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FALL RIVER DIOCESAN NEWSPAPER FOR SOUTHEAST MASSACHUSETTS CAPE COD & THE ISILANDS

t eanc 0 YOLo 28, NO. 41

.FALL RIYER,.MASS., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19,1984

$8 Per Year

In nuclear, abortion debates

Bish,ops say seek ideal

By Jerry FUteau

A PERMANENT DEACON distributes holy communion in the Diocese of Fairbanks, Alaska, a part of the United States still receiving support through the Society for the Propagation of the Faith. Marking World Mission Sunday this weekend, a special section on the work of the Propaga­ tion begins on page 7.

U.S. still missionary nation

Gives to, gets. aid

from Propagation

In Fairbanks the pope noted By ·Msgr. Jolm J. Oliveira our nation's "special role in sus­ Diocesan Director taining and' promoting.,the mis­ S~ie~ fur tM ~~ati~ . sionary efforts of the Holy See of th~ Falth of the almost $84 million ~ast "And today, standing on this year distrihuted to the missions missionary soil of America . . ." by the Propagation of the Faith; Those words were spoken, not nearly half came from A'merican by a pioneer or missionary two Catholics. or three hundred years ago, but But at the time of the estab­ by Pope John Paul II during his lishment of ,the Propagation of visit ~ast May to Fairbanks, the Faith, the U.S. church was Alaska. young and in great need of help. The year was 1819 and in For the Diocese of Fairbanks is, in fact, under the pastoral France Pauline Jaricot had an care of the Propagation of the ddea: that the needs of the iFaith, receiving support through church's missions CQuld best be the Propagation of tlhe Faith served by a single collecting supporting missions just ~ike other mission dioceses agency in Asia, Africa, Latin America everywhere; and that this sup­ port should come from alI Cath­ and Oceania. As we prepare .to observe olics, rich and poor, each ful­ World Mission Sunday this filling his or her missionary re­ weekend, it seems startling that sponsibility through prayer and the Holy Father should describe a truly sacrificial material of­ part of the United States as fering. Her plan - and the Society missionary territory. Yet until 1908, that could be said of any for the Propagation of the Faith place in our country. For more - came to fuH realization in than half'i,ts history, the United response to a plea for funds from Bishop Louis Dubourg of States has been "in the mis­ Turn to Page Six sions."

WASHINGTON (NC) - Abor­ tion, like nUiClear war, is "nec­ essarily" a matter of public morality, said Bishop James Ma­ lone, president of the 'U.S. bish­ ops, in a new policy statement released Oct. 14. The proper public policy queS­ tion about abortion and nuclear war is what should be done, not whether or not a !political response is needed, he said. At the same time, he added, "there is much room for dia­ logue about what constitutes ef­ fective, workable responses." The Youngstown, Ohio, bish­ op issued his statement as presi­ dent of the U.S. Catholic Con" ference, the nationail public policy arm of. the U.S. bishops, at the request of the 60-bishop admi~istrative board of the

usee.

On tlhe one hand, !he rejected pubilc pedicy issues. "As a na­ tion we are constitutionally the view Wlhich would demand committed to the separation of immediate and unqualified trans­ church and state but not to the lation of moral <:onviction into separation of religious and moral . public r,pedicy. On the other hand values from public life," he he repudilllted views which would declare abortion a strictly pri­ said. vate issue or that would cite - That, on the other eXitreme, insurmountable legal obstacles religious leaders should dictate and divided pwbJiJc opinion as to their followers how to vote. grounds for taking no action in "We do not seek the formation the realm of public policy. of a voting bl~, nor do we pre­ "The preven¢ion of nuclear empt the right and duty of in­ war and the protection of un­ dividuals to decide conscien­ born human me," Bishop l.\1alone tiously whom ithey' will support said, are foundamental issues of for public office," he said. ' "human dignity and the sancti­ On the election-year debate ty of life" which deserve "special emphasis." Bishop Malone also rejected ex­ Turn to Page Eleven treme positions.

.

.Bishop Malone categocically denied that the bishops are seek-_ ing to form a "voting, bloc" with their statements on various issues of pub'lic policy. "We are not a one-issue church," he said. His statement rejected two· extreme positions: - That religious leaders are out of ocder when they- address

Tridentine • rIte returns """" carefully VATICAN CITY (NC)

Pope John Paul II has given per­

mission . for use, under certain

conditions, of the Tridentine rite

for Mass, the replacement of

which was one of the major and,

most controversial reforms of

the Second Vatican Council:

A letter from the Congrega­ tion for Divine ,Worship to the heads of all bishops' conferences said readmission of the old Latin-language rite is not in­ tended for parish churches, ex­ cept in "extraordinary cases." lot is intended, the letter said, for particular groups that re­ quest it, in churches and ora­ tories approved by' the bishops. The decision reflected the pope's desire to accommodate groups that "remained tied to the Tridentine Rite,''" the ~etter said. Permission for the rite should go only to priests and fai'thful Turn to Page Six

w'

BISHOP DANIEL A. CRONIN, a co-consecrator, im­ poses hands on Bishop Maurus Muldoon, OFM, at Oct. 8 ordination ceremonies at Holy Cross Cathedral, Boston. Bishop Muldoon, from 1981 to 1983 director of Regina Pacis Center, New Bedford, will head the diocese of Olancho, Honduras, which he has served as apostolic admiriistrator since February, 1983. (Sr. Rita Murray Photo, courtesy of The Pilot of Boston)


THE ANCHORFriday, Oct. 19, 1984

In Latin America

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NEW BEDFORD AREA Bishop's Ball workers include, from left, Mrs. Emmett P. Al­ mond, Rev. Richard L. Chretien, Miss Mary Elizabeth LaRoche, George Mendonca and Miss Theresa Lewis. The diocesan television Masses at 10:30 a.m. on Channel 6 on Dec. 9 and 16 will be offered for the intentions of Ball su pporters and beneficiaries and will be cele­ brated by Father Chretien and Msgr. Anthony M. Gomes respectively.

New approach to religious in politics suggested

. rfaunton native addresses canon lawyers

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MILWAUKEE (NC) U.S. bishops and religious' superiors should try a new approach to forestall public controversies over religious holding political office, Msgr. Daniel Hoye, a Taunton native and general sec­ retary of the National Confer­ ence of ,Catholic Bishops, said Oct. 8. Msgr. Hoye has been on leave from from the Fall River . diocese since 1977, when he was fir~,t named to serve the NCCB. He said a bishop should be involved at an earlier stage in discussions, not learn of a de­ cision only wihen the order and its member have already de­ cided to ask the bisihops' per­ mission for the member to as­ sume or run for public office. Msgr. Hoye spoke at the Canon Law Society of America's national convention and in Mil­ waukee in October. He said there has Ibeen "rea­ sonabile and measured progress" in implementing the new Code

Solemn Novena to St. Jude October 20th to 28th NOV EN A D EV 0 T IONS 2:00 and 7:30 p.m. daily MASSES 7: 15, 8, 11 :30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. daily PREACHER Rev: Martin Dionne, O.P. THEME

of Canon Law, which took ef­ fect last year. As examples he cited decisions already made and deCisions pending at this fall's meeting of the U.S. bishops. On the question of a bishop having an earlier role in re­ solving the question' of whetiher a man or woman religious can hold public office or take other poHticarl ~eadership roles, Msgr. Hoye said it was not an issue which requires legislation or even involvement by the NCCB as such. But he said the Leadership Conference of Women Religious had asked the NCCB to study the question and work out guide­ lines. He thought such guide­ lines could help "avoid tihe ex­ periences of the recent past." Wtthin the past two years there have been three pulJlic contro­ versies in the United States in­ volving conflicts between a local bishop and a woman religious who wanted to hold public 'of­ fice. Msgr. Hoye said that at this November's meetillg tihe bishops' will be asked to decide on the age of confirmation in the Untted S~ates and revised guidelines for the permanent- diaconate. AIso on the November agenda are preliminary discussions con­ cerning norms for clerical dress and retirement of pastors, and regurlations concerning the cate­ chumenate, he said. In addition, .said the NCCB official, the bishops have asked various committees to look in-

"The Gospels"

,

ST. ANNE CHURCH and SHRINE Corner Middle and South Main Fall River, Massachusetts

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"Haven't you heard1 October 21st is Worl~ Mission Sunday!"

to questions about norms for lay preaching and for the buying and selling of church property; guidelines for ,the sacrament of peanace; regulations on the use of communications media; and several questions concerning premarital preparation. In his only rep-ort ,on th~ sub­ stance of a recommendation facing the U.S. bishops this fall, Msgr. Hoye told the canon law­ yers that the NCCB's Commit­ tee on PastoraI Research and PracticeS' is recommending to the bishops the proposal: "Con­ firmation should be celebrated between the eighth and 11th grades unless the bishop should decide that pastoral reasons dic­ tate otherwise. The right of Oriental Rite Churches to main­ tain their own practice is c1elU"ly understood." 'Over 450 priests, religious and laity from aU sections of the United States a.ttended the ses­ sions. Representing the Fan River diocese were Msgr. Henry T. Munroe and Rev. Jay T. Mad­ dock of the Diocesan Tribunal. Other diocesan members of the Canon Law Society are Msgr. Thomas J. Harrington and Msgr. John J. Oliveira.

Sr. Ida Gibelin A Mass of Christian Burial was offered Oct. 17 at St. Jo­ seph's Church, Fairhaven, for Sister Ida Gibelin, SS.CC., 98, who died Oct. 14. A native of France and the daughter of the Iate Odi'lon and Elisaberte (Marques) Gibelin, she entered the Sacred Hearts community in 1909 and came to Sacred Hearts Academy in Fair­ haven in 1911. She remained at the academy for almost her entire religious life, performing domestic duties, caring for boarding students and serving in the convent infirmary. When the academy closed some years ago she moved to the community's retirement home and house of prayer in Fall River.

ROME (NC) - During his Oct. 10-13 trip ito Spain, the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico, Pope John Paul II praised the region's missionary past, ac­ knowledged the "tears and suf­ ferings" of its present and urged the church to take a greater role in the future of its people. While he repeatedly empha-. sized the church's responsibHity to be an effective sOCial force, the pope was careful to define the limits of that force. In his most detailed public comment on Hberatiori theology, he told Latin-American bishops not to consider the poor as "a class in struggle." Class strug­ gle, a tenet of Marxism, has been used by some liberation theologians to explain how Christ's message should be ap­ plied in modern Latin America. The pope's trip, which includ­ ed an overnight stop in Zara­ goza, Spain, helped inaugurate a church-sponsored "novena of years" Ieading up to the 1992 celebration of the SOOth anni­ versary of Ohristianity in Latin America. But its timing enabled the pope to underline major points of a Vatican document on lib­ eration theology, released Sept. 3, .as he outlined the task of a "'new evangelization" of ~he reo, gion. Speaking to the bishops and about 100,000 people during a Mass Oct. 11 at a Santo Dom­ ingo racetrack, the pope insisted that work for the poor can never include violence. In an apparent reference to Nicaragua, where four priests hold posts in the Marxist-influenced Sandinista government, he also warned that church Ieaders should beware of bringing 1Jheir people under "pro­ grams of atheism." ·But his cautionary remarks did not eclipse his strong call for the church to seek social justice through emphasis on the moral and social dimensions of the Gospel. The pope criticized political corruption, arms expenditures and the confiicts in the region. He also warned against econ­ omic exploitation by "foreign powers" and decrying "the ego­ ism of ,the 'satisfied'" who ex­ ercise "privileges of an opuient minority" while otihers live in misery and oppression. In each of his talks, Pope John Paul also sounded themes of hope, repeatedly recalling the energy, faith and sacrifices of the first missionaries to the New WorJd. During an Oct. 12 ceremony in Santo Domingo, the pope gave wooden crosses to representa­ tives of the Latin American Bishops' Council :to symbolize their task of evangelization. Each bishop was accompanied by a youth from his COWltry. The young people symbolized what the bishops consider their great· est challenge: how to deepen faith among. younger genera­ tions who face unemployment, armed conflicts and the lure of drogs.


THE ANCHOR-Diocese of Fall River-fri., Oct. 19, 1984

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TOP SENIORS at Bishop Stang High School, North Dartmouth, being congratulated by Principal Thomas Donahue are, from left, National Merit Com­ mended Students Richard Munson, Michelle Gosselin and Kathy King and Semifinalist Marjory Gomez. Commended students rank in the top five percent of the over one million high schoolers who took the Merit examination; semifinalists are in the top half of one percent of candidates.

Msgr. Harrington at conIerence

Msgr. Thomas J. Harrington, vicar for administration and fin­ ance and chancellor, represent­ ed the FaU River diocese earHer this month at the 15th annual conferenCe of Diocesan Fiscal Managers a,t Charleston, SC. At the meeting, attended by some 250 delegates represent­ ing over 100 US dioce~s, Msgr. Harington, a member of the DFM executive committee, pre-

sided at two sessions at which Joseph E. Mahoney of Lexington discussed management of dioce­ san investment portfolios. Highlighting the confere!,!ce was an address by Bishop Adam Maida of Green Bay, Wisc., whose topic was implementation of the revised Code of Canon Law in diocesan administrative offices. The conference host was Charleston Bishop Ernest Unterkoefler.

SAMUEL M. TAUB, per­ manent deacon at St. Ann's parish, Arlington, Va., has been appointed executive di­ rector of the National Con­ ference of Catholic Bishops' Committee for the Perman­ ent Diaconate. Taub, 63, has served as staff associate in the secretariat. He will be the first permanent deacon to hold the executive posi­ tion. He succeeds Msgr. Ernest J. Fiedler, who has returned to pastoral work in Missouri. Taub and his wife Phyllis spoke in the Fall River diocese in June 1982 at a diaconalretreat at the Family Life Center in North Dartmouth. (NC Photo)

Diocesan clergy at Rome fete VATICAN CITY (NC) - Pope 'John Paul II urged U.s'. clergy to take the message of Catholic unity home with them as he ad­ dressed alumni of Rome's North American College during the 125th anniversary celebration of the college, held Oct. 12 to 15. Among the 300 alumni present were Bishop Daniel A. Cronin and Fathers John R. Foister, George W. Coleman' and Jon­ 'Paul GaHant from the FaU River diocese. ., "Your situation permits you to live the supernatural reality of communion wi,th the church of Rome and the bishop of Rome," said the pope. He also praised il:he U.S. bis,hops for their "pastoral insight and gen­ erosity" in maintaining a nation­ al seminary in Rome.

NOTICE

Next week's Anchor, the is­ sue of Oct. 26, will include a special Respect, Life section in observance of OCtober as Re­ spect Life 'Month. Oui-usual features, including Steering Points, will not appear. All will resume in our issue of Friday, Nov. 2.

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THE ANCHOR-Diocese of Fall River-Fri., Oct. 19, 1984

themoorin~ Reviving a Spirit of Mission This week The Anchor calls attention to the missionary church. It is more than necessary in our times and in par­ ticular in our country to remind ourselves, that we are a, missionary church, charged by the Lord to go and teach. Catholic men and' women over the centuries have re­ sponded to Christ's mandate and have given the~selves to the missionary life, often, in remote andsuffenng b~ck­ waters. Their labors form perhaps one of the most glonous chapters in church history. Yet in today's world of the haves and the have-nots, mJssionary zeal seemingly has waned, espeCially in our own American church. In our striving to be socially relevant and accepted into mainstream America, we have in many cases placed missionary goals on a back burner. So many Catholics seek first a good education, good jobs and great money that the mere suggestion of accepting responsibility for the I!!is­ sions is found repugnant. _ Yet the American church has a long tradition of giving to others. In the past thousands of our sons and daughters journeyed to the most remote parts of the planet. to wit/­ ness to the Lord Jesus and we can thank God that even to­ day that spirit lives in, some. For example, 89 mission-sending groups of religious men have 3,285 priests and brothers in overseas assign­ ments. And surprising to many is that 174 diocesan priests froni 75 dioceses served in the missions last year, while 221 U.S. congregations hllVe 2,540 sisters in mission lands. There are also 247 lay volunteers from, 24 sponsoring church organizations serving abroad fulltime. This effort is indeed commendable. Those preaching the Word in the name of the church are to be supported with limitless enthusiasm. Yet is' this enough? Can the American church do better? Have we lost. the challenge "of the Gospel? An overall survey indicates that in a three-year period there has been no notable increase in American Catholics serving in the missions. In 1960, there were 6,782 American missioners. Today it is estimated that there are 6,246. The number seems small when one considers that there are over 52,000,000 Catholics stateside, including 57,000 priests and 127,000 religious brothers and sisters. One. then re­ alizes that oW' miss'ion effort in reality involves only a dedicated few. Catholics want their sons arid daughters to have the best of America's good life. Be a doctor, lawyer or business person, but don't waste your time or talent on being a nun or priest is the general attitude of the upwa.rdly mobile American Catholic parent. As for being a missionary ­ forget it. This is why it is well on World Mission Sunday to re­ membe.r our missionary calling. It is true that not everyone can go to the missions in person. But all of us can give time and treasure to the cause: our time in prayer for those who do go and for those they serve; our treasure to support their efforts. Let us pray that enthusiasm and fervor will ignite our hearts and prompt us to respond, each in his or her own way, "Here I am, Lord," to the insistent missionary call 'of Christ.

WORLD MISSION SUNDAY

'How ~hall they believe him of whom they have n~t heard?' Rom. 10:14

Mor'al standards By Father Kevin J. Harrington

In every election year, the question .of the interrelationship between politics and religion arises. Unprecedented attention has been focused on the issue this year, occasioned by the false notion of impailtiaJity held by many Catholic politicians. The "blessings of liberty" reo ferred to in the Preamble to our Constitution are not meant solely to aid our pursuit of hap­ piness. Liberty is intended to facilitate protection of the life and rights" of all. When the liberoty .of the vulnerable is viewed as impeding our own pleasure, we have forgotten our roots. Our ~iberty was gained at great cost. Unfortunately, it has never been shared equal,ly by aU. 'PeOple with deep religious convictions were responsible in 1865 for the 13th Amendment that abolished' slavery; and in !ater years for the revocation of laws that made second class citizens of Americans because of their race, color or creed. OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE DIOCESE OF FALL RIVER Published weekly by The Catholic Press of the Diocese of Fall River Thirty years ago, as the Su­ 410 Highland Avenue \ . preme Court courageously caJled Fall River Mass. 02722 675-7151 for desegration of schools in Little Rock, Arkansas.. people PUBLISHER screamed that you could not Most Rov. Daniel A. Cronin, D.O., S.T.D. legislate morality. I , EDITOR FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATOR Today the voices of those op­ Rev. John F. Moore Rev. Msgr. John 1. Regan . posed to ,the rights of the un~ leary Press-Fall River

born are screaming again that we cannot ,legislate morality. But the much discussed Jef· fersonian waH of separation between church and state was never meant to deny people of religious conviction the right to enrich the body politic with their cherished v8ilues. Religiously informed consciences are essential for the preservation of liberty. Thomas .Jefferson himself, once asked: "And can ¢he liberties of a nation be thought secure when we h ave ed th' nl -form' . remov. el~ y .1 d baSIS, a conVictIon m lJue mm s of the people that these liber. ties are the gifot of God?" Something that cm truIy be ,labeled pernicious and pervasive has overtaken 'liS before we even knew it was there. As with most significant trends, it was upon us before we put our finger on it. The false notion of freedom that has swept our mand is a hangover from the "Me Generation" of the past decade. It is summed, up in :the attitude that -it's okay to do anything that crosses your mind so long as you don't hurt anybody else. Morality becomes passe and behavior is dictated by a single rule: "Enjoy life by avoiding responsibiHty." The field of acceptable behavior has been expanded so that social eonse· 0

?..

quences are ignored in favor of the urge to accommodate whatever desire seems most compell­ ing at the moment. Many politicians go along with this thinking, Hke weather vanes astutely pointing in the direc. tion' of their constituents. We note short-term policies yielded to by such elected officials in order to win votes and the sub­ sequent benefits of office. We thave ~~~ys. had an ex· c~ss of p?htlClans who. blow wrth the wmd and a scarcIty of statesmen who strengthen pub­ I· "f b th f f tho . IC oJ.e . y e oree 0 . elr own convIctions. Ma~y i~uences shape the unheal~y ones conscIence, abound and no one IS guara~­ teed a perfectly formed COnsCI­ ence. Traditionally, however, ROo man Catholics have looked to the pope and their bishops for guidance. There are of course the ever-popular voices ~f dis­ senters who urge Cathohcs to model themselves on the be­ havior of the majority of their coreiigionists.· But politicians, dike alI ere· ated beings, are ultimately judged by God's moral standard, a fact dikely to come as a rude awakening to those whose stan­ dards are determined by the whim of the moment.


De'moralization "A self-portrait of the modem priest in England and Wales depicts him as totally demoralized, overburdened tby pressures from both inside and outside the church with no certainty about what he is do­ ing and no hope for the future." That picture ds taken from a survey conducted by Father Peter Verity for England's Na­ tional Conference of Priests. Father Verity was quick to point out that this portrait does not tell the whole storY. He found many priests with a real sense of fulfillment. Still his report leads to in­ teresting questions. Above all, what ,is needed if priests are to rebound from feelings of de­ moral iz8ltion? In changing times, I b~ieve priests are not the only ones who have trouble in trying to live out their vocation. Trying to be a good doctor or business person, to maintain a marriage or live the single life can also lead to frustration. Why? Father ;venitJ('s study !!pdi­ cates that major sources of stress for priests are loneliness, and the desire of priests to change their public image and get closer to the people. There is a cleavage between some older priests, Wlho 'look back to the days before Vatican II, and younger ones amcious ·to Ibe free

THE ANCHOR-Diocese of Fall River-Fri., Oct. 19, 1984

By

from various past conventions FATHER and restrictions. Similar reports have been systems heard about U.S. priests. I be­ EUGENE lieve a principal reason for this X·RAY aUAL.ITV PIPE FABRICATION

is the fact that we are in a HEMRICK SPRINIQERS • PROCESS PIPING

period of transition. PLUMBING. GAS FITTONG • HEATING

For example, rectories that once enjoyed the camaraderie of tells us there are stages in life 32 MiD Street (Route 79) three or four priests are often and that people grow when they Assonet. MA 02702 ,reduced to one. avoid becoming frozen at one 6t4-2221 Where several priests once ,level. I think that point needs emerged from the sacristy to to be considered by priests who distribute Communion during feel demoralized. ~··········•••••••••••••••••••••••• N Mass, now Jay people are Could it be that once a .man eucharistic ministers. Pastors who once felt their decides to become a priest he only accountability was to the feels the image of church that bishop now report t.o parish attracted him always should ~ councils. And the religious edu­ remains the same? The truths of faith are un­ cation of young people, once served mostly by Catholic changeable. But do the priests : 87 STOWE ST. 6 FALL RIVER, MA : schools, is now the responsi­ who hold this belief feel that bility of fulltime paid directors unchangeability applies to every of religious education. Because phase of church life? of the specialization needed to Could it be that some priests M. S. A G U I A R & SON : conduct lC religious education have a notion of the priesthood : ~ program, some priests who are as a daily. giving-it-your-all not speci8ilists retreat from it. effoi1t - a kind of superman The presence of a number of image of the priesthood Wlhich. married Anglican priests who causes them to feel guilty have become married Roman when it is unfulfilled? Catholic priests in the United . Original ideals are difficult to States is another factor in these maintain. To sustain morale. I times of transition. suggest it is necessary at times . Demoralization can set in to ask what stage we have' when the relationship between reached in our life. Then, as part past and future patterns seems of this reflection process, we uncertain in a person's life. need to realize that in order to Durfee Falmouth be fulfilled we may need to What caJ:1 be done? Attleboro National DeVelopmental psychology grow beyond that stage.

piping

about her loneliness, inactivity and feelings of uselessness. So Nancy, 'being the kind of person she is, offered to check into viable volunteer and social activJties for her. The woman accepted her offer and Nancy proceeded to &Cour ibhe community for activi­ ties for older women living alone. She phoned churches and agencies, asked acquaintances, and compiled a ;lengthy Est which would be a chamber of com­ merce director's dream. She did all this while working 8 hours daily, tby the way. Oh yes, she also has a pain£ul form of arthritis. When she f.inaHy felt she ,had a complete list, Nancy visited her friend with enthusiasm. Later, and with wilted enthusi­ asm, Nancy shared the direction of their conversation with me. Nancy: 'There's a group' your age that folds, staples and ad­ dresses newsletters SIt church. They're been doing it for years and they have a lot of fun to­ gether. I think you'd like them." Woman:' "Yes, but that's in the afternoon and I really don't want to miss my soaps." Nancy crossed Qff half the Iist. Nancy: "WeN, there's a morn­ ing opening to :take the maga­ zines and sundries cart around the hospital. Once a week you would wheel lit into the rooms and meet and talk with the pa­ tients."

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Woman: "Yes, but I don't really like· being . around sick people." Nancy': "I suppose that rules out nursing homes, too?" The woman nodded and Nancy scratched more off the list. Nancy: "There's a popular course at the local recreation center in the mornings called Heallth and Exercise for :the Over Sixties. They do a mild form of yoga stretching and they discuss health habits, nutrition, and mutual support. Does that interest you?" Woman: "Yes, but I have a weak back so I don't think I better do that." lNancy: "There are alii lcinds of handwork and quilting groups that meet various mornings. How about those?" Woman: "Yes, but I've never been very good llJt that and those women are probably so good. ·Besides I don't need any quilts or !handwork." . Nancy: "Would you Hketo be part of a scripture group in your church?" Woman: "Yes, but that's in the evening and I don't "ike to go out at night." Nancy, getting weary: "There's one possLbility left. There's a morning bingo and brunch group for the retired that meets every Friday. Do you "ike bingo?" Woman: '''Y~, bUit l.it's so noisy at bingo it gets on my nerves." Nancy: Well, that's all I have, I'm afraid. Do you want me Ito check out morning classes at the college or card groups or garden C;1~b$?"

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There was a pause and the woman replied, "Yes· ... but I really don't want to get in­ volved lin any aotivity. What I would like are soine pleasant women who would drop by and talk once in awhile." Nancy kept !her cool unt~l she reached her. car and then she grabbed the steering. wheel and let out along ~ G H . By that time she told me about it, she was able to laugh along with me and ;r asked her if she was going to do more for the woman. She replied, "Yes, BUT - not on mornings, evenings, week­ ends or for a long time. No wonder she's lonely. She's got more time a·ndbetter health than I do. But instead of doing anything to make friends, she wants them delivered to her door." "Yes, but - " I started 11:0. say. " - shut up," Nancy said. I did. _

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which are still mission territory, as was the U.S. until 1908. This fact underscores a new understanding of mission, based in part on the experienoe of young churches. Mission dioceses today are often referred to as :'sister churches," partners with the older churches of Europe and America in the single effort to bring the church to all na­ tions and to bring all nations together as one people of G~: From that point, the society We in the U.S. must recall . grew rapidly. It received papal that we were once a materially authorization in 1823, and be­ poor local church; and that, like came an international organiza­ us, today's mission churches, ,tion in 1826; the 1829 total growing and maturing, have and coJ:lected was 300,000 francs; by wiU ihave much· to give and 1836 it had risen to 727,000 share. This unity in a' shared francs. universal mission was the basis The United States contil).ued for Pauline Jaricot's efforts to to be the major recipient of establish a society for mission this missionary support. Of the support. lIn his message for World total amount raised from 1822 CARDINAL MEDEIROS REMEMBERED was the to 1832, 42 percent weIl;t to Mission .Sunday, to be celebra­ theme of an Oct. 6 dinner at Boston's Museum of SCience, mission territories here. From ted on October 21st this year, .Pope John Paul notes that the . held for the benefit of the Catholic University of Portugal, 1822 to 1861, more than $7 mH­ Propagation of the Faith "during one of the late cardinal's favorite charities. Taking place on lion was provided to U.S. mis­ sions. In the 50 years after 1830, the course of the whole year what would have been the cardinal's 69th birthday, the nearly three· mHlion immigrant must promote the missionary occasion was attended by, among others, Cardinal Antonio spirit, an element that is not Ribeiro, (left), Patriarch of Lisbon, and Bishop ~aniel A. Catholics arrived here from Eu­ rope; the church coUld not have merely marginal but essential ·Cronin. (Sr. Rita Murray Photo, courtesy of The Pilot) served them as it did witlhout to the nature of the mystical body." outside help. We are the Body of Christ and Concurrently, the' immigrant our mission, like that of the population helped the maturing first 4isciples, is ,to witness t1he U.S. church respond to .the grow­ Gospel "to the. ends of the ing needs of newer mission ter-' musical and Hturgical skills of By Denise M. Gannon earth:" . ritories in Africa and Asia. The members; and providing an on­ Sacrifices for the ·missions. first U.S. units of the Propaga­ The Catholic Church is 'rich in going educational .forum on cur­ through the Propagation of the tion were established in 1839 tradition. Today we are building rent issues in &iturgical music. Faith, on Mission Silnday and on that tradition and becoming and Iby 1897 the society was in­ throughout the year, are a most richer still, drawing from the It is, say members, as "if we cOl'porated in the United States effective way of parti<;ipating ·in past even as we plant new seed. are taking fine old wine and en­ and had its first national direc­ the universal aspect of the casing it in 1lew and improved tor. Fittingly, he was a mis­ Music is one of our greatest wineskins." Church's mission; Gathered into sionary bishop' from . Lyon, one general fund with the sacri­ · treas·ures, stirring the soUl with In .line with this goal, the dio­ its relevance to liturgy and life. France, birthplaoe of the Propa­ fices of Catlholics across the cesan chapter is proud to wel­ gation. globe, . U.S. support is distribu­ Age upon age, musicians have come Father Funk to St. An­ Today the Propagation is' es­ t . ted ,equitably to hundreds of worshiped the Lord' through tabliS'hed in every U.S. diocese mission, dioceses with .needs their art. and the' church has ,thony's Church, MattapoIsett, a: 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 21 where and has become a trully world­ much like those of Louisiana been sensitive to the changing he wiU present "Old Wine/New wide effort: given pontifica1 sta­ and Kentucky in 1822. needs of society, aHowing many Wineskins," using the Advent ;tus in 1922, with its central ad­ Yet in a very rea:! sense, the styles to come and go. C}"Cles as his demonstrative tool. ministration shifted to Rome at soil of America is stiU mission­ Liturmcal musicians in the .,. Musicians, olergy and parish­ that time, the Society is active in ary - not just because of Fair­ of Fall River haye .long are invited to attend this diocese ioners some 90 countries, many of banks' -special circumstances, or r~ached o~t ~o b.oth pan~h and . program that will offer prayer, because some dioceses in our dIocese, fmding. moorest In and song and fellowship as partid­ country still receive help lin the suppo~t for theIr work. .. The Moment of Truth ' pants' merge the ancient hed­ "The man with.a new· idea is form of personnel and fmancial :NatJonally, ~ey are affl~la!ed tage of murgica1 music with . a c~nk until the idea succeeds." SUppOl1t, but because, as in every With the' NatJo~~ ASSOCIation . contemporarY perspectives.. other country on earth. there' of Pastora:l MUSICIans, founded - Mark Twain are still those among us who· in 1975 by Rev. Virgil C. Funk. Denise Morency GaDiwn is have not reaUy heard the Good Locally tlhey form the diocesan director of music at St. M~'s News of Christ., -And, .as St. chapter of the organization, led Church, South Dartmouth, aDd Paul wro~ to the Romans, "How since 1980 by' Glenn Giuttari. is coebairperson of program­ can tlhey believe if they have not Aims ,include deepening the ming for the diocesan Pastoral heard?" spiritual lire ~nd improving the . M~sicians chapter. Continued from Page One Louisiana in 1822. That year $4,583 (23,000 francs) was gathered from the sacrifices of the Ilay people of France who were tl:te first members of the Propagation; oI)e-third of that amount went to Bishop Dubourg, one-third to Bishop Benedict Fla­ get of Bardstown, Ky., and one­ third toward the education of future missionaries.

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Noting . also that permission could be granted only :in 're­ sponse· to.' serjous pastora1 rea­ . C()ntinued from page one

sons, Father Gurrieri' said that 'who accePt the liturgical changes "nostalgia is not a serious ,pas. included in 'the new ~oman · toral reason:'" missal, the letter saidr That The liturgy of the Tridentine condition appears .to , exclude, rite,is ba~ed on a ieXJt approved rebel Archbishop Marcel Lefe­ by Pope Pius V in 1570. ntat bvre and his followers who have liturgy was replaced in 1970 by rejected replacement of ,the Trithe new order of Mass approved', dentine Mass and have opposed other' Second Vatican· Council by 'Pope Paul VI and calling in general for use of ,the 1ang­ actions. uage of .t1hose participating in The decision is expected, to have Uttle effect on US CathOlics. the celebration. . Father John Gurrieri executive AJrchbishop Augustin Mayer, Congregation . prefect, said it director of the National Confer­ ence of Catlholic Bishops' Com­ wouldlbe up to bishops to decide . mittee on the Liturgy, said use whether 'to approve the Triden­ I of the Tridentine rite will be tine Mass on a regular basis in allowed only in strictly control­ parish churches, depending on led circumstances. pal'ticular ~ocaI situations.

.Tridentine

The aetter, listing conditions for .approval of the old rite, states: "Such celebrations should be made only for the use of those groups that ask for it: in the churches and oratories indicated by the bishop (not, however, in ' parish churches, unless the bishop has granted it in extra­ ordinary cases), and on the days and under the conditions estab­ lished by the bishop, either habi­ tually or for individual cases." Those seeking permission must make a written request to Pteir bishop. The bishop must make sure that the groups "do not share the positions of tlhose who place in doubt the tegiti­ macy and the doctrinal exact­ ness of the Roman Missal prom­ ulgated by Pope Paul VI in 1970."


'.

DIOCESE OF FALL RIVER MISSION SUPPLEMENT October 19, 1984

Holy Father Visits 'Most Difficult Mission' When Pope John Paul visited Fair­ banks, Alaska, in May of this year, he stood on the soil of what Pope Pius XI some 50 years ago called the world's most difficult mission, the nearly half million square miles of northern Alaska. . The natural conditions that met the earliest missionaries are much the same today: prolonged darkness and sub-zero temperature in winter, Arctic winds, and far-scattered set­ tlements in need of regular visits. Today's missionary who scoots over the terrain. by snowmobile or flies over towering mountains is impelled by the same spiritual drive as the missionary ~ho made the rounds by sled. " The Pope came to Fairbanks well aware of its history, and he wondered aloud about the extraordinary courage of Alaska's first missionaries of some 100 years ago: "Would they have dared to penetrate the interior of Alaska unless they had been fired by a profound love for Christ's Church, and utterly convinced of the Church's duty to proclaim the Gospel to all people?" He mentioned in particular the efforts of the Oblates of Mary Immaculate and the Jesuits whose courage and zeal made pQssible the

building up of the Church in the wilds of northern Alaska. Today there are some 14,775 Catholics in the Diocese of Fair­ banks, including Eskimos, as well as Indians, in addition to residents from the "lower 48." With only a handful of people in each of the widely-scat­ tered settlements, the Church in Alaska relies heavily on lay leader­ ship. Bishop Robert Whelan, S.J., Bishop of Fairbanks, has arranged for the education of 27 permanent deacons. With one of the diocese's 47 priests able to visit a settlement only once or twice a month, the day­ to-day communal life of the Church is animated by the permanent deacons who are trained in small groups to serve their neighbors as teachers of the Gospel. They are also leaders of prayer in the" community with the authorization to baptize and witness marriages. Fairbanks is still designated as mission territory, still in the care of . the Propagation of the Faith. Because of this special status of Fairbanks, in his homily at Mass there Pope John Paul made reference to the Church in the United States as missionary in both senses: receiving from the generosity (Continued on page 2)

World Mission Sunday Message Calls for Offering of Suffering

,j Photo by FaUci

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On December 28 last year, a man named Francis Xavier Chu died in a labor camp in China. Father Chu was condemned to

prison in 1960.'With the exception of a brief visit to his family and a con.... sultation with a doctor, his apostolate was, for 23 years, confined to a prison cell or labor camp. A report has just reached the West attesting to how this apparently restricted mis­ ~ionary used his long suffering for Christ, for the Church, and for the Chinese people. In his message for World Mission

Sunday, October 21, Pope John Paul II calls on all who suffer in soul and in body to offer their pain, frustra­ tion, or loneliness for the redemp­ tion of so many who do not yet know Christ. If there is a common denominator

in our world divided by ideology and dialect, by geography and belief, it is the fact that, tomorrow if not today, we all experience suffering. Enormous efforts are made by

scientists and sociologists, by lobby

groups and faith communities to alleviate the sufferings of the human family.

Yet, when the speeches are spoken and the research completed, when the airlift of grain is unloaded and the legislation passed, when all is said and done, humanity still suffers. "Only in the Cross can we find a "valid response to ahe" anguishing question that amses from the experience of suffering," Pope John Paul said in his message for World Mission Sunday.

"Christ Himself effected His work of redeeming humanity above all through the painful Pas­ sion. . .indicating at the same time the way for His followers: 'Let him. . .take up his cross and follow Me'."

Through the centuries, it has been the witness of suffering, even to the extreme witness of martyrdom, that has opened hearts and minds to the Gospel.

It was the memory of the martyrs (Continued Olll pmge 3) _


The Work of Jesus Goes on in the Missions With few exceptions, the Church throughout the missions proclaims the Gospel among the poorest of the world's peoples. . The Church in East Africa, for in­ stance, serves in an area crippled by drought. This same area holds more than 10 percent of the world's refugees, some of whom are sheltered in centers described as veritable concentration camps. "Wherever, they are," Jesuit Father Angelo D'Agostino writes of the refugees, "they need pastoral care. And who provides it _ for this multitude? Ultimately it is the responsibility of the local church." It is this local church in its several hundreds throughout the world that is the special concern of the Propaga­

tion of the Faith for there is scarcely a local church with the means to maintain the physical presence and service of the Church. As anywhere, she'tter mlist be pro­ vided for priests and religious; help must be available for the formation of lay. catechists. The future must be provided for- by assistance to semi­ narians and novices. The poor them­ selves must see the Gospel lived, and so the local church must be pre­ pared to feed the hungry, care for the. sick; to give the. cup of cold water in Jesus' Name. Through the Propagation of the Faith, annual "daily bread" support is supplied to mission dioceses where it is often the only income guaran-· . teed rear in and out.

"I will pour out my Spirit on all humanity" (Acts 2:17). The Church in Korea is one of the most rapidly growing Churches in the world. Since 1950 the number of Catholics has increased from 150,000 to a million anda half. Active Korean laity, as soon as they become part of the Church, feel themselves to be missionary; they want to spread the Faith. . The Church is becoming more local in. leadership. A report from the Diocese of Cheong Ju, for instance, notes that "There are 31 Korean priests and seven missionaries serving in the diocese today. Just 12 years ago, the reverse was true." Over the past two decades, the number of Korean women religious has quadrupled. For the "daily bread" support of the local churches of Korea and for the more than 700 local churches of the mission world, thEfPropagation of the Faith makes yearly basic grants averaging $35,000, an amount that allows the Church to grow and build its service to the poor.

L.V. Kofod

"He went round the whole of Galilee. . .proclQllmlng the Good News of the Kingdom" (Mt. 4:23). Lay catechists in Uganda give their lives as teachers of the faith, as Eucharistic ministers and leade'rs of prayer, as the animators of the faith in villages where a priest is visitor rather than day-to-day Father. Because, for so many, the faith is transmitted and nourished by catechists, their training is both extensive and thorough. Bishop James Odongo of Tororo, Uganda, brings entire families from remote villages into Tororo for two years of education in Scripture, catechetics, liturgy, and for training in nutrition, hygiene and family care. When these catec~ist families return to their villages, they influence every aspect of human life. The Propagation of the Faith supplies the means for hundreds of bishops to educate and support their catechist~.

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'Most Difficult Mission'

<Continued from page 1) of others, and contributing to the spread of the Gospel worldwide. "Standing on this missionary soil of America," the Holy Father said, "I wish to express my heartfelt thanks to the Church throughout the United States for everything it has done for the -cause of spreading the light of Christ's Gospel." The Pope made a plea to "beseech the Lord. . .to grant that many young people will dedicate their lives to the missionary . work of the Church."

Portions of this homily are included in the World Mission'Sun­ day cassette for use in United States parishes the weekend of October 13­ 14. The United States was a mission country for the first two-thirds 9f its existence. as a nation. The Holy Father's World Mission Sunday call for support of today's young­ Churches in the missions is one that falls on open ears as the Church in the United States continues to make return for all it has received.

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"They left their nets and follo~ed Him" (Mk. 1 :18)

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MISSIO

Some 800 men of the Missions are ordained to the priesthood each year. Indonesia is typical of many mission countries in reporting an increase in vocations; last year 15 of 20 Indonesian dioceses showed an increase in the number of young men studying in seminaries there. Reports come from various parts of Latin America that seminaries, long closed, are being opened; African seminaries report having to double their facilities to accommodate the qualified applicants. . Support of $700 Is supplied for each major seminarian, with a subsidy of $100 to $200 given to each minor seminarian. In addition, $300 yearly is provided to men and women novJces in religious communities.

,


Eucharistic Community:

Missionary Community

Rev. Msgr. William J. McCormack, National Director of The Propagation of the Faith.

·-Niissio'

"People brollight little children to Him, for Him toJay His hands on them" (Mt. 19:13). A,id from the Propagation of the Faith is given not only to support parishes and small faith communities, but to provide human services. O.ne mission Bishop, Michael Duraisamy of Salem, India, uses a portion of his funds for the many refugees and orphans in his care. "Our Sisters go out to rural areas where we have three leprosy centers, one especially for the care of children." The Propagation of the Faith has sent nearly $5 million 'to the Missions this year to help provide for the human services that nurture a child give dignity to an adult, and comfort the elderly. '

In the 22 years since the beginning of the Second Vatican Council, there have been great insights into the role of the Church in the continuing work of Redemption, none perhaps with such far-reaching potential as our own self-perception that we are the Church, and we are a Church involved in universal mission. This vision of Church harks back more than 19 centuries to the early Church in Antioch and to the begin­ ning of the mission of Paul to the nations. In Acts 13, St. Luke describes this first "departure ceremony. " The community of disciples was "engaged in the Liturgy of the Lord." To this community at prayer, the Holy Spirit spoke, "Set apart for me Barnabas and Saul to do the work for which I have called them." After prayer and fasting, and re­ sponding to the impulse of the Holy Spirit, the community sent forth two of its number who proclaimed the Gospel of Jesus not only to the Jews, but to the Gentiles, to the nations. Though it was two particular individuals who. were sent on mis­ sion, they were called in the context ofcommunity and sent forth with the consent and support of the -entire cQmmunity of disciples, the com­ munity at prayer. . Throughout the centuries, the dynamism for missionary work, which is really the power of the HoI}! Spirit, has arisen out of a faith com­ munity. Nowhere are we quite so visibly, so profoundly the Church as when we come together to receive Christ's Body in the Eucharist and to deepen our baptismal commitment

to act as the Body of Christ in today's world. Father Eugene LaVerdiere, S.S.S., noted Scripture scholar and author, says that "The Eucharist is indeed a celebration. But it is also and even more fundamentally a proclama­ tion." In the life and words and action of those who share in the Eucharist, "we proclaim the death of the Lord;" we proclaim the gift of Redemption. In the Eucharist, we find both motive and strength to reach out to the world with C.hrist's message and with His love. At the Eucharist on WorId Mission Sunday, we are invited to become a more faithful, more effective community of disci­ ples, actively continuing the mission of Christ to the nations. . "

Offering of

"Now you too. • .have heard the message of the truth and the Good News of your salvation••." (Eph. 1 :13>" In a Mission Sunday plea to his own people, Bishop Jean Margeot of Mauritius In Africa said, "In ~ome countries the missionaries depend almost exclusively on the Propagation of the Faith for their sustenance. . We must manifest our solidarity with the poorest!" All over the world on Mission Sunday, even the poorest of Catholic communities will be joined In prayer and sacrifice to share the Good News of Salvation with the two-thirds of our brothers and sisters who do not share our fanh, answer to the age-old question of St. Paul, "How can . they believe if they have not heard?"

Sufferi~g

(Continued from page 1) of Korea whom he canonized in May that prompted the Pope to use the occasion of World Mission Sunday to call all who make up.. the Church to offer their sufferings for the redemp­ tion of those who do not yet know Christ. "There are still millions," he said, "who do not know the Gospel. . .for them there is no ade­ quate explanation for suffering; it is the most oppressive and inexplicable absurdity. " On that same May journey, Pope John Paul was touched by the lives of literally thousands of our brothers and sisters who are suffering in that inexplicable way. He visited with Vietnamese,'Cambodian and Laotian refugees who are waiting for a place - any place - where they can put down a plate and a blanket and say, "I am home." He walked among the leprosy patients in Sorokdo, in

Korea, and looked into spirits engraved with the knowledge that they are not invited to the table of society. He sent a message to the suffering people of the Church in Vietnam. All these memories color the Holy Father's World Mission Sunday call to Catholics to. learn to give to our own suffering its authentic purpose, rooted in the participation of the People of God in the redeeming work of Christ. The Holy Father concluded that "this is perhaps the highest form of missionary cooperation" as it joins the suffering "missionary" so close­ ly with the sacrifice of Christ Him­ self, constantly renewed in the Eucharist. The Holy Father's invitation to be missionary with our suffering is a real gift to us, for there is not one of us who cannot answer.


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DIOCESE OF FALL RIVER 47 Underwood Street Fall River, Massachusetts 02720

617,675·1311 , ()Hiu~ 01

THE I\lSHo!'

October 13-14, 1984 \

My dear sisters and brothers in Christ, The Missions are very close to my heart. World Mission Sunday is an opportunity for all of us

to pray and sacrifice together for so many who would

b~lieve in Jesus if only they could hear of Him.

Next Sunday, as you pray at Mass for the needs of your

own family and friends, I ask you' to pray too for all

who "in sUffering and in joy cannot call on the name of

the Saviour because they ,do not yet know it" (pope John

Paul)'.

I also ask for your financial support'for the Church in the Missions. We all know how important it is to provide a~sistance to our local parish and diocese. with your generosity we are striving to meet our own needs. But we cannot take full, satisfaction in serving our own. We are not true disciples of'Christ unless we are serving others, especially the poor, and, inviting them to share our life in Christ.

Most Rev. Daniel A. Cronin, S.T.D.

So I urge your generosity for the, universal Church on World Mission Sunday. I ask you to offer a gift to the Propaga­ tion of the Faith that represents your day-by-day answer to the Lord's call to each of us to be His witness to all the world. I join ~ith you in prayer th~t, through us, the 'poor of

the Missions will hear the Good News of Jesus Christ;

Faithfully yours in Christ,

I'A~,a~~ ''1 Bishop of Fall River

Rev. Msgr. John J. Oliveira

How can they beDew

if they hene not heard?

WORLD MISSION SUNDAY il OCTOBER 21 i

For further information about the Propagation of the Faith, please contact:

Rev. Msgr. John J. Oliveira Diocesan. Director 368 North Main Street Fall River, Massachusetts 02720

THE SOCIETY FOR "

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THE PROPAGATION OF THE FAITH


ROME (NC) Jesuits ,in, Latin America have been en­ couraged by their superior to work with the poor and help them in the stmggle for justice. Superior General Father Peter­ Hans Kolvenbach said that the work often unavoid8Jbly dnvolves politics "in a certain sense," but he warned members of the order to avoid -joining a "class strug­ gle" or employing an abstract spirituality in their efforts. "You may rest assured tlhat no one will be oIbliged to leave the society for the sole reason that he is working with ·the poor," said Father Kolvenbach in two October meetings .with Jesuit provincill!1s in Latin Am­ erica. The 800-word speech he gave at both meetings was released in Rome Oct. 12 by the Jesuit headquarters.. It did not men­ tion Nicaraguan Jesuit Father Fernando Cardenal, who has been. ordered by Father Kolven­ bach to leave his post at Nicara­ ragua's Minister of Education. Father Kolvenbach told the Jesuits that to live the evangeli­ cal poverty of Christ means to "combat that poverty which is a non-value and which the strug­ gle for justice has to overcome." He asked Jesuits "to live fully the Eucharistic paradox" of aiv­ ing a Gospel poverty while fight­ ing to help tlhe poor overcome their material poverty. The general mentioned Jibera­ tion theology only once, to praise the document on the sub­ ject issued Sept. 3 by the Vati­ can Congregation for the Doc­ trine of the Faith. He said the document "fully confirms" Jesuit policies.

11

THE ANCHOR-Diocese of Fall River-Fri., Od. 19, 1984

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DIRECTORS

GEORGE E. CORNWELL

EVEREn E. KAHRMAN

ST. PAULA· FRASSIN­ ETTI, foundress of the Sis­ ters of St. Dorothy, be honored at the New England celebration of her canoniza­ tion last March, to be held at 1 p.m. Nov. 11 at the Ca­ thedral of SS. Peter and Paul, Providence. The community's provin­ cial house, Villa Fatima, is located in Taunton and the . sisters also staff Our Lady of Mt. Carmel School, New Bedford. All are welcome to attend the Nov. 11 Mass, at which Bishop Louis E. ·Gelineau will be principal celebrant and homilist. Music will be by the Peloquin Chorale.

will

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F·ROM THE "1 BOOKSHELF

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AND YET BELIEVE ... like the poor and homeless·touched by

this native sister in India, those who do

not know Jesus and His Gospel long for

comfort and hope.

Today's mission Church reaches out,

drawing them into the embrace of His

love and His Church.

Those who do not know Christ do 'not

need to see Him as Thomas,did. But, as

St. Paul wrote, "How can they believe if

they have not heard?"

Your gift to the Propagation of the Faith

will help the mission Church proclaim

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are still waiting to hear, and so urgently

need. Let them hear from you, today.

.Ideal

Continued from page one At the same time he acknow­ ledged' legitimate pluralism of views, saying:, "On questions such as these, we realize that citizens· and ipublic officials may agree with our moral arguments whi:le disagreeing with us and among themselves on the most effective legal and policy reme­ dies. "The search for political and October 21 public policy solutions 'to such Rt. Rev. Edward J. Carr, P;R., problems as war and peace and Pastor, 1937, Sacred Heart, Fall abortion may weLl be long and River,' Chal1lCellor of Diocese, diffioult," he continued, "but 1907-21 . a prudential' judgment that poli­ Rev. Francis E. Gagne, Pas­ tical solutions are not now feasi­ tor, 1942, St. Stephen, Dodge­ ble does not justify failure to un­ viHe dertake the effort. Rev. Wal,ter J. Buckley, Re­ "Whether the issue be the tired 'Pastor, 1979, St. Kilian, ·control, reduction and elimina­ New Bedford tion of nucJear arms or the .Iegal protection of the unborn, the OCtober 22 task is to work for the feasibility Rev. John E. Connors" Pas'­ of whllit may now be deemed un­ tor, 1940, St. Peter, Dighton feasible. The pursuit of complex Rev. Jerome F. O'Donnell, objectives like these ought not OFM, Our Lady's Chapel, New to be set aside because the goals Bedford ' may not be immediately teach­ able." October 23 ."In debating such martters," Rev. Joseph Eid, Pastor, 1970, St. Anthony of Desert, Fall River said the bishop, "there is much room for dill!1ogue about what October 24 Rev. Marc. Maurice Dagenais, constitutes effeotive, workable O.P., Retired Assistant, 1982, St. responses, but the debllite should not be about whether a response Anne's, Fall River . in the political order is needed." October 25 Whi:le focusing chiefly on the Rev. Reginald Chene, O.'P., nuclear war and abortion is· 1935, Dominican Priory, Fan sues in his 850-word statement, Bishop Ma:lone also noted that River Rev. Raymond B. Bourgoin, the U.S. bishops hav~ taken Pastor, 1950, St. Paul, Taunton positions on many public issues.

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RECORDS TAPES

[necrolo9OY)

The Society for

.

TIiE PROPAGATION OF TIiE FAITH The central organization·for the support of

. the Church's Worldwide mission work.

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- Yes! I want to help proclaim the Good News, so that others will hear and

believe in Christ. Enclosed is gift for the mission Church:

I I ,

I I

my

0 $-_.-

0 $10

0 $30

. 0 $100

0 My speelal oecrlflC8.$

0 Plea" tell me how I can Join your monthly donor program. Name Address City

Zip _ I Please ask the missionaries to remember theseState intention.s at Mass: _

I

ANCH. 10/19/84

Send your gift to: I

The Society for

I

I I

L~

THE PROPAGATION OF THE FAITH Reverend Monsignor John J. Oliveira 368 North Main Street

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12

THE ANCHOR-Diocese of Fall River-Fri., Oct. 19, 1984 .

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The history of' the Sisters of Clarke and Bernardette O'Brien, Mercy in tlhe Fall River diocese teacher and chi.Jd care worker at St. Vincent's Home; Sisters extends over III years, begin­ ning when Fall River was still Scholastica Heaney, aIlld Eugene part of tl;1e Providence diocese. Sullivan at St. Kilian's and St. In 1873 the first Sisters of James, New Bedford; Sister M. Mercy to serv~ Southeastern Grace Sherry at SS. Peter and Paul. Massachusetts opened St. J 0­ seph's Hospital on the 'corner of In fact, the Ust extends to Campbel'l and Pleasant Streets nearly half the residents at Mt. in New Bedford. L::;;ter the bui:Id­ St. Rita's. Collectively, their ing became St. Lawrence Con­ years of service are in the hun­ vent and recently it was sold to dreds; the number of aives they the Department of Child and touched are in the thousands. Family Services. To care for these sisters, now From St. Joseph's the sisters disabled by age or sickness, the branched out to Sacred Heart, Sisters of Mercy renovated their Holy Name, St. Ki'lian, St. Mary fonner novitiate, now known as and Holy Family parishes in Mt. St. Rita's. The facility is de­ New Bedford, where they taught signed to provide professional either in' the schools or catecheti­ medical, nursing and paramedi­ cal prog.rams. cal services as part of a total Fall River welcomed Sisters program for the physicall, emo­ of Mercy in 1874 under the aus­ tional, rehabHitative and social pices of Father Edward Murphy, wel1heing of each sister. pastor of St. Mary's. S'oon com­ Each -is recognized as a valu­ munity members were teaching able member of the Mercy com· and conducting religious educa­ munity and the rprogram's ob-' tion classes at St. Louis, St. Patrick, and St. Anne's parishes. jective is to assist her to achieve St. Vincent's Home opened in her fuU potential and Ito' enjoy 1885. In later years St. Joseph, her retirement years. As financial supporters of tlhe SS. 'Peter and Paul and Mt. St. centre, the Sisters of Mercy Mary Academy boasted .Mercy faculties. A long and fruiUul sponsor an annual dinner dance to help meet its expenses. This ministry reached out to Attle­ boro, North Attleboro, Taunton, year's dinner will take place Cape Cod and other areas of Wednesday, Nov. 7, at Venus de the diocese as the years passed·. MH'o restaurant, Swansea. Many sisters,. now residents of For'tickets or in(onnation re­ Mt. St. Rita Health Centre, garding private contributions, Cumberland, R.I., played vital , please contact Sr. Marie Lour­ roles in :the growth of the Fall dette, St. Vincent's Home, Fail River diocese during their active River, 679-8511; Sr. Rose Angela, , years. Bishop Feehan, Attleboro, 222­ 7970; Sr. Mary Nora, Our Lady They include Sister Canne1a of Mercy Convent, New Bedford, Corbett, fonner principal of Mt. 992-3694. ' St. Mary A:cademY; Sister Vir­ ginia Quinlan, former principal Sr. Mary Margretta, OUr Lady of Holy. Family Higih School and of Lourdes Convent, Taunton, recently on the staff' at Bishop 822-9206; Sr. Zita Foley, Center-, Feehan High S~hOOI; Sister 1M. Ville, 771-2786; or Sr. Mary Al­ Anastasia Davis, math teacher ban, Mt. St. Rita, Cumbel'1and, at Holy Family; Sisters Annette 401-333-6352.


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O.L. VICTORY, CENTERVILLE

Rite of InscriPiion f,or first communion candidates: 9:30 a.m. Mass Oct. 21 at Our Lady , of Victory, 10 a.m. Mass at Our Lady of Hop'e; for confirmation candidates, noon Mass a,t Our Lady of Victory. All welcome at 2 p.m. Mass today at Whitehall Health Care Facility. LaSALETTE SHRINE, Mothers' Group: meeting 8 ATTLEBORO ' p.m. Oct. 23, Nolan residence, 11 a.m. Oct. 22, People's Cha­ pel: presentation of p1ace of 40 Oak St. W. Barnstable. In­ icon of Our Lady of Kazan in formation: 428-5801. Russian spirituality, followed ST. MARY, NB by 12:10 ,p,m. Mass. All wel­ New parish council member: come. Dennis Desnoyers, representing ,the CCD program. HOLY ROSARY, TAUNTON

,teering pOint,

PUBLICITY CHAIRMEN are asked to submit news Items for this column to The Anchor, P.O. Box 7, Fall River, 02722., Name of city' Dr town shOUld be Included as well as full dates of all activities. please send news of future rather than past events. Note: We do not carry news of fundralslng activities such as bingos, whlsts, dances, suppers and bazaars. We are happy to carry notices of spiritual {Irograms, club meetlnlls, youth projects and similar nonprofit activities. Fundralslng pro­ Jects may be advertised at our regular rates, obtainable from The Anchor business office, telephone 675·7151. On Stearlng Points Items FR Indicates Fall River, NB Indicates New Bedford.

ST. JOHN OF GOD, SOMERSET

Parish 75th anniversary: 4 p.m. Mass ~ov. 4 concelebrated by bishop and visiting clergy, followed by 6 .p.m. social hour, banquet and dance at Venus de Milo restaurant, Swansea. Children's, choir ,rehearsal: 6 p.m. ea.ch Monday in church for 9:15 a.m. Mass each Sunday.

. "Invitation," 'an adult educa­ tion program, will 'begin Nov. 27 and continue each Tuesday through Dec. 18, meeting from 7:45 to 9 p.m. each week. Reg­ istrations will ,be accepted after all Masses this weekend. Fur­ ther information 'available at rectory. Scholarship committee meet­ ing: 7:30 p.m. Oct. 27,rectory.

Collectibles: gold - plated Christmas tree ornaments de­ picting Sacred Heart Church are available from Rosann Pa­ tota.

SS. PETER & PAUlL, FR

DCCW RETREAT

Meetings: Education Nomin­ a,ting Committee, 7:30 p.m..Oct. 22, school; Parent Involvement, 7 p.m. Oct. 23, school. . CORPUS CHRISTI, SANDWICH

Youth Group officers: James Gomez, president; Denise O'Bri­ en, Peter Martin, vice-presi­ dents; Nancy Pier<;e, secretary. They will meet at 7 ,p.m. today at Father Clinton Hall. October devotions: exposition of Bl. Sacrament, rosary, litany, homily and. Benediction, 4 p.m. each Sunday: ·rosary 7:30 p.m. each Thursday, also prior to 9 a.m. daily Mass. BIRTHRIGHT, TAUNTON

Volunteers needed for Great­ er Taunton unit; training pro­ ~ram 7 to 9 .p.m. four Tuesdays, 'beginning Nov. 6 at Birthright office, 93 Washington St., across from Morton Hospital. Registra­ tion or information: call 822­ 2921 or 823-1481 or visi.t the office 10 a.m. to noon Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday or 7 to 9 p.m. Oct. 29, 30 or 31. ST. STANISLAUS, FR

Teaching sessions on conse­ cration to Our Lady of Czesto­ chowa: Nov. 7, Dec. 5, after each daily Mass. MARIOLOGICAL SOCmTY OF AMERICA

New England regional meet­ ing: 10 a.m. Oct. 20, Aquinas Hall, P.rovidence College. Bis­ hop Eugene A. Marino will speak on Marian devotion and a Marian liturgy will follow, celebra,ted by Bishop Louis E. Gelineau. STONEHILL COLLEGE, N. EASTON

Public discussion on ethics and the media with William M. Bul­ ger, state senate president: 11 a.m. to 12:30 ·p.m. today, Dona­ hue Hall. All welcome. Infor­ mation: 238-1081, ext. 321. NOTRE DAME, FR

Coffee 'and doughnuts: spon­ sored ,by Circle of Friends fol­ lowing 9 a.m. Mass each first Sunday at Mt. St. Joseph School. Altar boy meeting: 11 a.m. Oct. 27, school. Lourdes water is 'available to parishioners. Information at rec­ tory.

SACRED HEART, FR

A women's retreat directed by Rev. Joseph Loughlin, SJ, will be sponsored by the Diocesan Council of Catholic Women Nov. 2 through 4 at the Family Life Center, N. Dartmouth. Res­ ervations: Miss Dorothy Curry 992-6814. COMPASSIONATE FRmNDS,

Meeting: 7:30 ·p.m. Oct. 22, St. Louis de France School. Swansea. Open to bereaved parents, siblings and other fam­ ily members. Topic: Handling the Holidays, presented by Shir­ ley Melin. Information: 676­ 8458. ST. JUDE/QUEEN OF ALL SAINnl. SANTUJT/MASHPEE

Thanksgiving Mass: 7 p.m. Nov. 21 at Queen of All Saints. Foodstuffs will be collected. " BIRTHRIGHT. HYANNIS

Volunteers needed to staff the office. Information: 771­ 1102. BLUE ARMY

First Friday vigil: 7 p:m. to midnight Nov. 2, St. Francis Xavier Church, Acushnet. All welcome. ST. JOAN OF ARC. ORLEANS

Rosary and Benediction: 5 p.m. each Friday in October; recitation of rosarY before 5:15 .p.m. daily Mass. ST. MARY, SEEKONK

Mary Day: 2 ,p.m. Oct. 28. Altar boys have donated a ciborium in memory of Edward R. Ring. ST.ANNE. FR

Mass 'and healing service with Mrs. Marie Rocha: Oct. 28. . Dedication of carillons: 11 :30 a.m. Mass Nov. 4, followed by reception in parish hall., Women's Guild meeting: 7:30 p.m. Nov. 14, church hall,' pre­ ceded by 7 p.m. Mass for de­ ceased members.

Annual St. Jude novena: 2 and 7:30 p'.m. daily in shrine Oct. 20 to 28, conducted by Fa­ ther Martin Dionne, OP. Paper drive each first Satur­ day, 9 a.m. ;to 5 p.m. at boat­ house .parking lot on Davol Street, conducted by parish Scout troops in cooperation with Heritage Park.

O.L. FATIMA, NB

ST. DOMINIC, SWANSEA

BL. SACRAMENT, FR

Youth ministry program for 9th to 12th graders: 7 to 9 p.m. Oct. 28, pa.rish hall. All youth welcome. '

Due to a planned rummage sale, all'- Oct. 21 Masses will be held in the church ra,ther than the parish center,

C~LIE'S OILeO.tINC.

"110M( IIA. . COUIICI MMEI"

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101 nOIAPT 14 HOIl' S""rt'C' Charles Velolo, Pres,

DIVORCED/SEPARATED, CAPE, ISLANDS

Meeting: 7 ,p.m. Oct. 21, S,t. Francis Xavier center, Hyannis. Information: Janet Farrell, 775­ 8168. '

OffICI .. OAK GlOVE

AVI~

fAll IMI

ST. LOUIS de FRANCE, SWANSEA '

Beginning 7 p.m. Oct. 21 and every third Sunday thereafter: holy hour led by permanent dia­ conte candidate Robert Norman­ din to pray for needs of parish and parishioners. All welcome.

IF YOU

CAN'T GO­ GIVE

INTERFArrR DINNER,FR

Bishop Daniel A. Cronin will be the ,principal speaker at the seventh annual Interfaith Din­ ner to be held at 6 p.m. Nov. 26 at Venus de Milo' restaurant, Swansea. Information and res­ ervations: Jewish Community Council, 673-7791. I

THE HOLY FATHER'S MISSION AID TO THE ORIENTAL CHURCH

October 21st is Mission Sunday, Christ asks all of us to be missionaries. He does not expect everyone to leave home and family and labor in His vineyards in foreign lands. But He does expect all of us to help spread His Gospel. You can answer His call through your gifts to Catholic Near ~t, our Holy Father's own mission to the Eastern Churches.

MEMORIAL ROME, FR

Halloween costume party: 6:30 to 9 p.m. Oct. 22, audito­ rium. . Resident council meeting: to­ day in auditorium. FAMILY LIFE CENTER, N.DARTMOUTH

Engaged Encounter weekend begins tonight; Connolly High School day of recollection Oct. 23; Lamaze Natural Childbirth classes,' Oct.' 24, 25.

GO TEACH ALL NATIONS

ST. JAMES, NB

ST. JOSEPH, FAIRHAVEN

Scripture group meetings: 7:30 p.m. each Monday at home~ to be announced. Child care available at 9:30 a.m. Mass each Sunday begin­ ning Nov. 4. Information: Sue Negri, 996-2759. Blood bank a,t church: Nov. 4, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Donors 'and 'aides needed. Information: Earl Faunce, 993-2061.

Religious issues before high court

WASHINGTON (NC)' Church-state questions are at issue in four cases the U.S. Su­ preme Court has agreed to hear this term: a Nebraska woman's religious objections to having her photograph on a dirver's dicense; an Alabama case on the constitutionaJity of a moment of silence in public schools for voluntary prayer or meditation; a Grand Rapids, Mich.. case on . the constitutionality of sending public sohool teachers into paro­ chial schools to provide non· sectarian enrichment and reme· diaJ classes; and a Connecticut case on a law requiring employ­ ers to give religiously observant employees a day off on ;the Sab­ bath.

For just $15 a month, you can train a native priest-a Sister, for $12.50. For only $14 a month, you can "adopt" a needy child. They'll all send you their photos and write to you. Churches, chapels, schools, convents, rectories and clinics are needed, too. You can build one yourself as a Memorial for someone you love for between $5 and $15 thousand. Or, give whatever you can. Your gift will help our priests and Sisters carry on their Christ­ like work in the Near East.

Parish Council- Finance Com­ mittee meeting: 7 p.m. Oct. 24, rectory.

Additions and/or corrections to the church memorial plaques 'are being made. The rectory should ,be notified of any ST. THOMAS MORE, changes. SOMERSET Souvenir tiles of the new Announced Masses ha.ve been church are available. booked for the .remainder of CYO officers: Maureen Ea­ 1984 and for much of 1985. Early gar, president; Jane Char-trand, vice-president; Erin Marino, arangements for such Masses are suggested. , secretary; Barbara Almedia, treasurer. Jim Leonard and De­ ST. JOHN EVANGELIST, nise Nault, advisors. POCASSET Hunger Walk: 1 p.m. Nov. 4, Vincentians: meeting follow­ 10 miles around Orleans. Infor­ ing 10:30 a.m. Mass Oct. 21. mation: Jim Leonard, parish chairman. Sponsored ,by Nauset Clergy Assn., with proceeds, benefitin~ Catholic Relief Serv­ ices. ROLY NAME. FR

13

THE ANCHOR-Diocese of Fall River-Fri., Oct. 19, 1984

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TASTY RECIPE

Your Sunday dinner will seem tastier and be more meaningful if you share your blessings with the hungry families huddled in refugee camps of the Near East. For only $20 less than the cost of most family dinners-you can feed a Palestine refugee family for an entire month. To show their thanks to you, we'll send you an Olive Wood Rosary from the Holy Land.

ANOTHER WAY TO HELP?

Needs of missionaries are great. It's hard sometimes to decide just where your help is needed most. Why not let the Holy Father decide? Mark your gift On any amount) Stringless, and send it to us. The Holy Father will tell us where it's needed. .

A

••.. ~

... ••

HELP THE MISSION­ YOURSELF

HELP

Through Catholic Near East Deferred Giving Plans, you receive a guaranteed income for as long as you live. Then your gift goes to the help of Chrisfs poor in the Near East. The good you do lives on after you. Write for details today.

co

6 ENCLOSEDPLEASEANDS

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FOR'­

Please retum coupon with your' offering

_

NAME

_

STREET

CITY

_ STATE.--~IP

_

THE CATHOLIC NEAR EAST WELFARE ASSOCIATION

NEAR EAST MISSIONS ARCHBISHOP JOHN J. O'CONNOR. President MSGR. JOHN G. NOLAN, National Secretary Write: CATHOLIC NEAR EAST WELFARE ASSOC. 1011 First Avenue. New York, N.V. 10022 Telephone: 212/826-1480


THE ANCHOR-Diocese of Fall River-Fri., Oct. 19, 1984

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Fsther "James O'Brien, princi­ pal, has been away from school • III III • chairing the visiting .committee of the New England AssocIation Weather permttting{ 720 Con­ of Schools and Colleges at St. noBy students and their faculty Jolm!s High School in Shrews­ and administrators wiN, even bury, which is applying for ac­ . as you read this, be participating creditation for the (irst time• in the annual Cougar Day Walka­ III •. III * thon around Nol1th Watuppa Parents' Niglhts -are planned Pond. III .•• III • for Oct. 29 and Oct. 30 begin­ ning at 7 p.m. ' ,A number of local artists • • • * have exhibited their, work this The Fall River school is proud fall in our Wolf GallerY of Art• . to IIlOte that five area people Currently on display are paint­ . chosen for the 1984 :edltlon of ings of Mark Troia, '81, who Outstanding Young Men of Am­ continUed his education aftei' erica are Connolly graduates: Connolly at Rhode Island School John Mitchell, '71; Edwar~ Lam­ ;' of Design. bert, '76; Arthur Viana, '76; John . Angelo, '75; and William Taylor, '76. ·Latiln Clulb officers. are Car- . • An appeal has gone out for therine Dorsey, Suzanne Burt unused musical instruments, to and Michael ·Butler, triumvirate; be used in organizing. a Con­ Kathey Santos, vice-consul; Su­ nolly ensemble. Murrini and zanne Tedeschi and Scott Han­ friends, please note. dren, secretaries; Jon Paul Cor­ reia, treasurer. • '" • III ~

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Connolly Thespians' wiD pre­ sent "Flowers for Algernon" at 8 pm. Nov. 16 and 17 and 2 p.m. Nov" 18.

Bishop Connolly

cecilia Belange.t'

Our Bible study group came up with some interesting obser­ vations this week. ,We began by talking about "the fa~th of our, fathers" and dmmediately the" gripping story of Abraham and Isaac came to mfnd. , "And the Lord said, "Take your son, your only son, Isaac, whom you love, and go to the ~and of Moriah and offer: him there as a b.urnt offering.''' Whllit Ii test of faith! Abraham and Sarah were old when this miraculous child was promised them. This was the chHd of their old age, the hope of his parents, the agent of the prom­ ises of God. This beloved Isaac was now called upon to be a sacrifice. Unbelievable! We could not help specuilliting upon the feelings that fiilled Abraham's !breast. He adored this child. Rich as the Old Testa­ ment ,is in "feeling statemelllts," it ds strangely silent in this in­ stance. It cooly continues: "So Abraham rose early in the' morning and .taking Isaac arf(l wood went on his way." .How often have we read or heard of parents who, upon los­

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SEREN/1Y

ANDCOMFOR! ACTIVl1Y OR SECLU­ SION IS YOURS AT

ing a child by accident, rage against God. And Abraham .is the man who so eloquently in­ terceded with divine wratn that he almost saved Sodom, the city whose wickedness was pro­ verbial. .But for his son, for himself, he said nothing. And ithat is the point of the sHence. Abra­ ham was not dnhuman. He did as he was told because God had asked for that which was olearly his. . Abraham obeyed God. He knew' that the only way to live was not to claim life but to sit lightly to it, to remember it is a loan and that the only way Ito amortize dt is' to give it back, ~itt1e'by mtle or all at once. That's what Jesus is saying to us also. There is the source of life, and there is everything else. Claim nothing and you wiil be given life and all things !be­ sides. Claim created goods, cling to them, trust in them and they wHI run through your fingers Hke sand. ' ,Life is Hke happiness: trouble yourself about it and you win lose it. Enjoy.it as· it comes, claim notlhing, and you will be given all things.

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15

THE ANCHOR-Diocese of Fall River-Fri., Oct. 19, 1984

OUR LADY'S

RELIGIOUS STORE By Bill Morrissette

936 So. Main St.,

~all

River

41HIDDEN VICTORY"

DENMARK'S Pharmacy

A NOVEL OF JESUS

portswQtch

Feehan, Stang In Grid Routs The Bishop Feehan High Shamrocks and the Bishop Stang I-«gh Spa11tans overpowered their opponents in footbaM ac­ tion last Saturday. Scoring 48 points for the sec­ ond consecutive game Feehan defeated the Fairhaven High ·Blue Devi'ls, 48-15, in the Divis­ ion One Southeastern Mass. Conference opeper for both schools. Jerry ·Bond scored three touch­ downs in leading the Shamrocks' overpowering offense. Peter Givens added two touchdowns in the winning cause as Feehan built up a 34-0 'lead before Fair-, haven was able to score. The victory boasted Feehan's season record :to 3-1-1 (won, lost, tied) and 1-0-0 in Division One action while Fairhaven is now 2-3-0 overall and 0-1-0 in division play. Dave Ottavianelli scored two touchdowns and boosted his season total points to 36 in dead­ ing the Spartans to a 24-0 shut­ out of Bourne in an inter-divis­ ion conference game. He also passed to Frank Souza for the olJher . Stang touchdown. Pat Driscoll kicked a field goal and Matt Lanagan converted two kicks for the extra points. Stang is now 4-1-0 overall and 1-0-0 in the conference's Divis­ ion Three. Bourne, which com­ petes in Division Two, is 1-4-0 overall and has yet to see action in divisiona'l play.

The Coyle-Cassidy Warriors dropped a 30-12 decision to Dighton-Rehoboth's Falcons in a Division Three encounter. It was Dighton-Rehoboth's 13th straight victory. The FllI1cons are . now 51-0-0 overall, 1-0-0 overall. In other Division One games Falmouth pinned a 35-14 rout on Durfee and Attleboro blank­ ed Somerset 8-0. It was t1he first division loss for Somerset's Blue Raiders who are now 3-2-0 overall, 2-1-0 in division. The Bombardiers of .A:tltlleboro are 4-0-1 and 2-0-0 in Division One. The ga"me was Falmouth's first in Division One and the team is now 4-1-0 overall. Dur­ fee is 0·5·0 overall, 0-2 in div­ ision. Attleboro Jifted its rec­ ord to 4-0-1 overall and 2-0-0 in division while Somerset is 4-2-0 overal'l, 2-1-0 in division. With a 21-0 viotory over Mans­ field, Canton took over undis­ puted possession of first place in Hockomock League footbaU. Canton, which had shared the Jead with Foxboro, upended Rockland 26-14 in non-league action. . Other Hockomock results: Franklin 6 Oliver Ames 0, North Attleboro 7 King Philip 7, Sha­ ron 27 Stoughton 7. Standings: Foxboro 3·0-0, Canton 4-0-0, North Aittleboro 2-1-2; Franldin 3-1-0, Oliver Ames 2-3-0, Mans­ field 1-3-1, Sharon 2-2-0, King Philip 0-2-3, Stoughton 0-5-0.

Soccer Bishop Stang is host to Bish­ op ConnoHy, Old Rochester is at Diman Yoke, Dartmouth at Westport and New Bedford Yoke-Tech at Holy Family. En­ tering this week Yoke-Tech was the Jeader with a 9-0-1 record with Dartmouth oocupying :the runner spot with an 7-2-1 rec­ ord in conference's Division Two. New Bedford High and Den­ nis-Yarmouth remain the top two contenders in Division One with the Whaletowners in first place and Dennis-Yarmooth the

runnerup after last Monday's games. Unbeaten and untied. in nine games Foxboro was :the leader in Hockomock soccer with Franklin 7-2-0 the runnerup. To­ day Oliver Ames is at North Attleboro, Stoughton at Frank­ lin and Canton at Sharon. Bristol County CYO Hockey League results last Sunday: Fall River South over Mansfield, New Bedford over Fal:! River North.

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WITH·,

GRATITUDE

TO

ALMIGHTY ,

GOD

S~L\INT

JOAN OF ARC' P ARISH~ ORLEANS, MASS.

,

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21

WEDN.ESDAY, OCTOBER 2~

11 :00 A.M. - MASS OF THANKSGIVING

1:00 P.M. - MASS OF ANOINTING FOR SICK AND ELDERLY PARISHIONERS

2.:00·4:00 P.M. - OPEN HOUSE 4:00 P.M., - VESPERS AND BENEDICTION

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25

MONDAY, OCTOBER 22

.7:30 P.M. - PRAYER. SERVICE FOR THE MEN

8:00 A.M. - MASS FOR DECEASED PARISHIONERS

,'- FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26

7:30 P.M. - LIVING ROSARY, BLESSING OF

MARIAN STATUE

3:30 P.M. - CHILDREN'S HOUR

7:30 P.M.. - ECUMENICAL HOLY HOUR'

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23

SU NDAY, OCTOBER 28,

7:30 P.M. - HEALING MASS REV. ,FRANKLIN DARLING ::i­

,

2:00 P.M. - ORGAN RECITAL AND DEDICATION OF THE ALLEN ORGAN

(The only, Priest Ordained From. the Parish Since it was . Founded in 1947)

THE NEW CHURCH IN ORLEANS SEATS 650. IT WAS DESIGNED BY HOLMES & EDWARDS, INC•.OF BOSTON, ARCHITECTS. JAMES P. EDWARDS,. PRESIDEN'I; WAS ASSISTED ON THE PROJECT BY HIS STAFF; ANDREW CHISHOLM AND WALTER SHULEY. PAGANI CONTRACTORS CO., INC. OF SANDWICH, MASS. WAS THE GENERAL CONRACTOR. STEVEN PAGANI, PRESIDENT, WAS ASSISTED BY ARTHUR PAGANI, JOHN PAGANI AND JOB SUPERINTENDENT HARRY McFADYEN OF BRIDGEWATER., ' GROUND BREAKING WAS ON JUNE 25, 1983, ~ THIE DEDICATION TOOK PLACE AUGUST 12, 19~4, BISHOP DANIEL A. CRONIN, S.T.D. CELEBRATED MASSON EACH OCCASION 'ASSISTED BY REV. JOHN MSGR. JOHN J. OUVEJRA. ,

..,.

. The General Pl:tbllc Is CordiaUy Invited To Celebrate With [18 On The Occasion of l'he Completion of Our New Church At Any o~ All of The Activities I~isted Here. Rev. John F. Andrews, Pastor

,It


10.19.84