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VOL.47, NO. 25

• Friday, June 27, 2003

FALL RIVER, MASS.

Southeastern Massachusetts' Largest Weekly • $14 Per Year

Diocesan faithful help Appeal surpass goal FALL RIVER - The 62 nd annual Catholic Charities Appeal of the Diocese of Fall River has concluded with the extraordinary sum of $3,674,844.95. This is the largest total in the history of the Appeal, exceeding last year's amount and eclipsing the previous all-time high registered in 2001. Hearing of the auspicious conclusion to this year's efforts, Bishop-Elect Coleman broke into a broad smile, encouraged to know that funding will be available for the many diocesan apostolates and ministries whiCh depend upon the Catholic Charities Appeal for support. With gratitude to Almighty God for blessing this year's Appeal with success and with grateful recognition of the hard work of pastors and parish committeesthrough the diocese, Bishop-Elect Coleman certainly found that the news of this year's result was a positive note upon which to embark for the challenging deliberations which will occupy his attention and that of his peers at the bishops' meeting. At Diocesan Headquarters, Msgr. Thomas J.

Harrington, director of the Appeal, and Michael J. Donly, diocesan director of Development, agreed that the campaign had gone extremely well. "With the slowdown in the economy, we were, to be candid, a bit apprehensive," Msgr. Harrington stated. "And with the celebration of Holy Week and Easter coming at the very end of April, the parish programs got off to a relatively late start. The upshot was that returns were slow to arrive at headquarters in the first days and weeks of the Appeal." Donly identified the extraordinary overall success of the individual parish programs in the 101 parochial communities across the diocese. "Some of the larger, affluent parishes on Cape Cod and in suburban areas of the diocese realized truly remarkable sums, for which we are most grateful," Donly said. "But we were particularly heartened by the results in so many of our inner city parishes. We had some returns and increases in urban areas that border on the miraculous." Increasingly well organized parish committees seem to contribute to the success of the Appeal. Turn to page J1 - Appeal

ST. JOSEPH of Cluny Sister Eugenia Brady; left, was selected by Bishop-Elect George W. Coleman as the first woman Spiritual Moderator in the 50~year history of the Fall River Diocesan Council of Catholic Women. With Sister Brady is DCCW President Lynette Ouellette. (Photo by Maddy Lavoie)

Sister Brady named first woman moderator in DCCW history By

DAVE JOLIVET EDITOR

FALL RIVER - For the first time in its 50-year history, a woman will serve as spiritlk'l1 moderator for the Fall River Diocesan Council of Catholic Women. Bishop-Elect George W. Coleman recently appointed St. Joseph of Cluny Sister Eugenia Brady to the position which had been fUled by diocesan priests for the past five decades. "I feel very privileged to be named," Sister Brady said during an Anchor interview last week. "I know this diocese very well, and I love the Diocese of Fall River and its people." Sister Brady, who resides with her community in Newport, R.I., has previously served as associate director of religious education in the diocesan Education Office for eight years, and introduced the RAINBOW program, a grief process for children, adolescents and adults, through the diocesan Of-

fice of Family Ministry. These days, Sister Brady is a visiting retreat director at the St. Edmund's Retreat at Enders Island, Conn., and does free-lance ministry in spiritual direction, retreat days, and workshops up and down the east coast. "Many within the DCCW are thrilled to have Sister Brady as the new spiritual director," said Council President Lynette Ouellette. "She comes highly recommended and we know she will be a great asset to the Council. Many of the women are very impressed with her." Bishop-Elect Coleman was given a list of three candidates for the position. "We didn't know how the bishop-elect would respond to having a woman candidate," said 'Ouellette. But having known Sister Brady and her qualifications from her work in the Education Office, Bishop-Elect Coleman Turn to page J3 - DCCW

A 100TH birthday party was recently held 100 YEARS - Germaine Lapointe wears a big smile as she celebrates her 1OOtl} birth- at the Catholic Memorial Home, Fall River, day at Our Lady's Haven, Fairhaven. She for resident Elizabeth Heneghan. She and was joined by many relatives and friends. friends enjoyed music, cake and ice cream. Lapointe lived in New Bedford and worked The Fall River native worked in a cotton mill for 40 years at the Metropolitan Insurance making yarn for many years and in 1998 received a Community Spirit Award. Company.


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" SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS gather with Msgr. Edmund J. Fitzgerald, executive director of the Diocesan Health Facilities during a recent awards banquet at White's of Westport. Each received a $2,000 scholarship. From left: Diane Kitson-Clark, Regina Spencer, Elizabeth Carreiro, Msgr. Fitzgerald, Inez Varao, Elisha Dumont and Sara LeBeau.

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DHF holds annual Awards and Scholarship Banquet

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WESTPORT Diocesan Health Facilities recently held its annual Awards and Scholarship Banquet at White's of Westport where it awarded seven $2,000 educational scholarships. Those honored were: Elisha Dumont, Catholic Memorial in Fall River; Inez Varao;Diocesan Health Facilities; Gregory O'Connell, Madonna Manor, North Attleboro;

Daily Readings June 30 July July 2 July 3 July 4

July 5 July 6

Gn 18:16-33; Ps 103:1-4,8-11; Mt 8:18-22 " Gn 19:15-29; Ps 26:2-3,9-12; Mt 8:23-27 Gn 21 :5,8-20; Ps 34:7-8,10-13; Mt 8:28-34 Eph 2:19-22; Ps 117:1-2; In 20:24-29 Gn 23:14,19;24:1-8,6267; Ps 106:1-5; Mt 9:9-13 Gn 27:1-5,15-29; Ps 135:1-6; Mt 9:14-17 Ez 2:2-5; Ps 123:1-4; 2 Cor 12:7-10; Mk 6:1.6

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THE ANCHOR (USPS-545-mO) Periodical Postage Paid at Fall River, Mass. Published weekly <;Jtcept for the first two weeks in July am the week after Christmas at 887 Highlam AvemJe, Fall River, Mass. O272ObytheCalholic Press ofthe Diocese ofFall River. Subscription price by niail, postpaid $14.00 per year. POSfMASTERS send address changes to The Aochor, P:O. Box 7, Fall River, MA 02722.

Diane Kitzon-Clark, Marian Manor, Taunton; Regina Spencer, Marian Manor; Elizabeth Carreiro, Our Lady's Haven, Fairhaven; and Sara LeBeau, Sacred Heart Home, New Bedford. The event is also an opportunity to celebrate dedication and years of service to the five skilled nursing facilities and two community programs sponsored by the diocese.

The recipients of the Reflection of Mission Award were also recognized for service, which best reflects the homes' mission. Thee honorees were: Mary Hoxie, Catholic Memorial Home; Deborah Langille, Madonna Manor; Thomas Morin, Marian Manor; Marjorie Morris, Our Lady's Haven; and Pauline Arsenault, Sacred Heart Home.

In Your Prayers .

-

Please pray for the following priests during the coming week June 30 1952, Rev. Simon Pease, SS.CC., Administrator, Sacred Hearts, Fairhaven . 1961, Rev. Alphonse M. Reniere; O.P., Dominican Priory, Fall River

July 1 1993, Rev. FemandoA. Veiga, CM, Vincentians Mission House, Fall River

July 2 1967, Rev. Gerard A. Boisvert, Assistant, Notre Dame de Lourdes, Fall River 1996, Rev. Maurice H. Lamontagne, Retired Pastor, S1. George, Westport -

July 3 . 1942, Rev. Thomas P. Doherty, Pastor, S1. Kilian, New Bedford July 4 " 1955, Rev. James A. Coyle, S.T.L., Pastor, Holy Name, Fall River July 5 1943, Rev. I.E LaBonte, Pastor, Sacred Heart, New Bedford 1985, Rev. Edward P. Versailles, M.S., LaSalette Shrine, North Attleboro

July 6 1963, Rev. Edmond Francis. SS.Cc., Pastor, S1. Mary, Fairhaven


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Friday, June 27, 2 0 0 3 t h e

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Diocesan priest leads national effort to restore unity of priests, bishops

PILGRIMAGES/ToURS HEALING RETREATS IMMACULATE CoNCEPTION CHURCH

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Father Mark R. Hession is president of the National Organization for Continuing Education of Roman Catholic Clergy.

By

DEACON JAMES

N.

DUNBAR

CENTERVILLE - From Our Lady of Victory Parish in this Cape Cod community, pastor Mark R. Hession is reaching out to priests and bishops nationwide to restore credibility in Church leadership. As president of the National Organization for Continuing Education of Roman Catholic Clergy, Father Hession is following up on the national group's timely initiative "Cultivating Unity: the Presbyterate and the Bishop" launched last year. In essence, it offers a transformational process intended to engage any entire diocesan presbyterate with its bishop in frank and faith-centered dialogue leading to a common rededication to its priestly ministry. The effort follows tough measures taken within the last year in the midst of the sexual abuse scandal, which has put a strain on the relationship between bishops

and priests. In the midst of acknowledged estrangement between priests and their leader, "by God's grace we are called to be 'repairers of the breach,''' Father Hession said, quoting Isaiah. . A growing body of research suggests that isolation, loneliness and confusion about a priest's identity and mission in the Catholic Church today represent a serious threat to the health and vitality of priestly life and ministry, Father Hession noted. One of the truly extraordinary elements of "The Basic Plan for the Ongoing Formation of Priests" which the U.S. bishops unanimously adopted two years ago, is its insistence on ongoing formation, not only in the life of the priest, but also of the local presbyterate as a whole. The U.S. bishops explained that "the ongoing formation of a presbyterate is a deliberate cultivation of the unity of the priests and their bishop, a unity that responds to God's grace and the mission entrusted to them." NOCERCC is partnering with the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate (CARA) at Georgetown University, to develop a convocation-style process in several dioceses representing

various geographic, demographic and cultural attributes. After the necessary evaluation and appropriate fine tuning, the Cultivating Unity process will be made available to all dioceses in the United States. Father Hession said that the NOCERCC-CARA team will work closely with the local bishop and diocesan directors of ongoing formation to develop the convocation-style ~xperience of prayer, study and dialogue on issues that relate directly to ecclesial unity, personal holiness and well-being, and the pastoral experience. The Cape Cod pastor said that Cultivating Unity represents a radical departure from traditional models of ongoing formation of priests, which are focused exclusively on individual priests or on small groups of priests. Intended as a thoroughly inclu- . sive and collaborative process rather than another program among the many available, CulTurn to page six - Unity

Under the Spiritual Direction of"

FR. JOSEPH P. McDERMOTT c....;. .

Pastor of Immaculate Conception Church 122 Canton Street· Stoughton, MA 02072

PHOENIX/SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA: October 8-17, 2003 Exciting trips are planned to the Grand Canyon, Sedona, Montezuma's Castle, Meteor Crater, the Petrified Forest, and the Painted Desert. Also, visit St. Thomas the Apostle & Canaan in the Desert (the garden of Jesus' Suffering & Resurrection) in Phoenix, St. Timothy's in Mesa, & Sr. Maria Goretti's in Scottsdale

FRAMINGHAM, MASSACHUSETTS: Oct. 31-Nov. 2,2003 Three-day Healing Retreat: Marist House - Friday evening to Sunday afternoon (Saturday & Sunday, ALL MEALS)

GUADALUPE, MEXICO: Feb. 4-10, 2004 Scheduled visits to: Guadalupe Shrine, Pyramids & Museum, City of Puebla, Our Lady of Octolan Shrine, Chapultepec Park, the Floating Gardens, San Miguel de Milagro, and St. Michael Archangel Chapel. Other planned events: City Tour of Mexico; Cathedral, a Focolare Show, and a Dinner Show (Breakfast & Dinner, DAILY)

--------------------

Each trip includes comfortable rooms with private bath. Mass, usually each day. Fr. Joseph McDermott will serve as your Spiritual Director. There is time for relaxation, socializing, etc. For brochures with itinerary, prices, and conditions contact Margaret Oliverio.

FOR FUTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL Margaret Oliverio @ 781-762-2029 or 781-844-2073

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Diocese of Fall River

OFFICIAL

Life

His Excellency, the Most Reverend George W. Coleman, Bishop-elect of Fall River, has announced the following appointments: Rev. Michael A. Ciryak, OFM, from Parochial Vicar, Saint Mary Parish, Mansfield, to Parochial Vicar, Holy Name Parish, Fall River, and Chaplain, Bishop Connolly High School, Fall River.

Business

Rev. Paul T. Lamb, from Chaplain, Morton Hospital, Taunton, to Parochial Vicar, Saint Francis Xavier Parish, Hyannis.

Personal

Rev. Roger 1. Landry, from Parochial Vicar, Espirito Santo, Parish, Fall River, and Chaplain, Bishop Connolly High School, Fall River, to Parochial Vicar, Saint Francis Xavier Parish, Hyannis. Rev. Edward A. Murphy, from Parochial Vicar, Holy Name Parish, Fall River, to Chaplain, Morton Hospital, Taunton.

Employee Benefits

Rev. John M. Murray, from Parochial Vicar, Corpus Christi Parish, East Sandwich, to Chaplain, Cape Cod Hospital, Hyannis, with residence at Our Lady of Victory Parish, Centerville..

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Rev. William M. Rodrigues, from Parochial Vicar, Saint Francis Xavier Parish, Hyannis, to Chaplain, Saint Luke's Hospital, New Bedford, and Director. Hispanic Apostolate, Cape Cod, with residence at Saint John the Baptist Parish, New Bedford. Rev. Rodney E. Thibault, from Parochial Vicar, Saint John the Baptist Parish, New Bedford, and Chaplain, Saint Luke's Hospital, New Bedford, to Parochial Vicar, Corpus Christi Parish, East Sandwich. Effective July 2, 2003

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Friday, June 27, 2003

themoorin~

the living word

The search for peace The headlines are becoming very scary. Each day Americans are dying in Iraq. Our search for weapons of mass destruction only draws a blank. Chemical warfare has been reduced to a few empty cans. Now it seems as if Iraqi oil is to pay for the war and subsequent occupation. Qur attention is currently being turned to Iran and its nuclear ambitions. North Korea is seen as an ever-present threat to Asian peace. The list seems endless, and in all of this the United States becomes more entrenched in a resolve to become the world's, police force. What makes this even more frightening is that such a mind-set has become public policy. The name of the game is now power - here at home and abroad. Somehow, the American people are being manipulated to believe that everyone is against us. A rising surge of legalistic moves is placing us in a danger that could indeed affect citizens' rights and freedoms. Under the guise of national security, people in American are facing greater personal restrictions and limitations. The terrorists of 911 I are indeed having an impact on the way we live, move about and interact. Because of the confusion of the times and 'the power of governmental propaganda, one does wonder how our own constitutional sensitivities are being dulled and blunted. If this were the case, then the nation has some developing serious issues that will indeed infringe onus all. Reading the signs of the times and interpreting them is not an easy task. ,Ours is indeed a 'new and precarious age of history. It is a time of serioils and swift upheaval spreading to all comers of this planet. They are the byproducts of people's intelligence and creative activity. However, they can recoil upon us, upon'our judgment and our aspirati'ons. Increase in power is not always accompanied by control of that power for the benefit of mankind. We are becoming perplexed about how to control tha~ danger. In no other time of history have so many enjoyed the abundance of wealth, resources and economic well-being. Yet, a huge proportion of the world's people are plagued by extreme need, hunger and illiteracy. So many people have a keen sense of personal freedom, while at the same tim~ being face-to-face with new forms of slavery in living and thinking." It is obvious that we have not seen the last of bitter political, social and economic warfare. We are not free from the specter of total mass destruction. As a result, many people are suspended between hope and anxiety and wonder very uneasily about the current course of events. It should be obvious that peace is the essential healer of our times. It is our responsibility and duty to spare no effort in order to work for the moment when all war will be completely outlawed by all nations of the earth. This is a lofty goal. However, the lessons of history show us the futility of warfare in bettering the human family. It does nothing more than destroy people and nations. It should also be noted that the arms race is not a defensive strategy, but really a curse on the human race. There is no question that if it continues, it will bring forth.an even greater lethal disaster, which would be the end of us all. In this light it is imperative to acknowledge that the universal common good must be pursued in an appropriate way and more effec. tively achieved. We must lay a foundation on an international ievel for a community of all people to work towards the solutions of the very serious problems of our times. We must not be blinded by false hopes. Every one of us needs a change of heart, and look to those tasks that we all can perform together in order to bring about lasting peace.

The Executive Editor

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.OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OFtHE DIOCESE OF FALL RIVER ".

.Publishe~ weekly by the Catholic press of the Diocese of Fall River ,

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. 887· Highland AVenue P.O. BOX 7 Fall River, MA' 02720 Fall River, MA 02722-0007 FAX 508-675-7048 Telephone 508-675-7151 E-mail: TheAnchor@Anchornews.org Send address changes to P.O. Box, call or use E-mail address

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EXECUTIVE EDITOR Rev, Msgr. John F. Moore EDITOR David B. Jolivet

NEWS EDITOR James N. Dunbar

OFFICE MANAGER Barbara M. Reis

POPE JOHN PAUL

II,

SEATED BEHIND A MONSTRANCE CONTAINING THE EUCHARIST, IS DRIVEN

ON A FLATBED TRUCK THROUGH THE STREETS OF ROME IN THE ANNUAL CORPUS CHRISTl PROCESSION RECENTLY. DURING THE CELEBRATION OF THE FEAST, THE PONTIFF ENCOURAGED FAMILIES AND MARRIED COUPLES TO ATTEND DAILY MASS TO STRENGTHEN THEIR BONDS OF LOVE AND UNITY. (CNS PHOTO BY ALESSIA GIULIANI, CATHOLIC PRESS PHOTO)

"Is NOT THE CUP OF BLESSING WHICH WE BLESS A SHARING IN THE BLOOD OF CHRIST? Is NOT THE BREAD WHICH WE BREAK A SHARING IN THE BODY OF CHRIST?"

(1 CORINTHIANS 10:16)

The vi rtue of slowing down By

fATHER EUGENE HEMRICK CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

"Whenever people confess that they are impatient, I suggest as a penance slowing down their way of life. They are to start their penance by leaving the confessional slowly, praying a prayer of thanks slowly and slowly walking out of the church." That was one of many practices discussed by priests in a seminar on the priesthood's healing ministry. Of course, in addition to countering impatience, slowing down lowers blood pressure. Slowing down is a winner when it comes to achieving inner peace. But what does it mean to slow down? •Slowing down often has connotations of getting older. If we have a fast step and slow it down, we may think to ourselves, "People will see this as a sign of deterioration and a loss of vitality." Slowing down isn'tsynonymous with a "slowdown," either, which, according to the thesaurus, suggests "stagnation" and "letting up." In most cases, slowing down is a sign of mature deliberation

and wisdom. Some weeks ago I went to a golf tournament to see what it is that separates the professionals from the amateurs. As I watched the pros hit practice shots, what immediately caught my attention was their constant effort to slow down in order to make their swing more deliberately smooth. On the other hand, the one thing golf . hackers have in common is a rushed swing. When people detect the deliberation and control that is created in our live~ when we slow down, it won't be old age that comes to mind for them. Rather they will get a sense of the maturity or, perM' haps, sanity that results . I think of slowing down as a virtue. It counsels us to be alert to all the little urges we have to run, bolt, speed and rush. It advises: "If you are tempted to dart across the street when stoplights are red and there is a break in the traffic, take a deep breath, look around, enjoy the environment and wait until they turn green. This may be the first deep breath

you've taken all day. "When you take off for work, don't become like a launched rocket and explode out of your home. Take a moment to become composed, and then walk slowly to the door and down the walk with this thought in mind, 'If I start the day under control, that's how I'll conduct myself throughout·the day.' "Before retiring in the evening, recite the prayer Blessed Pope John XXIII would recite before going to bed: 'Lord, I have done everything I could do today, now I leave the rest to you. I am going to sleep.' Slowing down means avoiding the temptation to let the business of the day and world events rush around in our minds after we hit the pillow." There is a saying in Italian that goes something like this: "Go slowly and you will-go a long way; go with too much gusto, too often, and you go to your death." "Life" ought to be a synonym for slowing down. For, as anyone who has cultivated the art of slowing down knows, "This is really living!"


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Friday, June 27, 2003

51

Our Lady of Victory Parish begins expansion campaign CENTERVILLE - With an exciting design to expand and renovate its facilities, Our Lady of Victory Parish is launching a $2.5 million capital campaign called "Building Our Future, Building Our Faith." At its successful conclusion the campaign will bring to fruition an ambitious plan to build a new religious education center, convert the current rectory into office space and make several improvements to the existi ng parish plant. ~(nformational presentations on the project have begun to introduce the campaign to parishioners and are scheduled to

continue over the course of several months. "With such a large parish we decided to conduct the campaign in stages over the next three months so we can be sure to reach all our people," said Ed Marshall, a parishioner who is serving as campaign chairman. Pastor Father Mark R. Hession believes "There is genuine excitement growing for the campaign and. what it will enable us to do. We have a generous, compassionate and dynamic parish family, and the improvements ,will allow us to better serve their needs." Early pledges from some pa-

rishioners have already enabled work to begin on repairs to the exterior of the church. Plans call for all of the church to be made handicapped-accessible. Our Lady of Victory lists more than 10,000 parishioners who worship at the main church on South Main Street and the parish's mission, Our Lady of Hope Chapel in West Barnstable. Religious education programs enroll approximately 1,150 students. "We're literally bursting at the seams," Father Hession said. Along with religious education classes, the parish center

is also home to several dozen parish organizations and a number of community groups, which meet there regularly. "Quite honestly, the time has come for us to make some major renovations on our buildings and operating systems in order to continue to do all that we hope to do as a vibrant and growing community of faith," Father Hession explained. Construction on the new Religious Education Center is expected to start within six months. The Center will provide 12 additional classrooms to existing parish facilities and add a meeting room capable of

seating 60 people for adult enrichment opportunities; a reception area and an elevator. Another facet of the project will be the conversion of the current rectory into office and meeting space for the parish priests and pastoral and administrative staffs. Planners hope that all of the major work will be completed within 18 months. Two informative presentations on the project are slated for June 20 and 21, from 6 to 8 p.m., at the Parish Center.

For additional information contact Thomas Sullivan at 508-375-0966.

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As the real' world turns To no one's surprise, it rained 'jealousies or bickering. There again last weekend. But I know was trust and compassion and of 30 people that didn't care a love. bit. Tucked away in the woods Individuals became commuof East Freetown, these people, nity, without losing their indiof all ages and backgrounds, viduality. Persons became famwith various interests and con- ily, without losing their personcerns, were oblivious to the lat- alities. And yes, equally as imest saturated Saturdayand Sun- portant, strangers became day. No, for them, the Son shone friends, without losing their all weekend'. strangeness! For the 138 lh time in this dioA team of 17 incredible cese, a group of strangers people with incredible talents walked the road to Emmaus to- and gifts simply absorbed an gether, and when they got there, outstanding corps of 13 they were family. I've walked retreatants with incredible talthat road more than a couple of ents and gifts, until there was times, and each instance is so neither team nor candidates any different, except for one thing- longer. the end resull- arriving as famAnd when that happened, the D real world got a little bit larger and a little bit stronger, as it has 137 times previously. By Dave Jolivet The world we all live in can, at ily at journey's end. And I guar- times, eat us alive. Last week, antee it's happened all 138 30 people bit back - with kindtimes. ness, compassion and unity. On this latest sojourn, a Eventually, they'll be enough gentle giant of a man, in more people chomping back so that ways than one. told us what we the world we all live in will bealready knew - that it's so come the real world ... the tough to feel like family in the world God envisions for us. "real" world. But he quickly The next journey to Emmaus corrected that misconception. embarks this November. One of The real world, he said, is the the greatest gifts you can give a one in which we ARE family. young adult between 20 and 35 That's the world that is meant years of age is to send them on for all of us. that journey. It's also one of the And what a wonderful world greatest gifts you can give to the it is. Last weekend a group of world we all live in. The strangers met in the real world. road map to Emmaus can be obThey slowly and patiently got to tained by calling 508.-822-6549. know each other. They talked Just consider it aAAA memberand they listened. They worked ship for the soul. together to complete assign- , Last weekend 30 friends ments. They ate together and didn't give a hoot it was a washprayed together. They cried to- out. And the real world's a betgether and they laughed, and ter place for it. laughed and laughed together. Comments are welcome at There was no road rage or davejolivet@anchornews.org.

My View From the Stands

Unity

Continued from page three

tivating Unity is designed to reach out to priests of the diocese and their bishop as a single body. To date, 38 bishops, provincials and religious communities have contributed more than $36,000 to the Fund for Cultivating Unity. Bishop John Kinney of St. Cloud, Minn., the U.S. bishops' Epi scopal Ii ai son to NOCERCC. inaugurated the Fund in late 2002 with his own gi ft of $1,000. In May, Cardinal Roger Mahony of Los Angeles contributed $5.000. Father Hession has invited "100 bishops who would be willing to give $1.000 each to join Bishop Kinney as founders of the Fund." In the Post-Synodal Apostolic Exhortation Pasrores Dabo Vobis, Pope John Paul 11 echoes the Sec-

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ond Vatican Council's teaching that "ordained ministry has a radical 'communitarian form' and can only be carried out as 'a collective work.''' Father Hession said it is his hope and that of NOCERCC that through this initiative as well as other opportunities for authentic and humble leadership, "that we can cultivate a common culture of unity within the presbyterate for the sake of the whole Church." Dioceses looking for more information on Cultivating Unity can contact Jim Alphen in the NOCERCC National Office, 1337 W. Ohio Street, Chicago, Ill., 60622. He can be reached by telephone at 312-226-1890; by FAX at 312-829-8915; or by Email at jalphen@nocercc.org.

Friday, June 27, 2003

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Outward appearance a'nd self-esteem hips. too wide, bad hair day and so I was at a gathering recently on. It's not surprising that we've that brought together a lot of gotten fixated on appearance in an women who hadn't seen each age where we internalize ideals of other in a while. Some of the beauty created and continually comments I heard were: "You served by television. look great," "You've put on a little What accounts for what rnight weight, but you look good," "Your be a lifelong dissatisfaction with hair really got gray," and so on. one's appearance? It may be due Almost all the greetings had to do with some kind of comment on appearance. I was not surprised. We'd have to be unconscious not to know that in American culture today we, especially women, place enormous value on 'By Antoinette Bosco the externals - what we look like. I remember a few more to one's early experiences years back reading of a "selfthan to anything else. All too many esteem'survey" done by New of us stopped liking the way we Woman magazine. In interviewing looked because of family mes600 men and women, it found that nearly half the women had low sages. I remember how long it took self-esteem, while only one-third me to get over the self-consciousof the men did. And what contribness I had about my looks after uted to women's self-esteem? hearing my mother tell me from Satisfaction with their bodies and the time I was an adolescent that if their looks. Clearly, many women my nose were smaller, my lips were suffering low self-esteem fuller and my face not quite so because they hated their looks. round, I'd be really,pretty. Oh Should anyone doubt that, just think about conversations you've well! The biggest problem, though, had with friends. How often have was weight, because my mother you heard people tell you all the things that are wrong about their was obsessed about pounds, and appearance: too short, too tall, too God help us if she ever saw us with our stomachs sticking out! fat, nose too big, skin too rough,

The-Bottom Line

Even when she was almost 90, she weighed herself every morning' and every evening to m<lke sure she didn't get above 105 pounds. Now, when a mother is that fixated on weight and she has five daughters, you can imagine what gets passed on to them! My older sister simply rebelled; the rest of us still make sure we never put on too many extra pounds. To emphasize the importance of early family messages, I remember once when I was about 12 we had visited a family whose daughter was graduating from high school. In the car coming home, my mother s~d she felt.~. sorry for the girl because she was so homely. My father said that she may not have been pretty but she was smart, had a great personality, was a hard worker and, most important, a loving daughter and a really good girl. His admiration and his value - came though loudly and clearly, and I internalized his message forever. There's so much more to life and people than appearances. In all the talk about a return to family values, let's place the theme expressed by my father up front again so we can look for beauty where it really resides, in the heart and soul, not in the face and body.

Born out of wedlock Q. What is the official Church teaching about those conceived out of wedlock? Are they regarded as equally called forth by God as others or merely accepted by him as an afterthought? Are they allowed to be baptized or not? Are they still forbidden to enter the priesthood or religious orders?

official doctrines about it. There's no reason it should have. What it teaches, and what the Bible tells us, about God's fatherly and motherly love for everyone applies to these boys and girls as well. Children of unwed mothers and fathers are correctly and routinely baptized under the same conditions as anyone else. As the rite for baptism of children provides, these

(Missouri) , A. I wish I could say I was astounded by this' letter, but unfortunately I was not. The misconceptions it reveals, especially in the first part, are shared by an unbelieva61y huge number of Catholics, as By Father well as Christians of other John J. Dietzen faiths. I don't blame the writer for what he leamed, of course, and conditions include appropriate I'm glad he wrote. But how did we practice of their faith by the ever manage to convey such a Catholic parents, well-founded weird image of a God who treats hope that the parents will nourish the child's faith properly in people well or badly because of how other people behave? coming years and so on. Formerly, illegitimacy was an Whatever sin or wrong the parents may have done, God does impediment to holy orders and to not treat their children any entrance into at least some differently or love them any less religious communities. Dispensation from this impediment, than he does the rest of us. In fact, however, was easy and common, if Jesus always shows, as he does, an exceptional care toward those if other requirements were met. Today, the impediment of in greater need, the social pain and financial hardships that often illegitimacy no longer exists in accompany the birth of children Church law. whose parents are not married Q. We call Jesus Christ the might suggest that God has a Prince of Peace and often sing special place in his heart for these the prayer of St. Francis, "Make children and their families. me an instrument of your At any'rate, the Church has no peace." In light of this, how do

Questions and Answers

we interpret the words of Jesus in Matthew (10:34-36) that he has come not to spread peace but division, even dividing families in their relationships with each other. What in the world does that mean? (Michigan) A. The traditional, perhaps somewhat obvious, understanding of this passage and the similar one, in Luke (12:51-53) is that the decision whether or not to accept Jesus and his teaching will divide people, even members of the same family. Jesus himself is, of course, the primary proof of that fact. While he taught that the kingdom of God would be one of peace and reconciliation, his very proclamation of that kingdom inflamed the emotions of people who did not wish to accept it. Since the decisions we are invited to make about God's kingdom require resolution and total commitment, it is inevitable that the process will be divisive, until its final fulfillment. Yet, even in these painful conflicts Jesus calls us to reconciliation and, forgiveness of our "enemies." As Hither Benedict Viviano, O.P., puts it in his commentary on Matthew, 'The struggle is not a goal in itself, but an inevitable consequence of the absolute allegiance Jesus claims from his disciples" ("New Jerome Biblical Commentary" p. 652).


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Friday, June 27, 2003

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Stories that deserve greater coverage' As policy, I avoid reference to other Catholic columnists, notably George Weigel because he knows the pope personally and uses really long words, a couple of which sent my computer's thesaurus into a long, deep depression, That said, though, Weigel is a good guy, especially when it comes to writing about baseball, which he does about once every other year. The rest of the time he gets into really churchy stuff and drops names like Cardinal Joseph Ralzinger, Father Richard John Neuhaus and Karol Wojtyla (I knew all along it was the pope's real name, but the spelling had me a little off balance.) I. on the other hand, drop the names of my grandchildren, my retired scuba-dive buddy Winston and my neighbor Bud. I mention Weigel, though, because he spoke to a national gathering of Catholic press people in May in Atlanta. There he outlined seven topics he felt held "largely unexplored stories" for the Catholic press: Catholic intellectual life,

popuiar piety, "reform of the reform of the liturgy," impact of the "Catechism of the Catholic Church," new forms of ecumenism, Catholic church gains in the U.S. South and the "shaping of American high

homes. What saints make the best dashboard guardians? Patron saints? Are grandchildren fun travel companions - or after a week on the road does selling them for medical experiments sound good? Are parish parking lots responding to this potential ministry? How has prayer helped these nomads find rest areas, fuel, sewage stations; repair shops, Mass schedules, Wal-Marts? - The delightful chaos in many By Dan Morris multiethnic parishes.. For example, all kinds of new languages are springing up: Spanglish, culture" by converts such as Tagolish, Englimese, Father Neuhaus and "reverts" Rushspaningle, etc. (See, I can such as Supreme Court Justice make my spellchecker develop a Clarence Thomas. twitch, too.) As much as I might disagree - Life in the pews. What are with Weigel on issues surrounding the designated hitter in major the latest pew toys? Should pew league baseball, I had to agree makers develop toddler re. straints? Can the "orans posithese are seven good areas. tion" be considered a snub? At I would like to supplement the sign of peace, should we them with additional topics that say, "Peace," "Peace be with appear to receive little Catholic you," "Peace of Christ" or press ink: "Jesus loves you"? Would it be - Motor homes. An estia sin to say, "Can you hear me mated "whole lot of' - perhaps now?" more - Catholics now spend a - Special blessings. In great deal of their lives in motor

The. offbeat world of

71 addition to traditional blessings of pets, houses and boats, parishes are now sites for blessings of motorcycles, new teen drivers and many other interesting things. This seems worthy of both ink and attention from the hierarchy and maybe even a pastoral letter. - "American Catholic low culture." How are Catholics such as many of you - St.

UNITED NATIONS (CNS) An effort to develop an international convention on the rights of people with disabilities got Vatican support in a recent statement. 'These persons are rich in humanity," said Archbishop Celestino Migliore, nuncio to the United Nations. "Each has rights and duties like every other human being." He said disability was "a place where normality and stereotypes are challenged," and where society was moved to see "that crucial point at which the human person is fully himself or herself." In 1975, the U.N. General Assembly adopted a Declaration on the Rights of Disabled Persons. But, unlike a declaration, a convention for countries ratifying it would carry the force of internationallaw. At the initiative of Mexico, the General Assembly adopted a resolution in 200 I to set up a committee charged with exploring the pos.sibility of producing a convention. Meeting June 16-27 at U.N. headquarters in New York, the committee found most speakers supportive of the convention proposal. And its sessions took place with a large number of wheelchair users in the room and in the corridors outside. Dzidek Kedzia, speaking for the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, put the number of disabled persons worldwide at 600 million, and said a study by the office of the commissioner found

U.N. human rights instruments had "not been fully used so far" to support their rights. The study concluded that the idea of a convention "should be explored," he said. The Vatican representative said

a person with disabilities had "every right to be a subject and an active agent in the everyday affairs of human existence," and that the Mexican proposal seemed designed to achieve this goal.

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Vincent volunteers, CCD teachers, visitors of shut-ins, parents, etc. - influencing how this nation and our Catholic community thrive? Actually, a lot of these latter stories do see some ink. And, one hopes, wi1l see a lot more. I know Weigel would agree.

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SANTO CHRISTO FEAST COLUMBIA STREO FAlLRIIER The Santo Christo Feast, on Columbia Street is the first summer feast in the city of Fall River - which is presently celebrating its bicentennial year. Santo Christo Parish - Mother Church of all Portuguese Parishes in the Fall River area, is an integral part of the history of our city.

PARISH PROGRAM 2003 SATUROAY, JUNE 28 6PM OUTSIDEMASS-AND TRANSFER OF THE IMAGE ofSanto

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Christo from Church to the St. Anthony Plaza located at the east ofthe Church, where a Solemn Celebration ofthe Eucharist will take place. The main celebrant will be the Pastor Emeritus of Santo Christo, Msgr. Antonino da Costa Tavares. Our Preacher will be Rev. Jose Paulo Machado, Pastor in Santa • Clara - Ponta Delgada, Stio Miguel; FOLLOWED BY PROCESSION. ROUTE: Canal/Ferry / Mulberry / William / Grant, to Church. IPMII Mldnllbt: FEAST ACTIVITIES with a presentation by the group "Jack Sebastitio," and a presentation by the Folklore Group "Associaftio Lusitanea" of Fall River.

SlTUROAtJUNE2. 4PM SOLEMN PROCESSION. Participating will be several priests, civic authorities, business leaders, cultural, civic & sporting organizations. ROUTE: Columbia / Washington / William / Mulberry / Division / Broadway / Columbia, to the Church. 8:301111PM FEAST ACTIVITIES with a presentation by Nelia and her group.

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Fall River diocese marks its centennial

The following are ih~A~it in a series of h~Jorical sketches ofthe parishescQnipris~ng the Diocese of Fall River, founded in 1904. The series will run in chronological order from oldest .tonew~stparish, according to diocesan archives, concluding in March, 2004, the centennial anniversary of the diocese. Please note that ALL parish histories will run 'in the order they were founded'~ includ~ng parishes that have been suppressed or merg~d. Histories ofmerged parishes will run according to the time-line.

,'St. Michael's Parish, 'Fall River FALL RIVER - By the late IIi 1898, instead of using the per church on the existing. base1890s,' the City of Fall River basement church, Masses were ment church. watched as the banks of the, celebrated at nearby St. Mathieu路 - The Gothic style church with Taunton River became home to Church at St. Mary and;~ Spanish accents,was dedicated on many people who left their native Wellington streets. Dec. 3, 1,922. Azorean Islands in Portugal in On Feb. 28, 1902, Father Jose Father Ferraz also reached out time of extreme poverty to seek a Constantino Flores, assistant at to minister to the people of new life and new opportunities. Santo Christo, was named the first Assonet who had no parish, and The first Portuguese Catholic pastor of St. Michael Parish, with also to the people of Somerset. community in all of North' a congregation ,of 1;800. He built who also p,ad no churcho{their America was founded in 1872 in a rectory and it was ready by Dec. own. Through his efforts, St. th"lwhaling city of New Bedford. 4, 1902. Unfortunately, Father Bernard's was established' in Shortly after, priests from St. John Flores only lived in the house for Assonet and St. John of God in the Baptist Parish there would one day. He was stricken was ap- ,Somerset. pack their bags and travel on the pendicitis on December 5 and Father Ferraz purchased the weekends to Fall River, to the died two days later at the age of, former Fulton School from the Parish of Santo Cristo dos 40. City of Fall River ,in 1930 and Milagres on Columbia Street. Father Manuel Cipriano Grillo with the assistance of the Holy In 1896, when Father Candido was the next pastor as the Fall Union Sisters Iounded a parish d' Avila Martins was pastor of River diocese came into being in school. In' 1934, the Lindsey Santo Christo, he listened with 1904 with Bishop William Stang Street School was donated to the concern to the needs of the many, at the helm. parish and became its second Portuguese immigrants settled in On Labor Day in 1910 the school building. the Bowenville neighborhood in 'feast of St. Michael was celFather Ferraz was named a the city's North, End. He re- ebrated by the parish for the first monsignor and when he died in quested Bishop Matthew Harkins time. Father Grillo organized a 1944 was succeeded by Father ': of Providence, whose diocese in- Sacred Heart Society, Holy Ro- Augusto Leal Furtado, pastor of , eluded Fall River, that a new sary Society and the Daughters of St. John of God Parish in chl,lrch be built .for those in Mary. Somerset. After six months he Bowenville. When Father Grillo rem'11ed to' was replaced by FatherJoseph ~. A basement ctIurch was built the Azores in 1913, Father Silvia in 1944. ' and its cornerstone blessed on Christiano de Jesus Borges beFather Silvia restored the May 30, '1896: ,Father路 Francisco,., came, pastor and began planning parish's financial stability as well; Silveira Mesquita, it native of Pieo for a new church. Father John de as its spiritual growth and forma-:", in the Azores, became pastor of Fontes Ferraz succeeded him in tion. He died in 1955 at the age::!' ,Santo Christo and was'respon- 1917. It was decided not to build of 55. " sible for the ','mission church." new church, but to build an upTum to page 13 - St. Michael

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Our Lady of Mount Carmel Parish, New Bedford NEW BEDFORD - From the founding of the United States as anation, there has been contact between America and Portugal and their peoples. At first, this contact was mostly diplomatic. But later, lured by the possibilities of a "better life," this contact came largely in the form of immigration. Drawn initially by work in the whaling 'industry andlater by work in the textile mills, theseimmigrants have brought to the American "mosaic" a richness that is distinctively Portuguese, In New Bedford, as the numbers of Portuguese immigrants grew, so did the need for their pastoral care. The first Portuguese Catholic Church in America, St. John the Baptist, was established in 1871. But by the beginning of the next century, the Portuguese pbpulation in the South End required a new parish. ' On Sept. 5, 1902, Father Jose Duarte Nunes, a native of Terceira Island in the Azores, became the first pastor of the new congregation. Father Nunes bought a tract of land on Rivet Street between Crapo and Bonney streets for the proposed church and dedicated the parish to the honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary under the title, Our Lady of Mount Carmel. The first parish census listed 606 families, comprising , 2,749 souls. With generous cooperation from his parishioners'and great personal sacrifice, Father Nunes labored to establish a solid beginning for the new parish. Eventually, however, his health broke and on Dec. 7, 1907 he resigned as pastor. On that same day, Father Antonio Pacheco Vieira became the second pastor. A native of St. Michael, Azores, he would be made a monsignor and remain at the helm for the next 56 years, still one of the longest pastorates in American Catholic history. Under his leadership, the par-

ish founded an elementary school, staffed in 1941 by the Sisters of St. Dorothy. Among the most beloved members of this Congregation were Sister Margaret Walsh (at Mt. Carmel from 1947-1992) who was the first U.S. born vocation to her Congregation, and Sister Aurora Avelar (at Mt. Carmel 1963-1997), who worked extensively with the immigrants and the poor. Besides running the school, the Sisters were involved in many other good works. In 1953, when their ne~ convent was completed, the old convent became the parish CYO Center. Msgr. Vieira's remarkable pastorate ended with 'his death on Good Friday, March 27,1964. At the age of98, he was acknowledged to be the oldest, active priestin the United States. That same spring, Father Jose Maria de Bettencourt e Avila became the third pastor. A native of Sr. George's, the Azores, he brought the parish through the wide-ranging changes initiated by Vatican II. He also attended to the needs of a new wave of Portuguese immigrants that swelled the parish membership to more than 15,000. III health and the mounting pressure of these responsibilities led to his retirement on Jan. 31, 1974. A native son of the parish, Father Luiz Gonzaga Mendonca, vicar general of the diocese, became the fourth pas,tor. The thorough renovation of the church occurred during his pastorate. Upon Msgr. Mendonca's retirement on June 15, 1994, Father Henry Arruda became the fifth pastor and continued as pastor for seven years, until succeeded by Father John J. Oliveira in 2001. Father Oliveira is the current pastor and Fathers Michael M. Camara and Kevin A. Cook are the parochial Turn to page 13 - Mt. Carmel


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Watch out, GI Joe and Barbie:~ Dolls of saints, Jesus now selling WASHINGTON (CNS) - Can toys possibly of- hasn't gone back to it since. fer a religious message? ,I A few months after her friend's death, while laThree Catholic 'women from different parts of the II).enting the lack of first Communion gifts, O'Toole country seem to think so. They each recently began began researching the possibility of producing and marketing toy dolls of Jesus or the saints. marketing saint dolls. Harriet Rich in Oswego, Ill., came up with her idea ' She initially created a porcelain prototype doll of of .. ;"sus doll as a more appropriate toy for young St. Jerome but rejected it because it was breakable. children to bring to church after she saw a child trot "What good is it for kids if it sits on a shelf?" she out a Teenage Mutant Ninja Thrtle and a hot pink troll thought. So she started looking for alternative matedoll in the pew in front of her one Sunday at Mass. rials and eventually came up with a formula that proTeri O'Toole and her sister in the Los Angeles Arch- duces touchable and natural-looking "skin." diocese thought up saint dolls after being disappointed Now, on dollmaking days, O'Toole and her 16with the lack of year-old niece, Saimaginative first rah Morton, pour Communion gifts. the rubber-type And Mo Homer, mixture into molds from Omaha, Neb., in a labor-intensive also came up with manufacturing prothe idea of a Jesus cess done in the gadoll when she rage. PATRICK MCQUEEN OF Notre Dame High School in looked for a toy her On a good day, Utica, N.Y., wrote a Pro-Life letter to Sen. Hillary Rodham toddler could sleep the two women can with that would go produce 24 heads, Clinton, D-N.Y., in support of banning partial-birth abortion. along with the stowhich O'Toole (CNS photo by Paul Finch, Catholic Sun) ries she often read to paints individually her child at night. by hand to resemble Rich, a granda number of historimother and an accal holy figures complished seamsuch as Moses, stress from St. Anne Mary and the Baby By HOWIE MANSRELD Parish in Oswego, miserably. I only hope that the Jesus, St. Francis of CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE originally thought of Lord will have mercy on you and Assisi, St. Joan of designing a Jesus UTICA, N.Y. - Standing up your fellow pro-choice colArc, St. Juan Diego, doll with an accom( Blessed' Kateri for one's values can be daunting, leagues." panying storybook McQueen said his parents, Tekakwitha and especially in high school, but 16~: nine years ago. But Mother Teresa, year-old Patrick McQueen holds Bob and Christine McQueen, alafter trying unsucstrong to his Pro-Life position, ways talk about issues with him. , among others. cessfully to 'market ' "They are both very Pro-Life The finished despite what others might say. the product to m~or As part of a recent assignment and when a political election heads, hands and toy companies for feet are .later as- for global studies class, comes up, one of the first quesfour years, she put sembled onto poly- McQueen, a sophomore at Notre tions they ask is whether they are her 22-inch Jesus in filled bodies stored Dame High School in Utica, Pro-Life or pro-choice," he said a box. in the bam behind wrote a letter to U.S. Sen. Hillary in an interview with The CathoFour years later, the family home in Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y., in sup- lic Sun, newspaper of the Syraher daughter Rose Lemon Heights, port of banning partial-birth abor- cuse diocese. "They have always Krolak, a parishiotion. influenced me." Calif. TERI O'TOOLE, creator of the "Soft Saint"line of reliner at St. Joan of Arc "To oppose a bill banning parThe learning atmosphere at Many of the 18Parish in Lisle who gious collectable dolls, displays her Joseph and Mary inch dolls have ac- tial-birth abortion is both inhu- Notre Dame has allowed started her own busi- with the Infant Jesus creations. From her home in Lemon cessories such as ro- mane and un-Christian. How can McQueen to grow in his under-!!e_~~ cre~ting educa- Heights, Calif., she and members of her family make the saries. St. Michael you possibly call yourself a Chris- standing of his Catholic faith, he tional Jlds, told her toys by hand. (CNS photo by Paula Doyle, The Tidings) the Archangel doll tian if you support a woman's said. "People here make it easier mom she would has a shield that right to choose, especially in such to talk about the tough issues. Not a brutal manner?" wrote everyone is Catholic here, but we help her with the doll project. doubles as a detachable pin. Krolak helped her mother create a transfer pattern O'Toole told The TIdings, newspaper of the Los McQueen, a parishioner of St. share similar values," he said. "We can have ,discussions and for the doll's face, which was originally hand-painted Angeles Archdiocese, that eventually she plans to Anne's Church in Whitesboro. "For a mother to use the ex- disagree." ," by Rich, and advised her to reduce the doll's size to create puppet versions of the dolls and cloth Peter Troy, global studies 16 inches and make the storybook into a four-by-five- storybooks on the lives of the saints. Ten percent of cuse that she can't afford a child inch pamphlet that could be run off on the computer. the profits from the sale of each doll is donated to a right now, or isn't ready to take teacher at Notre Dame, said Rich said once her business started rolling her hus- charity based on a charism or characteristic of the responsibility (for) parenthood, is McQueen is not afraid to stand up band, Bill, took over the computer work, in addition depicted saint. ' , totally unacceptable. These young for his beliefs. "Patrick always to constructing and cutting out all of her templates and Horner, who attends St. Cecilia Cathedral in mothers and fathers must be able asks very diverse questions about patterns and airbrushing each doll's sandals. The re- Omaha, created a 16-inch plush doll called the Jesus to accept the consequences of the issues," Troy said. "He has a good grasp of so many complex tired couple. invested $1.,000 in th~ doll company they Hugs Me doll after brainstorming with her sister while their actions," he added. McQueen said the issue of topics for such a young guy. He's vacationing a few years ago. named Lovmg ExpreSSions of Faith. "At first I was very skeptical," her husband told the By the end of their vacation, they had created a abortion really hits home for hirit. a bright kid. He's very gregarious Catholic Explorer, newspaper of the Diocese of Joliet, business plan and had a rough idea of what the doll He is an adopted child and feels and mixes well with others in this fortunate that his birth mother school." Ill. "But I think it's a good idea, I really do. It would would look like. McQueen is also a member of be nice if kids had something like this, maybe they According to a report by the Omaha World Her- chose to carry him to term and not would be more interested in church." ald, the sisters then sent their idea to a dollmaker and have an abortion, he explained in the school's varsity soccer team and Junior ROTC program. 'The real message of this doll is God's love and his took the prototype to an Omaha company that helped the letter. "Although I do not know my Through ROTC, McQueen has mercy," said Harriet Rich, noting that it is also "a tan- refine the pattern and find a manufacturer. gible symbol of hope, something you can hold onto." The doll also is sold with an accompanying board birth mother, I thank her every volunteered his time at various She said her favorite part of the doll is Jesus' "sweet book, titled "Jesus and the Miracle of the Loaves and day, through prayer, for giving me nursing homes and facilities. The face!'-;&! "reassuring smile." Fishes." A portion of the profits is donated to the gift of life," he wrote to entire ROTC experience has Clinton. "As a Christian, an given him a taste of what to ex"I \hink that's what we all need to see, that other children's charities. side of hini: his humanity and his gentleness," she The dolls may be purchased as follows. Harriet adopted child and a person, I am peer from military life. "I would like to go into the Rich's Jesus' dolls, 630-554-6723, or E-mail appalled by your decision to opadded. O'Toole, 49, who recently began producing saint hbrich@yahoo.com. Teri O'Toole's saint dolls are pose the bill banning partial-birth Navy after high school, probably dolls, previously ran her own business as a digital available online at: www.softsaints.com. The Jesus abortion. You' have been afforded focusing on science," McQueen graphics designer, creating artwork for high-end po- Hugs Me dolls are available online at: the wonderful opportunity to said. "A Catholic person can still litical and corporate clients. But a few years ago she www.LynnLeeToys.com. or by calling 866-762- make a difference in this world, be in the Navy and hold on to their to set a standard, and have failed values." closed the business to care for a dying friend and she 6362.

High school student chastises senator on partial-birth abortion

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Catholic Oscar-winning actor's death mourned By CATliOUC NEWS SERVICE

SOPHIE MARCEAU and Luke Wilson star in a scene from Warner Brothers' "Alex & Emma." (eNS photo from Warner Brothers)

eNS movie review: 'Alex & Emma'

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played by Wilson), a lovelorn writer whose finicky tastes for amour are tom between an alluring French tart (Sophie Marceau) and her chiIdren's apple-pie au pair, Anna (also played by Hudson). Of course viewers don't have to read the last page to see how this one will tum out, as life begins to imitate art and the wordsmith finds himself falling in love with his girl Friday, leading to misty-eyed epiphanies ~ it wasn't writer's block but "commitment block" and the like. Wilson, known more for his bone-dry humor, seems uncomfortable wearing the romantic lead mantle - though his is not nearly as implausible a stretch as asking viewers to believe that Hudson, who sashays through the film batting her eyelashes and pouting her lips, is hard up to find a boyfriend. Unlike his earlier witty manifesto on modem sexual politics; "When Harry Met Sally," Reiner here breaks one of the cardinal rules of the genre by not placing enough roadblocks - or even potholes on Alex and Emma's byway to bliss. Their relationship is' without obstacles and is never really in jeopardy - with the exception of a plot twist thrown in late in the game divesting the narrative of any doubt as to whether they will stroll off into the end-eredit sunset together. "Alex & Emma" was loosely inspired by the lore surrounding Feodor Dostoevski's novella "The Gambler." Deep in debt from gambling, the Russian novelist was faced with forfeiting to his publisher all rights to his past and future works unless he could deliver a new book within 30 days. The story goes that he hired a stenographer. With her help he finished the book, falling in love with her in the process. Due to sexual situations, including a shadowy sexual encounter, minimal violence and some profanity, the USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is A-Ill - adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG13 - parents are strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

NEW YORK (CNS) - Forced by gambling debts to write a best seller in 30 days or pay dire consequences, a frustrated novelist falls for the per~y stenographer he hires to take dictation in the leaden "Alex & Emma" (Wamer Bros.). Billed as a romantic comedy, this unsatisfying yawner directed by Rob Reiner lacks both romance and comedy, exacerbated by floundering performances by the two moonstruck leads, who have about all the onscreen chemistry as a pair of wet socks. Alex Sheldon (Luke Wilson) is an author suffering from that most debilitating ailment: scriptorus blochophrania - in layman's terms, writer's block. Considering the fact that he is flat broke and owes some Cuban kingpin $100,000, this creative impotence could not have come at a worse time. Denied any further advances by his publisher (Reiner), the only way he can get the money to pay off the loan sharks is to complete his tome - which in its current manuscript form consists of only one sentence. Having already lost a writer's most treasured"commodity - his laptop - to the increasingly impatient thugs, and faced with the reality of losing a slightly less valued asset (his life), Alex cuts a deal to buy a 30-day extension with the . understanding that failure to pay up will give a whole new meaning to "deadline." With a firm belief that necessity is the mother of invention - or at least the aunt of 400 pages - Alex employs the services of Emma Dinsmore (Kate Hudson), an opinionated dish with excellent typing skills but little luck in the relationship department. . His muse recharged,Alex begins to dictate his great American novel to Emma, who chimes in with pithy comments that force him to exercise new muscles in both his head and his heart. For the remainder of the film, the·narrative seesaws between these typing sessions and scenes of the fictitious world of Alex's story which mirror the main plot in some way. The "Great Gatsby"-esque novel revolves around Adam Shipley (also

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Peck also shone in roles that ranged from Audrey LOS ANGELES - The passing of Catholic actor . Hepburn's romantic interest in "Roman Holiday" to Gregory Peck, who died June 12 at age 87 in his Los Josef Mengele in "The Boys From BraziL" Already established in Hollywood, Peck lent his Angeles home, is being mourned in Hollywood and talents to the "Family Theater" radio drama at!,tho]ogy elsewhere. "As epitomized in his role as AtticusFinch in 'To mounted in the 1940s and '50s by Father Parrrck....~ ~~ ~ Kill a Mockingbird,' Gregory Peck embodied both in. Peyton, the Holy Cross priest who also advocated that ,. his personal and professional character a strong moral families pray the rosary together.' presence which will be sorely missed in the entertain. Although his film career had largely wound ~own ment industry," said Gerri Pare, director of the U.S. - he made no more than five movies a decade from the 1970s on - Peck's career bishops' New York-based Of- ,.......",.........., enjoyed a bit of a renaissance in fice for Film & Broadcasting. In Los Angeles at the Ca1995, shortly before he turned thedral of Our Lady of the An80. Catholics in Media Associates honored him with a lifetime gels, Cardinal Roger M. rrr~~_.J .achievement award that year. Mahony led a memorial service Also. in 1995, Christian for Peck, who won a Best Ac- 1"',,,.............. Brother Patrick Molyneaux tor Academy Award for his part 1Ih--f~ in 'To Kill a Mockingbird." published a biography of Peck, . The service, which followed ~;;;;F:-·"" "Gregory Peck: A Bio-Bibliography." The book told how Peck a small private burial, included prayers, music, readings from won America's highest civilian. Scripture and spoken memoriaward, {he Medal of Freedom, als to the actor, according to an and offered a glimpse into archdiocesan announcement. Peck's relationship with Presi\ Peck, who was born in La dent Lyndon B. Johnson after \ Peck co-founded the National Jolla, Calif., and began his acting career on the New York Endowment for the Arts and the stage while still in his teens, American Film Institute. was featured in dozens of movIn the late '90s Peck took to ies, more often then not playthe road, doing a one-man show ing men of great dignity. that offered a retrospective on Pare's predecessor as direchis acting career. tor of the bishops' film office, In an interview with T.he Henry Herx ranked a 1950s' ACTOR GREGORY Peck as coun- Catholic Sun. newspaper of the Peck film, ~'The Gunfighter," as try lawyer.Atticus Finch in the 1962 Diocese ofSyracuse, N.Y., Peck the sixth-best western of the' film "To Kill a Mockingbird." said he learned about order and 20th century. Of the top 10 . discipline "early on," thanks to westerns chosen by Herx, "The Gunfighter" was the the Church; he had been a student at St. John's Milionly one classified A-I - general audiences - by tary Academy in Los Angeles, run by the Irish Sisters the office. of Mercy. He briefly considered becoming a priest. Other Peck starring roles included his portrayal of "I believe in discipline and order each day, but also . a young Scottish missionary in 'The Keys of the King- time for play and foolishness," Peck added. dom," a crusading journalist ferreting out antiHe had narrated a 20-hour audio version of the Bible, Semitism in "Gentleman's Agreement," a husband and which eamed him a Grarnmy nomination in 1995. father trying to protect his family in the original 1961 ~ Peck's first marriage ended in divorce. He is surversion of "Cape Fear," and a host of military and vived by his second wife of 49 years, Veronique, and seagoing men in such films as "Twelve O'Clock by two children from his first marriage and two from High," "Captain Horatio Hornblower," "Moby Dick," . his second. A son from his first marriage committoo--"MacArthur" and "Pork-Chop Hill." suicide in 1978. . .-- -4

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immoral conduct of its characters, . USCCB Office tor Film & Broadremedied somewhat by its under- casting classification is A-IV lying theme of forgiveness. Sev- adults, with reservations. The eral sexual encounters with nudity Motion Picture Association of and an ambivalent attitude toward America rating is R - restricted. adultery. The USCCB Office for "Nowhere in Africa" . Film & Broadcasting classification (Zeitgeist) is A-IV - adults, with reservaAbsorbing drama set in 1938 tions. The Motion Picture Associa- about a Jewish couple (Merab tion of America rating is R - re- Ninidze and Juliane Kohler) and stricted. their young daughter (Lea Kurka) "The Legend of Suriyothai" who are forced to flee their home (Sony Classics) in Germany and relocate to a reLavish historical epic about mote farm in Kenya to escape Nazi Queen Suriyothai (M.L. Piyapas persecution. BeautifUlly filmed, Bhirombhakdi), the heroic first writer-director Caroline Link's lady of medieval Siam who died period piece weaves together variin battle, valiantly trying to save ous events in the self-exiled her people from Burmese invad- . family's lives as each character ers. Directed by Chatrichalerm struggles with questions of idenYukol, the visually sumptuous tity, love and loyalty to eacR-:6ilier film is weighed down by a cum- and country. Subtitles:=S6me bersome, at times tedious, narra- sexual encounters, an implied aftive,heavy doses of brutality and fair, fleeting nudity, a few disturba myriad of characters with exotic ing moments and an instance of names which change throughout, crass language. The USCCB 'Ofmaking it difficult to keep score. fice for Film & Broadcasting clasSubtitles. Recurring gory violence, sification is A-III - adults. Not on and off the battlefield, as well rated by the Motion Picture Assoas some fleeting nudity. The ciation of America.

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tCClIV~ulll(e~ NEW YORK (CNS) - The following are capsule reviews of movies recently reviewed by the Office for Film & Broadcasting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

"The Heart of Me" (Thinkfilm) Emotionally complex period melodrama about a strait-laced Englishman (Paul Bettany) enmeshed in a love triangle with his repressed socialite wife (Olivia Williams) and her bohemian sister (Helena Bonham Carter). Despite nuanced performances, the film,. directed by· Thaddeus O'Sullivan, is weakened by a pervasive ambivalence regarding the

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Friday, June ·21~12003··

;

Appeal

St. Anne: $200-Peter & of Charity of Quebec; $400-M/ ters of Isabella, M/M James M. M Donald W. Johnson; $100-M/ Burke, M/M Joseph Giordano, Continued from page one Lynne Silvia. St. Joseph: $100-M/M Den- M James Holmes, M/M George M/M Wayne Casey, M/M ffionald Viveiros. Day. I Some promotional initiatives ganization in the parochial com- nis J. Hickey. NORTH FALMOUTH I Our Lady of the AssumpSt. Michael: $1,000-St. were introduced this year as well, munity. St. Elizabeth Seton: $1,000including unprecedented use of , There are so many noteworthy Michael Federal Credit Union; tion: $200-Lawrence Drayton; $100-M/M John Oliveira, M/M M/M Raymond Ivaska, S~. Eliza$100-Alfredo Alves. brief, hard-hitting commercials individual highlights among the SS. Peter and Paul: $100- Julio DePina, M/M Richard beth Seton Men's Cluth, M/M on cable television and longer parishes of the diocese that offiHugh O'Doherty; $50b-M/M infomercials graciously aired by cials at Headquarters were loathe Sts. Peter and Paul Women's Rocha, M/M Herbert Turner. Dominic DiMartino, M/M FloOur Lady of Mount Carmel: Club. local media outlets. to attempt to identify them all. $160-A Friend; $100-M/M rence McCarthy; $40,0-M/M St. Stanislaus: $1,500-M/M "The more our story can be told Msgr. Harrington did promise Domingos Arruda, Violante Leonard Roberge; $300-M/M Ed to prospective donors, the greater that as staff analysis of the over- Thomas Pasternak-Walsh Phar- Pimentel. Coye; $250-M/M Richard Giere, macy; $1,200-M/M John appreciation people have of what all returns is completed, further St. John the Baptist: Jean Langley, M/M Vincent Hadfield; $550-M/M Louis is being accomplished by our agen- news will be forthcoming. Mazurek; $500-A Friend; $250- $1,500-St. John's Cemetery; Robinson, M/M John Sullivan; cies," Msgr. Hanington speculated. "And," he concluded, "after Gail & Michael Noonan; $200-M/ $750-M/M Timothy J. Lopes; $150-M/M Edward Gibbs, M/M Donly concurred, noting that the th'is year's satisfactory cam- M Robert Gaw, Anne Joerres, M/ $200-Robin Santos; $125-M/M George Gillis; $125-M/M Joseph exceptional return which contribu- paigns, we'll have lots of great M Thomas Drewett, M/M Rob- Alberto Pereira; $100-Alda Tamucci; $100-M/M Hobert tors can count on, with 94 cents out stories to tell." ert Wilbur, M/M Michael Medeiros, M/M Dimas Farias, Bouchie, M/M Robert Connell, of every dollar given going di~ctly Both he and Donly echoed Banalewicz; $100-Julie Hilda Couto/M. Joaquim Mouco, Ed Hannon, Florence Leary, M/ to service, appears to attract gener- Bishop-Elect Coleman's heartfelt Bresowar, M/M Walter M/M Jose C. Pacheco, Anony- M Charles LoGiudice, Robert mous, In Thanksgiving, A Friend. McCusker, M/M Kevin O~Neil, M/ ous support. expressions of gratitude for all Wisniewski. St. Joseph-St. Therese: M James Orphanos, M/M RichAt one of the far-flung posts who have helped to make the Santo Christo: $500-Santo ard Renwick, Mary Riley. in the diocese, an increase of 100 2003 Catholic Charities Appeal Christo Faith Formation; $300- $1,OOO-Leonard Kane. NORTo'N St. Kilian: $100-ln Memory percent over last year's level of such an overwhelming success, M/M Alberto Tavares; $100St. Mary: $100-M/M Paul of Fernandes Marcondes. ',. giving was registered. Father citing the office staff at Headquar- Susana Lopes. . St. Lawrence: $1,000-St. Varnum. HYANNIS Henry Dahl, pastor of St. Peter the ters, the parish chairmen and OSTERVILLE St. Francis Xavier: $1,000- Vincent de Paul Society, Verna Apostle Parish, Provincetown, committees, parish secretaries, Our Lady of the Assumpwhere returns of$14,437 doubled often the vital link in the program, Sherman Rogean; $500-M/M Galvin; $150-M/M Philip Beard, tion: $300-M/M Feliz D'Olimpio, Charles Touhey; $'125M/M John Garrahan; $350-Marie the $7,262 amount of 2002, attrib- and the tens of thousands of doM/M Louis McKnight; $100-M/M Suzanne Sullivan; $100-M/M McKenzie; $250-M/M Richard uted a measure of the success· to nors who've responded with such Fred M. Bean. James F. Costa, M/M' David F. implementation of time-tested exceptional generosity to the in- Peckham; $200-M/M David POCASSET Lopes, Kathleen M. Manning, M/ procedures such as instituting a vitation to help those needy indi- Selfe, M/M Lucien Poyant, Jr., M/ M Paul Baptista, M/M Mauel St. John the Evangelist: M Charles Hurley, M/M Barry, second-mailing approach to do- viduals and families "who come $800-ln Memoriam; $100-M/M Jorge Bosch; $150-John &' Lima. , nors and improving efforts at or- to us for assistance." St. Mary: $160-M/M David J. Timothy Andrade. Patricia Bowen, Jannette & Larry' PROVINCETOWN· Cleveland; $125-John Arribada; $100-M/M Eric R. St. Peter the Apostle: $100Alberghini; $110-Helen Corrie, M/M Paul Correia. Francis Peters. NORTH ATTLEBORO McGrath; $100-Ed Bennett, RAYNHAM Sacred Heart: $160-David Rose & Germaine Bouchard, St. Ann: $400-M/M Mark Mrs. Ida Brown, Mrs. Charles Dey; $100-M/M John Calautti. St. Mark: $250-Charles & Karsner; $300-M/M Stuart Logan, M/M Richard Corbin, O'Brien; $225-M/M David Dorothy L. Ellis, Dorothy Loretta Roland. McCormack; $1 OO-M/M Richard St. Mary: $2,OOO-Ryan & Hughes, Patricia Holland, PARISHES Ponchito Mangahas Family, M/ Deana Welter; $1,600-St. Kellogg, M/M John Moran, M/M Dean, M/M Timothy P. Garrity, M Robert Marining, Mary M. Vincent de Paul Society- Gordon Riordan, M/M James ATTLEBORO St. John the Evangelist: M/M Albert R. Guiod, M/M Tho- Manwaring, M/M Shane Peros, Attleboro District Council; Williamson, M/M David Yelle. $500-M/M Thomas DeMarco, mas L. Hennigan, Mrs. Anna M/M Robert Saunders, M/M $1,OOO-M/M Donald McHoul; SEEKONK Del Malloy; $300-M/M Douglas Huber, Dr/M William Johnston, Robert Stauble, Mrs. Helen $125-M/M Stanley Prokop; Our Lady of Mount Carmel: Strott; $250-M/M Paul Fournier, M/M James McAuley, M/M Rich- Bolderson, M/M James Hegarty. $100-M/M David Belskis, M/M $1,100-M/M Richard Laporte; M/M Paul Roque; $200-M/M ard R. Perella, M/M Costantino Stephen Bengtson, M/M Joseph $1,OOO-M/M Andrew Mihailides; MANSFIELD Daniel Blake, Mildred Kelley, In Sabatini, M. Joyce Sampson, M/ Clayton, M/M Charles Sedlack. $525-M/M Stephen Oliver; $200St. Mary: $1,OOO-M/M Karl Memory of Rev. Thomas M Robert C. Scott, Theresa Tay- Clemmey; $250-M/M Francis M/M Jeremiah O'Connor; $150NORTH DARTMOUTH Mayhew, John McCarron, M/M lor, Beverly A. Waage. M/M Arthur Mello; $120-M/M St. Julie Billiart: $1,OOO-M/ Baldini; $160-M/M Bryan J. Hill; EAST FALMOUTH Anthony Rinaldi; $165-M/M $150-M/M David J. Anacone, M/ M George Silvia; $1 OO-Raymond Christopher O'Halloran; $1 OO-M/ St. Anthony: $140-M/M M Andre J. Charpentier; $125- Barbero, M/M David Thomas, M/ M Raymond DiMeo, Philip Brian Kirby; $150-M/M Gerard LeFrancois, Kevin Manning; Gustav A. Bender; $1 OO-Bella P. Clara J. King; $100-M/M C.M. M Anthony Furtado. Jensen, M/M David Mitchell. $100-M/M Richard Benoit, M/M Rabesa. St. Mary: $400-Russell NORTH EASTON Fillmore, M/M Frederick G. EAST FREETOWN John Caponigro, Irma Ferland; $250-John & Patricia Immaculate Conception: Gibbs, M/M Michael B. Jost, St. John Neumann: $200- Marie E. McGann, M/M David $250-M/M James Griffin; $100- Harwood; $200-A&A Fuel ComFantaccione, M/M Michael Gallagher, M/M Robert Girling, Robert & Teresa St. Jean; $100- Quinlan, Helen Sheehan. M/M Kevin Johnson, Martyn lin- pany; $150-William & Carla M/M James Iwuc, M/M Gregory M/M J. Armand Dupont, M/M Continued on page /3 coln, Mary E. Donovan, DaughMARION Jolly, Helen Lepper, Susan Roger LaFountain, M/M Edward St. Rita: $1,OOO-Stephen & Mahesh, M/M Michael O'Keefe, Boren, Alvin & Shirley Magnett, Connie Heacox; $200-Robert & GiffITl f. $F JEFFREY E. SULLIVAN M/M Raymond Taylor, Lor,i M/M Rickie E. Pacheco. Nancy Hart; $100-Dennis & FUNERAL HOME EAST SANDWICH Wasserman. Bibles • Books • Video Debbie Giokas. 550 Locust Street Music • Gifts • Cards Corpus Christi: $200St. Stephen: $150-Dr/M JoMASHPEE Fall River, Mass. seph Ochab; $100-Mrs. Joan Maureen Doran; $150-M/M John Christ the King: $2,OOO-M/ Lardner; $100-Mrs. Douglas M John Riordan; $1,000-John Hallal, George D. Ringuette. Rose E. Sullivan St. Theresa of the Child Moquin, M/M Russell A. Dellamorte; $500-M/M Richard William J. Sullivan Jesus: $400-M/M Alfred Colo- Carpentier, M/M Robert Nichols, Santangelo, Mrs. John Connor; Margaret M. Sullivan nies; $225-Louis Lacivita; $200- Gloria Pomelli. $400-M/M Jack F. Gurkin; $300508·672·2391 FAIRHAVEN M/M Robert Peloquin; $110Lawrence J. Bennett; $200-M/M St. Joseph: $200-M/M John E. Coughlin, M/M Joseph Anonymous, M/M John FriedPRACTICE THE DEVOTION OF THE FIRST SATURDAYS, lander; $1 OO-Gerard Brousseau, Domenick Nicolaci. Mazzucchelli; $150-M/M Brian St. Mary: $100-M/M John Veroneau; $100-M/M Robert F. M/M Robert Joubert. AS REQUESTED BY OUR LADY OF FATIMA Roderiques, Mrs. Marguerite Paul, M/M Ben Arkinson, Joan BUZZARDS BAY On December 10, 1925, Our Lady appeared to Sister Lucia St. Margaret: $200-Thomas Rudler. Joyce, Violet P. Slate, Rosemary (seer of Fatima) and spoke these words: "Announce in my FALL RIVER & Mary Tully; $100-M. Kelly . Gannon, M/M Kenneth Pedicini, tulme that I promise to assist at the hour ofdeath with the graces St. Mary Cathedral: $100- M/M David Wright, M/M Gerard O'Leary, Victor & Gerri Barrows. necessary for the salvation oftheir souls, all those who 011 the first St. Mary's Cathedral Women's Keen, Anne Antonelli, M/M CENTERVILLE Saturday of five consecutive 1Il0llths shall: Our Lady of Victory: Guild. Ronald E. Primavera, Karlyn A. 1. Go to confession; 2. Receive Holy Comlllllllion; 3. Recite the Holy Name: $200-MlM Mario Curran, Anne A. Tierney. $1,040-Thomas J. Furey III; Rosary (5 decades); and 4. Keep me company for IS minutes while $500-M/M Robert M. Oliveira; $140-M/M Mark MATTAPOISETT meditating on the 15 mysteries ofthe Rosary, with the intention of O'Shaughnessy; $400- Gauvin; $125-M/M Jeffrey St. Anthony: $450-M/M Edmaking reparation to me." Josephine Passamonti; $300- Medeiros; $100-M/M William ward J. Sylvester; $125-M/M In a spirit of reparation, the above conditions are each to be Mrs. Raymond Wynkoop; $200- Keating, Jr., M/M Herman R. Bruce Lemieux; $100-M/M Robpreceded by the words: "In reparation for the offenses Atty/M Don Weber; $150-M/M Mello. ert Carvalho, Patricia Leclair, M/ committed against the Immaculate Heart of Mary:' Sacred Heart: $250-Patricia William Bussiere; $100-John M James Machado. Confessions may be made during 8 days before or after the Antrim, Mrs. Donald Brunelle, M/ M. Healey; $100-Sacred Heart NEW' BEDFORD first Saturday, and Holy Communion may be received at M Dale A. Carlisle, M/M William Seniors, Sacred Heart Women's Holy Name of the Sacred either the morning or evening Mass on the first Saturday. H. Crowley, M/M George E. Guild. Heart of Jesus: $525-Sisters

Catholic Charities Appeal returns

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Publicity Chairmen are asked to submit news items for this column to The Anchor, P.O. Box 7, Fall River, 02722. Name of city or town should be included, as well as full dates of all activities. DEADLINE IS NOON ON FRIDAYS. Events published must be of interest and open to OUT general readership. We do not carry notices of fund-raising activities, which may be advertised at OUT regular rates, obtainable from OUT business offil;e at 508-675-7151. -'roo ',' ATTLEBORO - St. Joseph's Palish has 24-hour EuchaiisticAdoration every day and seeks people to join for an hour or two of prayer. For more information call Pauline L'Heureux at 508-222-7047. FALL RIVER - The Hudner Oncology Center at Saint Anne's Hospital invites area cancer patients to participate in an education and support program to be held Wednesdays from 5-6 p.m. in Room 220 of Clemence Hall. For more information call Mark Theodore at 508-6745600 ext. 2279. NEW BEDFORD - Volunteers are needed· for ttie Donovan House. a transitional home for women and children. Share your time. knowledge and skills. Training and ongoing support will be provided. For more information call Debra Kenney of Catholic Social Selvices at 508-999-5893. NORTH DARTMOUTH ~ A Divorced-Separated Support Group will meet June 30 from 7-9 p.m. at the Family Life Center, 500 Slocum Road. It will include the. video "There's a Spiritual Solu.tion to Every Probtem." For more information call Bob Menard at 508673-2997. NORTH DARTMOUTH-A three-part series entitled "Dreams: Formed, Shattered, Reformed," will

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Friday, June 27, 2003

be held at the Family Life Center, 5.00 Slocum Road July 17, 24 and 31 from 7-9 p.m. For more information call the Office of Family Ministry at 508:999-6420.

NORTH DIGHTON Twenty-four hour Eucharistic adoration will begin July 4 following the 8 a.m. at St. Joseph's Church, 499 Spring Street. It will continue until the 8 a.m. Mass on July 5. ORLEANS -A Separated-Divorced Catholics Support Group will meet Sunday at 7 p.m. at the St. Joan ofArc Palish Center. For more information"call Father Richard Roy at 508-255-0170.. POCASSET - The 10th annual Mass of the Anointing of the Sick will be celebrated Sunday at 2 p.m. at St. John the Evangelist Church, 841 Shore Road. For more information call Betty Kazimer at 508-563-9020. SWANSEA - First Friday daylong Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament will be held July 4 beginning after the 8 a.m. Mass at St. Dominic's Church. It will continue until 6:30 p.m. when a Holy Hour and Benediction will occur. Devotions tq our Blessed Mother follow the 8 a.m. Mass July 5.

BISHOP WILTON D. Gregory, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, looks up as he answers a question during a press conference in St. Louis. At left is Robert S. Bennett, a member of the bishops' National Review Board assigned to monitor how well the bishops deal with sexual abuse and child protection. (CNS photo from Reuters)

u.s. bishops d~scuss Church probleIns, vote on Inajor texts By JERRY FIL':EAU CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

that they "have been magnified to discredit the moral authority of th·e Church." ST. LOUIS - The U.S. Catholic bishops discussed seriThe bishops took a first look WAREHAM -A seven-week ous problems facing the U.S. at two major action items. program held on Thursday nights Church and voted on new direcThey heard an opening presenentitled "Finding New Life," will tories for catechetics and deacon tation on a 357-page "National begin July 10 at 7:30 p.m. at St. . formation at their June 19-21 throttle.'~ Directory for Catechesis." It is Patrick's Church. This Life in the spring meeting in St. Louis. On June 19 more than 30 intended to replace the 1979 diSpirit Seminar is sponsored by the Three of their five half-day members and supporters of the rectory, "Sharing the Light of parish Charismatic Prayer Group. sessions were closed to the me- Survivors' Net~ork of those Faith," taking into account many For more information call Mark. dia, but reporters were briefed on Abused by Priests, including two intervening developments, in-· Cosgrove at 508-291-3086. the general nature and concluding the issuance of a tent of those sessions. new general directory on WEST HARWiCH - The The bishops spent the catechesis by the Holy See. In an address to the bishops at Perpetual Adoration Chapel at Holy whole day behind closed They also heard a presen. Trinity Church, Route 28, invites doors June 20 in structured .their public opening session, Arch- tation on a "National Direcpeople to sign up and spend an hour discussions to reflect on bishop Gabriel Montalvo, papal nun- tory for the Formation, Minor two in prayer. This regional what they regard three of cio to the United States, urged the istry and Life of Permanent chapel ofthe mid-Cape areadepends the highest-priori'ty issues Deacons in the United on the support of people. All ages in the U.S. Church: the bishops to respond with faith, hope States." and charity to the "real problems" . welcome. identity and spirituality of They voted on both diconfronting the U.S. Church. bishops and priests, the derectories but a number of cline in sacramental pracbishops had left the meeting tice and lack of adequate early, so not enough votes faith formation among U.S. mothers of abuse victims who. had were cast for a conclusive deciCatholics, and challenges facing committed suicide, held ~n sion. As a standard procedure, holds degrees from Haverford Catholic laity in ,today's culture. hourlong silent prayer vigil ;in bishops who did not cast a vote College in Pennsylvania, the UniThe day'of r~flection was the Aloe Plaza, across the street from then will be polled by mail to versity of Notre Dame, and the first major step ·in an 18-month the Hyatt Regency Hotel where complete the balloting. Oblate School ofTheology in San process initiated last November to the meeting was taking place. 'J1he The bishopsdeci,ded to unAntonio, Texas. Prior to entering determine whether the bishops .vigil was prompted by the apP~lr- . dertake the development of four Holy Cross, he worked for the should convene: the first plenary· ent attempted suicide in Bos~on new documents: a pastoral letU.S. DepartJ!lent of Energy and council of the U.S. Church since of Patrick McSorley, a sexual ter on the theology of mission the AARP. 1884 and, if they do, what themes abuse victim of defrocked Bos~on in U.S. Catholic schools and Jenkins, a native of Binghamton, and issues it should address. parishes; a statement applying priest John Geoghan. N. Y., hold degrees from King's Bishop Wilton D. Gregory of In an address to the bishops at Catholic social teaching to agCollege in Wilkesbarre, Penn., and Belleville, Ill.; president of the their public opening session, ricultural issues in the face of the University of Notre Dame. A U.S. Conference of Catholic Archbishop Gabriel Montalvo, emerging challenges of biotech. former director of campus minis- Bishops, stressed that the bishops papal nuncio to the United States, nology and global trade; a statetry at St. Joseph's College in South have done a great deal over the urged the bishops to respond ~ith ment offering practical ways of Bend, Ind., he has also served a past 18 months to address the faith, hope and charity to the '.'real improving collaboration beprincipal of St. Patrick's Academy clergy sexual abuse crisis and that problems" confronting the U.S: tween women and clergy in the in Binghamton. He is a member of they are still engaged in that pro- Church. Church; and a statement on the Stonehill College's Resident Life cess. While recognizing that the formation and preparation of Staff. In a report to the bishops June problems are real, he also warned ecc1esial lay ministers.

Congregation of Holy Cross to ordain transitional deacons NORTH EASTON - Seminarians Walter Jenkins and John Reardon, members of the Congregation of Holy Cross, Eastern Province of Priests and Brothers, will be ordained transitional deacons at ceremonies Sunday at II :30 a.m., in Holy Cross Church in South Easton. BishopAndre Richard, C.S.c., archbishop of Moneton in New Brunswick, Canada, will ordain the two men. OJ:! Saturday, Jenkins and Reardon will profess their perpetual vows as Holy Cross religious at a noon ceremony also in Holy Cross Church. Reardon. a native of Scituate,

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21 Archbishop Harry J. Flynn of St. Paul-Minneapolis, chairman of the USCCB Ad Hoc Committee on Sexual Abuse, said the bishops' work to combat clergy sexual abuse of minors since last June has been going "at full


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Friday. June 27, 2003 ;

Continued from page 1 J Dunn, Eleanor Lalime; $100Harold Doran, Pedro &Eduarda Ferreira, Angela Robertson, Fred Siemon, Francis Laliberte, Gerald & Patricia Snee, Henry & Francine Sousa, Thomas & Sherry Ustas. SOMERSET St. Patrick: $249-Susan Darcy; $200-M/M Michael Desmarais; $1 OO-St. Vincent de Paul Society. 51. Thomas More: $250-MI M David W. Molloy, Sr.; $200-MI M'Norman Bessette; $150-Margaret O'Grady; $126-ln Loving Memory of Anne & Arthur Desrosiers & Virginia & Arthur Rebello; $120-Gertrude O'Neil, Eliza Sabra; $100-lsabelle Cabral, John Gaspar, M/M Roger A. Gaspar, Alice Langfield, M/M Daniel' P. McDonald, M/M Andrew Primo, Mrs. George R. Reinhagen. SOUTH EASTON Holy Cross: $100-M/M Michael E. Donovan, M/M Joseph Oliveira. SOUTH YARMOUTH 51. PiusTenth: $2,500-James Dooley; $150-Thomas Murphy.

SWANSEA I St. Michael: $100-M/M Larry Bywell. . TAUNTON Holy Rosary: $100-M/M Gregory Glynn. 51. Jacques: $125-Corinne Wagner; $1 OO-Claire Urbanus. St. Mary: $100-Michael & Christine Costa, Miriam Sullivan, Kenneth Souza, Joseph & Dorothy Nates, Glenn Perkins. St. Paul: $150-St. Paul's Council of Catholic Women; $100-Jacqueline DaSilva, M/M Charles Flynn. WAREHAM 51. Patrick: $1,OOO-Kendrick House; $150-Anna Balano; $100A Friend, Peace in the Holy Land. WELLFLEET Our Lady of Lourdes: $100Maureen E. Corrigan. WEST HARWICH Holy Trinity: $1,1 OO-Deacon/M Dana G. McCarthy; $500M/M JameS,. Brennan; $300Marjorie Tivenan; $250-Philip F. Cacciatore; $150-M/M Stanley Nowak; $100-Hugh & Lynne Drummond, Mary Banks McLean, M/M Richard Pickett, Maria Dane Serena, Lillian F.

St. Michael Father Arthur Cordeiro dos Reis as pastor constructed a new St. Michael School which was dedicated in 1957. Msgr. Humberto Sousa Medeiros, who had grown up in St. Michael's, became its next pastor, continuing the work of his predecessors. He was named Bishop of Brownsville, Texas in 1966. In 1970 he became Archbishop of Boston and was appointed a cardinal in 1970. He died in 1983 at the age of 68. Msgr. Luis G. Mendonca took

WESTPORT Our Lady of Grace: $300M/MJohn MacDonald III; $100M/M Bradford Perkins. St. George: $150-M/M Joseph McConnell, M/M Paul Methot; $100-M/M Tony Francisco, M/M Lawrence Medeiros. St. John the Baptist: $3,100-White's of Westport; $100-M/M Ronald Begin, Angelina Souza, M/M Stephan Gelinas. BUSINESS & COMMUNITY CAPE COD AREA: $1 ,OOO-Holy Trinity Women's Guild, West Harwich; $500-0ur Lady of Victory-Hope Women's Guild, Centerville. . FALL RIVER AREA: $3,OOO-Slade's Ferry Bank. NEW BEDFORD AREA: $500-Perry Funeral Home; $100-Vander Electric & Equipment Company, Inc. NATIONAL: $190-Atty. Patrick K. Cunningham, Lincoln, RI; $100Auburn Construction Company, Inc., Whitman.

Continued from page eight

over the reigns of St. Michael's, established a bilingual school and a night school, and formed a Faith Formation Program. Father Joseph Oliveira replaced him in 1969, and added new life to the Holy Ghost Feast. Father Luciano J. de M. Pereria was the next pastor and established a Youth Ministry Program. When he retired in 1996, Father Luis A. Cardoso, longtime pastor of St. John of God Church, Somerset, was named pastor. He has brought many changes to the

Mt. Carntel vicars. Msgr. Antonino C. Tavares is in residence. Abilio Dos Anjos Pires is the deacon, Dolores Vasconcellos and Mary Beth Laprise are the coordina-

Williams.

Continuedfrom page eight

physical plant and to the spiritual renewal of parish life. Father Luis A. Cardoso is the current pastor and Father Scott A. Ciosek is the parochial vicar. Joseph A. Correia is the director of Faith Formation. The church is located at 189 Essex Street, Fall River, MA 02720. It can be contacted by telephone at 508-6726713; by FAX at 508-679-1841 ; by E-Mail at

rectory@saintrnichaelsparish.org and the Website is www.saintmichaelsparish.org.

DCCW

Continued froll! page one

opted to make DCCW history other women to fulfilllhe longing with the appointment. for srj"ituality through the Church "I see my spiritual moderator and .0 other. She explained that role as providing a prayerful expe- the DCCW can be an important tool rience for the women of the coun- .for enhancing a woman's spiritualcil; offering them spiritual enrich- ity, and should embrace all women. ment; and helping them to ltarn . "We must attract women of all ages how Catholic women can live and and circumstances," said Sister work in the world today," said Sis- Brady. "We should reach out to ter Brady. "Women need a spiritual single mothers, women hurt by the presence in their lives." Church. those on the margins of With an already jam-packed society, everyone. We cannot select schedule, Sister Brady accepted the . only certain women. appointment with joy and anticipa"I see a revolution happening, tion. "I received the full approval and women are realizing that a refrom my religious superior and joy- lationship with God is OK, despite fully said 'yes,'" she continued. their roles as mothers, wives and "Despite being already very busy, career persons. Women like DorI felt the excitement that God was othy Day and Edith Stein are great calling me to one more opportunity models. There were intelligent, to enable women to grow in his motivated persons, who after having tUl1led away from God, chose Spirit." Sister Brady and Ouellette agree to joumey back to Him, and bring that after 50 years the DCCW is still others 'With them." Ouellette told The Anchor that strong and vibrant, and that increasing its membership can only for- while this is a first for the Fall River Diocesan Council ofCathotify their efforts. "In my work, I give many, many lic Women, more councils nationretreats and workshops to women," wide are opting for women modsaid Sister Brady. "Years ago, it was erators. "In the words of Helen mostly retired women who at- Keller, 'alone we can do so little, tended, but more and more I see together we can do so much,'" she young women, single moms, career said. Sister Brady shared those sentiwomen come to find something that ments. "I have a lot of hope for is missing in their lives - God. "Women today are hungering women in the Church." she said. for something more than just self. "I'm a great believer in the power They are seeking something Spi!'i- of the Holy Spirit, and I see the tual, and if they can't find it in the Spirit at work in the women of the Church, they'll look sumeplace DCCW. "It's an exciting time as a else. In my presentations I try to draw them into a Catholic, Chris- woman to live in the 21 st century in tian spirituality that can satisfy that the Church. There are so many hunger, and I feel the DCCW can symbols of new life in all areas. It's wonderful for me to be able to deal do that as well." Sister Brady explained that with women on their own levels, Catholic women should encourage with the help of the Spirit."

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FATHER RODNEY E. Thibault, center, was a recent guest of the New Bedford Serra Club where he shared stories about his vocation to the priesthood. He is pictured here with member Timothy J. Lopes, left, and club President Timothy E. Mitchell, at White's of Westport.

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Friday, June 27, 2003

News from Bishop Feehan High School

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ATTLEBORO - Bishop Feehan High School seniors Ryan Tully and Justin Brunell were selected as scholar-athletes by the National Football Foun" dation. They are two of 22 high school students chosen to represent the eastern Massachusetts chapter of the foundation and were honored along with other selections at the foundation's 28 th annual banquet. Senior Brian Loew was honored by the school for distinguished achievement in community service and was recently nominated for the statewide Prudential Spirit of Community Award. He is the son of Neil and Joyce Loew of Plainville and plans to rtllend Marist College this fall. Ashley Bigda, also it senior, was recently named Miss.,Greater Auleboro and is currently competing in the Miss Massachusetts Pageant. She is the daughter of Mark and Denise Bigda of Attleboro and will auend Merrimack College this fall. Senior Mary Bucci of Norfolk has been awarded the school's Daughters of the American Revolution Award. It recognizes students who exhibit qualities of dependability, service, leadership and patriotism. The daughter of Vincent and Susan Bucci, she will he allending Bates College.

Feehan senior Zachary Annino, son of Doug and Beth Annino of Mansfield, was awarded a $1,000 scholarship for his narrative in the Guideposts magazine's Young Writers' Contest. Annino's personal narrative told of a lesson learned and how God has been at work in his life. He plans to use the scholarship when he enters the University of New Hampshire as a freshman. . Student Margaret Marino placed in the top 19 percent of the nationally recognized Arts Recognition and Talent Search Program this year. She was one of 649 award recipients nationwide and received a Merit Award for her performance in the voice category. She is the daughter of Rick and Joan Marino of Plainville and plans to attend Wagner College. Senior J. Luke Krafka, an accomplished cellist and vocalist, was selected to the National High School Honors Orchestra after playing at the National Convention in Ohio. He will tour with the New England Conservatory Youth Philharmonic Group this summer. Krafka is the son of Michael and Holly Krafka of Milford. He will attend the Boston Conservatory this fall.

STUDENTS FROM Margaret McCormick's first-grade class at Our Lady of Mount Carmel School, New Bedford, display certificates they earned for completing a book reading project. They also received a "Book It" medallion and a free piz.za from Pizza Hut.

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WHALING PROJECT - Tim Soars of St. Anthony's School, New Bedford, works on a whaling project as classmate Bryan Freitas looks on. Students built collages, ships and mini sea scenes as part of the story. Below, Robert Thibeault and David Iria show off their efforts.

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BISHOP STANG High School students display awards they received for excelling on this year's National Latin Exam. Sponsored by the American Classical League, the exam was taken by 34 students from the North Dartmouth school.

Bishop Stang students receive 'awards NORTH DARTMOUTH Bishop Stang. presented several awards to its students recently on its annual Awards Night. Senior Racine Silva, daughter of Tony and Tina Silva of Swansea, took home The President's Award for Excellence and the 2003 John C. O'Brien Scholar Athlete Award. The President's Award for Excellence is presented to a student who exemplifies the highest ideals of Bishop Stang and is a true role model for his or her peers.The scholar athlete award is presented to the student/athlete wlio

possesses the qualities that former athletic director and coach John C. O'Brien did. The Theresa E. Dougall Award, given to an outstanding senior female athlete, was presented to Bethany Lemeneger of New Bedford. It is awarded to multi-~port athletes who lead by example. The Carlin Lynch Award, which honors an outstanding male athlete who leads by example, was presented to senior Henri Valois of New Bedford. The Gilbert Barboza Unsung'

Hero Award was presented to Nicole Desrochers of North Dartmouth. It is awarded to the student who best exemplifies the spirit of cooperation and generosity. Senior Daniel Shea is the 2003 recipient of The Spartan Award. It is presented to student who best displays citizenship and service beyond the school service requirements. It was voted on by the principal of students, department chairmen and student council representatives. Shea is the son of Daniel and Monka Shea of Lakevilie.

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Coach naDled for new football teaDl at Bishop Connolly FALL RIVER - James McNamee, principal of Bishop Connolly High School, recently announced that Frank H. Sherman Jr., was named to the position of head football coach and athletic director for the Fall River school. The Cougars will begin their first season of football this fall. Sherman comes to the position with more than 13 years experience coaching football on the prep

school, high school and college levels. He has expertise in all areas of coaching having been an assistant and head football coach with responsibilities focusing on both offense and defensive aspects of the game. Sherman is presently a human services coordinator in the Fall River area and resides in Westport.

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FIRST-GRADERS Andrea Mirka, Waverly Ciffoliollo, Samantha Pereira and Mitchell Ramos-Tardo from Our Lady of Lourdes School, Taunton, display items they and other classmates sent to our troops overseas. They filled 94 shoeboxes. Below, parents Jennifer O'Keefe and Teresa de Mello give first-grader Zachary Hebert a hand boxing items. . ",

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NEW BISHOP Connolly High School football Coach Frank H. Sherman Jr. stands with Principal James McNamee and team mascot Freddy 'Cougar, played by student Garret Moniz, during a recent press conference at the Fall River school.

Teen summer time away from home By KATHERINE COOLIDGE CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE The summer diaspora has begun. The evidence is strewn all over my house. Medical forms, passport, T-shirts for an exchange program, language dictionary, handbook on customs .and cultures all speak of a young man embarking on a trip of a lifetime. The mother in me simultaneously cheers and shudders at the thought of sending my second child halfway around the world. He's one among so many this summer. Teens with varied interests and callings are scattering to the winds. Some go to camp, others on church mission trips, some to visit family and still others travel abroad. Some trips hold a unique. opportunity for meeting new people, eating new or dif-

ferent foods and seeing new sights. On the other hand, some teens will travel to see people and places they have visited before. Remember, however, that people and places change over time. You have grown, too, in the time since you last visited. So, whether traveling to a new destination or old stomping grounds, here are some pointers that may make your summer experience more meaningful: Anticipate nothing. Expect anything. Try to leave your dreams of an idyllic adventure or your lack of enthusiasm for Auntie Sue at home. Be open to the opportunities that will unfold on your travels. Take a journal. Try to spend some time with it each day. If you are not a writer, draw a picture,

Gratitude is an attitude - an safely and are doing OK. P.,S.stash away the guides and bro- . chures from places you visit, attitude that works wonders. siblings love to get mail. Postcopy a few lines of a song you When words fail, smiles, acts of cards with a few words to the heard or dash off a quick prayer kindness, "pleases" and "thank brother or sister at home will be yous" cross language and cultural appreciated. Be safe. Make sure someone barriers - and make the Auntie knows where you are at all times. Sues of the world just melt. Go with the flow. Itineraries Take a friend, or two, or three carved in stone before you left with you when you venture out. become fluid and ever-changing Don't leave your safety sense on in the face of travel delays, the floor of your bedroom (with weather changes, etc. Some of ' your dirty laundry) ~hen you one group's fondest memories leave! Finally, remember your eternal are playing cards with youth for that day. Make it your own. from all over the United States traveling companion. Yeah, God. Those memorable experiences as they waited out a travel delay Take a moment, preferably daily, that you thought were ingrained in an airport. Addresses were to thank him and ask for his conforever in your brain somehow exchanged and friendships tinued guidance on your advenwill leak out on the way home. formed while they were just kill- ture. Travel can be a hectic time. Steal a quiet moment away. You will be amazed at what you ing time. And, please, while you're at Call, write, E-mail home will forget - only to remember on that cold, November day not often, but ~nough to make . it, say a prayer for your p'arents when you drag out your journal sure the folks left behind know left behind. Thanks, and Godspeed. you've arrived at your destination again.

Coming of Age

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June 27, 2003

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Administrative waste in U.S. health care called

morally indefensible Church should tell the private insurance industry: "What you are doing is sinful. This is not acceptable. We have 41 million uninsured and you blow all this money on your funny little forms that no one can understand." He also said the United States has a "deficit of kindness" in terms of the percentage of gross domestic product allocated to for- ' eign aid. Denmark, Norway and Netherlands give 0.80 percent of GOP to other nations, while the U.S. total is only 0.12 percent of GOP, he said. "But we do not know this because the president keeps telling us we are the most generous people on earth," Reinhardt said. Catholics should tell their national leaders that we inust "do better by Afghan children, for instance, than the Taliban," Reinhardt said. "And if the people in Washington do not do it, leaders of this Church just have to step up to the plate;' he added. 'There should be no malnourished children in Kabul. We are drowning ip food. We are paying farmers not to grow food. That does nofmake sense."

ORLANDO, Fla. (CNS) The administrative waste in the U.S. health care system is inefficient, burdensome and morally indefensible, a Princeton economist told leaders of Catholic health care. Uwe E. Reinhardt, professor of health economics at Princeton, addressed the international economic impact of the U.S. health care system in the annual Flanagan Lecture closing the recent convention of the Catholic Health Association in Orlando. He said the United States' speitds more on health care than any other developed country in the world - $4,631 per person in 2000. ~'We Americans were found to spend $360 (per person) more on administration, and another $259 on other things they could not identify, which I suspect is more administration," Reinhardt said. "You, as leaders of health care, really ought to- focus on that a little more," he added. "Of the savings we squeeze out of our clinical enterprise, the $390, all of it gets blown on paper." Reinhardt said the Catholic

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TAKING PART in the recent dedication of Ow Lady's Garden at St. Bernard Parish in Assonet were, from left: Father George Almeida, Faithful Friar Fourth Degree of Knights of Columbus; Father Ralph Tetreault; Judy Normand, Cenacle of Prayer; Father Tim Goldrick, pastor, chaplain to Cross of Christ Council, K.'of C.; Past District Deputy Steven Holmes; District Deputy Edward Medeiros; Grand Knight Andrew DiGiammo; and Denise Branco, of the Columbiettes. . ,

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Assonet .·pari~b creates garden honoring our Blessed Mother first Communions and wedding photographs. On Easter it was the scene of the annual Easter egg hunt. On Pentecost Sunday, the garden was formally dedicated. The date was chosen in remembrance of the Blessed Mother's presence in the upper room when the Holy Spirit carne upon the Apostles. After the ceremonies, a parishwide chicken barbecue was held, hosted by the Cross of Christ Council, Knights of Columbus, whose members were instrumental in the garden project.

. Beginning last fall the garden began to be built between the church and the rectory. In an area that 175 years ago was the hitching area for horses of those at worship, a rose arbor and trellis has been erected. New brick and cobblestone walkways, trees, shrubs, rosebushes and perennials historically dedicated to the Vlfgin Mary have been set and planted. A water foundation muffles noises from the street adjacent. The garden has become the site for beginning of religious processions and a backdrop for baptisms,

ASSONET - Taking to heart Pope John Paul II's urgings to make this the Year of the Rosary, St. Bernard's Parish has fashioned "Our Lady's Garden;' a quiet, beautiful place to pray and meditate. The centerpiece of the garden is a white marble s,tatue of Our Lady ofLourdes, which, for more than 65 y~ has been known as "Our Lady of Assonet."· ' _. , For many years the statue could be seen in'the sanctuary of the mission church ofSt. Bernard until 1979 when it.was moved outdoors.

Catholic, Pro-Life groups criticize .AM~ vote on cloning for research

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Weltjugendtag , Kiiln 2005, , THE OFFICIAL logo for World Youth Day 2005 was released by Gerrt:lan organizers recently. Drawing on Christian , and local symbolism, a large red cross dominates. the artwork. The German city of Cologne will host the international . Catholic youth gathering August 16-21'in 2005. According to organizers, the 'cross is a reminder that the event is foremost an encOlJnter with Christ; the star symbolizes divine guidance, as it had led the three Magi on the road to Bethlehem; ,_ ,the comet tail represents the star's route which comes from God; the two red peaks stand, for the Cologne cathedral, a 'central point for the World Youth Day celebration and where relics of the Magi are held; the large blue ellipse'symbolizes the L!niversal communion of the Church and the water of baptism.,The motto for World Youth Day 2005, "We have come tq worship Him," is from the Magi story in Matthew's Gospel. (CNS photo from World Youth Day 2005)

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faith-based doctors, said in a statement that AMA actions such as the cloning vote have "led to a mass exodus of members for the past several decades." . Although the AMA "in the I960s used to speak for nearly nine of every 10 doctors," Stevens said, its membership of 260,000 now represents only about two of every five doctors. Judie Brown, a Catholic who is president of the American Life League, called the AMA "arrogantly misguided" and said the vote was "further proof that the AMA is incapable of distinguishing between good medicine and bad medicine." "Neither smooth-sounding phrases nor appeals to our sense of compassion for the chronically ill can change the basic fact that the AMA is endorsing a 'clone and kill' policy that will result in death - in the name of science - for countless living human beings," she said.

president of the Catholic League for Religious and Civil Rights, in a statement. "That others might benefit does not justify such a crass manipulation of the human species." Donohue said the AMA action "seeks to bypass a national conversationon the subject by imposing elite opinion on a still-uncertain public. The AMA is an important body but it is no substitute for a democratic airing oflife-anddeath issues." The Senate has not yet voted on a House-passed bill that would ban any type of human cloning, research or reproductive. After the AMA vote, White House spokesman Ari Fleisher reiterated President Bush's stand on cloning. "The president's positions on this are well-known," he said. ''The president is opposed to human cloning in all its forms." Dr. David Stevens, executive director of the Christian Medical Association, an organization of

CHICAGO (eNS) ---' The American Medical Association has drawn criticism from Catholic and Pro-Life groups for the-recent vote at its annuaimeeting in Chicago declaring that "cloning for biomedical research is consistent with medical ethics." The recommendations from the AMA's Council o,n Ethical and Judicial Affairs, approved without debate, said physicians should be free to decide whether or not to participate in such research and called for "appropriate 'oversight of this research and safeguards for subjects participating in this type of research." But the research is never safe for the human embryos created in ,the process, said officials of several Catholic and Pro-Life organizations that oppose any form of human cloning. "To intentionally create human life - which is what a human embryo is - only to destroy it is immoral," said William Donohue,

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06.27.03