ things get God's will. His whole life was a in the way and I find that I am not commentary on freedom, and flowed free. Then when I come back to you from his capacity to say to his Father, I find peace. But it is difficult ''not my will, but yours, be done." because I am not always strong Paradoxically, the more we come to enough to hold to your teaching. I know and act on God's will, the more guess this is when I need you most of our will aligns with his, the freer we all." will be. We will then be free to stand ''No, Jesus, I have not been up for what is true and right and in following your teachings and I am turn to help others toward freedom. I' not free. Although I kno}v who you Many of the saints were great are and consider myself to be a models of the freedom living in the Christian, I pretty much embrace a Truth brings. St Francis ofAssisi different value system than the one was one such person. During the first which you gave us. I am constantly week of October, I took some time to on a roller coaster brought about by explore the life and teachings of St. my choices in life, but it is the path Francis ofAssisi with my students at that I have chosen. I have chosen to St Pius X School.We touched upon embrace a competitive, materialistic, his early years when he was a rich young man and also upon his eg<>-<!riven world" - I, 'Then you will know!,the truth, conversion, which ultimately led him and the truth will set youl'free." Such to answer God's call. powerful words. How do we Many of the students found embrace them? Francis so much more than a sweet, We are all challenged.to hold fast peaceful saint who loved animals. As to Jesus' teachings, in a world where we discussed Francis's self-surrender there may be many distractions to serve God and to work among the stemming from very busy lifestyles, poor and the lepers, we saw how television, computer and videO sacrifice can ultimately lead to games, the Internet, materialism and freedom. ~t. Francis was a living consumerism. No matter what age illustration of the liberty that flows we might be, our faith must be from true love of God and neighbor. strengthened by prayer, reacting of Greta MacKoul is the author and illustrator o/uThe Ocean Flowers, A Scripture, the Eucharist ~d service. Living according to Jesus' truth will Parabk 0/ Love" and numerous give our hearts and minds a greater articks. Greta and herhusband capacity to understand Jesus' George, with their chiJdrrm are teachings. That is the way we will members o/Christ the King Parish come to know the truth and freedom in Mashpee. "


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The Anchor

OCTOBER

20, 2006

May we remember to serve others "Please move your tomatoes on the vine to the belt." As these words come from an automated self-service checkout at the market, one quickly realizes that self-service is now a state of the art industry. Throughout the course of a day you can fill your car up with gas, get money out of an ATM machine and do your grocery shopping without saying a word to another human being. Self-service does make ordinary chores move along more quickly but does it make us less responsive to each other? Jesus constantly interacted with people and was able to bring healing and love by being present to them. His goal was to always follow his Father's wilL The miracles that became part of his ministry made a deep impression on the Apostles and the crowds who witnessed these astounding

service to others would come would stand out as someone events. The request of James suffering and pain. James and who looks to help others and and John to be granted a John agree that they can accept special place in the kingdom not lord it over others. this challenge. As the other Jesus' entire ministry that Jesus came to establish is Apostles hear this bold focused on serving others. The an honest desire that any ambitious and energetic person response they become angry followers of Jesus continue to serve the needs for others with the two brothers. Jesus would want for themselves. today. Dedicated The power and prestige of being ..<;;---.~-..- -..... priests, deacons, .... religious and lay associated with Jesus mily of the Wee 'b were overwhelming. 29th Sunday in Power did indeed play Ordinary Time a role in the ministry of Jesus. Having Religious Education By Father experienced the power programs. Members of Richard L. Chretien that came from Jesus St. Vincent de Paul made the request of Societies provide food, clothing, and shelter to all in has to once again explain that James and John most naturaL need. Missionaries leave their. the kingdom he had come to Jesus uses this request to establish would be totally clarify what would be expected homelands to preach the different from any other from those who would follow Gospel throughout the world. kingdom. "Whoever wishes to The words of Jesus heard him. Ambition and power are today still hav~ an impact on become great among you will part of every institution. Used men and women who respond be YOU!; servant: whoever haphazardly power can enslave and hurt. Jesus states that wishes to be first among you to study for the priesthood and power used for the benefit of will be the slave of alL" This religious life. Loving and serving the Lord statement made it obvious that others would be the trademark involves sacrifice and pain. anyone who follows Jesus of the kingdom. Along with

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Jesus would never ask any of his followers to do anything that he himself did not do. Saying yes to his heavenly Father even when it meant suffering and death on a cross, was and still is the most powerful statement that Jesus ever made. "Can you drink the cup that I drink or be baptized with the baptism with which I am baptized?" James and John said yes. Can we say yes to the call to serve others? Being a slave is not casy. The demands are great, the needs of others are even greater. In our self·service world we need to remember others. The next time you hear "Please remember to take your receipt," at the supermarket check out, ask yourself, "Am I serving others, or am I being served?" Father Chretien is pastor of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception and Notre Dame de Lourdes parishes in Fall River.

Upcoming Daily Readings: Sat, Oct 21, Eph 1:15-23; Ps 8:2-7; Lk 12:8-12. Sun, Oct 22, 'l\venty-ninth Sunday in ordinary time, Is 53:10-11; Ps 33:4-5,18-20,22; Reb 4:14-16; Mk 10:35-45 or 10:4245. Mon, Oct 23, Eph 2:1-10; Ps 100:2-5; Lk 12:13-21. Thes, Oct 24, Eph 2:12-22; Ps 85:9-14; Lk 12:35-38. Wed, Oct 25, Eph 3:2-12; (Ps) Is 12:2-6; Lk 12:39-48. Thurs, Oct 26, Eph 3:14-21; Ps 33:12,4-5,11-12,18-19; Lk 12:49-53. Fri, Oct 27, Eph 4:1-6; Ps 24:1~6; Lk 12:54-59.

Scotland the brave Sailing back to Mallaig from the "little isles" of Eigg and Muck, with the craggy peaks of Skye's Black Cuillins filling the horizon, it's easy to have a Brigadoon moment and imagine yourself in a Scottish land of enchantment at the edge of the world. Western Scotland's topography is striking in its variety: lochs, mo~rs, great eruptions of rock, the bluest of ocean waters, a canopy as capacious as Montana's

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•••

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off the faded memories of its Industrial Age greatness, has remade itself into a bustling center of commerce, finance, .

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high-tech, and culture. Edinburgh remains one of Europe's most charming cities, its 18th-century New Town a monument to the beauties of neo-classical urban design and its Old Town a splendid medieval rabbit's warren leading from Edinburgh Castle down the "Royal Mile" to the palace of Holyrood House. Alas, the new Scottish Parliament buildings - hyper-modernist excess of the worst sort - are nearby, and rather spoil the palace environs and the view of "Arthur's Seat," one of those abrupt promontories with which Scotland abounds. The Scottish Parliament disdains prayer, but I was invited to offer a few thoughts at the Parliament's weekly "Time for Reflection." Twelve of129 parliamentarians thought it worthwhile to hear what "reflections" I had to offer; sic transit gloria Weigel. The new Scotland has its

oddities. My wife and I couldn't find Scotch eggs - tasty little cholesterol bombs made of deepfried, sausage-wrapped hardboiled eggs - in the food halls at Jenner's, Edinburgh's answer to London's Harrod's. But we did find a vegetarian version of Scotland's national dish, haggis. Haggis, for the uninitiate, is a meat pudding made of the . ground parts of the sheep that the sheep has no right to be proud of, mixed with burnt oats and stuffed into a bag made at least traditionally from the lining of a sheep's stomach; it sounds awful, but is in fact delicious. But "vegetarian haggis?" What's next? Alcoholfree single-malt Scotch? The very fact of the new ScottishParliament, which has been sitting since 1999, seems to have exacerbated tensions north· and-south of Hadrian's Wall. Indeed, I was struck by the sharp, anti-English tone of even the most temperate Caledonian parliamentarians I met. Some MSP's seemed aware of the grave panEuropean problems being caused by the soul-withering secularism that has fueled a crisis of civilizational morale across the continent. Yet the Parliainent itself seems obsessed with redefining marriage and acquiescing to various other demands of the gay

lobby, all in the name of a hollow notion of "human rights." Given present political trends, it's not hard to imagine an independent Scotland having social policies resembling those of the ultralibertine Netherlands. On our way to Dunvegan Castle, home of Clan Macleod on the Isle of Skye, my wife and I stopped to explore the ruins of a medieval church. A hundred yards or so above the ruins was a roughhewn stone stele which had been carved and raised by the local villagers to mark the millennium year of 2000. A nearby plaque boasted that it was precisely this kind of pillar that pagan Viking raiders had raised throughout Scotland. Which seemed both odd and sad. Where Columba and Donan and the other Celtic monk-saints had planted the faith on the far rim of Europe helping save western civilization in the process, post-Christian Scots of the 21st century now raised pagan monuments, seemingly indifferent to him whose incarnation the Great Jubilee of 2000 celebrated. I met an impressive cadre of young Scottish Catholic intellectuals, activists, and artists over the course of four days of lectures in Glasgow and Edinburgh, and I wish them well. They have, I fear, got their work cut out for them. George Weigel is a senior fellow ofthe Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington, D.C.


OCTOBER

9

20, 2006

Precious moments Monday 9 October 2006Before it was Cathedral Camp, National Shrine of Our Lady of it was a popular amusement La Salette, Attleboro - Columpark - literally the end of the bus Day (observed) line for the New Bedford A priest is required by trolley. We called the retreat Church law to make an annual retreat. Here I stand outside the La TheJ~~~,ip's Salette Retreat House ,·;,:ns,~f ~.J chatting with Father .&.::b" . "Mickey" Genovese, retreat director. Priests are arriving for "Return -- ~Goldrick ":-;:""~:::,.;,.' to Me with All Your Heart." There are not so many of us today as there used , house "The Hotel." I suspect to be and we are all pastors. the nickname goes back to Fresh reinforcement troops will World War II, when the Army be rare. trained there. We now have options, but In the old days, priests once we all made our retreat ordained less than five years together at Cathedral Camp. needed to hitch a ride to

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Cathedral Camp. They were forbidden to own cars though some secretly did, I hear. I first attended the priest's retreat at Cathedral Camp in October, 1964. I wasn't a priest. I was a seminarian just assigned to some seminary in I Canada. Back then, two retreat sessions were held, there being way too many priests to house them all together. We seminarians waited on table. We also served daily Mass for the priests. Before the days of concelebration, the hall was lined with two long rows of portable plywood altars. Each priest said Mass privately, and sometimes simultaneously. The

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It's only mid-October and , already Thanksgiving and Christmas have begUll crowding out Halloween in the central aisle of the grocery store. It exhausts me just looking at it. As 21st century American Catholics, we live under the shadow of a commercial,"mediadriven culture that feeds us the " never-ending message that we need more, more, more. There is so much racing around, pursuing of goals, acquiring of goods, and checking off of lists. Commercials, billboards, and junk mail bombard us with the' message that satisfaction in life is not possible until we have this or that new and "best" tI1ing. Not price is too high. No sacrifice too great. Of course, the problem is that there is always another, new and 0 "best" thing. Our obsession for more doesn't stop with material goods either. Rampant consumerism pollutes our thinking at just about every level. It slyly coos, "Oh, so you have job. That's nice, but did you know that for just a little longer commute your neighbor has a job that pays A lot more? Plus, her company, well, it's the leader in the industry." I'd love to tell you that I'm above such media-driven consumerism, but it would be a lie. As much as all of us may want to deny the influence of our more and bigger-is-better society, we all sometimes fall victim to its hooks. We fall victim because there is a kernel of truth in its message. We should pursue our dreams. We should attempt the heights we were born to climb. We should

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want good for ourfarnilies and lovedones. :BUt when does'all our pursuing,acquiring, and striving b~ome merely "chasing alter the wind;' as EccleSiastes 4:4 describes me~gless lahQr? W}1en,do we stop breaking our necks, . bending the rules, and shifting our priorities in order to achieve

goals that thtt world, not God,. ,:w<··· has set up for us? How do we recognize the bolindary between the life gpals.,. we/were meant to achieve and chasing after the "

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St. Paul inst:rq~ts us in the fine points of doing this in his Letter to the Romans: "00 not conform any longer to the pattern of this »:~r19, bqt be 1:raJ1~fo:qned by the renewing of your mind. Then you will'be able ill test and approve what Gofl's will is-his good, pleasing and perfect will" (12:2). If we hadn't figured it out by reading the life and times of Jesus Christ in the Gospels, St. Paul tells it like it is in his letter . to the first Roman Catholics: being a Christian is to be radically different than the world at large. To be a Christian means to stop conforming and start transforming our lives. Where the world offers us a million self-help books, we should first buy a study, read, and digest the wisdom of the Bible and the Catholic Catechism. Scripture and the Catechism are our road signs,

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pointing the way to God's good, . perfect'and pleasing will for us. Scripture and the Catecb,ism are . ow: escort to and through the essential truths of the Catholic • faith. Before needing a therapistc Ora reQOvery group, we should preemptively get God's help with our problems by going to Mass, regular confessioQ, an,d establishing a time to read our Bible and pray daily. "For the word of God, Scripture, is living and active," we read in the Epistle to the Hebrews. "Sharper than any d6uble.t.edged sword, it penetr~teseven to dividing soul and spirit, joints . and marrow; it Judges die thoughts and attitudes of th~" heart" (4:1~-1~i). Scripture ~.~ powerful. Scripture will help us kIlow when we have crossed the" line between th,e life goals we were meant to achieve and merely chasing after the wind. As the months roll around and new seasonal items invade the central aisi~ of our grocery' stores, maybe we can take one Small step away from the consumer pattern of the our world and not buy. Instead we can remind ourselves that neither will our spiritual hunger be satisfied nor our souls be saved by the acquiring of anything packed in plastic. Only by accepting the gift of faith from the Lord Jesus Christ will our souls be satisfied and saved, and that gift is free for the asking. Heidi is an author, photographer, andfull-time mother. She and her husband raise their five children in Falmouth. Comments are welcome at homegrownfaith@Yahoo.com.

altar server was the congregation. I enjoyed meeting the priests and seminarians, but truth be told, I did it for the inoney. We were paid $50 for just two week's work, plus tips. I had already worked 10 weeks at the diocesan summer camp for underprivileged children, St. Vincent's in Westport, and the total pay for the entire season was also $50, plus ~ll you could eat of Joe Lima's cooking. With $100 in my pocket, I bought a black suit and a felt fedora and headed off to Canada. I reported to the seminary with 20 cents in my pocket, two dimes in case I needed to make an emergency phone call, but I sure looked spiffy. Priests' retreat was modeled after monastery life. We were formally dressed in cassocks. Everything was regulated by the chapel bell. The younger priests were assigned to ring the bell and to work as sacristans. Every day we had Morning Prayer, Evening Prayer, Benediction, and Night Prayer. One afternoon, rel~gious order priests were imported to hear our confessions. There were lengthy periods of 'what we called Grand Silence when we were not allowed it> speak. . Sometimes our meals were also silent, the only sound being pious readings froin a podium in the mess hall, ~e called it the refectory. Meals were my · part 0 f thi!e retreat. This f avonte should not surpris~ those of you who know me. After meals, there was an hour of free-time. It was great fun sharing the enthusiasm of the younger priests and hearing the war stories of the older men. The athletically inclined headed for the ball field. French-speaking priests tended to gather at the band shell. Portuguese speaking priests drifted towards the waterfront. The English-speaking perched on the porch of Villa Maria, which, I understand, began life as a roller rink. It was really the only time we were all together. We caught up on all the news. When we II

tired of chatting, we could inspect the tables of the religious goods vendors and check out the latest books. Some would decide to take a constitutional and stroll around the ellipse. We all walked in the same direction in those days. Some few were au contraire. They walked the opposite direction. Such rebels. We were not allowed to leave the property, but there was a dirt road out back that was well-traveled. Lights out was at 9 p.m. Rumor has it that some of the brothers gathered clandestinely to play cards into the wee hours. I find this hard to believe, mostly. The conferences were held in the chapel. The seats were hard - none of these fancy padded stacking chairs. Sometimes it was hot. Air conditioning in church buildings was forbidden by Bishop Connolly. The bishop himself always participated in one of the weeklong sessions, and addressed the priests on the last day of both retreats. The timing, I suspect, was to discourage us from sneaking home early. The bishop gave a "State of the Diocese" report. There was always some interesting tidbit by way of announcement. Also at the end of the retreat came a steak and lobster dinner. Who would miss that? Not me. Times change, I suppose, but it's still good to be on retreat with brother priests. On this year's retreat at La Salette, the men joke, "Tim, is this conversation going to appear in The Anchor?" I ask. them to speak directly into the microphone. Father Goldrick is pastor of St. Bernard Parish, Assonet. Comments are welcome at StBernardAssone~aolcom.

Previous columns are at www.StBernardAssonet.org.

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PRACOCE TIlE DEVOTION OF TIlE FIRSI' SATURDAYS, AS REQUF.SfED BY OUR LADY OF FATIMA On December 10, 1925, Our Lady appeared to Sister Lucia (seer of Fatima) and spoke these words: "Announce in my name that I promise to assist at the hour of death with the graces necessary for the salvation oftheir souls, all those who on the first Saturday of five consecutive months shall: 1. Go to confession; 2. Receive Holy Communion; 3. Recite the Rosary (5 decades); and 4. Keep me company for 15 minutes while meditating on the 15 mysteries ofthe Rosary, with the intention of making reparation to me." In a spirit of reparation, the above conditions are each to be preceded by the words: ''In reparation for the offenses committed against the Immaculate Heart of Mary." Confessions may be made during 8 days before or after the first Saturday, and Holy Communion may be received at either the morning or evening Mass on the fIrSt Saturday. Paid advertisement

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REMARKABLE WOMEN - Bristol County Sheriff Thomas J. Hodgson is flanked by residents, graduates and employees of St. Francis Residence for women in Fall River. The Sheriff's Office recently donated $25,000 to Catholic Social Services for the residence. The residents and graduates of the house have answered "yes" to God's offer of healing. (Anchor1Jolivet photo)

Area women treasure spiritual rebirth By DAVE JOLIVET, EOITOR FALL RIVER - "We're not bad people, we've just done bad things," said Paulette L., a resident at St. Francis Residence in Fall River. The residence is home to women who were formerly incarcerated at the North Dartmouth or Barnstable House of Corrections. Each of the seven women currently living at the house do so of their own choice - a choice that leads them on the road to spiritual, physical and emotional healing. Their stories are as different as their personalities, but there is one strong, common thread - the desire to make their lives better, and the knowledge that God has called them to be healed and they have said "yes." "This home is a place for those who are serious about recovery," Karen R. told The Anchor during a recen,t intervi~»: with six of the residents and several graduates who return to help and support those who followed a similar path. "Coming here was the best decision I've ever made. I tried so many ways to stop using drugs, b u t . none of them ever . '.,,-. •-? . . r.,... . -. . <

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but with God's approval, I'm rebuilding my life. I can't wait to get back here after the weekends. I'm working toward living on my own again." Paulette L. said the home is "sacred ground. I never knew what unconditional love was, but I've learned about it here. I don't get scared here. I'm learning to leave everything behind." She said when she first saw Waters, "it was from a window at the house of correction. I saw an aura around Cindy. There was such a peace about her." She added she experiences that peace at St. Francis Residence. With regards to her house mates, Paulette said. "To see someone grow gives me great hope. This house has taken some hard-core addicts and has turned them into strong, complete women." Jennifer added that the key to succeeding is "to be honest with yourself and with others. If I'm honest, I'm going to be OK." Each of the women agreed they are all working on different aspects of their lives, but the support . they receive from one another and the St. ,I _ •.•...

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Cindy ~aters has. ." , -An(;lIIJI'Pm,ttnsof~"#t.~ vehicle to get us where been coordmator at St. .'--.'-c:;._"~~..· ,.,' . ~ .-;'.."'"'/_ ( _< '- --1 we're going," said JenniFrancis for nearly a year. fer. A recovered alcoholic of 16 years, and a licensed Jaime D. recently moved into the residence and alcohol counselor, she and Franciscan Sister Claire credits the staff, residents and relief staff for keepChabot have gained the trust and admiration of the ing her from an extended incarceration. "This place residents, through their own faith in God, their trust provides me with balance," she said. "I now have in the residents, and their loving commitment to both. God in my life and will keep him there always. And "I've been clean for 17 months thanks to Cindy, I have the support from the women here, who are Sister Claire Chabot and the graduates and current teaching me to learn from their mistakes." residents," added Karen. When asked how it felt to turn her life around, Each of the women expressed a deep gratitude she said, ''I'm not turning my life around, I'm turnfor the support system they have found at St. Francis. ing it over. Over to God. By surrendering my life to "I thank God for Catholic Social Servic~s," said God, I have the chance to become who I really am. I graduate Lisa M. "I have my kids back in my life, didn't surrender to lose, I surrendered to win." my health and my spirituality." Lisa, after having There are occasions when a resident stumbles. lived at the residence, is completing the necessary "When something affects this house, we all feel it," steps to become part of the St. Francis relief staff, said Karen. "We're there for that person and we'll joining three other graduates. "This house showed help her through it." me a new life, and I want to help the women who are The women ofSt. Francis Residence are no longer here now." defined by their additions nor their pasts. They are Not all the women were raised Catholic, and those accepted for who they are - women of courage and that were hadn't actively practiced the faith for some faith, and women whom God called to be healed. time. "But as soon as we came here, Mass and prayer Residents Karen, Paulette, Jennifer, Joan M., became a waY,,0f life," Lisa continued. "Now it just Jaime and Lisa C. took a critical step toward healing comes naturally." by saying "yes" to God. And graduates Lisa, MelResident Jennifer B. told The Anchor, "This issa, Annie and Tina are real-life examples of what choice was a matter of life or death. After years of follows that positive response. drinking and taking drugs, I'm changing my life. I Just a few moments spent with the women of St. have three children and they're beginning to trust Francis Residence made it clear they are truly me and they are proud of me. I'm working at be- Anchor's Persons of the Week, and beyond, coming the woman God wants me to be." Submit nominations for Person ofthe Week to Jennifer continued, saying she now goes home theanchor@anchornews.org or The Anchor, P.O. on the weekends. "I never thought this was possible, Box 7, Fall River, MA 02722.


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The Anchor â&#x20AC;˘ Blessing of icon marks completion ofWest Harwich parish renovation "

EVERY DOG HAS ITS DAY - Pets of the students at St. Francis Xavier School in Acushnet wait for the Blessing of the Pets Worship to begin in honor of St. Francis of Assisi. Pastor Father Daniel W. Lacroix did the honors.

WEST HARWICH - Holy Trinity Parish recently welcomed Bishop George W. Coleman as the celebrant of the 4 p.m. vigil Mass. During the Mass, the bishop blessed an Icon of the Holy Trinity which will be installed pn the wall above the main entrance to the church. The installation of th~, Holy Trinity Icon marks the conclusion of the renovation of Holy Trinity Church which began during the first week of March. During the renovation project the floors of the church were tiled, the walls and woodwork painted, the pews and furnishings refinished, new lighting fixtures installed, two shrines to house the images of the Blessed Virgin and the Sacred Heart were created and a new partition separating the sanctuary from the stage of the parish hall was designed and installed. Many of the former furnishings in the sanctuary were refinished and placed "in the parish's summer chapel, Our Lady of the Annunciation Chapel in Dennisport. The new sanctuary furniture was designed and built by Lloyd's Woodworking of Hudson, and the New Holland Custom Woodwork Company of Pennsylvania. The icon of the Holy' Trinity was "written by" Fernando Botelho of Rhode Island who has created icons for other churches including the Icon of Our Lady of Providence for the Cathedral of SS. Peter and Paul in that city. The Holy Trinity icon"is eight feet tall and four feet wide. It is modeled on one painted in the 15th century by St. Andrei Rublev of Russia. This icon conveys the story I

from Genesis Chapter 18 of the three mysterious visitors to Abraham and Sarah; the early Church saw this incident in the Old Testament as pointing to the mystery of the Trinity and therefore adopted it as a way to image what is divinely mysterious and therefore truly invisible. The icon depicts three angels seated in harmony with one another partaking of the one cup. The angel on the left represents God the Father; the angel in the middle clothed in red, the color of blood, represents God the Son who is begotten by the Father and who took flesh; and the angel on the right clothed in green, the color of life, represents the life giving Spirit of God. While icons are more likely to be seen in churches in the East rather than in the Latin rite of the West, when a church is erected in honor of the Blessed Trinity, it is challenged to obtain a suitable depiction of the Trinity that is also sound theologically. That is why Holy Trinity of West Harwich which had existed for the past 40 years without an image of the Trinity decided to obtain this icon and_commissioned Botelho to create it. Holy Trinity Church was built with stained glass windows which have color but no images, so the icon of the Holy Trinity certainly fills a void in sacred art. The icon of the Holy Trinity is the first of three icons which Botelho will "write" for the parish. The other two will be the Baptism of the Lord, to be installed over the baptismal font, and the Resurrection, of the Lord to be placed over the altar of reservation.

WEATHER FIT FOR A DUCK, OR DOG, OR CAT -Father John C. Ozug, pastor of Our Lady of Fatima Parish in New Bedford, and parishioners braved inclement weather for the blessing of animals in honor of St. Francis. (Photo by Ron Cabral) /

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POOCHES AT PRAYER - In honor of St. Francis of Assisi, parishioners gather in the Garden of Peace at St. Bernard Church, Assonet Village, for the traditional blessing of the animals. In attendance were several cats and dogs and even a few old goats. (Photo by Barret Castro)

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A FITTING COMPLETION - Father Edward J. Healey, pastor of Holy Trinity Parish, West Harwich, stands with Bishop George W. Coleman after he blessed an icon of the, Holy Trinity at a recent ceremony marking the completion of renovations at the parish.


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Stars are clueless about marriage as a sacrament CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

The following editorial appeared in a recent edition of The Catholic Messenger, newspaper of the Diocese of Davenport, Iowa. Few of us take our cues for living from the pop stars of Hollywood. The tabloids and slick magazines at supermarket checkout lanes stay in business by keeping those assorted, and mostly young, actors and singers in a spotlight. They are the royalty of a society that makes "entertainment" a major industry. But most readers of The Catholic Messenger won't be influenced by a moral or political thought coming from that comer of the world. Philosophy from that source is dependably libertarian about personal behavior. The Hollywood voice, such as it is, generally favors the free expression of appetites. And even though thoughtful people pay scant attention, a continual stream of this attitude pouring into our eyes and ears from socalled "beautiful people" has an effect, especially on the young. When a famous actress or singer says she plans to have a baby but won't marry the father, impressionable young psyches take notice. After all, this is coming from someone who represents success in a glitzy world of excitement and glamour. The latest hot quote out of Hollywood is from young actor Brad Pitt, who told Esquire magazine that he and his girlfriend, actress Angelina Jolie, "will consider tying the knot when everyone else in the country who wants to be married is legally able." Apparently, this is supposed to make them heroes wherever marriage means no more than a social convention with legal benefits for any two people, otherwise unrelated, who want to live together. Since very few marriages among entertainment personalities last long, there would be little to expect from a Pitt-Jolie union even if they changed their minds. Pitt,

though, apparently wants us to believe that he is giving up something important, taking a principled stand, to promote an even more important cause. The implication is that he and Jolie would gladly pledge "'til death do us part" in the legal state of marriage if homosexual couples were able to do the same. But no one is fooled. Where marriage is treated as no more than a legal convention marking stages in a life of serial monogamy, what does it mean if someone stands up for the principle of homosexual marriage? Nothing. The institution of marriage is the antithesis of the onenight stand - and also the twoyear or the five-year stand. In some way, nearly everyone grasps this point. Marriage is very different from the hookups, liaisons and short-term relationships that characterize so much of the entertainment business. So Pitt and Jolie can do whatever fits their mood of the moment. It will pass. They could, of course, surprise us and show an understanding of what marriage really is. They could influence another generation to see that a faithful covenant, a life commitment, is both possible and a journey to joy. If they don't do that, it's sad but not unexpected. Leading lights in human progress don't come from the world of acting. Marriage requires a woman and a man, first of all. Pitt and Jolie meet that standard. It also requires a faith mature enough to grow through the surprises of making a life with another person who only gradually reveals his or her full reality. In other words, to lay down one's life for another is a fair description of what we're invited to in marriage. Magazines like Esquire and People aren't the source of inspiration for a life of such sturdy faith. We're better off trusting in the story of Jesus and paying attention to the faithful people around us.

Diocese of Fall River TV Mass on WLNE Channel 6 Sunday,.October 22 at 11:00 a.m. Scheduled celebrant is Msgr. John J. Oliveirat pastor of St. Marfs Parish in New Bedfordt and director of the Diocesan Propagation of the Faith Office

THE EYES OF FAITH - A boy named Levi is pictured in a scene from the movie "Jesus Camp." For a brief review of this film, see CNS Movie Capsules below. (CNS photo/Magnolia)

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lCalIV~Ulllle~ NEW YORK (CNS)- The following are capsule reviews of movies recently reviewed by the Office for Film & Broadcasting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. "Alex Rider: Operation Stormbreaker" (Weinstein) Adequately entertaining action adventure based on the first volume of the popular children's book series by Anthony Horowitz, about a London teen (Alex Pettyfer) who, after learning that his recently deceased uncle (Ewan McGregor) was a secret agent for the British government, is recruited into the spy biz to investigate a shadowy American billionaire (Mickey Rourke) who's planning to use his high-tech "stormbreaker" computer to unleash global death. Despite a lightweight script padded with chases and explosions, director Geoffrey Sax keeps the action fast-paced and the tone amusingly campy, though some of the story elements may be a bit grim for some young viewers. Some nongraphic action violence and scenes of peril. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is A-II - adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association ofAmerica rating is PG - parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children. "Infamous" (Warner Independent) Author Truman Capote (a bravura tum by Toby Jones) travels to Kansas with his friend, "To Kill a Mockingbird" author Nelle

Harper Lee (Sandra Bullock), after the brutal murder of the wealthy Cutter family in 1959, and decides to write the nonfiction novel that became "In Cold Blood" by interviewing the townspeople, the authorities (Jeff Daniels), and the killers themselves (Daniel Craig and Lee Pace). The similarities and differences between this version (by writer-director Douglas McGrath), with more humor and greater scope, and director Bennett Miller's "Capote" (made at the same time) are interesting. It also boasts a starry supporting cast (Gwyneth Paltrow, Sigourney Weaver, Hope Davis, Isabella Rossellini and Juliet Stevenson) as his high-society friends back in New York. Some gay elements involving Capote and one of the killers, innuendo, discreet but strong re-creation of the murders, some grisly images, two hangings, rough and crude language and expressions, an irreverent remark, domestic violence, and abortion and suicide references. The l!SCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is L -limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R - restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian. "Jesus C~mp" (Magnolia) Fascinating documentary about an evangelical summer camp where children are trained to lead the 'fi"ght in "reclaiming America for Christ" through a militant Christianity which critics claim has little to do with the Gospel. Codirectors Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady give voice to both those who charge that what is being done is harmful indoctrination and those who see it as instilling passionately held religious values. While it's understandable that many of the evangelicals interviewed elJlTIestly

feel alienated by the increasingly secular, materialistic and immoral culture - and many of those same concerns may resonate with Catholics - the picture painted is nevertheless sobering. Some emotionally intense images and mature discussions. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is A-II - adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13 - parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13. "Marie Antoinette" (Sony) Visually sumptuous but dramatically inert biography of France's most celebrated queen (Kirsten Dunst), her arranged marriage to the future King Louis XVI (Jason Schwartzman), the lengthy period it took them to consummate their marriage and produce an heir, and her heedless spending and pleasure-seeking, which would infuriate the masses and help lead to the downfall of the monarchy. Director Sofia Coppola has impressively recreated the 18th-century period (albeit with some contemporary flourishes), and for the most part adheres to the historical facts, but rather disappointingly ends with the royal family's arrest and only hints at the queen's maturing transformation. The performances are sound, though the flat American accents of the leads are a detriment, as is the uninspired dialogue. Much speculation about the royal conjugal dilemma, brief partial nudity, an adulterous encounter and innuendo restrict viewing to adults and older adolescents. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is A-III - adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13 - parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.


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British bishops urge government to discar~ cohabitation proposals II

LONDON (CNS) - The Committee for Marriage and II Catholic bishops of England and Family Life. Wales have urged Bbtish govThe bishops were reacting to II ernment advisers to discard pro- a public consultation exercise posals to grant the rights of mar- launched during the summer by ried couples to couples who are commissioners who recomcohabiting. II mended that cohabiting couples They said the proposals be treated the same as married would send out a "powerful sig- couples in the event of a split. . nal that the state ha~[ no interest The consultation closed at the in the institution ofIi marriage." end of September; the Law The bishops said the proposals Commission will deliver its fiposed a "grave risk" lo marriage, hal report to the government II • and the government should take next summer. steps instead to su'bport marThe commission wants the riage. ' II government to decide if rights "A man and a woman who are should apply to couples who do II not have chilsimply cohabiting have the ,;"...;.'1----------- dren as well as very clear op{14 man and a woman those who do. MASS APPEAL - Catholic pilgrims line the streets as the statue of the Virgin of Nazareth is carried in tion to marry who are simply cohabiting The 'proposals II ' an annual procession to Our Lady of Nazareth Basilica in Belem, Brazil, recently. As many as two an d conse- have the very clear option wou ld ~ean million,Catholics are estimated to have participated in the pilgrimC!-ge this year. (CNS photo/Lucivaldo quently ~njoy tomarryandconsequently those who have , Sena-Interfoto, Reuters) th~ benefl~s o,~ e,1joy the benefits ofbeing lived together bemg marned, " . d." "''h b' ,J-. ~'" may be able to the bishops mfrrte J II e '1SIiOPS sa/v. sue for Ii slice said in a Sep- -;-11- - - - - - - - - - of one tember statement to the Law another's property and wealth if .. .ll d epen d ent th ey break up. an In C ommlSSlon, NEW YORK (CNS) - The world seems to be tious choice but rather through miscalculation, sterbody establ{shed b~[ Parliament The commission claims that to draw up key reforms to laws. the laws that governed cohabi"sleepwalking" down the path of nuclear weapons ile debate and the paralysis of multilateral mecha"The, gradual erdsion of tax tation were "illogical, uncertain proliferation, increasing the{isk of nuclear terrorism, nisms for confIdence-building and conflict resoluI and benefits has already led to a and unfair" and were devoid of said the "Vatican's representative to the United Na- tion," he said. ' · .. . ht s. tions. 0 f t heII.mshtutlOn ng The Vatican has repeatedly asked governments d owngrad mg of marriage, and tollprovide the However, the bishops argued The United NatioJ)s must foster greater interna- "which openly or secretly possess nuclear anns, or existing and fewer financial and that the solution for such a lack tional dialogue to ensure compliance with treaties those planning to acquire them" to change their plans testamentary benefi~s ... to those of rights "already exists, namely restricting the proliferation of nuclear weapons and and "strive for a progressive and concerted nuclear II banning their testing, said Archbishop Celestino disannament," the archbishop said. living outside a marital relation- marriage." ship would undoubibdly lead to "Couples who cohabit and Migliore, the Vatican's U.N. nuncio. "Policies of nuclear deterrence, typical of the Cold Without a. fIrmer commitment to these treaties War, can and must be replaced by concrete measures' a further underminib g of the in- deliberately choose not to marry stitution of marriagk," the bish- forgo the responsibilities and more states will ann themselves with nuclear weap- of disannament based on dialogue and mutual,negoII ops said. "It would inevitably obligations and also the legal tiations," he said. Archbishop Migliore also asked for greater efforts , lead to the question'jl'Why-marry benefits of marriage," they to restrict the spread of small anns, saying that greater at all?'" I added. The statement was signed by The number' of people emphasis should be given to the "human dimension" Archbishop Pete!II Smith of. cohabitating in Britain has inof the destruction caused by these weapons, especially Cardiff, Wales, chairman of the creased by about 60 percent over to children. bishops' DepartmeAt for Chris- the last decade, with about four He said that there are 643 million small anns in tian Responsibility I~nd Citizen- million adults living together the world today and these weapons "kill and maim ship, and by Auxi~iary Bishop outside wedlock. The number is tens of thousands, spark refugee crises, undermine John Hine of. Soufhwark, En- predicted to double in the next the rule of law and spawn a culture of violence and impunity." gland, chairman ofll~he bishops' 20years. , I The Vatican supports establishing "an obligatory legal framework aimed at regulating the trade of conIi , The apparent ventional weapons of any type, as well as regulating nudeartesttook place underground . the know-how and technology for their reproduction," In Hwaderi. Our Lady of liGuadalUpe Parish at St. James Church he said. North Korea. It also favors international standards for the imseeks a music director for its 3 weekend English Masses. port, export and transfer of convention8.I weapons, Vocal and orgarbpiano ability required. Openness to ocons, increasing the possibility that such weapons will he said. cas.ional bilingul~lliturgies sought. Pay is on a per Mass fall into terrorist hands, he said October 5 in a speech In an recent talk to the General Assembly, Archbasis.II to the U.N. General Assembly in New York.. bishop Migliore asked for "more focused initiatives" Please contact Father Wilson or Deacon Larry at The Vatican has observer status at the United Na- to combat AIDS in poor countries. 508-992-9408. Ii ' tions which means that it can speak at sessions but "The concentration of our fmancial, logistic' and cannot vote. human resources would enable the countries most The world is at a crossroads regarding nuclear' affected by IDV/AIDS to put an end to this scourge weapons, said the archbishop. and consolidate the hope that humankind will overu~I;~dYi of FatiIqa toS~er I,.ucia,plessed "One path can take us to a world in which the pro- come the pandemic worldwide," he said. lDtaa~~ Blessed Frart~sco ' July l~, 1917 all come to ask, for the consecration of Russia to my Immaculate liferation of nuclear weapons is restricted and reverSed The archbishop also reiterated the Vatican posi,9 th~Co~~on of Repar~fionon.~e Fir~t SaturclllYs. If through trust, dialogue and negotiated agreement," tion that "ensuring access to reproductive health" ts are bkded, Russia will be converted, aiJ.~ there will be he said. as stated in the U.N.'s 2005 World Summit Out- . peace. If not, she will spread her errors throughout the world, causing "The' other path leads to a world in which rapidly come Document means "reducing maternal morv;Wars,,~,tpe~}ltipns pf the c;hurch. :fhe goo~ will by martyred, the growing numbers of states feel obliged to ann them- tality." : Holy Fiither will ha,ve much to suffer: yarious 'nations will reannihiselves with nuclear weapons and the threat of nuclear In the past, when the phrase on reproductive health lated. Inthe end, my Immaculate Heart will ¢Umph. The Holy Father teriqrism grows," he said. has appeared in U.N. documents it has been inter,will cQg~ecrat~Ru~siatome, and she Will be converted, and a period of peace will be gJ;anted to the world.'In PortUgal, the dogma of the "The international community seems almost to be preted by many people as meariing support for acFaith will always be preserved, etc." sleepwalkiIig down the latter path, not by conscien- cess to abortion.

Vatican's U.N. nuncio: World is 'sleepwalking' to nuclear terrorism

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"The Catholic Church is a very powerful presence in the Philippines," she continued. "It is where the people really turn for help - and hope." These days the Gaffneys call Colorado Springs', Colo., home. Both husband and wife work for the diocese there: Ed as director of planning, and accountability for di?cesan leadership; Donna as the director of the Pontifical Mission Societies. Speaking of her role as director of the mission office, she said: "It was the answer to my prayer, ' 'What do you want me to do, Lord?' And it continues my vocation.to serve as a missionary." In all they do, both Donna and Ed take a cue from their time in the Philippines. "There we learned to 'listen for the voice of God' in all of life's experiences," Donna said. "That voice will tell you how he wants you to follow him. "When an event happens to the people in the Philippines even when tragedy strikes - the people always ask, 'What is God saying to us?''' she continued. "I think because they see God in everything they don't give in to despair, The Filipinos are like palm '. ).. trees - they:Sway with the typhoons of life.;' The iwo years the Gaffneys spent in the Missions was "lifechanging, faith-changing," Ed and Donna agreed. As part of the Anawim Community of Corning, New York, the two were already deeply educated in the faith when they heard the mission call. "That community is about forming lay people to serve the Church," Donna noted. "We knew the documents - we knew about service and vocation in our heads. "But it was the people and the Church in the Philippines that really put the experience into our hearts," she concluded. And in their hearts it will always remain. ' .

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invited missionary priest is welcomed rifice of the Mass." into every parish across the diocese The money collected on Mission every· year. Sunday is sent to the national office, "It allows him to explain his which in tum is sent to Rome "where society's mission situation, get some secretaries for churches in the variprayerful and financial assistance, and ous sountries decide how the money also allows us to look beyond our own will be allocated to people in dioceses diocese and our country to the needs worldwide," he explained. "Besides the solicitation and colof the Church everywhere on the lection of funds, our office is also globe," he stated. Approximately 250 missionary charged with 'mission animation,' priests submit a request to the dio- that is, to make people aware of the cese to be included in the Mission- mission Church and the need to proclaim Christ in our areas and ask for ary Cooperative every year. "Our diocesan office runs the Co- prayers for the mission." As part of this year's celebration operative, the Holy Childhood Association, as well as the Mission Sun- of Mission Sunday, every priest in day' collection, which is our largest every parish has received a copy of a poster showing the Holy Father, Pope endeavor," said Msgr. Oliveira. Priests from 50 missionary soci- Benedict XVI, and carrying his meseties or congi-egations - some of sage, as well a brochure in a general mailing, Msgr. Oliveira reported. which are present in the diocese Because he is the invited celebrant visited parishes in the past year. They included Franciscans" Dominicans, of the weekly televised Mass on MisBorromeans, Jesuits, Carmelites, sion Sunday, Msgr. Oliveira said his Columbans, Assumptionists, and homily will be on the missions and priests from the congregations of how each Catholic can observe it in a the Sacred Hearts, Holy Cross, and special way. the Incarnate Word. "I'll be telling them about the three 'I missionaries came from dio- things the Holy Father mentions in ceses in East Africa, SUdan, his Mission Sunday message for this day. He tells us that even if we never Tegucigalpa, Haiti, and India The office is also mindful of the trovel to or visit a mission, we can be needs of the diocese's supported mis- a missionary through prayer, personal sion to Guaimaca in Honduras where sacrifice and through financial supthere are two parishes served by port," he stated. priests and religious Sisters from' the' , The'Society for the Propagation diocese, he noted. of the Faith was founded in Lyons, "Another way missions receive France, in 1822 by a young French help from us, is that from time to time laywoman, Pauline Jaricot. Inspired by stories she heard about people in our diocese leave funds for the missions by ways of bequeaths, missionary work in China, she felt through the National Propagation of caUed by the Lord to help the worldthe Faith Office in New York," Msgr. wide missionary work. While she never traveled to the missions, she Oliveira noted. . "Still another way we support the gathered friends and workers in a missions is by offering a memorial family silk mill into "circles of 10," chalice that anyone can purchase asking each one to pray daily for the from our office. It is inscribed with missions and to sacrifice a penny a thy person's name and we send if off week. Today, the General Fund of the to a mission where there is a priest who needs a chalice. Instead of a per- Propagation ofthe Faith, which draws soft giving flowers as a funeral offer- from Catholic gifts across the world, mg, we offer this memorial chalice is the basic means of support for the for the missions instead. It is a great Catholic mission, which account for opportunity for a family to have a 1,150 struggling dioceses in places member remembered at the holy sac- all across the globe.

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alg whO\1,fu.e chtbnicallY hOmelessdlle to 1aniceBarlon, cha.frrnan of Barnstable Huphysical or mental illness or substance abuse man Services Committee. is~es. With clolto 800;homeless inClividu+This writer served as moderator, and also a~rand oilly about 100 emergency shelter presentedananalysis~fresponsestothepro~g~, wi~~~r canj~e tough.on ttl9~e w;i!h0ut at viderquestionnaire,., . roof ovef their 'head. While there Je also' Participants 'were charged withthe task of m~~ th~, 150~~omele$~ families compri~- catalogingexistin~ resource's, identifying ing ~ ad<litioriill400 people, families tend' gaps'in service's, and f6rmulating an optimal to spend {!IT lessJime homeless than do indi- "vision." This vision, or plan, will assist in viQUals".theimplemeI1tatioI1of "Operation III From Forty-nve service providers, a dozen con- the Streets," the' Human Services ct{j-fied'ci?zen~,%i.lnd T{jwnof~arnst~Ble Of~!A'Committee:~;extended program based on last ficials including Town ManagerJohn Klimm,. year's successful "Operation In From the

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, A family goes to the missions dia also had rooms there, and would pass by the community room each night as the Gaffneys prayed the rosary .One night their local ordinary, Bis'hop Je'sus Cabrera of Alaminos, heard of the family practice. From then on, if he was in that building, he would join them. "He asked us to speak on the radio of our prayer life as a family," said Donna. "He offered that as' an example to the families in his diocese." Just as prayer preceded their decision to be missionaries; it was also a big part of their tim~ overseas. "When things got rough, that's when we went 'inside' - in prayer," Donna said. "It wasn't easy being on mission with five kids. My greatest prayer was that none of them would get sick- and happily, they did not." Donna, however, had to undergo an operation while in the Philippines. "Prayer got us through that and everything else - the temperatures of more than 100 degrees, the lack of electricity and water, the dirt that was four-inches thick," she recalled. "We couldn't have survived without the prayer." Ed and Donna often traveled ' with Bishop Cabrera w,hen he' would drive in his Jeep ,to celebrate Mass in village missions. The journeys would last for hours, mostly on dirt roads, Ed remembered. " All along the way the people would see us and wave," he said. The three would arrive in a vil.lage by late morning. Bishop 'Cabrera wo'uld celebrate Mass, hear confessions and administer the sacraments of baptism, first Communion and confirmation. There would then be a big feast. "Those visits especially - when you realize that they wait for a priest to celebrate Mass sometimes for two months - made you realize how the people valued their faith," Donna said.'

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Listening to the voice'of God When Donna and Ed Gaffney heard about the opportunity to go to the Philippines as missionaries, they carefully weighed their options. "'We've got to really think about going," they said. "And we've got to think how we'll feel if we don't go." As Donna Gaffney put it: "For me, there was something in my heart that said, 'God has given you so much, and there is no way you can give it all back, but this will be a start.' We knew we had to go it because of all the blessings that we received from God." "There was a lot of praying about the choice initially," her, husband added. "I loved my job at the college and I had to pray about whether this was what the Lord' wante.d me to. do, to give this all up.' In the end it came down to putting our trust in God." The Gaffneys, who then lived in upstate New York, did answer the call to mission, They packed up and headed off to the Philippines with .five of their six children, then aged four to 14. The couple's oldest daughter, Megan, was a junior in college at the time, and the family didn't want to interrupt her education. "Before our time in the Phil" ippines, our kids knew that the world was there for them," Donna said. " After their mission experience, they discovered the importance of being there for the other person." "Being there" in the Philippines from 1993 to 1995 included instructing principals and teachers in education methods, te~ching young people English; and giving retreatsto high school stu-. dents. The, couple was even part of a Sunday night radio broadcast. When they 'first arrived, the family lived on the top floor of the building that housed. the radio station. Later they moved to a small house in the village. A few missionary priests from In-

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ordination among service providers, and the need for a 24-hour, dry shelter off of Main Street in Hyannis. Catholic parishes have for many years provided support to the Cape's largest emergency shelter, Noah. Christ the King, Corpus Christi, Holy Trinity, Our Lady of the Assumption, Our Lady of Victory, Our Lady of the Cape, St. Elizabeth Seton, St. Francis Xavier, S1. Joan ofAre, St. Margaret's in Buzzard's Bay, St. John the Evangelist, S1. Patrick's, St. Peter's, and St. Pius X are among those which have provided meals, clothing, and holiday assistance on a regular basis.

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School safety issues affect public, Catholic school~i alike WASHINGTON - Recent deadly school shootings, in particular what occurred in the one-room Amish schoolhouse in Perinsylvania, shattered an illusion that some schools are immune fromIi violent attacks. ... The incidents, two of them involving intruders, sparked an October 10 summit convened by the White House. The Conference ~m School Safety took place in Chevy Chase, Md., after the latest schOol shooting'victims had been buried but while the issue was still top news with the October 9 arrest of a 13-year-old student for firing ali assault weapon in a Missouri middle school. Summit participants, who included educators, police officers, White House officials and stupents, discussed ways to combat school violence, but they were leery about offering any sweeping solutions. Speakers emphasized the ne~d to have crisis plans in place and to practice them, to take bullying and threats seriously and to have open communications with school parents. I Catholic newspaper marks anniversary with gift to I,tistorical Society BARRE, Vt. - The official newspaper of the Diocese of Burlington celebrated its 50th anniversary by giving a gift. The Vermont Historical Society's collection of Catholic materials increased significantly in September with a donation of 83 parish histories from the Vermont Catholic Tribune newspaper. Pat Gore, editor of the newspaper, and Father Peter Routhier, vicar general of the statewide Diocese of Burlington, presented a dozen white binders filled with booklets or typewritten parish histories, as well as several hardcover histories, to Paul Carnahan, Vermont Historical Society librarian. ''This is a unique donation in that a denomination has pulled together for us histories of various parishes," Carnahan said. The idea for the donation was generated by the staff of the Cathoiic Tribune as a way to commemorate the diocesan newspaper's 50th anniversary. Pope tells Zambian bishops to continue preaching honesty, fidelity VATICAN CITY - Living upright and faithful lives, Zambian Catholics will bring others to Christ and help improve their country's social life, Pope Benedict XVI said. "In your teaching continue to proclaim the need for honesty, family affection, discipline and fidelity, all of which have a decisive impact on the health and stability of society," the pope said in an October 13 talk to the bishops of Zambia. The bishops were making their "ad /imina" visits to the Vatican to report on life in their dioceses and their nation. Speaking on behalf of the group, Coadjutor Archbishop Telesphore Mpundu of Lusaka, president of the Zambian bishops' conference, said the consolidation of democracy and the impact of the AIDS epidemic were among the biggest challenges the Zambian people are facing. Papal minibooks: Portable, affordable and rap.idly disappearing VATICAN CITY - The Vatican is preparing to publish Pope Benedict XVI's biggest book to date: "Complete Teachings, Vol. I." At 1,376 pages, it's the kind of tome designed for libraries and specialists, covering the pontiff's output of speeches, messages, sermons and documents during his first nine months in office. But the pope's writings are also finding their way into more bite-sized volumes that are enjoying unusual popular success, according to the Vatican publishing house, Libreria Editrice Vaticana. The pope's talks to families, diplomats, cardinals and young people have been issued in minibooks that sell for one euro each - about $1.25. To its delight, the Vatican has found these small~r books rapidly disappearing; some of the more popular titlt:s have sold tens of thousands of copies. "The world is discovering that Pope Benedict is a pope who should be read," said Salesian Father Claudio Rossini, director of the Vatican publishing house. Pope meets Italian prime minister, discusses public policies VATICAN CITY - Pope Benedict XVI met Italian, Prime Minister Romano Prodi October 13, discussing public policy issues of concern to the Catholic Church and international affairs. The meeting was Prodi's first audience with Pope Benedict since Prodi's center-left coalition won an April election. The Vatican press office issued a statement saying the pope and prime minister spoke about concems::in "the sphere of bioethics, the defense and promotion oflife and ofth~ family, solidarity, dialogue among religions and cultures, arid the education of youth." While Prodi's government has not introduced any n~w legislation on the most sensitive topics, some members of his coljlition have suggested easing Italy's restrictive abortion laws, permitting assisted suicide, expanding the use of the RU-486 abortion pill and granting officiallegal status to cohabiting couples.

MIRACULOUS VISIT - Cardinal Sean P. O'Malley, OFM, of the Boston Archdiocese, prays before the reliquary of the miraculously incorrupt heart of St. John Vianney, patron -saint of parish priests. The relic was available for viewing for priests, seminarians and religious last week at St. John's Seminary in Brighton. The following two days it traveled to St. Mary's Church in Waltham, and the Cathedral of the Holy Cross in Boston, for viewing by the general public. This was the first time since St. John Vianney's canonization in 1925 that the relic has left France. St. John Vianney was once dismissed from the seminary-because of his difficulties wit~ academic studies. But he persevered and was ordained in 1815. Three years later he was named pastor in Ars, a tiny village near Lyon. Within a few years he transformed the religious life of the village, and his fame as a preacher, confessor and spiritual counselor soon spread throughout France and around the world. Cardinal O'Malley expressed a hope that the visit of St. John Vianney's relic would be an inspiration for potential vocations to the priesthood. (Photo by Gregory Tracy, Boston Pilo~

Pope names two Boston auxiliaries, new Davenport, Iowa bishop WASHINGTON (CNS) - Pope Benedict XVI has accepted the resignation of Bishop William E. Franklin of Davenport, Iowa, and appointed Auxiliary Bishop Martin J. Amos of Cleveland as his successor. The pope also named Father John A. Dooher, pastor of St. Mary's Church in Dedham, and Father Robert F. Hennessey, pastor of Most Holy Redeemer Church in East Boston, as auxiliary bishops for the Boston archdiocese. Archbishop Pietro Sambi, apostolic nuncio to the United. States, announced the changes in Washington October 12. Bishop Franklin, 76, has headed the Davenport diocese since January 1994. Canon law requires bishops to submit their resignation to the pope when they turn 75. Two days before his resignation was accepted by the pope, the diocese announced it had filed for bankruptcy protection because of sex abuse lawsuits it faces. It filed a petition for Chapter 11 reorganization in the Iowa District of U.S. Bankruptcy Court. The pope also accepted the resignation of Auxiliary Bishop John

P. Boles of Boston. Bishop Boles, against retired Bishop Lawrence D. 76, was ordained a priest of the Soens of Sioux City, Iowa, for acBoston archdiocese in 1955 and tions during his 33 years as a priest appointed as a Boston auxiliary of the Davenport diocese. Bishop-designate Dooher, 63, bishop in 1992. Bishop Amos, 64, was ordaiI).ed was born in Boston and ordained a priest of the Diocese of Cleveland to the priesthood in 1969 for the in- 1968. In 2004, he temporarily Boston Archdiocese. He has served gave liturgical and sacramental as- as president of the priests' senate sistance to a parish in Barberton, and been a member and moderator Ohio, after its pastor was arrested of the archdiocesan priests' counfor cultivating marijuana plants in cil. a rectory bedroom. He has also served as a pastor, Bishop Frimklin was appointed an administrator and director of the to Davenport after having served archdiocesan Office of Spiritual for six years as auxiliary bishop - Development. Bishop-designate Hennessey, of Dubuque, Iowa. He has had to deal with the clergy sex abuse 54, was ordained to the priesthood scandal over his last few years as in 1978 for the Boston Archdiocese. Davenport bishop. The diocese, He has been pastor of Holy Rewhich agreed to a $9 million deemer Parish in East Boston since settlement with victims two years 1994, and currently is on the ago, had openly considered filing archdiocesan priests' council and for bankruptcy as early as 2004. the clergy personnel board. In September, a jury awarded $1.5 He also has served with the Mismillion to a man who claimed sionary Society of St. James the abuse by a Davenport diocesan Apostle, a Boston-based organizapriest nearly five decades ago. tion of diocesan priests from the The jury's action prompted the U.S. and other English-speaking bankruptcy filing,. according to countries who take a temporary leave from their dioceses for misdiocesan officials. The diocese also has had to deal sionary work in Ecuador, Peru and with sexual abuse claims lodged Bolivia.


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Students cruise the Acushnet River NEW BEDFORD - St. Joseph School's fifth-graders recently explored New Bedford and Fairhaven's waterfront by boat to learn about the past history ~d c:urrent use of the seaport. Shortly after the start of the school day, students walked through the historic center oftown to the Fairhaven Shipyard and Marina where they boarded the Whaling City Expedition's boat "Acushnt!t." "The beautiful summer-like weather made the trip all the more enjoyable," said fifthgrade teacher Michael Cholette. Students learned many lessons on the trip from Captain Bob

Bouley, a graduate of St. Joseph " a boat some. day. A second enSchool. Students saw men workjoyed seeing the lighthouse and learning about the five islands. ing on nets, unloading vessels and performing routine maintenance Still another was fascinated with tasks on many fishing boats. " the cruise under the New Bedford One group of men even·offered Fairhaven Bridge and the sound" of cars passing overhead. a little advice, "Stay in school! ""This was a completely new Get a good job!" experience for my class," said Capt. Bob explained that fishCholette. "The majority of stuing is one of thl? most dangerous dents have been on a boat before, jobs in the world. He also outlined the history of but not on a boat in a working the whaling fleet, identified wellharbor. Students had the opportunity to extend the knowledge they known vessels and pointed out the harbor's geographic points of ingained during last year's tour of the Whaling Museum by witnessterest during the 90-minute tour. ing how a commercial fishing fleet One student learned that she " , and ship yard operates." loved the water and h~s to own .~

A FOOT REST - Soccer player Brandon Fastino takes a break from the action during a recent practice at Bishop Stang High School. The sophomore is one of many students enjoying the fall sports season at the North Dartmouth school. "

IN CRUISE CONTROL - Fifth-grade students from St. Joseph School in New Bedford enjoy a cruise through Fairhaven's waterfront during a recent school field trip. They learned about the history of the town and the current use of the seaport.

THINGS ARE LOOKING UP - Christina Raposo, principal and teacher for the third and fourth grade at St. Anthony olf Padua School, New Bedford, shares a photo opportunity with her students during a recent school day. Below, students in the extended care program get ready to enjoy some baseball in the school yard.

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Boy Scouts get ready to bob for apples at the recent Scout retreat held at Cathedral Camp in East Freetown. The annual event attracted Scouts from across the diocese who participated in a variety of activities.


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Lamenting missed opportunities

Tigers manager and his brother, a priest, both serve as shepherds DETROIT (CNS) - There are many ways in which managing a baseball team is similar to managing a parish, said Father Thomas 1. Leyland, brother of Detroit Tigers manager Jim Leyland. In a sense, they are both shepherds to their "team," with Father Leyland's team being an active parish with 8,000 parishioners and a school and Jim Leyland's tearn being the Tigers, who beat the New YorkYankees and the Oakland Athletics to advance to the World Series. In either role, the leader must affirm people, encourage them to do their best, encourage them to work as a team toward a common goalall while keeping the teammates' different personalities in mind. Also, Father Leyland said, it's important to keep in mind where your team is going, and what its vision is. Father Leyland has been pastor at St. Rose Parish in Perrysburg, Ohio, just south ofToledo, for more than seven years. It is the parish in which he and his family, including his six siblings, grew up. He disagrees with the idea that he has a harder job than his brother, considering the number of people they shepherd. Jim Leyland has to deal with mediaexposure, FatherLeyland reasons. Although sports has become a kind ofreligion to people, especially considering that sports keeps some people away from Sunday Mass, sports also has positive aspects, such

By CHARLIE

as bringing people together, he said There's a large Tigers following in Toledo, he said, because of the short distance between the two cities and because of the Toledo Mud Hens, Detroit's top farm team. "It can buildcommunity among people," he told The Michigan Catholic, newspaper of the Detroit Archdiocese. 'That's a positive." Father Leyland also pointed out that for an area such as Detroit or other economically hard-hit areas, it's great to see it coming alive because of the success of its baseball team. "It's good for the city:' he said. Father Leylandhimselfwentto a few regular-season games, but likely wasn't going to catch anypostseason games unless the Tigers make it to the World Series. He's been watching some ofthe games on television, although he didn't get to see much ofthe team 'sAL Division Series win against the Yankees because he was celebratingMass and thenofficiated at a wedding. He said he gets nervous watching the games, depending on how the Tigers are playing. His family is close, keeping in contact through phone calls. He jokes that he doesn't pray for a particular team before a game because he's afraid he'll get blamed if they lose. "I get asked that all the time:' he said. He said he prays for the health of the players, that no one gets injured. and that they do their best.

''FARAWAY''

This time, this place Misu~ed, mistakes Too long, too late Who was [ to make you wait Just one chance,just one breath Just in case there's just one left 'Cause you know You know, you know That [ love you [ have loved you all along And [ miss you Beenfar away for far too long [ keep dreaming you'll be with me And you'll never go Stop breathing if [ don't see you anymore On my knees, r II ask Last chance for one last dance 'Cause with you r d understand All ofhell to hold your hand r d give it all r d give for us Give anything but [won't give up 'Cause you know You know, you know (Repeat second verse.) So far away Been far away for far too long So far away Been far away for far too long But you know, you know, you know [wanted [ wanted you to stay 'Cause [ needed [ need to hear you say That [ love you [ have loved you all along And [forgive you For being away for far too long So keep breathing 'Cause r m not leaving

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CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

Hold onto me, and Never let me go Sung by Nickelback, Copyright 2005 by Roadrunner Records Another hit for Nickelback? Apparently so, with the release of "Far Away" off the "All the Right Reasons" disc. I read that music critics say Nickelback's songs all sound the same, but with 10 million CDs sold, no one could deny that Nickelback has made an impact. . "FarAway" focuses on an experience common to all of us: missed opportunities. The song's character laments that now he must love his romantic partnerfrom '1ar away." He had a chance to establish an enduring and good relationship with her, but he hesitated "too ICing, too late." Now he asks himself, '~o was I to make you wait?" i At this point, he has a much different sense of what he wants. He is begging for one "last chance" to save the relationship. He has come to realize that "I love you, I have loved you all along, and I miss you." He wants her to say "I forgive you for being away for far too long." He asks her to "hold on to me, and never let me go." The song doesn't reveal the outcome of the character's changed perspective. Perhaps he and his girlfriend re-establish a much different and more committed relationship or maybe she has moved on. Whether in relationships or other aspects of life, most of us experience lost opportunities. While such situations can leave us feeling sad and re-

gretful, it is importaJit to keep a positive view. This attitude begins by recognizing that opportunity knocks many times in life. Even when a current opportunity is lost, often what it offered will reappear in another way. Forexamp,le, ifthe guy in the song indeed was emotionally "far away" too long in his girlfriend's view, what he wanted in a relationship can come back into his life. There isn't a "one and only." Different people complement us in various ways. The song's character may grieve the opportunity he wasted, but when he enters.a new relationship he is likely to be more aware of what is required to form a true and healthy emotional connection. To live and love' fully we must approach life with trust. All ofus face disappointment and disillusionment. However, even when you feel very alone, you are not. God's presence will bring you healing, guidance and support. These gifts will help you redirect and re-create your life. Life holds so much promise. Even when you've made a serious mistake in judgment, through it God will help you to discover more of the best in yourself. Accept lost opportunities. Let the hurt teach you how to live differently, but refuse to get down on yourself. Rather, open yourself to the present and the new oPP'?rtunities about to unfold.

Comments are welcome at: chmartin@swindiana.net or at 7125W 200S, Ro~kport, IN 47635.

We are¡ all missionaries wherever we are As you've read or skimmed the headlines or articles in this week's Anchor, you most likely have . noticed that there is a certain theme that ties this issue together. As I write this article I'm still not sure what I can offer to you on this theme but let's see where it goes. When I think missions or missionaries, I think of those saintly type folks that give of their lives, talents and time to bring the Gospel to other countries. They live in and work with the people of those countries and try to not only bring Christ to them, but the very necessities of life such as food, education and medical care. I have no experience with the missions or missionary work other than listening to the missionaries who visit our parish. I've also read about and followed the work of students from my daughter's Jesuit university who travel to Honduras and Haiti and I've read the articles and follow the work of Fathers Paul Canuel and Craig Pregana of our own diocese as they work in Honduras. As with most of us, I offer prayers for them and contribute to help continue their work.

When we look at these people and particularly well poised to a what they do, I would guess that "missionary life" in the Church not necessarily a life in a foreign not many of us are, can be,. or will land but here in our country or local be missionaries or can we? NQt to get all "teachy" on you, communities. "There is much to do here," as I told my daughter when the word mission comes from the Latin missus, past participle of she said that many of her friends mittere, which translates "to send off." While my' Latin teacher, Mr. Grey, might think that I retained . something from four years of Latin C+ scholarship, I confess that the Internet is ! my source for this By Fran~ Lucca information. Upon reading 9. \ this definition, the closing of our Sunday liturgies immediately came to mind. The were spending a year in Central priest says, "the Mass is ended ... America after graduation and I thought she might be so inclined. go ..." That "sending off" is our My purpose in discouraging her call to "mission" and to be "missionaries," ready to spread the word was not only a selfish desire to keep her close and safe, but also formed to others. So while foreign lands by my belief that there is so much may come to mind when we think of the missions, I believe that the to do here. After all, there are many areas of our own country that are in rest of us.are also "sent forth" each desperate need of hearing God's and every day. The missionary aspect of our word, but are also in need of faith is what sends us forth to do the medical assistance, food and work Christ calls us to do. I think education. There are still parts of that today's young people are our country where folks do not

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have enough to eat, do not have adequate educational opportunities, and do not know the saving grace of our God. In fact, with the decreasing numbers of priests from our own country, I've heard others say that it may not be long before we as a country will be considered a mission and others will be coming here from other countries to spread the Word. Several months ago, I wrote of how many feel that today's young people will be our next great generation and I certainly feel that is true. That spirit should bode well for our country and our world. After all, who but today's young people are better prepared and suited for "mission" work. Our young people today are more mobile than any previous generation. Many have studied abroad and have travelW extensively. Today's young people have also experienced and endured much more than past generations with the reality of broken and ~lended families, the trauma of abuse and a front seat to the atrocities of terror

and war. These very circumstances make this next great generation particularly prep~ to be sent off to make a differenCe in this world, this country and ill the community. The young people'oftoday have the enthusiasm, the creativity, the ability to make a difference in the world. They "get it." And so while some will go to distant lands -like my youth minister intern, Na~an, who will travel to Guatemala this January others will be working locally to try to make a diffe~nce. After all, with God as our Fapter, we are all of the same family.,What family member wouldn't reach out to help the others when they are in need? On Sunday, when we hear the priest say 'The MaSs is ended ... go," may we accept:that as an ongoing challenge tb make a difference for our biothers and sisters in the world no matter where they may be. ' Lucca is a youth ministerat St. Dominic's Parish in Swansea. He is the chair and a director ofthe YESl Retreat and the director ofthe Christian utukrship Institute (Cll).

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done in his name and in his honor. He is the foundation ofour parish and the foundation of our lives. Let the work we begin today lead to the building up of his kingdom." Part of the ceremony recognized the parishes' oldest and youngest members. Three-month-old Etta Cecilia Parks was with her mother Denise Parks who said, "It is an honor to be participating." Her daughter was recently baptized at the parish. Next to the infant was the community's oldest member, Frances Raymond, 101 years old. She has been a parishioner her whole life and said the parish's first priest baptized her. "I was baptized here and married here and I'm here today on this speNO STORM CAN SHAKE THEIR INMOST FAITH - Members of cial occasion. I'm glad to be a part of an Amish family walk down a road to attend a funeral ceremony for this today. Father Dahl is a great pasvictims of the Amish school shootings in West Nickel Mines, Pa. tor and he's very caring of all of us." During a recent homily, Cardinal Roger M. Mahony of Los Angeles Those who attended also were in- called on the Catholic faithful to imitate the heroic virtue displayed vited to sign a book that will be placed by the Amish of Pennsylvania as they faced the ''tremendous tragin a time capsule inside the new edy" of the October 2 shootings. (CNS photo/Jason Reed, Reuters) church for future generations to see. Town Planner Keith A. Bergman RAISING THE ROOF - Deacon Thomas P. Palanza and Father also spoke at the event and extended Henry J. Dahl inspect a model of the new St. Peter's Church. congratulations to Father Dahl and Groundbreaking ceremonies were held October 12 and construc- parishioners on the occasion of the tion is set to begin shortly at the site. (AnchotiGordon photo) By CYRIL JONEs-KELLEn groundbreaking on behalf of the own lives." CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE town. According to state police, 32''The people of St. Peter's Parish SAN DIEGO - Los Angeles year-old Charles Carl Roberts IV Continued from page one are a vital part of the fabric of Cardinal Roger M. Mahony called entered a one-room Amish schoolrate many things we've enjoyed in for the parishioners of St. Peter the Provincetown's community and on the Catholic faithful to imitate house in West Nickel Mines, Pa., other churches in this new church. Apostle. In so many ways the sorrows Bishop Coleman's prompt pledge the heroic virtue displayed by the and shot 10 girls before taking his We're hoping we can work through and tears that happened with that dev- that the church would be rebuilt is ,Amish of Pennsylvania as they own life. Three of the girls died at the winter and complete the project astating fire have given way to hap- today fulfilled with this joyous faced the "tremendous tragedy" of the scene, and two others died groundbreaking celebration." . piness and joy;' in 12-14 months." the recent schoolhouse shootings. shortly after they were hospitalParishioner Barbara Leblanc was He went on to say, ''The work we That would put the project's_ "I was simply stunned," the car- ized.Four,ofthe five injured girls completion date before Christmas are beginning today should enliven ''very happy," with the groundbreaking dinal said, "when I first heard cbntinued to recuperate; doctors 2007, but that all depends on the win- our faith and make us grateful. When- and looks forward to the new church. about these shootings and these said the fifth girl suffered a head ter weather local construction crews ever we look to the interest of our "It's been along time coming and it's a children being killed and critically wound and was not expected to neighbor or community we are in a wonderful day for all of us. I used to injured. encounter. survive. "But I was more astounded as I R.A.D Jones Architects Inc., of sense God's co-workers. We pray come to Provincetown during the sumThe cardinal said the Amish began to see these Amish people' also have started an education fund Rockland is doing the documentation God will see this project to its suc- mers and now I live here;' Father Dahl was thankful to all that going about dealing with this tre- for the children of the shooter. for the new church and construction. cessful completion." One of the unique features they will Bishop Coleman spoke about the have been involved in the planning mendous tragedy," he added. "Extraordinary. Extraordinary. The cardinal's remarks came in Heroic. Courageous. Unbelievincorporate is a sanctuary shaped like long history the Catholic Church has process and donated money to h~lp a homily to the Western lieuten- able," he said. "It's a very, very difthe bow of aship. The pulpit will be had in Provincetown and noted that make the rebuilding a reality. ''There has been so much planning ancy of the Knights and Ladies of ficult challenge." round like a crows nest and the altar even before the 132-year-old church will be a rock cut flat and inscribed existed there were priests as far back and meeting over the last 22 months the Holy Sepulcher who had gathThe cardinal added that the virwith the words ofJesus to Peter when as the 1850s coming to the town to and I'm glad we've reached this ma- ered for a Mass and investiture cer- tue of forgiveness among the jor step. We lost a beloved landmark, emony last week on the campus of Amish was accompanied by the he told him he is the "rock upon help make the Eucharist available. which I build my church.", "All of this will be built upon the but we're ready to rebuilt it with joy the University of San Diego. virtue of "simple goodness." He The new church will be handi- foundation of Jesus Christ," the and hope." A~dressing his remarks primanoted how they had not sought A luncheon followed. rily to the men and women who media attention but had humbly capped-accessible and have a covered bishop added. "Whatever we do is were about to be invested into the accepted "God's plan for them" portico to protect those arriving for order, the cardinal recounted how and had shown "an overflowing Masses from the elements. Items rethe Amish had gone the very day sense of goodness and self-givcovered in the fire, an 1896 statue of St. Peter, several other statues and the of the shootings, which occurred ing." October 2, to console and bring tabernacle, will be incorporated into The cardinal said the one who forgiveness to the wife, of the exemplified this goodness most for the new structure. shooter. He recounted how they him was. 13-year-old Marian "It's going to be a wonderful church," said Deacon Palanza. had made meals for her and her Fisher, who had begged the shooter In addition to the new building, three children throughout the to take her life and to let the week, just as they had for the younger girls go. renovations will be made to the nearby, three-story rectory, which is families of the girls who were , '" Shoot me first and let the more than 100 years old. A garage shot. other girls go.' What extraordinary "That is heroic," the cardinal goodness and charity," the cardiwill be added and the building will said. "Can you imagine yourself, nal said. Marian was one of the five be moved from its current location. can I imagine myself having that who died; her ll-year-old sister, A safer and more effective exit for level, that degree of courage to live Barbie, survived. the parking lot will be designed as well. out Christian forgiveness in such He said he will never again hear an extraordinary manner? It is dif- the command of Jesus that those "Once it's all done it will be more fun~tional and practical in getting SPANNING A CENTURY - Denise Parks introduces her three- ficult for us to understand and to who wish to enter the kingdom of around the buildings," added Deacon month-old daughter, Etta, to 101-year-old parishioner Frances comprehend but that is precisely heaven must become like one of Palanza. Raymond, prior to the groundbreaking at St. Peter the Apostle par- the level and degree offorgiveness these little ones without thinking In his address, Bishop Coleman ish. The two are the youngest and oldest parishioners respectively. that Jesus preached time and time of those Amish children and their said, ''This is truly a wonderful day (AnchotiGordon photo) again and calls us to imitate in our goodness.

Catholics urged to imitate heroic virtue displayed by the Amish

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;Eucharistic Adoration NEW BEDFORD - Perpetual eucharistic adoration is held at Our Lady's Chapel, 600 Pleasant Street. For more information call Laurie Larsen-Silva at 508-888-7751. r--~-"-""""---"-"----"---"l

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ATTLEBORO - A Portuguese healing service, led by La Salette Father Manuel Pereira, will be held Sunday at 2 p.m. at the National Shrine of Our Lady of La Salette. It will include the opportunity to be anointed and prayed over individually. For more information call 508-222-5410. FALL RIVER - A healing Mass will be celebrated October 26 at 6:30 p.m. at St. Anne's Church. Rosary will be prayed at 6 p.m. Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament will follow.

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to participate in their monthly holy hour October 29 at 12:30 p.m., at Holy Trinity Church, Route 28, West Harwich.

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ACUSHNET St. Francis Xavier Parish's Centennial Year will close December 3, when at 4:30 p.m. the parish choir, under the direction of Barry & Judy De Rossi, will offer a concert of sacred and popular Christian music. A 5 p.m. Mass will begin with Bishop George W. Coleman presiding. A buffet banquet will follow at the Century House, Main Street Acushnet. For more information call 508-995-7600. ATTLEBORO - Musician John Polce will bring his Bethany Nights Program to the National Shrine of Our Lady of La Salette October 27 at 7:30 p.m. It will feature music and prayer. For more information call 508-2225410.

BRIGHTON -Alumni ofSt. John's Seminary are invited to its second annual alumni dinner October 27 beginning with informal tours of the seminary, at 4 p.m. A holy hour will follow and reception and dinner will begin at 6 p.m. For more information call 617-746-5448 or email mary.brown@sjs.edu.

FALL RIVER - The first annual Catholic Memorial Home Harvest 5K Road Race and Fun Walk will be held tomorrow beginning with registration at 8:30 a.m. at the home, located at 2446 Highland Avenue. To register online visit the Website: www.jbrace.com.

FALL RIVER - A soup kitchen is open on Mondays from 5-6 p.m. at Sacred Heart Church Hall, 160 Seabury Street. Volunteers are welcome to assist beginning at 4 p.m.

MASHPEE - A sacred music concert featuring organist Peter Lea-Cox will be held November 3 at 8 p.m. at Christ the King Parish. For more information call 508-477-7700.

FALL RIVER - The Diocesan Choir is holding rehearsals for new members in the Bishop's Chapel at the Cathedral of St. Mary of the Assumption. Tenors and basses are especially needed. For more information call Madeleine Grace at 508-678-1054.

NEW BEDFORD-A spaghetti and meatball dinner will be held October 25 from 4:30-6:30 p.m. at the Sacred Heart Home, 359 Summer Street. For more information call 508-996-6751.

FALL RIVER - Bishop George W. Coleman will celebrate a Mass of Thanksgiving for couples observing significant wedding anniversaries, including the first year, Sunday at 3 p.m. at the Cathedral of St. Mary of the Assumption. For more information contact your local parish. FALL RIVER - The Employee Recognition Team at Catholic Memorial Home is sponsoring the second annual Craft Show and Bake Sale in the auditorium at 2446 Highland Avenue, on November 5 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Local public vendors are welcome. Sale open to the general public. Free admission and free drawing. Complimentary coffee. For information call 508-679-00 II. SWANSEA - The Fall River Diocesan Council of Catholic Women will meet October 26 at 7 p.m. in the parish hall of St. Louis de France Church. There will be a talk by police officer Peter Robidoux. Refreshments will follow. For more information call 508-673-6145. TAUNTON - Girl Scouts wishing to earn the Marian Award or Spirit Alive Award will meet October 24 at 5 p.m. at the religious center of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception Parish, 379 Bay Road. For more information call Mary Powers at 508824-4452. WEST HARWICH - Holy Trinity and Holy Redeemer parishes invite all

NEW BEDFORD - A parish bazaar will be held tomorrow from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Holy Name of the Sacred Heart of Jesus Church. For more information call 508-992-3184. SWANSEA - The Knights of Columbus, Bishop Cassidy Council No. 3669, will meet October 23 at 6:30 p.m. at St. Louis de France Parish, 66 Buffington Street, for the celebration of Mass. New members are always welcome. For more information call Manuel Ferreira at 508-4008038. TAUNTON - St. Anthony Parish will hold its annual Harvest Fair, October 28 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. It will feature crafts, a quilt raffle, bazaar and face painting. Portuguese sweetbread and malassadas will be available. For more information call 508-822-0714. WEST HARWICH - Holy Trinity Parish Harvest Bazaar will be held November 4 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. in the church hall. It will include a bakery table, Christmas comer, pies made by Father Edward J. Healey, a Chinese auction and games for children. For more information call 508432-4000.

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ATTLEBORO - A Grief Education Program is held Mondays from 10:30 a.m. to noon and Thursdays from 6:30-8 p.m. at the La Salette Retreat House, 947 Park Street. For more information call 508-222-8530.

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CONVENING IN MILWAUKEE - Several members of the Boston Province of the National Council of Catholic Women attended the recent General Assembly in Milwaukee. Front, from left: Helene Beauregard, president of the N.H. DCCW; Irene Sylvall" NCCW treasurer; Pauline Frechette, president of the Boston Conference; Anna Saars, president of the Maine DCCW; and Maureen Papineau, president of the Fall River DCCW. Rear: Helen Flavin, president of District One, Fall River; Debra Blais of the N.H. DCCW; Father Lawrence Conley, moderator of the Boston Province; Sister Eugenia Brady, moderator of the Fall River DCCW; Lynette Ouellette, past president of the Fall River DCCW; and Sandra Breton of the Maine DCCW.

Brother Lionel Morneau; served 70 years as religious FALL RIVER - Word has been received of the death on June 23, of Brother of Christian Instruction Lionel Morneau, 86, in the St. Andre Health Care Facility in Biddeford, Maine, after a long illness. He had served as a religious for 70 years. Born in St. Rose-de-Degele, Quebec, Canada, he was the son of the late Elise Morneau and the late Helene (Rioux) Morneau.

,In YQur I?l'ay~rs

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Please pray for these priests during the coming weeks

October 24 Rev. Marc Maurice Dagenais, O.P., Retired Assistant, St. Anne, Fall River, 1982 Most Rev. Joseph W. Regan, M.M, Retired Prelate of Tagum, Philippines, 1994 October 25 Rev. Reginald Chene, O.P., Dominican Priory, Fall River, 1935 Rev. Raymond B. Bourgoin, Pastor, St. Paul, Taunton, 1950 Rev. James W. Connerton, CSC, Founder, Stonehill College, North Easton, 1988 Rev. Msgr. John J. Steakem, Pastor, St. Thomas More, Somerset, 1999 October 27 Rev. Francisco L. Jorge, Assistant, Our Lady of Mt. Carmel, New Bedford, 1918 Rev. Edmond L. Dickinson, Assistant, St. Mathieu, Fall River, 1967 Rev. Joseph F. O'Donnell, Retired Pastor, Immaculate Conception, North Easton, 1990 October 28 Rev. Alfred E. Coulombe, Pastor, St. George, Westport, 1923 Rev. Stanislaus Kozikowski, OFM Conv., Pastor, SI. Hedwig, New Bedford, 1956 October 30 Msgr. Robert L. Stanton, Retired Pastor, St. Paul, Taunton, 1992 Rev. Denis Sughrue, CSC, Director of Postulancy, Holy Cross Novitiate, North Dartmouth, 2002

Brother Morneau attended Notre Dame School in Fall RiVer and was a member of Notre Dame Parish during his early teens when his family resided in Fall River. He entered the BROTHER OF juniorate CHRIS11AN INSTRUCTION of the LIONEL MORNEAU Brothers of Christian Instruction at age of 15. He made his perpetual profession

on Aug. 15, 1942. Brother Morneau had a long and varied career, teaching at schools in New York, Maine, and Canada. He enjoyed working the orchards in his later years. After his formal retirement at Alfred, Maine, in 1985 due to health problems, he continued to serve the community there in various ways, mostly in a number of maintenance tasks. He leaves a brother, Gerard Morneau of Brunswick, Maine; and a sister, Mrs. Mary Gaudette of Florida. His funeral Mass and interment were in Biddeford, Maine.

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WORLD MISSION :SUNDAY OCTOBER 22,2006 Dear brothers and sisters, may the World Missionary Day be a useful opportunity to understand ever better that the witness of love, the soul of the mission, concerns everyone. Indeed, serving the Gospel should not be considered a solitary adventure but a commitment to be shared by every community. As well as those who are in the front line on the frontiers of evangelization -. and I am thinking here with gratitude of the men and women missionaries - many others, children, young people and adults, with their prayers and cooperation, contribute in various ways to spreading the Kingdom of God on earth. It is to be hoped that this participation will continue to/row, thanks to the contribution of one and all. willingly take this opportunity to express my gratitude to the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples and to the Pontifical Mission Societies (PMS), which are dedicated to coordinating the efforts made in every part of the world to support the activity of those on the front lines on the missionary frontiers. May the Vrrgin Mary, who collaborated actively in the beginning of the Church's mission with her presence be. neath the Cross and her prayers in the Upper Room, sustain their action and help believers in Christ to be ever more capable of true love, so that they become sources of living water in a spiritually thirsting world. I wish this with all my heart, as I impart my Blessing to you all. From the Vatican, 29 April 2006 BENEDICTUS PP. XVI

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r------------------------------------------------------~ The Society for THE PROPAGATION OF THE FAITH ••. a Pontifical Mission Society Complete the coupon and submit it with a donation in the basket this weekend at church, or send to:

Rev. Msgr. John J. Oliveira, P.A., 106 Illinois Street, New Bedford, MA 02745 Enclosed is my World Mission Sunday gift for the Missions ... NAME: ADDRESS: CITY: .. ..

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10.20.06