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Appeal assisting family members en route to picking up the pieces By DEACON JAMES N.

PETAL-COVERED STREET - Bishop George W. Coleman, at far center, processes before the statue of Christ of the Miracles in Ponta Delgada on the Island of St. Michael in the Azores last Sunday for the annual Santo Cristo feast that harkens back to April 1700. At right are Father John J. Oliveira, pastor of Our Lady of Mount Carmel Parish in New Bedford, and Father David A. Pignato, secretary to the bishop. (Photo by Pedro Monteiro/Correio dos A~ores)

Fate of Marriage Protection Amendment still up in the air

DUNBAR

NEW BEDFORD - Down and out is an old boxing t~rm that describes fighters who, after taking too much punishment can't bounce back. But it also applies to many of the women, who, with a child or children in hand, walk througn the door of Donovan House on Rockland Street in need of food, lodging, and relief from drug addiction, mental problems, and other disabilities that have knocked them to their knees. ''We are a transitional program for homeless women and children, "a referral from all the human service agencies in ' " - - - ' - - our area:' said Barbara Tavares, ~,oordinator' at Donovan House for the past four years and a case manager for two 'years prior to that. "With the help of other allied Catholic Social Service agencies, we team up to connect all the dots and give those who come seeking help the resources neede~ so they can successfully return to the commu-

nity," she added. Her story is echoed at other locations providing buman services to women and men, also funded by the Catholic Charities Appeal including St. Claire Residence in Hyannis and Samaritan House in Taunton. At Donovan House the criteria for acceptance includes documented homelessness - that often includes eviction - and disability. "The disability frequently includes alcohol and substance abuse, and mental health instability," Tavares explained. "Iroi'licaIIy, it's not always financial." While many of the women seeking assistance have suffered from domestic violence or abuse, that is not one of the key considerations for acceptance, Tavares noted. 'There are usually many issues," she reported. "While many of the women have been hurt by domestic. violence, the astronomical number of them suffer from substance abuse, Tum to page 15 - Assisting

BOSTON - Another legislative this by a 2003 activist court ruling spearheaded a diocesan-wide prayer delay on the Protection of Marriage that opened the door to "same-sex drive, said the delay actually heartAmendment is really a symbolic win marriage." ened him. "I rejoice because that for the proposal, say those who want Murray has said she would not gives us more time to intercede with to bring it before voters. only bring the measure up for a vote, God for his divine intervention and On May 9, Senate President but would also work to defeat it. Gov. that his good will is accomplished," Therese Murray recessed until June Deval Patrick has reportedly even said Father Leonard, pastor of St. 14 a constitutional convention that dangled promi~es of administrative Kilian Parish in New Bedford and will decide the measure's fate. jobs before lawmakers in exc,bange spiritual advisor to Catholic Citizen"We have the 57 votes needed; for killing the measure, a move he ship. that's why they recessed," said With the help ofVicar GenBea Martins, who had traveled eral Msgr. John Perry, Father to the Statehouse with two "We went to support the 57 leg- Leonard asked all parishes in busloads of supporters. Mar- islators who are with us," Martins April to set aside special times tins represents the Fall River said. "They're under heavy pres- ofprayer - Masses and hours Diocese with Catholic Citi- sure, and we need to keep support- ofeucharistic adoration - for zenship, a lay political action ing them so they'll hang tight." God's protection on marriage. group. He also encouraged individuAbout 400 supporters of als to pray and offer sacrifices the proposed ballot question turned denied, according to a May I0 Bos- on their own. out, despite reports that Murray, an ton Herald article. Martins said the response by opponent, would recess the joint sesAnd the gay activist group priests and parishioners has been . sion. ''We went to support the 57 leg- MassEquality has asked the Demo- great. ''We'll continue to focus on islators who are with us," Martins cratic National Committee tojoin the prayer, because this will be won only SAFE AND SECURE - A young mother and her child enjoy the· said. "They're under heavy pressure, fray, according to Boston Globe re- with God's help:' she said. and we need to keep supporting ports. That help appeared evident to comfort and safety' of Donovan House, funded by the Catholic Charities Appeal. . them so they'll hang tight." This prompted the committee many present at a January 2 Only one hurdle remains - a sponsoring the amendment, clifihanger session when lawmakers vote by at least 50 of the 200 law- VoteOnMarriage.org, to ask support- finally gave the amendment its first makers - to have the amendment ers: "If you're a Democrat, please vote needed to advance. put on the 2008 ballot. Amending politely call the DNC at 202-863Marriage supporters had also the state constitution requires votes 8000 and ask them to focus on other brought legal pressure to bear. On by two consecutive legislative ses- issues, not persuading Massachu- December 27, the state Supreme sions and approval by voters. setts legislators to deny you your Judicial Court ruled that the legisThe amendment would define right to vote on the marriage amend- lature had a constitutional duty to marriage as the union of one man ment." vote on the measure. And and one woman. Massachusetts citiInstitute of the Incarnate Word VoteOnMarriage.org had also zens were denied the chance to do Father Samuel Leonard, who has Tum to page 19 - Fate , \

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MAy 18, 2007

Sainthood congregation recommends Pope Pius XII be named venerable By CINDY WOODEN CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

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VATICAN CITY - Members of the Congregation for Saints' Causes met May 8 to consider the cause of Pope Pius XII and apparently voted to recommend that Pope Benedict XVI formally declare him venerable. Passionist Father Ciro Benedettini, vice director of the Vatican press office, confirmed the congregation had met, but since the result of the vote still had to be presented to the pope he would not say May 9 what the result was. Italian newspapers, citing unnamed sources, said the congregation's cardinals and archbishops recommended that Pope Benedict formally recognize that Pope Pius lived the Christian virtues in a heroic manner. Once the pope issues a decree r.ecognizing heroic virtues, the candidate is referred to as venerable. Before a candidate can be beatified, the pope also must issue a decree recognizing a miracle attributed to the candidate's intercession. A second miracle is needed for canonization. The newspaper Corriere della Sera reported May 9 that a minority of the congregation members had voted "no," urging Pope

Benedict to delay issuing a decree until there is "a more favorable climate," particularly regarding the ongoing controversy over Pope Pius' actions during World War II. However, a Vatican source told Catholic News Service in Rome May 9 that the congregation's vote was unanimously in favor of issuing the decree.. Jesuit Father Peter Gumpel, the promoter of Pope Pius' cause, was out of town May 9 and unavailable for comment. Pope Pius led the Catholic Church from 1939 to 1958; immediately before his election, the then-Cardinal Eugenio Pacelli was the Vatican secretary of state. For years, controversy has HALLOWED HALLS - The Vatican library will be closed from July 14 to September 2010 for major raged over whether Pope Pius did renovations. The library's ever-growing and massive collection of ancient and modern volumes has and said enough in defense of the put too much stress and strain on the 16th-century building. The interior of the library is seen in this Jews and other victims of the Na- undated file photo. (CNS photo/Catholic Press Photo) zis. The May 8 vote of the congregation members was based on a review of a six-volume, 3,000page "positio" or position paper By CAROL GLATZ and walls of one of the library's halls, making pubCATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE prepared by the promoters of lic access to the reading rooms impossible, he said. Pope Pius' sainthood cause. The All renovation projects that could be done without VATICAN CITY - The Vatican Library is closing report, given to the Vatican in 'its doors to the public for the next three years for reno- disturbing visiting scholars "have already been done. 2004, included sworn testimony vatic:m. Now the big problem is left," he said. It involves refrom witnesses, historical docuStarting July 14, the library will be closed until Sep- vamping an entire wing. ments and a review of literature tember 2010 in order to carry out "major structural renoFounded in 1475, the Vatican Library is now home - both neutral and negative vation of one wing of the library," the library's vice pre- to almost two million books and manuscripts. About pertaining to the Vatican's ac- fect, Ambrogio Piazzoni, told Catholic News Service. 100 scholars visit the library every day. tions during World War II. After the library closes this summer, scholars will the library's ever-growing and massive collection of ancient and modern volumes had put too still have access to the library's collections by ordermuch stress and strain on its 16th-century building, ing copies in digital, photographic, photocopied or he said. Workers will have to reinforce the floors microfilm formats, Piazzoni said.

Vatican Library to be renovated, closed to public for three years

Pope says Church must continue to reach out, face vocations crisis

WELL RECOMMENDED - Pope Pius XII, who led the Catholic . Church from 1939 to 1958, is seen in an undated formal portrait. ; The Congregation for Saints' Causes reportedly has recommended . that Pope Benedict XVI declare Pope Pius venerable. (CNS photo)

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VATICAN CITY (CNS) While the Church must continue to be a missionary Church reaching out and giving support to younger churches, it must also face the widespread crisis of vocations, Pope Benedict XVI said. As the Church continues its missionary activities around the world, "we cannot help but see the difficulties that emerge today in this field," he said in a May 5 speech to participants of two separate missionary conferences. The Superior Council ofthe Pontifical Missionary Works and the World Mission Congress "Fidei Donum" met in Rome recently to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Pope Pius Xll's encyclical, "Fidei Donum" (''The Gift of Faith"). The letter highlighted the missionary needs of Africa and urged established churches to help younger churches with prayers and funding. It also called on diocesan priests, religious and laypeople to help in the missions. Pope Benedict thanked all those who have dedicated themselves to spreading the Gospel. Missionary

work has helped make every baptized person feel part oCone Church and has led to "reciprocal enrichment" as cultures and communities exchange their gifts and talents, he said. However, some of the difficulties facing the Church today in continuing its missionary mandate include the declining numbers and advanced age of "clergy in the dioceses that once sent missionaries to faraway regions," the pope said. "In this context of a widespread vocations crisis, this certainly rep-

, • The Anchor

resents a challenge that must be faced," he said. Nonetheless, without ignoring the problems, the Church must look to the future with hope and confidence, he said, "giving a renewed and more authentic identity to 'Fidei Donum' missionaries" that responds to a world that is much different from that of 50 years ago. Some of the things to strive for, he said, are the promotion of real communion among local churches and helping young churches with formation. OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE DIOCESE OF FALL RIVER Vol. 51. No. 20

Member: Catholic Press Association. Catholic News Service

'Published weekly except for two weeks in the summer and the week after Christmas by the Catholic Press of the Diocese of Fall River, 887 Highland Avenue, Fall River, MA 02720, Telephone 508-675-7151 - FAX 508-675-7048, email: theanchor@anchomews.org. Subscription price by mail, postpaid $14.00 per year. ,Send address changes to P.O. Box 7, Fall River, MA, call or use email address ;, PUBLISHER· Most Reverend George W. Coleman exECUTIVE EDITOR Father Roger J. Landry fatherrogerIandryCanchomews.org 'EDITOR David B. Jollvet davejolivetOanchornews.org NEWS EDITOR Deacon James N. Dunbar jlmdunbar@anchornews.org BE~ORTER

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U.S. 4J Bishops', study draft of guide for high sc.Qool religion curriculum

DIFFICULT CROSS TO BEAR ...:....- The cross of St. Joseph Church stands amid rubble in the aftermath of a tornado that swept through Greensburg, Kan., May 4. The tornado, rated an F5, was the most powerful to hit the U.S. in eight years. Greensburg, a town of about 1,500 people, was about 95 percent destroyed, according to City Administrator Steve Hewitt. (CNS photo/Michael Schweitzer, Dodge City Daily Globe)

Bioethicist calls C·alifornia suicide measure 'implicitly anti-Catholic' By DAN MORRiS-YOUNG CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE SAN FRANCISCO - Calling proposed California 'physician-assisted suicide legislation "strongly and implicitly anti-Catholic" and accusing its advocates of "trying to bend the Catholic Church's moral teaching to the will of the culture of death agenda," an international expert on bioethics urged listeners at a recent lecture to do everything in their power to help defeat the controversial bill. Titled the California Compassionate Choices Act, Assembly Bill 374 would allow physicians to prescribe a lethal dose of medication to people diagnosed with a terminal illness, given less than six months to live and deClared mentally competent. Wesley J. Smith, keynote speaker at the annual public policy breakfast sponsored by the San francisco Archdiocese's Office of Public Policy and Social Concerns and held at St. Mary.'s Cathedral, said the measure seeks to establish "ending life as an appropriate way to relieve suffering." Once that premise has been established, he said, it becomes logical to extend what would be seen ."as a legitimate medical treatplent" to the chronically ill, the terminally ill at any stage, individuals in intractable pain and even those who are depressed. "How can you not go there?" he asked. "How can you say yes to a person with terminal cancer and no to a quadI1plegic" who wishes to end his or her life'? "Premises lead to places," said Smith, a consultant to both the Center for Bioethics.and Culture and the International Task Force on Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide. While news reports often say the

language of A.B. 374 mirrors Oregon's physician-assisted suicide law, Smith said the Califorilia bill would prohibit care centers, hospice facilities and other in-patient residences from barring medical personnel from providing physicianassisted suicide. While a conscience clause does exist for general, acute-care hospitals allowing them to' bar doctors from prescribing life-ending medications, smaller. facilities are exempt, said Smith who is an attorney as well as senior fellow at the Discovery Inst~tute, a Seattle~based think tank. The situation could force Catholic nursing homes to either allow physician-assisted suicide or close, Smith said. "It would be a huge dilemma - choose b~tween no care or unwillingly becoming part of .snuffing out human life." The author' of 11 books including :'Culture of Death: The Assault on Medical Ethics in America," Smith went into detail on developments in the Netherlands where legal and medical protocols nowallow doctors to kill pej)ple without

their permission. "It is called termination without consent," he said, '~and between 800 and 1,000 are killed every year." He also said eight percent of the babies who die annually in the Netherlands are euthanized because of physical or mental disabilities. , Key to reaclung this point, he said, is coming to .believe "that those babies are not really human" and substituting a "quality of life" ethic for acceptance "ofthe intrinsic value of human life." Smith advised his audience to pay attention to "the money imperative" in the debate surrounding A.B. 374. He said it costs "about $100 in medication and maybe another $500 to $1,000" for a medical consultation to arrange for assisted suicide, while it takes perhaps "$100,000 or more" to· care for a terminally ill person in the last stages of life. Health care organizations such as HMOs, he charged, cannot help but view physician-assisted suicide .as "cost containnient."

WASHINGTON (eNS) - The teachers in the consultation ifthey wish U.S. bishops are. studying a draft cur- to do so. But each diocese should colriculum guide for Catholic high school late such responses into a single subreligion courses across the country. mission back to the committee, he said Prepared by the C,omrnittee on Accol,"ding to the framework, the Catechesis of the U.S. Conference of first semester of the core curriculum Catholic Bishops, the draft sets the should treat the revelation of Jesus framework for six core semesters plus Christ in Scripture, giving students an five elective courses from which introductory understanding of the schools inay choose two- preferably Bible and its meaning for Christians, in the senior year or one each in the with special emphasis on the Gospels. junior and senior years. The curriculum's second semester The curriculum rramework, devel- is about Jesus Christ, Son ofGod. The oped at the request o( publishers of third, on Jesus' mission in the world, catechetical materials, is intended as a focuses on the paschal mystery of guide for those publishers and for di- Christ's suffering, death and resurrecocesan offices and Catholic high tion for the redemption of humanity. schools to help them develop their own .The fourth semester is about the curriculum guidelines and evaluate Church and the fifth is about the sacreligion textbooks for use in their raments as privileged encounters with schools. Christ The sixth, about life in Christ, ''It is planned that ibis curriculum covers topics such as vocation, sin, , framework will also:be adapted to virtue, grace and the commandments. The·five electivecomses in the draft . shape catechetical instruction for high school age young people in parish re- framework curriculum are titled ligious education andl'youth ministry "Scripture," ''History of the Catholic programs:' said Archbishop Donald Church," ''Living as aDisciple ofJesus W Wuerl ofWashington, chairman of Christ in Society:' ''Living the Call of the Committee on Catechesis, in a let- Jesus" and "Ecumenical and Interfaith ter accompanying the'draft. Issues." He added, howev~, that the comWithin each semester the frameI' mittee recognizes tijat "not all the work presents an outline of topics to points in the curriculum framework be covered, citing Scripture and ''Catcan be fully developed" in texts and echism ofthe Catholic Church" refermaterials for such,' out-of-school ences where relevant. catechetical programS. . The introduction to the curriculum The bishops have been asked to framework says it is "strongly recomstudy the dcift and submit coinments mended" that publishers and school and suggestions for revision by July and catechetical programs follow the 1 so that a revised ~ can be pre- framework's sequence of core Semespared. for final con~deration and a ters because it ''reflects a systematic vote when the bishops hold their gen- . point of view in which each course eral meeting in Baltimore this No- builds on a foundation laid by those vember. • which precede it." ArchbishopWuerl invited the bishSome national uniformity in se~ ops to involve members oftheir dioc- quence is also desirable because ofthe esan staffs, school administrators and mobility of society, it says. 'I

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Cardinal praises Bush pledge to veto any attack on Pro-Life policies By NANCY FRAZIER O'BRIEN CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

Group aims to preserve Mercy Sisters' values at schools the order founded ERIE, Pa. (CNS) - Martin Larrey's passion is history. He has, taught college students the history of Latin America, 16th- and 17th-century Europe and the ancient world. These days, however, he is working to preserve history, as in the tradition and values of the Sisters of Mercy at colleges and universities the order founded in the United States. Larrey, a longtime college administrator, is interim executive director of the Conference on Mercy Higher Education. Formed in 2003, the confeI:ence' is workfug to ensure that the 16 colleges and universities founded by the Sisters ofMercy in the U.S. maintain both the Catholic and Mercy traditions. ', Larrey and representatives who work in the mission activities of Mercy institutions met recently at Mercyhurst College in Erie to share ideas on how to integrate the Mercy mission, values and direction into higher education. He says most colleges and universities carry out that role to varying degrees through oncampus Mercy mission and service offices. With Mercy regional communities being integrated into larger communities, the rights and responsibilities for Mercy colleges and universities are being transferred to the conference. "It's a l~ng and time-consuming process;' said Larrey, who has a doctorate in Spanish imperial history. He was dean of humanities at Gannon Uniyersity in Erie several years ago. His most recent college post was dean of graduate students at the Mercy-

founded College of St. Mary in Omaha, Neb. In his current position, Larrey works out of an office at the college. Mercy Sister JoAnne Courneen, who directs the Mercy Institute at Mercyhurst College, said she is helping assess the institute's current and future role in integrating the Mercy mission and Catholic tradition at the Erie college. ' ' ''I found the meeting helpful as it reinforced some ofwhat we had been thinking and provided new insights," she said. . Larrey is looking to take Mercyoriented values such as hospitality, compassion and service to others and make them a stronger part of Mercy higher education. ''We need to find a language and focus on which we can agree," he said. Also, he said, conference members are aiming to collaborate more on educational goals and outcomes. He said previous meetings have defined a Mercy philosophy that recognizes the sacredness and dignity of the human person, especially those who are disadvantaged. "We want our people to recognize that kind of relationship with God in their career and way of life," he said. Larrey would like to see programs designed for both employees and sm'dents explaining Mercy values and what it means to be part of Mercy higher education. He and Mercy mission representatives will get a chance to continue discussing that issue and others at the next meeting of the conference in January.

WASHINGTON - The head of the ·U.S. bishops' Committee on Pro-Life Activities welcomed President George W. Bush's promise to "veto any legislation that weakens current federal policies and laws on abortion." Cardinal Justin Rigali of Philadelphia also expressed gratitude in a statement for pledges by 155 members of the House of Representatives and 34 senators to uphold any such vetoes. "These pledges help ensure that through the rest of this administration and this Congress Americans need not fear that the federal government will pursue new ways to force them to be involved in government-funded abortions, coercive population programs abroad or the destruction of embryonic human beings," the cardinal said. "Instead, we should work together to build respect for human life at its most defenseless stage~, and to support women and families facing an unintended pregnancy or caring for family members challenged by age, illness or disability," he added. Bush outlined his stand in identical letters to Speaker of the House

Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate .tors had a similar message and Majority Leader Harry Reid, D- noted that Bush's father, President George H.W. Bush, had issued such Nev. As you know, current law' pro- a letter June 4, 1991, "to great efhibits federal funding for abortion, fect when he was confronted with both domestically and internation- a Democrat-controlled Congress." "An examination of the record ally, except in cases of rape, incest or where the life of the mother is will show that attacks of Pro-Life endangered," the president wrote. policy in the Democrat-controlled , "Recent legislative practice has en- Congress were much more vocifsured that taxpayer funds do not un- erous prior to the June 4 letter than derwrite organizations that perform th~y were after the letter," the senaor promote abortion as a method of tors wrote. "It seems the committee chairs were more successful in family planning." Also protected under U.S. laws holding pro-abortion provisions at or policies are human embryos and bay when there was a formal decthe conscience rights of health care laration that their legislation had no providers and entities, and taxpayer chance of enactment if it contained funds may not be used in "coercive pro-abortion and other anti-life or involuntary family planning pro- measures that weakened present law or regulations." grams," he added. Congress was expected to begin "I urge that these and other existing, important protections be re- work soon on appropriations bills spected and continued," Bush told for the next fiscal year. Many curthe congressional leaders. "I believe rent Pro-Life policies are contained it is the most basic duty of govern- in amendments, or riders, to approment to guard the innocent. With priations ,bills that must be renewed that in mind, I will veto any legis- each year. The Hyde Amendment, for exlation that weakens current federal policies and laws on abortion, or ample, prohibits the use of federal that encourages the destruction of funds for abortions, except in cases of rape or incest or to save the life human life at any stage." The 155 House members had of the mother. It is named for urged Bush to make that pledge in former Rep. Henry Hyde, RAIl., a March 30 letter to the president. who retired at the end of the 109th A February 1 letter from 34 sena- Congress.

Iowa priest named vice rector of Pontifical North American College DAVENPORT, Iowa (CNS) - Father Robert Gruss, with us." . chancellor and vocations director for the Davenport Dia:Bishop Amos told The Catholic Messenger that Facese, has been named vice rector for seminary life and ther Gruss ''has the ability, the personality and the gift director of human formation at the Pontifical North for that kind of ministry to the Church." American College. ' The 51-year-old priest said he never imagined he The U.S. seminary in Rome is the alma mater of Fa- would return to the North American College in a leaderther Gruss, who was ordained to the priesthood for the ship capacity. \he news that he was being considered Davenport Diocese in 1994. . , . for the post stunned him initially, he said. Bishop Martin J. Amos agreed to release Father Gruss Through discernment and prayer, he realized "this is from the diocese for three to five years ' what God is calling me to do:' to serve at the college. The priest will While the post is an honor, it is a move to Rome in August. major change that still overwhelms Father Gruss ''will guide the forhim. mation of more than 170 future "I'm sad about leaving this dia:priests from all over the U.S. as well cese. It's home," Father Gruss said. as from Australia," said Archbishop He will miss the staff he works with Edwin F. O'Brien, head of the U.S. atthechancery,alongwithhisbrother Archdiocese for the Military Services priests and the people he serves in the and chairman of the college's board diocese. of governors. "I'm giving up a lot to do this;' he The archbishop was rector when said, including his black Labmdor, Father Gruss was a seminarian at the Thstfu, whom he has to leave behind. North American College. The vocations work he has been '''As the seminarian, so the priest' doing for 'the past three years will be goes the adage," Archbishop O'Brien hard to leave behind, as well as the said in an email to The CatJwlic Messeminarians he has helped nurture senger, newspaper of the Davenport . FATHER ROBERT GRUSS and mentor. Diocese. "Father Gruss was a sterling Father Gruss also leaves at a time seminarian, a natural leader, serious about his spiritual when the diocese is in the midst of significant change as life and his studies while here. a result of filing for bankruptcy in October. He said he "His extensive experience as a priest in Davenport looked forward to contributing to the planning process has enriched him immensely and in every respect. I know ,through which the diocese will reorganize. he will take the challenge, and enjoy it, and be most AttheNorthAmericanCollege,hewilloverseedaily effective," he said. "Our thanks to him for accepting, communal life in the seminary and will stand in for the and to the people of God of Davenport for sharing him rector when he is gone.


MAY 18, 2007

~rTHE INTERNATIONAL CHURCH

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New wave of mainland Chinese challenges Church in Toronto' By MICHAEL SWAN CATHOLI9 NEWS SERVICE TORONTO - Earlier this year, a young Chinese man approached Redemptorist Father Peter Chin and asked him if he were a Catholic priest. When Father Chin said "Yes," the young man unburdened himself of a secret he, had carried across an ocean and through 12 time zones. Before the young man left his village in China's Fujian province, his grandmother had taken him aside and whispered in his ear that when he got to Toronto the first thing he had to do was find a Catholic priest and tell him he was a baptized Catholic. Like many Fujianese, the young man's family has been Catholic since the first wave of

PART OF A CHANGING PQPULATION .,...... Parishioner $imon ,Gao poses for a photo at Saviour of the World Parish in Mississauga, Ontario'. Gao, his wife, Agnes Liu, and a small Mandarin-speaking group at Saviour of the World celebrate • Mass on Saturday evenings. The group finds itself in the 'shadow qf the Cantonese majority of the parish. (CNS photo/Michael Swan, Catholic Register) missionaries hit the Chinese coast in the 16th century. Through nine or 10 ge.nerations, through the official disapproval of the Qing Dynasty and the official atheism of the communist revolution, ,Fujianese Catholics kept the faith. When the government established the Chinese Catholic Patriotic Association in 1957, Fujianese took their faith underground rather than accept' public, separation from the worldwide Cnurch. The young man is one of an increasing number of Mandarinspeaking Chinese from the main'land coming to the Toronto area, , where many Chinese Catholic~ are Cantonese speakers from Hong Kong and Macau. The Mandarin speakers are a big challenge for the Church !n Toronto, said Father John Lung, pastor of Saviour of the World Chinese Catholic Mission in nearby Mississauga. lhe di{fer-

ences between the new immigrants and the immigrants of the last generation are not just about language; Cantonese and'Mandarin speakers have 'very different experiences and different cultures, he said. The small Mandarin-speaking group at Saviour of the World cel-ebrates Mass on Saturday evenings. It finds itself in the shadow of the Cantonese majority of the parish. FANFAIR FOR BLAIR - Supporters applaud British Prime Minister Tony Blair as he leaves Trimdon :'Cantonese speakers', they Labor Club in northern England May'1 O. Blair said he would step down as prime minister June 27, came to North America so early. after serving for more than'1 0 years. (CNS photo/Nigel Roddis, Reuters) , They have' a much better foundation,here," said parishioner Gary Lio,u. Liou and the others who joined Saviour of the World in the last five years believe it's just a By SIMON CALDWELL four children, told Catholic News Sermatter of time before they catch He said that the Church ofEngland , CATHOUC NEWS SERVICE vice May 10 that he thought Blair, 53, is grateful that Blair "has refused the up with the Cantonese congregaLONDON - Church leaders in was an exceptional prime miirister. tion that packs the church Sunday demands of some to close down the He said he has known Blair since space in our society within which both mornings, runs a lively and en- the United Kingdom acknowledged became ten- vigorous debate and the full diversity gaged youth group and, in just the ups and downs of British Prime 1983 and that they later I' ' seven years, raised the money to MinisterTony Blair's decade in office. nis partners and good"friends. ' of religious conviction can find voice ,Blair, an Anglicap, whose wife, and be expressed." While they commended Blair for build the stone church near downhelping to secure peace.in Northern Cherie, and childrefl.' are Catholic, town Mississauga. He added that the current reinstateWhile adding 15 to 30 new Ireland, Church leaders also raised never discussed the pqssibility of co~­ ment of a power-sharing government converts a year may seem like as- questi~ns over the wisdom of taking version to the Cath04c faith, said Fa- ' in Northern Ifeland "bears witness to ther Caden, adding that the possibility one of his most enduring achievetounding growth to Saviour of the Great Britain to war in Iraq. World's neighboring Catholic parCardinal Cormac Murphy- of Blair's future coO\"~rsion would be ments, and the high profile given to ishes, Father'Lung knows evan- O'Connor of Westminster, president a "matter for him and his conscience." development issues; especially in Af"He used to come every Sunday to rica, and to the environmental crisis gelical Protestant congregations of the Catholic Bishops' Conference for Mandarin speakers are grow- of England and Wales, said in a stlte- Mass," the priest said. "He didn't re- reflects the passion and intelligence he . ing much faster. ment that he recognized the "serious ceive holy ,Commuilion but would has brough! to his work as prime min"They don't have so many divisions of opinion on the war in read the lesson andl do all sorts of iSter." regulations, like in the Catholic Iraq," but added tJ:!~t "history will things." , A new leader will be elected June Church. For instance, if they want make a better judgment than today." Anglican Archbishop Rowan Wtl- 24. Blair's preniiership has witnessed Cardinai Murphy-O'Connor liams of Canterbury" described Blair an era of gro~, high employment 'to start a church and they have the money; they can just build a small , thanked Blair "for his dedication ~d as a man of "genuin~ peTS?nal faith" and low interest rates, but opinion polls ' church," Father Lung said. "For whole-hearted commitment to the ser- who has not "shied a~ay from the risk have indicated that the Labor Party will Catholics, the diocese says it has vice of his country." aSsociated with confronting extrem- lose to the C<~nservative Party at,the "In particular, I would warmly ism:' to be a certain size." next national election. In Toronto, Our Lady of Mount commend his efforts in securing peace Carmel Church's congregation is in Northern Ireland'and his constant now 50 percent Mandarin-speak- concern for the eradication of poverty ing, and Father Chin uses the in Africa," he said. [,1;. " - .: " .' I: _ ': '" However, the bishops' Catholic Cantonese members of his parish to help integrate'the'newcomers. Agency for Overseas Development He mixe~ speakers of Cantonese said Blair had failed to meet expectaEstablished I'in 1962, Sullivan's Catholic Store has I and Mandarin on the parish coun- tions in the fight against extreme povbeeri servicing the spiritual needs of , cil and committees and celebrates erty. the South I Shore of Massachusetts, Cape Cod, the big feast~ - Christmas, EasThe 'British government under ter, Pentecost ' - with trilingual' Blair delivered more aid and worked Nantucket ard Martha's Vineyard for over 44 years. Masses in Mandarin, Cantonese to use it more effectively, but ultimate!y "delivered generosity but not and English. , .Still, he said, he wishes, he justice," CAFOD said in a statement. could do more to reach out to the CAFODadded that "disappoint-. Mandarin-speaking population. ments, alongside the, undeniable "Look around. The Chinese achievements, spring partly from the population is growing, growing high hopes and ambitions with which Visit our website at tremendously," said Father Chin. Tony Blaircame to power ... and partly www•• "And because we're not so active from the leaking away ofinternational in our printed material arid what. influence that has dogged the prime for religious gifts,suited for'any occasion: not, the evangelicals are taking minister since the invasion of Iraq." over." Blair, who became prime minister Bibles Baptism Father Chin believes the work- in May 1997, told Labor Party memFirst Communion Confirmation , ing-class, mainland Chinese , IJers at the Tnmdon Labor Qub in his' constituency of Sedgefield, England, population has a great deal to ofMusic & Videos Rosaries and more... fer the Church in Canada. "These that he would step down June 27. Blair .people could suffer communism ' told supporters, many' of whom have . Sullivan's Catholic Store I, for over 50 years imd hang on to grown disillusioned with the war 'in 428 Main Street, Hyannis, MA 02601 their faith. That's something we Iraq, that he did what he ''thought was ' Phone: 1-508~775-4180 - Fax: 1-508-778-6988 need," he said. "We need this sort right for our country." Father John Caden, 83, the of life testimony to a faith in spite of dungeon, fire, whatever." Sedgefield priest who baptized Blair's

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6 Christ, the Church and the believer Prior to Benedict XVI's arrival in Brazil, therewas much speculation about how he would address some burning issues for the Church in Brazil and throughout Latin America. These are the issues that will comprise much ofthe conversation of the decennial General Conference 'of the Bishops of Latin America and the Caribbean (CELAM) which Benedict had come to inaugurate: the exodus of many Catholics to Pentecostal movements; a drastic shortage ofpriests, especially outside of cities; the false but popularpoliticization of the Gospel by some theologies of liberation; the presence ofincreasingly dictatoriai regimes, ofleft and right, to which Latin America seems prone; and the pressure on Latin American cultures to accept a secularist agen~ on moral issues coming from forces outside the continent. Benedict's response to these challenges surpassed all expectations. Everthe master teacher and synthesist, he first identified a common cause for all of them and then a global solution. What he proposed ought to be more than a matter ofmere curiosity for Catholics in Massachusetts. It's relevant not just because one out of every two Catholics in the world now lives in Latin America or because tens of thousands 'of Catholic immigrants from Latin America now live and worship in our diocese. His global solution is relevant as well because it provides the foundation for a truly Christian response tothe challenges we face closer to home. . . . The pope said that the problems the Church in Latin America faces all stem ultimately from a weakness and confusion about the faith. Therefore, the firSt and most important step in remedying those problems, he proposed, must be to clarify the identity of Christ, the Church and the Catholic believer. He first focused on Jesus Christ. Contrary to the ideas ofMarxist liberation theologians; Jesus was not a political messiah with a mission to topple the Romans and establish an earthly kingdom: Instead, Benedict stated, he was the "missionary of the Father" with the task "that all men ... be saved and come to the knowledge of the truth." The "core ofhis entire saving message" and salvific means was a genuine ' love that overflows in deeds. ''No one has greater love than to lay down his life for his friends," Benedict stresses, pointing,to Jesus' words and action. Christ is the missionary of God the Father's love and saves uS through love. The Church's identity flows directly from Christ's. "The Church'~ mission," Benedict says, "exists only as a prolongation of Christ's mission: 'As the Father has sent me, so I send you.'" Since Jesus was sent by the Father to reconcile simiers to himself, Benedictconcludes that ''this, and nothing else, is the purpose of the Church: the salvation of individual souls." Our motivation for that mission, like Christ's, must be love. Jesus "loved even to the extent of giving his life for us on the cross," Benedict accentuates, and ''the action of the Church and of Christians in society must have this same inspiration." He succinctly adds, 'The Church has been sent forth to spread Christ's love throughout the world, so that individuals and peoples 'may have life, and have it abundantly.'" The believer's identity flows from the reality of the Church. Each ofus is called to live in Christ's love and to spread it, to be a "disciple and missionary oflove." The first step, that of "authentic Christian living," seeking genuine ''holiness of life." The second step is to ','evangelize" whicb is to spread God's love to others. These flow directly from love ofGod and love 9fneighbQr, respectively. Benedictemphasizes that the Church "does not engage in proselytism" or pressured conversions, but rather grows by "attraction" to the "irresistible missionary power ... of holiness," which is the light of Christ's love radiating through translucent believers. The mission of believers, therefore, must be to introduce others ~o the living, loving Christ encountefed in his Church. ''Being Christian," Benedict writes in his first encyclical, "is not the result of an ethical choice or a lofty idea, but the encounter with an event, a person; which gives life a new horizon and a decisive direction." For this reason, he comments during his visit, ''Christians should be aware that they are not following a character from past history, but the living Christ, present in the today and the now oftheirlives. He is the livingone who walks alongside us, revealing to Us the meaning of events, of suffering and death, of rejoicing and feasting, entering our homes and remaining there, feeding us with th~ bread that gives life." The God in whom we believe is not "merely imagined or hypothetical, but God with a human face; he is God-with-us, the GOd who loves even to the cross." So many of the problems facing the Church and society in Latin America and NorthAmerica flow from Catholics' nevercoming into contact with this living Jesus Christ. Some people walk away from a Jesus whom they thirik is either dead or boring. Others stay, but live an unattractive discipleship grounded on following some man-made image ofJeSus. Others leave the Church to seekhim in places where they thirik he abides. Benedict says all these problems come from a flawed evangelization. 'Those who are most vulnerable to the aggressive proselytizing ofsects ... and those who are incapable of resisting. the onslaught of agnosticism, relativism and secularization are generally the baptized who remain insufficiently evangelized; they are easily influenced because their faith is weak, confused, easily shaken and naive, despite their innate religiosity." Once that happens, in large enough numbers, all ofsociety suffers. ''If we do not ' ,know God in and with Christ, all of reality istransfonned into an indecipherable enigma," the pope charges. "Wherever God and his will are unknown, wherever faith in Jesus Christ and in his sacramental presence is lacking, the essential element for the solution of pressing social and political problems is also missing." Without .seeing "God with the human face ofJesus Christ," society ''will not find the necessary consensus on moral values or the strength to live according to the model of these values." Stated positively, 'The presence of God, friendship with the incarnate Son ofGod, the light ofhis word: these are always fun~ental conditions for the presence and efficacy ofjustice and love in our societies." The fundamental mission and service of the Church's believers, Benedict says, it to help society solve its "indecipherableenigrna" through contact with the God, ''who has shown us his face in Jesus Christ." The ''most precious inheritance" Latin Americans have, is the "priceless treasure offaith in God who is love." Benedict calls them to rejoice in this inexhaustible'inheritance and spend it in addressing urgent ecclesial and social problems. We will turn to those applications in upcomingweeks. , ,

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JAKE LENNON AND SHAUN GORDON WERE ALL SMILES AFfER RECEIVING THE SACRAMENT OF CONFIRMATION RECENTIX AT ST. JOHN THE EVANGELIST PARISH IN POCASSET. FROM LEFT ARE LENNON, PASTOR FATHER ROBERT C. DONOVAN, MSGR. DANIEL F. HoYE AND GORDON.

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The guide to all truth As Wf:, near the end of the Easter season, and prepare to celebrate the coming of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost, we recall the words of • Christ concerning the role the Holy Spirit would plltt'jn his newly established Church. On the eve of his death, as Christ addressed the Aposties with his parting words, he ,spoke to them of "another Counselor," or "Advocate," who would soon be sent to them. Christ told the Apostles, ''Nevertheless I tell you the truth: it is to your advantage that I go away, for if I do not go away, the Counselor will not come to you;'but ifl go, I will send him to you" (In 16:7). Christ described this Counselor as ''the Spirit of truth" (In 14: 17), and explained the important part the Spirit would play in God's act of revelation: "But the Counselor, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, he will teach you all things, and bring to your remembrance all that I have said to you': (In 14:26). It would be the. task of the Holy Spirit to safeguard and secure the revelation deposited by Christ to the Apostles. ·It was the Spirit who helped the Apostles remember what Christ had said, so that years later, when their memories were committed to writing, in their memoirs called the Gospels, the revelation of Christ would be accurately recorded. It can sometimes happen, when reading certain passages of the Gospels, that the doubt presents itself to our minds whether the

words are truly those of Christ, or were instead fabricated by the writers to convey their faith in him. When this happens, we must remember that the Scriptures are unlike other human wri~gs they are truly sacred, produced by the divine influence of the Holy Spirit, while remaining historical, tru~ to the actual words and deeds of Christ. No matter how sophisti-,

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(Dei Verbum, No. 11). . In addition to recording accurately the teachings of Christ, the Apostles also had to apply those teachings to answer specific moral questions, in order to guide the first believers to live a life consistent with the revelation of Christ. In this important task, they again had the assistance and guidance of the Holy Spirit, who would not allow them to err; for, Our Lord had promised them, ''When the Spirit of truth comes, he will guide you into all the truth" (In 16:13). The truth of the Spirit's work in safeguarding and preserving the revelation~ of Christ is attested to by St. Peter, who ,must have become convinced of the Spirit's presence and influence in his own sacred writings. St. Peter reminds us: "Know this first of all, that there is no prophecy of scripture that is a matter of personal interpretation, for no prophecy ever came through human will; but rather human beings moved by the Holy Spirit spoke under the influence of God" (2Pet 1:20-21; see also 2Tirn 3:16). As we prepare to celebrate the descent of the Holy Spirit on the early Church, we can put into the deep of our faith by reaffinning our ' belief that it is the Holy Spirit, the Spirit of truth, who has guided the Church in preserving the teachings of Christ, and who guides her still toaay.

Father Pignato is chaplain at Bishop Stang High School in North Dartmouth and is secretary to Bishop George If. Coleman.


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Me, of little faith If the Twelve Apostles were I tuned into NESN just in time alive today. and if they were Red to see thousands of jubilant Sox fans, I think I'd be most like fanatics partying in and out of good old St. Thomas. Not Fenway Park. That seemed a bit because of the saint part, but too unusual following a 5-0 loss, even for Sox fans, so I stayed because of the doubting part. tuned. While Red Sox Nation was Lo and behold, our boys whooping it up on Mothers Day following the Home Towne , rallied with six runs in the ninth Team's miraculous six-run, to win, becoming only the ninth-inning resurrection from second team in the last 28 years the dead, I, Thomas, was glued to do so in Major League to the tube watching Jeff Gordon Baseball. And I was watching and his steam-spewing Chevy NASCAR. I called downstairs to Denise to turn the game back on, for she too had bailed out, and was, in keeping with the day's take the checkered flag at nautical theme, channel surfing. Darlington Raceway in South We watched the post-game Carolina. show together. While doing so, Denise and I had every our next door neighbor popped intention of watching the in with a confession. He Mothers Day matinee from admitted he had given up on the Sox and was watching, of all Fenway. After our oldest son took mom (and Emilie and me) things, NASCAR. Knowing I out for a glorious sushi banquet, am the neighborhood Sox we headed home filled with maniac, he felt compelled to seaweed and raw fish ready for apologize for his lack of faith. Red Sox baseball. That does Like Thomas, I had to sound like something the swallow my pride and admit . Apostles would have done. failure as well, which seemed to We watched the Sox flounder ease the guilt of my remorseful for a while, but with them . neighbor. That's why I'm here I trailing 5-0 heading into the suppose. ninth inning, I figured my best All else aside, Mothers Day entertainment dollar would turned out to be a pretty good come from the Deep South. day in the Jolivet household. Thomas would have been proud. My wife was showered with Following the steamboat's chocolates and toiletries, half of impressive Nextel Cup win, I which she can share with me. figured I switch over to watch Phil She enjoyed a wonderful fresh Mickelson wrap up the PLAYERS fish feast, of which I shared in Championship, also emanating as well. And, she got to bask in from down south at TPC Sawgrass, the glory of an incredible Red near Jacksonville, Fla Sox comeback victory, as did I, My trip from South Carolina somewhat. to Florida was derailed when I I can't wait for Fathers Day. thought I'd first confirm my No doubt about that. worst suspicions about the Sox. davejolivet@anchornews.org

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This is the second in a series by Father Thomas M. Kocik on the distinctiveness ofthe Catholic faith. Monsignor Ronald Knox, a convert from Anglicanism and arguably the most brilliant English Catholic writer of the last century, famously quipped that the comparative study of religions is the best way to become comparatively religious. There are two ways to understand this. When, for example, we learn of similarities between Christianity and the preChristian myths that tell of gods who descend to earth, die, and are resurrected, we might be led to infer that Christianity is simply a recasting of old myths and nothing more, in which case we will have lost our faith. In fact, the resemblance of certain pagan myths to the passion and resurrection of Jesus was used as an aIgUDlent against Christian faith from the earliest days of the Church. Those who discredit Christianity as mythical would have us believe that the stories of Dionysus, Attis, Adonis, Osiris, and Jesus are variants of the same primordial theme. But there is another way of taking it. Rather than read the . Gospels in light of the world's myths, we might turn the tables and interpret myth in light of the Gospels. From this perspective, we discover bits and hints of the truth fully revealed in Jesus Christ:Just as God spoke directly to Abraham and the Hebrew prophets, so, we might say, he planted "seeds of the Word" in the minds of pagan mythmakers to prepare the world

for the coming of his Son in the fullness of time. Such w~ the view of the Church Fathers and later Christian apologists, including C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkem (fine mythmakers in their owtl. right). Whatever intimations o~ higher truth contained in ancient mythology became historical fact in Christ: Or, to put it in biblical terms, ''the Word became flesh and dwelt among us" (John 1:14). " As I wrote in this series'

introduction, our faith can be more vibrant when we open our eyes to , God's mysterious dealings with all peoples and cultures; we can then appreciate more deeply the fullness of God's saving truth as this comes to us from Israel to the Apostles and from one generation to' the next within the Church. Before we lilunch our investigation 6f the major world religions, however, it is worth pausing to take ~otice of the prevailing intellectual climate. Among those on the commanding heights of culture the . Marxists used to say), ~specially in the universities, it is widely assumed that there is rtosingle, unifying, uppercase Truth. There is "your" truth and "my'; truth, what ''works'' for you and what ''works'' for me; but the truth is either nonexistent or unknowable. From

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this assumption, it follows that "enlightened" spirituality does not revolve around anyone concept of God; nor does it require that we. believe in anyone creed, anyone set of doctrines, anyone recipe for salvation, or, for that matter, any One. To quote the bumper-sticker version of the same, "God is too big to fit into one religion:' And so we have the reason why countless spiritual seekers drift through the reli~ous marketplace, sampling and browsing but never committing lest they miss out on something good. The dominant philosophical mood has little . . patience for the idea of a . God who cares whether and how we conceive him, worship him, and order our lives in his service. This raises obvious difficulties for serious Christians, Jews, Muslims, and other people offaith who insist that it is just as possible to get it wrong in religion as in algebra It is taken for granted that no one religion or plillosophy can grasp the whole of reality. There is a certain truth in that assumption, and we cannot afford to , ignore it when considering Catholicism's claim to the fullness of truth. Therefore, as a final preliminary to our tour of the major religious traditions, we will explore the possibility and limits of human knowledge about God and the world. Only then will we be able to grasp and express the Catholic claim in an intellectually responsible way. That is our task for next time.

Father Kocik is chaplain at CharIJon Memorial Hospital in Fan River.

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Endings and beginnings' - The last Sunday of Easter. - The last pericope from the Book of Revelation. - The last prayer at the Last Supper in the last Gospel. If anything, this Sunday is about endings. As with all endings, however, it must be about beginnings, too: Stephen is the first martyr, the first to fall for the faith. The Spirit, whose coming was heralded last Sunday, is still in evidence: Stephen is Spirit-filled, the Church and the Spirit callout Maranatha, and John's Jesus intimates the Spirit's work when he promises to make his Father's name known. In all the Johannine "unity" talk ("you are in me and I in you"; "I in them and you in me"), there is hidden something mightily important for us to hear: Jesus prays "for all those who will believe in me through their word." First Reading: Acts 7:55-60 In today's portion of the Acts of the Apostles, Luke recounts the death of Stephen. In Luke's first volume, his

Gospel, Jesus had died with the words, "Father, into your hands I commend my spirit," and had prayed for the Father to forgive his executioners. In Acts, Stephen dies with similar words on his lips, thus providing another model of how Christians ought to face their deaths. Second Reading: Revelation 22:12-14,1617,20 Today's second reading concludes several weeks of excerpts from the book of Revelation by presenting the final verses of that New Testament book. The author, writing to churches that have been the victims of Roman oppression and torture, encourages his readers to remain steadfast in the faith. Jesus is coming soon to conquer the evildoers and to exalt the righteous. Gospel: John 17:20-26 In this passage from John's Gospel, Jesus prays for his followers of both yesterday and today.

Jesus is away. Formerly at this time, the Easter candle that reminded us of him was put . .aside. Now we continue to light it since we still have a week of Eastertide to go. Pentecost is now seen as the last moment of the "Fifty Days of Easter."

We are, like the Apostles in those in-between days, waiting. Those Apostles must have been waiting with a certain amount of apprehension. They knew their waiting was a lull before the storm, a pause before their work, an intermission before their mission. It is about that mission that Jesus speaks in today's Gospel reading. The Gospel of John speaks again and again about that mission left by him. In

John's Gospel, Jesus speaks 21 times about being sent by the Father into this world. Today's mission is well known: "That they may be one, as you, Father, and I, your offspring, are one." We all know that text very well. We especially know it within an ecumenical context. "That they may be one" seems to us to mean that Jesus prayed that the Lutherans, Presbyterians, Roman Catholics, Quakers, Methodists, Baptists, and Reformed churches might be one. Did Jesus know how badly we Christians would make things? That would be an anachronistic reading of this text. Maybe Jesus did not pray for that unity, though that unity will be the outcome of his prayers. He prayed for another unity , among his Apostles and those who would listen to those Apostles. To reduce the text to "ecumenism" may be one of our attempts to escape from our

real mission in this world, if only because ecumenism is something that seems to concern Church leadership, and therefore others. We always try to escape from our real mission, Jesus prays, "That they may be one as I am one with you, Father, who sent me: one in the intention to redeem, to save, to liberate, to serve, to assist, to deliver, to make grow. Father, let them be one in that redemptive purpose of ours." It is at that very practical level that Jesus prays we should be one. It is at that level that Jesus hopes the world may start to believe in him, the Father, the Spirit, and us, his followers. It is from that point of view that Jesus says, when they report to him that others are driving out the devils of this world in his name: "Don't bother, my name is preached, my mission is on its way." "Father, that they may be one, as you and I are one, you who sent me into this world." Amen. Father Bergeron is pastor ofSt. Anne's Parish in Fall River.

Upcoming Dally Readings: Sat, May 19, Acts 18:23-28; Ps 47:2-3,8-10; In 16:23b-28. Sun, May 20, Seventh Sunday of Easter, Acts 7:55-60; Ps 97:1-2,6-7,9; Rv 22:12-14,16-17,20; In 17:20-26, MOD, May 21, Acts 19:1-8; Ps 68:2-5ac,6-7ab; In 16:29-33. 'lUes, May 22, Acts 20:17-27; Ps 68:1O-1I,20-21; In 17:1-lIa. Wed, May 23, Acts 20:28-38; Ps 68:29-30,33-36c; In 17:l1b-19. Thurs, May 24, Acts 22:30;23:6-1I; Ps 16:1-2a,5,7-1I; In 17:20-26. Fri, May 25, Acts 25:13~21; Ps 103:1-2,1I-12,19-20ab; In 21:15-19.

Gonzalez v. Carhart again and again by this Court and with increasing comprehension of its centrality to women's lives.' Now imagine you're speaking to an anthropologist who has just returned from a previously undiscovered primitive tribal community on lL remote islaiid in the South Pacific. If he' reports that the ability to bear children is a central factor in the lives of the tribe's women, you might figure that you'd met another one of those remarkable social scientists who has found a way to earn a living by saying the blatantly obvious. B,ut if he told you that the right to Stort your day with our hearty breakfast: kill their own children was Stroll ta the beach in Kennebunkport essential to these women, you'd village or relax in our saltwater pool. have to conclude that the island is a terrible place, populated by. Aunique, yet affordable experience bloodthirsty pagan savages, and any sane traveler should stay away." , .Vet that seems to be precisely what Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was asserting: that the legal right to kill their offspring is "central" to the lives of American women. ft'anci5can 6uest JOouse Not good. AIin/e taste ofHeaven on Earth The anti-Catholic bigots 26 Beach Avenue' Kennebunkport, Maine quickly exposed their hand in the (207) 967-4865 www.franciscanguesthouse.com . wake of Gonzalez v. Carhart. The morning after the decision was

The day after the Supreme Court upheld the federal partial birth abortion ban by a five-four vote, the pseudonymous "Diogenes" offered a rather chilling commentary on the Catholic World News Web site: "In her angry dissent in Gonzalez v. Carhart, Justice Ginsburg writes that the majority decision ' ...cannot be understood as anything other than an effort to chip away at a right declared /

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handed down, Philadelphia Inquirer cartoonist Tony Auth depicted nine Supreme Court justices behind the bench, five of them wearing miters. University

of Chicago law professor Geoffrey Stone noted in a blog posting that "all five justices in the majority are Catholic" and charged that the papist quintet had "failed to respect the fundamental difference between religious belief and morality." About which my colleague, Edward Whelan, . made two telling observations: (1) It is absurd on many levels to suggest that Chief Justice Roberts and Justices Kennedy, Scalia, Thomas, and Alito were imposing their religious beliefs on the nation..Rather, Whelan wrote, "they were deferring to the entirely reasonable moral judgments of the American people, manifested through bipartisan majorities in Congress.;' How is it an imposition of religious belief to uphold .the constitutionality of

a law democratically enacted with to the innocent). Like Justice Ginsburg's assertion of what's bipartisan support? Were all the "central",to women's lives, this members of the Senate and the intellectual bewitchment bodes ill House of Representatives who on many fronts. voted to ban partial birth abortion Senate Majority Leader Harry imposing Catholic' Reid (D-NV), who had voted for dogma on the republic? the Pm:tial birth abortion ban, Please. criticized Justice Samuel Alito for (2) The legal and upholding the ban, which historical facts of the suggested a certain, er, senatorial matter, Whelan inconsistency. But perhaps the continued, are that the four dissenting justices truer consistency here is the ih Gonzalez v. Carhart . consistency of political expediency, for Senator Reid knows that - Ginsburg, Stevens, the pro-abortion lobby, a cru~ial Souter, and Breyer - "have a component of DemocratiC fundconsistent record of misconraising, will brook no dissent struing the Constitution to from its extremism. This puts impose their own substantive preferences" - which is to say, Democrats who may have qualms their preferred policy outcomes, about infanticide (as Senator Reid evidently once did) in a very tight like an unrestricted abortion box. license. A smart Democratic presidenThus the attempt to defend the tial candiQate would embrace the constitutionally indefensible (Le., Roe v. Wade) continues to unhinge' Court's decision as the beginning of a new, rational consideration of prominent lligal scholars like the abortion issue in American Geoffrey Stone. Ta suggest that public life. As things stand now, Roe can· only be opposed on Democratic candidates are grounds of religious dogma is to expected to defend infanticide. betray an ignorance one would That's not a task the more prefer not to associate with thoughtful of them are likely to faculty members of a distinwelcome. guished law school: an ignorance George Weigel is a senior of both elementary embryology (the product of human conception fellow ofthe Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington, is a human being) and the first D.C. principles of justice (do no harm


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How I gained access to the secret archives Sunday 13 May 2007 Library also contains art, postage Dayton, Ohio - Mother's Day stamps, prayer cards, recordings, Every year I travel to the medals, and rosaries - all Marian Marian Library and International themed. There is a reference Marian Research Center. It's located in the Roesch building at the University of Dayton. The Marian Library has the world's largest and most comprehensive collecc--Goldrick tion of printed materials " r. on the Blessed Mother - some 100,000 books and collection of Scripture commenpamphlets in 50 languages. These tary, patristics, theology, and include treatises, books on Marian history. It's the world's clearingshrines, sermons, newspaperl house of information on authentic magazine clippings, and antholoMarian devotion, a center for gies of Marian poetry. The Marian continuing study and research. .-'~.,_.c:

The director of the Marian Library is Swiss-born Father Johann Roten. Father Roten, a Marist priest and professor, lectures extensively on Mariology in Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas. He is the I president of Mariology Society of Ameri(;a. He is a founding member of Friends of the Creche, the national organization for those who collect Nativities. He is also a fun guy. Father Roten invites me to view the library's permanent creche exhibit. This collection was begun in 1994. The Marian Library's creche collection is

The Prayer of Jabez: a~c~ the rosary During summer break I enjoy challenging myself to learn more about one subject. A few summers back I was given a book titled ''The Prayer of Jabez," so I decided to make it and prayer the focus of my summer learning. Written by a contemporary Evangelical author, the book encourages readers to repeat a brief prayer from I Chronicles 4:9-10 and to ask for specific blessings from God on a daily basis. The prayer goes like this, "And Jabez called on the God of Israel saying, 'Oh, that You would bless me indeed, and enlarge my territory, that Your hand would be with me, and that You would keep me from evil. that I may not cause pain!" Building on the phrase "enlarge my territory" the author instructed me to pray for anything that I believed would allow me to live a fuller. more abundant life because these were the things that he claimed would transform my life and help me spread the Gospel. Things like a raise, a promotion, or a just a bigger and better life all counted. I liked the idea of praying from Scripture. but as I put this prayer into action, I began to have doubts. Did the prayer in anyway account for the fact that God's answer to my earnest requests for more "territory" might be, "No?" Was this prayer leading my heart toward God or toward being more selfcentered than ever? Finally I asked myself, was this prayer increasing my hope in God's provision or leading me to presume on God like a good

luck charm? Midway through the saine summer I found myself trying to explain Catholic prayer forms to a Lutheran friend and discovered that rknew more about the Prayer of Jabez than about the rosary! I was totally embarrassed and ashamed. By the end of the summ~r I was so uncomfortable with the Prayer

of Jabezthat I stopped praying it altogether. The following summer I made Mary the topic of my summer learning and read a copy of "Hail Holy Queen" by Scott Hahn. I, also began my journey to learn how to pray the rosary. As with the Prayer of Jabez, we are encouraged to pray the rosary OIl a. daily basis. Likewise, the primary prayers of the rosary,' the Our Father and,the Hail MarY. are straight from Scripture and th~ d~cades led me to memorize events from the life of Christ. Most importantly, as I prayed, I felt that my heart was led toward God and opened to the importance of regularly interceding for others, not just praying for my own gain. ' In October of that same year, Pope John Paul n declared it to be the Year of the Rosary. Due to the work the Holy Spirit had done in my heart and mind over the past two summers, our entire family committed to praying a one-decade rosary

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.every night that year. Since then the rosary has taken root in oUr home and flowered into a beautiful instrument of ongoing personal· and family prayer. As Cradle Catholics, there is a good cbance that some of the riches of Catholic tradition are just so much background noise. We might think, "Yeah, my mother prayed the'rosaryor novenas, but I need something with a little more pizzazz!" It's almost as if we've been inoculated against Catholicism due to small, insufficient doses of it, ~ when we wereyouog. For this reason we are' highly SUsceptible to and . easily wooed by New Age ,~c spiritual fads like Fungi She" other religious practices like . yoga: or even u-endy new . devotional.practicespublisbed by contemporary Christian authors. We honestly believe that newer is better. Wen. in my ~petienceof the Prayer of Jabez versus the rosary, newness bas nothing to do with the effectiveness. In our desire to commwricat~ witb God through prayer I believe it is worth the effort to go back and mine the riches of Catholic tradition. In Catholicism we find contemplative, charismatic, meditative, vocal, silent, and many other forms of prayer that have empowered God's people over nearly all seven continents for over 2,000 years. Now, it would be hard to enlarge one's territory too much more than that. Heidi is an author, photographer, and full-time mother. She and her husband raise their five children in Falmouth. homegrownfaith@yahoo.com.

9 made possible through the generosity of friends and donors under an organization known as Creches International. The permanent exhibit is really not so "permanent." It changes annually. There in simple customdesigned enclosed museum caseS and display tables are about a hundred beautiful Nativity scenes from around the world. These are both folk art and fine art. Each of the scenes is arranged in a unique setting using all sorts of colorful and creative materials. The settings highlight the p¥ticular culture and aesthetics of each set. It's amazing to see the variety not only of the creches, but also of their striking settings. ibe settings are done by professional designer Michel Forrest of Montreal, Canada. Michel spend~ about a month every year at the university designing and fabricating exquiSite new creche settings~ Friends of the Creche presented :ryu.chel Forrest with the prestigious "Award of Recognition" at its 2003 national convention in II Hyannis. ! This year, for the first time, Father Roten brings nie into the creche storage area. This secure facility is located in a large building, formerly a factory for National Cash Regist~r Company, and now owned by th~ university. I can't believe my eyes. There are hundreds of creches archived there - about 1,400 ~ets. Some are still in their display cases. Others are carefully stored in museum-style cardboard boxes. Each piece of each stored set is individually rolled in foam sheeting, tied carefully with string at both ends, and placed gently in _the appropriate box. The boxes are coded to indicate their contents. There is also a written placard describing each creche and a photographic record. I am very ~areful not to accidentally knock anything over. Father Rottep is way too trusting. You know me. Fortunately, I manage to control myself. Those Tai Chi classes have proven helpful. My visit to the secret archives is like experiencing Christmas all over again. I love it, but then again I'm a Nativity nut. These sets are stationary at the moment, but every Advent! Christmas season most of them circulate for public displays. In addition to the exhibit at the Marian Research Center, there is also a display at the Cathedral of St. yeter in Chains in Cincinnati

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and in the Art Institute of Dayton. Both regular and juried creche exhibits are held at these two locations and elsewhere. Then there is a separate cycle of creches that goes out to parishes and schools in the area. There are also special exhibits which are sent out occasionally to various other sites. Father Roten and his staff are now preparing a traveling exhibit that will tour the United States. Similar plans are afoot in our own diocese. The Anchor (27 April 2007), featured a photograph of workers demolishing the old concrete-block building at the National Shrine of Our Lady of La Salette in Attleboro. The site will be the location of a new visitor's center that will include an-auditorium, a bistro, a display of the history of the order, and a new gift shop. Ground breaking was held April 29. What's to become of the old gift shop? According to Shrine Director Brother Bob Russell, MS, if all goes well the former gift shop space will be refitted as a permanent creche exhibit, with additional areas for expanded seasonal displays. La Salette Shrine has been exhibiting creches seasonally since the late 1980s and has been quietly building its own collection over the years. The creche display has proven very popular. The proposed permanent creche exhibit in Attleboro will have the potential to eventually become the largest in the United States. Who ever said Christmas can't last all year? It will if Brother Bob Russell has anything to say about it. Father Goldrick is pastor of St. Bernard Parish, Assonet. Comments are welcome at StBernardAssonet@aol.com. Previous columns are at www.StBernardAssonet.org.

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Media wizard David Fortin's work advances Catholic Charities Appeal By MIKE GORDON, ANCHOR STAFF NEW BEDFORD - In a darkened office in downtown New Bedford, David Fortin works diligently creating videos about the Catholic Charities Appeal that nrises funds to benefit thousands of persons across the Fall River Diocese. '''Ibis is a way 1can use my talents and expertise to help Catholic Charities and further the work of the Church," said Fortin, this week's Person of the Week. "I appreciate the opportunity to work for the annual Appeal." Fortin and his wife Anne are parishioners at St. Joseph's in Fairhaven. Together they own and operate Media Image Productions Inc., creating professional programs for business, industry and education. ''We've been in business 22 years and I've always enjoyed multi-media work," he said. When The Anchor visited his office, Fortin was working on a safety training video involving shipyard accidents. He said being named a Person ofthe Week was ''unexpected.'' Fortin, a native of Fairhaven, attended Catholic schools in the diocese and graduated from Bishop Stang High School in North DartANCHOR PERSON OF THE WEEK mouth. He holds a bachelor's degree from Emerson College in Boston, where he studied communications and television production. ''I remember as a student being invited by Msgr. John F. Moore to come and watch the making of the television Mass for Channel 6. "I found that very interesting and year's later here I am." Fortin became involved with the yearbook in high school and did numerous multimedia projects for the school including slide presentations for graduation. He went on to work as a senior AV technician at Stone and Webster Engineering for five years before starting his own company. Fortin has been involved with the Appeal since 1992 and each year his video creations are shown on public access television, parishes and the appeal kickoff in several deaneries. ''It's nice to be able to work with the diocese and it feels good to do this kind of work." When he first got involved in the process, clients and service providers came to his office in New Bedford where they were interviewed and photographed. ''We did photos and live video at first," explained Fortin. "Eventually we went on location at the various ministries where we could see people being helped first-hand. We get to interview those who are directly - helped by the effort. We get to see the fruits of the labor and in the video you can see the work of Christ and the Church." Several stories made an impact on Fortin, including one woman who was a homeowner for 16 years who lost her job and ended up a the Samaritan House. Another woman and her daughter also found themselves homeless and were living at the Donovan House. Both locations are benefactors of the annual Appeal. ''We interview and ask about 15-20 questions. Then we make an audiotape and my wife creates a transcript of all that was said. Then on paper we select what we want and begin the process of editing." It's no easy task for Fortin who generally ends up with five to six hours of footage and has to edit those 330 minutes to about 12. ''We do several versions of the video," said Fortin. ''We do a 12-minute version eree. , •

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PRAYERFUL WALK - Processing with Bishop George W. Coleman, center, during feast of Senhor Santo Cristo dos Milagres, in St. Michael, Azores, are, left, Bishop Emeritus Aurelio Granada Escudeiro, former bishop of the Azores; and at right, Msgr. Antonio da Luz of Capelas, Azores, godfather to Father Henry S. Arruda, pastor of St. Anthony Parish in Taunton. At rear wearing miter is Bishop Antonio de Sousa Braga, bishop of the Azores. (Photo by Pedro Monteiro/Correio dos Ayores)

Msgr. John 1 Oliveira attends national meeting ofPontifical Missionary Societies DAVID FORTIN

SAN FRANCISCO - The National Meeting of the directors of the Pontifical Missionary Societies in the United States was held from April 24-26 in San Francisco, Calif. The meeting's theme was: "One family in mission' making a faithfilled difference at home - and around the world." Meeting annually, the directors and staff have an opportunity to interact with one another and with the National Directors from New York. Each year an annual financial report is presented and a specific mission society is highlighted. This year the Society of St. Peter the Apostle was featured. This segment of the Pontifical Mission Society exists to assist in the formation of priests in missionary areas. With the increasing vocations it is more important that the need be addressed. Msgr. John J. Oliveira, director of the Pontifical Mission Society for the Diocese of Fall River, raises money for this organization. He assigns parishes for this purpose through the Missionary Cooperative Plan in the summer months. Msgr. Jan Dumon, secretarygeneral of the Society of St. Peter the Apostle, made a presentation and Father Anthony Jayokody the rector of Our Lady of Lanka Seminary in Sri Lanka, addressed those needs how the SPA has assisted them. The Society welcomed Archbishop Henryk Hoser, the international president of the Pontifical Mission Society. National directors from Ireland, Ecuador, Zambia, the Antilles and Sri Lanka attended and

made presentations as well. The group had the opportunity to pray at Mass at the Cathedral of St. Mary of the Assumption with Archbishop George Niederauer of San Francisco as celebrant. The Cathedral was a beautiful setting for this solemn liturgy, overlooking the city. It offers a modem and prayerful setting for celebration. Msgr. Oliveira likes to attend the meetings when possible. "It is great to see how the contributions for the Mission Societies and especially Mission Sunday collection are utilized," he said. "It also provides an opportunity to learn about the Church throughout the United States and throughout the world. It is always a great opportunity to experience the Universal Catholic Church beyond our usual areas." New at this year's meeting was a Propagation of the Faith credit card. Users of this card will automatically have one percent of their payments donated to the National Headquarters of the Mission Society. Those interested in using this card should contact the Mission Office "I take the opportunity to thank so many who assist in making Christ known throughout the world through your generosity and prayerful remembrance," said Msgr. Oliveira. "It also assists many of brothers and sisters in need to have the basic necessities of life." For those wishing to assist the missions throughout the world or support those preparing for the priesthood, contact the Propagation ofthe Faith office at 509-995-6168.

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Israeli archaeologists say they have found King Herod's tomb By JUDITH SUDILOVSKY

ologists have long known where King Herod was buried, but they had been unsuccessful until now in their search for the actual mausoleum. Over the past three years a team lead by Netzer began circling in on an area on the northeastern slope of the hillside which the ancient king, wellknown for his architectural feats, had constructed some nine miles south of Jerusalem in commemoration of a military victory. The palace complex he built at the summit was said to be among the most spectacular of his building projects, and it was here that he chose to have his remains buried. Dominican Father Jerome Murphy-O'Connorofthe French Biblieal and Archaeological School of Jerusalem called the discovery "really important" and congratulated Netzer for his perseverance in his search for the tomb. "It is wonderful to have found pieces of the sarcophagus. (Ancient Jewish historian) Josephus Flavius is perfectly clear that Herod was buried there:' saidFather Murphy-o'Connor, noting that it would not surprise him if no inscription was found because of the ancient custom of blotting out any mention of a reviled leader such as King Herod.

CATHOUC NEWS SERVICE HERODIUM, West ~ank - After three and a half decades of scouring this dusty, he~t-scorched mountainside, Israeli archaeologists said they have finally fQund the elusive tomb of King Herod the Great. The location and unique nature of the finds as well as the historical record leave no doubt that the ·finds are the remains of the king's burial site, despite there being no inscriptions, said Ehud Netzer, the Hebrew University professor of archaeology who has led the excavations at Herodium since 1972. The dig uncovered the various buildings at the towerin~ cone-shaped site which King Herod, who ruled Judea on behalf ofRomefrom 37 B.C. to 4 B.c., had constructed. Only one or two other sarcophagi of. this monumental size and quality have been discovered, he said. "Not every rich Jewish citizen of the time could afford a sarcophagus like this," he said. '1t is reany a royal one. The stone work is very different. It is really an important, well-executed monument. It is a great $isfaction (to have found it.) I am not sure I myself have fully digested it yet." . Because 0 f anCIent texts, archaeII

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ON GUARD - One of 38 new Swiss Guard re'cruits is sworn in during a ceremony in Paul VI hall at the Vatican May 6. New recruits are sworn in every year on May 6, commemorating the date on which 147 Swiss soldiers died defending the pope during an attack on Rome in 1527. (CNS photo/ Max Rossi, Reuters)

Pope thanks Swiss Guards for dedicated, loyal service By CAROL GLATZ CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE VATICAN CITY - Pope Benedict XVI thimked the Swiss Guards for their dedicated and loyal service of watching over the Vatican and keeping popes safe. The Swiss Guard's 500 years of service to the church in Rome reflects "a long history of loyalty and generous service always offered with dedication, at times to the point of heroically sacrificing one's life," he said. The pope's comments came during a special audience with Swiss Guards and 38 new recruits. New soldiers are sworn in during a colorful ceremony at the Vatican every May 6 to commemorate the day 150 Swiss Guards died saving Pope Clement

Vll's life during the sack of Rome May 6, 1527. Pope Benedict said the guards' dedication has "rightly earned them the esteem and trust of all pontiffs" who have always been able to count on their "help, support, and protection." ''Thank you, dear friends, for your quiet, but effi~ cient presence next to the figure of the pope; thank you for your professionalism and also for the love with which you carry out your mission," he said. He told the guards to remember that in addition to being "exemplary soldiers" they are also called to be "good Christians." ''The Lord is calling you to holiness," he said, and urged them to live a life of simplicity, solidarity and prayer.

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SAND CASTLE -i-lerodium, the desert site of King Herod the Great's fortress and palace, is seen in this May 25, 1998, photo released by the Israeli Govemment Press Office. (CNS photo/ Yaacov Saar, Israeli Govemment Press Office via Reuters)

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DVD/video reviews NEW YORK (CNS) - Thefol- is PG-13 - parents strongly caulowing are capsule reviews of new tioned. Some material may be inand recent DVD and video releases appropriate for children under 13 from the Office for Film & Broad- (Sony Pictures Home Entertain~ casting of the U.S. Conference of ment). "Music and Lyrics" (2007) Catholic Bishops. Theatrical movLikable, if featherweight, roies on video have a USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classifica- mantic comedy about a has-been tion and Motion Picture Association 1980s pop star (Hugh Grant) comof America rating. These classifi- missioned to write a song for a cations refer only to the theatrical reigning pop diva (Haley Bennett) version of the films below, and do who discovers that his plant lady not take into account DVD releases' (Drew Barrymore) has a talent for extra content. lyrics, so he enlists her help, and ''Breaking & Entering" (2007) they fall in love in the process. The So-so drama about a London two leads are effortlessly charming; architect (Jude Law) -living with there's a refreshing absence of roa Swedish-American divorcee mantic conflict and nice message (Robin Wright Penn) and her au- about real values and believing in tistic 13-year-old daughter - who oneself, but for all that and despite has an' affair with the widowed some funny barbs about the music Bosnian mother (Juliette Binoche) business, the film could have used of a troubled boy who has broken a bit more wit. Apart from a single into the architect's inner-city office, implied premarital encounter, prompting are-evaluation of his life writer-director Marc Lawrence's and relationships against the city's film is mostly devoid of objectionevolving cultural landscape. Writ~r- able elements, making this acceptdirector Anthony Minghella's film able for older adolescents. Morefeatures good performances, but mentioned tryst, some skimpy cosinterweaves its themes of immigra- tuming and gyrating moves from tion, motherhood and economic the pop star, brief physical scuffle, disparity into a plot that's not terri- mild sexual banter and innuendo. bly compelling, though its moral The USCCB Office for Film & resolution involves forgiveness and Broadcasting classification is A-ill reconciliation. Some rough and - adults. The Motion Picture Ascrude language and profanity, up- sociation of America rating is PGper female nudity, a prostitute char- 13 - parents strongly cautioned. acter, a couple of nongraphic sexual Some material may be inappropriencounters, some sexual banter, in- ate for children under 13 (Warner fidelity and a condom reference. Home Video). The USCCB Office for Film & ''The Painted Veil" (2006) Excellent film adaptation of W. Broadcasting classification is A-ill - adults. The Motion Picture As- Somerset Maugham novel set in the 1920s about an English bacteriolosociation ofAmerica rating is R restricted. Under 17 requires ac- gist (Edward Norton) who, after he companying parent or adult guard- learns of his bored socialite wife's ian (Weinstein). . (Naomi Watts) infidelity, venge"Catch and Release" (2007) ..' fully insists she accompany him to Dour, slow-moving romantie,' a remote Chinese village during a comedy about a woman (Jennifer dangerous cholera epidemic there, ·Garner) whose fiancee is killed and how, over time, they establish shortly before their wedding who a deep and abiding love, with the . learns that he fathered a child with; wife even volunteering to minister an out-of-town massage therapist to the sick at the local hospital run (Juliette Lewis) who eventually by nuns. Lushly photographed on comes to town with the child in tow, location, the film - under John moving in with her and her fiance's Curran's direction - unfolds at a buddies (Kevin Smith, Sam Jaeger leisurely pace, but the intelligent and Timothy Olyphant) with ensu- love story at its core, and the spiriing romantic complications. Writer- tual journey and ultimate redempdirector Susannah Grant's formu- tion for its heroine, are movingly laic chick flick strains for credibil- conveyed, with impressive, nuity, the acting is bland (especially anced performances by the leads, Olyphant as her principal love in- as well as by Diana Rigg, Liev terest), and is unredeemed by the Schreiber and Toby Jones. A brief overall message of forgiveness and scene of lovemaking with shadowy a reasonably moral wrap-up. Per- nudity, a flash of rear nudity, inmissive sexual mores, intimate en- nuendo, adultery, images of the counters (one intense but fully sick and dying, drug use and a few clothed, the other gauzily photo- crass expressions. The USCCB graphed with no actual nudity), Office for Film & Broadcasting sexual banter and innuendo, some classification is A-III - adults. crude language and expressions and The Motion Picture Association of profanity, a suicide attempt and America rating is PG-13 - pardrug use. The USCCB Office for ents strongly cautioned. Some Film & Broadcasting classification material may be inappropriate for is A-ill - adults. The Motion Pic- children under 13 (Warner Home ture Association of America rating Video).

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ICailViUII11ei NEW YORK (CNS) - The following are capsule reviews of movies recently reviewed by the Office for Filnl & Broadcasting ofthe U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. ''Civic Duty" (Freestyle) An out-of~work accountant (peter Krause) begins to suspect that his nextdoor neighbor, Muslim student (KhaledAbol Naga), may be a terrorist and reports him to a skeptical FBI agent (Richard Schiff), much to the consternation of his wife (Kari Matchett), who scoffs at his unfounded suspicions. Jeff Renfroe directs with the requisite tension and Krause is especially good mixing his average-Joe persona with increasingly loony paranoia, but although Andrew Joiner's script grapples with some interesting post-September 11 themes, the presumably intentional ambiguity ofcertain plot elements undermines the message of an otherwise suspenseful thriller. Rough and crude language, mild profanity, innuendo, ethnic slurs, moderate violence including a shooting death, nongraphic husband-wife sexual encounter, domestic discord and briefdrug reference. The USCCB

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Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is A-ill'-:" adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R - restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian. . ''Georgia Rule" (Universal) Uneven drama (with some comic moments) about a San Francisco mother (Felicity Huffman) who leaves her deeply troubled 17-year-old daughter (an impressive Lindsay Loban) in the care of a stern but loving, God-fearing grandmother (Jane Fonda) in small-town Idaho. Director' Garry Marshall's glossy soap opera is well acted, and ultimately delivers a pro-family message, along with other positive themes of intergenerational bonding and forgiveness, but the formulaic plot, insufficiently defined characters and tawdry elements like the granddaughter's blatant sexuality and gutter language, a major sexual abuse theme and patronizing view of the pious Mormon townspeople are detriments. Strong sexual material, though no nudity, implied underage encounters, innuendo, rough and crude language and profanity, domestic violence, blackmail, heavy alcohol use and drug references. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is L - limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R - restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

"Paris, Je T'Ahne" (First Look) A kaleidoscopic anthology of 18 vignettes, each directed by a top-narne filmmaker (Gus Van Sant, Walter Salles, the Coen Brothers, Wes Craven, etc.) and featuring a host of international stars (including Natalie Portman, Bob Hoskins, Elijah Wood, Juliette Binoche, Gena Rowlands, Steve Buscemi and Nick Nolte), set in various neighborhoods in the City of Light. The stories concern love, relationships, racial tension, loneliness, sickness, death and the other ingredients of life, and range in tone from funny, sad and poignant to the supernatural. Though not all are gems, they feel very much of a piece and provide a thought-provoking smorgasbord. In French and English, with subtitles. Rough language, innuendo, drug dealing and use, a stabbing death, brief sexual encounters, a sex emporium scene with a scantily clad dancer, divorce and a vampire sequence with blood. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcastingclassification is L-limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association ofAmerica rating is R restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian. ''28 Weeks Later" (Fox Atomic) Hyperviolent sequel to the 2002 horror film ''28 Days Later" with virus-infected zombies on a rampage across Britain, and the efforts of the authorities to repopulate the country decimated by what is called a "rage virus." Despite decent special effects and photography, director and cowriter Juan Carlos Fresnadillo mostly just serves up 101 minutes of mindnumbing, nearly plotless butchery as the cast, including Robert Carlyle, is chased nonstop by virus-infected zombies. Crude and profane language, several instances of the f-word, a fleeting sexual encounter, grotesque mass slaughter and numerous individual violent acts. The USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification is o - morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association ofAmerica rating is R - restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

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GEORGIA ON THEIR MINDS - Jane Fonda and Lindsay Lohan star in a scene from the movie "Georgia Rule." For a brief review of this film, see CNS Movie Capsules below. (CNS photo/Universal Studios)

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$ The Anchor news briefs Religious groups launch sanctuary program for immigrants WASHINGTON (CNS) - With immediate plans to shelter families in Los Angeles, New York and San Diego, an interfaith coalition calling itself the New Sanctuary Movement announced plans to try to protect families from deportation in churches and other faith-affiliated places around the country. Following the example of the 1980s church-based network that sheltered Central American immigrants who sought refuge from civil wars at home, the New Sanctuary Movement hopes to enlist religious congregations around the country to publicly shelter people who are at risk of deportation. The organization is particularly focusing on "mixed-status" families, or those that include a combination of people who are in the country illegally and legal residents or U.S. citizens. "Our concern is the separation of families, the anguish and suffering they endure under the current law that doesn't have a heart," said Father Juan Carlos Ruiz, a New Jersey priest who is founding director ofAsociacion Tepeyac, an immigrant community services agency in the Bronx borough of New York City. Press conferences announcing the launch of the New Sanctuary Movement were held in New York, Los Angeles, San Diego, Chicago and Seattle. Metuchen Diocese is one of top 100 adoption-friendly workplaces METUCHEN, N.J. (CNS) - The Diocese of Metuchen has been named one of the 100 best adoption-friendly workplaces in the United States for 2007 by the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption. The diocese was recognized as 92nd best among small, medium and large employers and industry leaders, and fourth best among nonprofit organizations, the foundation announced May 1. "We are pleased to assist families as they respond to God's call to love and discipleship," said Metuchen Bishop Paul G. Booi:koski. "Adoption is the deliberate choice families make to extend the natural boundaries of their family. "The Church is grateful for these parents who are generously giving their children not only the gift of their hearts but the gift of faith in Jesus Christ," he added. "Families are all part of God's plan. We see the adoption program as another way to help families live out their vocation as God intended." According to diocesan officials, the Diocese of Metuchen was the first Catholic diocese in the United States to provi~e adoption assistance to employees when it unveiled its program in November 2005. Irish court rules 17-year-old girl can travel abroad for abortion DUBLIN, Ireland (CNS) - The High Court in Dublin has ruled that the country's health authorities have no right to stop a 17-yearold girl from traveling abroad for an abortion. The case arose when the girl - known only as Miss D, a ward of the court - learned that the child she is carrying suffers from anencephaly and would have a life expectancy of just a few days outside the womb. Anencephaly is a head disorder caused by a neural tube defect, resulting in the absence of a major portion of the brain, skull and scalp. Medical experts say the life prognosis after birth for babies with anencephaly is a maximum of three days. Ifeland is one of the only countries in Europe where abortion remains illegal. Miss D was expected to travel to neighboring Britain for an abortion. Ireland's Health Service Executive had sought the support of the Irish police force to keep the girl from leaving the country to seek an abortion elsewhere. A lower court had ruled that it could not give permission for the girl to travel. Mexican bishop says he's been threatened for helping victims ofrape GUADALAJARA, Mexico (CNS) -A Mexican bishop said he has been threatened for advocating on behalf of 13 women allegedly raped by Mexican soldiers. Bishop Raul Vera Lopez of Saltillo, known as a champion of indigenous and other human rights, said he has been "under pressure and receiving threats not to get involved in the case" of the sex-trade workers who said they were raped last July. Bishop Vera, whose diocese is in northern Mexico, said that he has received phone calls at home in the middle of the night. One of the calls told him to "be extremely careful," he said, adding that another spoke of sending him a ticket for a journey "to the other side." Bishop Vera responded to journalists' questions at a press conference about migration at ITESO, a Jesuit university in the Guadalajara area. The victims claimed the rapes occurred in July in Castanos, a town near Monclova, a steel-producing center approximately 120 miles south of the Texas border. The alleged attackers in Castanos were guarding ballots after the disputed July 2 presidential election.

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Bishops get draft of guideline$ for education in c'haste living By JERRY FILTEAU CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

The draft guidelines outline what elements of the Church's teaching should beli included as components of education for chaste living, starting with the scriptural account of human be-

catechesis on the nature and vocation of men and women <:reated WASHINGTON --:- "Educain the image of God and called tion for chastity is more than a to form bonds of loving and call to abstinence," says a draft chaste communion with one andocument being studied by the other through friendship, service, U.S. Catholic bishops iJ;l marriage and celibacy for preparation for a vote this the sake of the kingdom," fall. It adds that parents are "the pri- the document says. Sent out to the bishops Other parts of the documary but not the exclusive edu- ment address the role of at the end of April, the draft is titled "Catechetical . cators of their children" and that parents, the role of teachers Formation in Chaste Liv- the invitation to other educators and catechists and the role ing: Guidelines for Cur- "to carry out their responsibilities of publishers. It cites some "special isriculum Design and Publi- in the name of the parents arises cation." sues of concern," saying from the consent and authoriza"Parents are called to that "serious offenses tion of the parents. 'r ensure that their children's against chastity are identieducation in human sexufied because of their prevalence in our society today ality occurs within the context of the moral principles and ings being created i* God's own and the particular dangers they truths of the Church," it says. pose to chaste living." image and created for love. It adds. that parents are "the The guidelines address the Listed among the special isprimary but not the exclusive role of pastors in ensuring "that sues are pornography, the contraeducators of their children" and the education and formation of ceptive mentality and practice, that the invitation to other edu- the young in human sexuality is premarital and extramarital sex, cators "to carry out their respon- in accord with the Church's cohabitation, sexual abuse, homosexual activity and same-sex sibilities in the name of the par" teaching." . ents arises from the consent and "This formatio'n includes unions. authorization of the parents." "Education for chastity, susEDUCATION: Assistant Principal for Catholic tainedby parental example and school,PreK-81 Catholic educatlonrequired, adminprayer, is absolutely essential to istrative experience preferred. Send reSUme.to: "develop authentic maturity, teach respect for the body and foster an ¥artha Mulligan, RSM "" understanding of the nuptial Mercymount Country Day meaning of the body," it says. 35 Wrentham Road The 14-page draft document ~umberland, RI 02864 was developed by the Committee on Catechesis of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, chaired by Archbishop Donald W. Wuerl of Washington. In a cover letter to the bish• Prompt 24 Hour Service • Automatic Deliveries ops, Archbishop Wuerl invited • Call In Deliveries • Budget Terms Available • Free Estimates them to consult with diocesan staff members or others if they You Never Had Service wish and to submit responses Until You Tried Charlie's from their diocese by July 1 so Ii We're located at ... that the committee will have time 46:0ak Grove Ave., Fall River to prepare a final draft for the orcal/ ... bishops to consider at their No508:675-7426 • 508-674-0709 vember national meeting in Baltimore. Msgr. Daniel Kutys, deputy secretary for catechesis in the USCCB Department of EducaThe Franciscans tion, said the committee did not Immaculate Conception Province go into questions of appropriate (OFM) age for specific aspects of eduVocation Director: cation for chaste living, leaving Br. Charles Gingerich, ofm that to the experience of publishEmail: Charles848@aol.com ers. . Web Site: The point of the guidelines, he WWW.FRANOSCANVOC.ORG . said, is to stress that catechetical education should be dealing with 1-800-521-5442 (days) l-888-521-5442 (evenings) questions of faith, virtue and 978-863..()()42 moral life and not involve ques978-863-0041 (evenings only) tions of biology and other sciFAX: 978-863-0172 ences except to the extent necesusA sary. 459 River Road In family life materials for Andover, MA 01810-4213 younger children, he said, many CANADA catechetical programs put any 2210 Lawrence Ave. East physiological discussions ina Toronto ONT. Ml P 2P9 parent segment. l:

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Fusco, Dr&M James Kearns; $300Charles Crowley; $250-M&M Jacques Van de Kerchof; $200-Jane. Breton, Catherine F. Hassey; $150-Mrs. Charles Caires, Dr&M Joseph A. Costa; $125M&M Frank Cooper; $lOO-M&M Bertra,nd Allain, Jr., M&M William Carter, M&M Robert L. Carvalho, M&M William Goetz, M&M John Hayes, M&M James O'Neil, M&M Vernon Pais, M&M John Perry, Eileen Sargent, M&M John Vaughn. Nantucket _ St. Mary/Our Lady of the Isle: $500-M&M Walter' Folger, In Memory of Beulah & Edwin Scully, Robert Mooney; $360-M&M Richard Lewis Congdon; $300-M&M Charles Dragon; $250-M&& Peter D. Hicks, Dr. John J. O'Neill; $ZOO-M&M David Dunham; $100-Mrs. Joseph Agostino, Lee Rand _ Burne, M&M Kenneth W. Holdgate, Jr., M&M William Knight, M&M William O'Keefe, Billie Olson, M&M Dale Waine. New Bedford Holy Name of the Sacred Heart of Jesus: $1,ZOO-Rev. Clement -E. Dufour. Our Lady of Fatima: $Z50-M&M Robert Berche; $200-M&M Michael Murray, M&M Timothy Paul; $150M&M John Giza; $100-M&M Victor DeFrias, M&M Romain Payant, M&M Normand Pepin, M&M Roniild Cormier. Our Lady of Guadalupe at St. James: $1,ZOO-Rev. Martin L. Buote; $100-Charles & Thelma Carpenter, Roger & Mary Blanchard, Louis Proulx. St. Francis of Assisl: $1,500-Rev., Albert J. Ryan; $150-M&M .David Souza; $100-M&M Davis Balestracci. St. John the Baptist: $1,OOO-St. Vincent de Paul Society; $Z50-A Friend; $ZOO-Portuguese Charismatic Prayer Group, M&M Jose F. Carreiro, In Memory of Mary E. Mello; $130-M&M Paul J. Couto; $120-Maria Freitas; $100M&M Manuel J. DaSilva, M&M Lester Lucas, M&M Jose DaSilva, M&M Norberta Pacheco, M&M Octavio Medeiros, M&M Antonio DaSilva, M&M Luis M. Soares, Constance Mello, M&M Manuel Sousa, Anonymous, A Friend.. M&M Antonio Felix, M&M Liberal Medeiros. St. Joseph-St. Therese: $1,000Anonymou's; $Z50-Anonymous; $~OO颅 Anonymous, M&M Rene L'Heureaux, SI. Vincent de Paul Society; $150Anonymous; $100-Anonymous, M&M David Alves, In Memory of M&M Raphael Beaulieu by Therese, Simone, & Alice Beaulieu, M&M Paul Carrier, Bernadette Constantine, M&M Alfred Brade, M&M Alan Gibb, M&M Conrad Letendre, M&M George Racine, M&M Thomas Weaver. St. K!I!an: $ZI6-Robert Marcondes; $100-Rosalie Alves. St. Lawrence: $1,100-Rev. John M. Sullivan; $800-Rev. John P. Driscoll. North Attleboro Sacred Heart: $1,500-M&M Dennis Dion; $1,OOO-Eleanor Buchinski; $600-M&M Donald Lacasse; $500Leslie & Kevin Dealy, M&M Paul Dion; $300-M&M David Winn, Dr&M Ernest Collamati, M&M Robert Schroeck; $Z50-M&M Edward Dion; $ZOO-M&M Earle Flynn, M&M Joseph Howard, M&M Normand Cloutier; $180-M&M Ruben Chevere; $175-Dr&M Antonio Soriano; $125-M&M Alfonse Vitagliano; $100-M&M Ryan O'Heir, M&M Thomas Wolf, M&M Thomas Trout, M&M Paul Sauve, M&M Leo Piette, M&M William Tansey, James & Margaret Carroll, M&M Brian Coyle, James & Jean Carley, Therese L'Homme, Catherine Gagne, M&M John MacDonald, Barbara Shannon, Yvette Hamel in Memory of Rev. Bertrand Chabot. St. Mark: $4,500-Rev. Thomas L. Rita; $1,Z50-Paul & Marisa Schasel; $500-M&M Paul J. Briggs, Sr., Bernard Holmes, M&M Michael Murphy, Bruce & Madelyn Young; $300-Norman & Eileen 'Lacasse, Roberta Jaron; $Z50M&M Timothy Gilmore, M&M Thomas Gruppioni; $200-M&M Robert Guillette, M&M John F. Lynch; $150-M&M Leo. Sullivan, Joy E. Rezza; $100-Elaine Carlos, Robert & Eileen Demers, M&M Robert Duquette, Jr., Richard & Janet Fesik, Charles & Doris Legg, Kenneth & Denise Pickering, M&M Lance

MA_Y_18_,_20_0_7_ _ Trafford, M&M Christopher Sweet. St. Mary: $660-SI. Vincent de Paul Society; $550-Louise Farrands; $500-Joseph Doran, M&M Paul Roche; $300Jeff & Corinne Forbes; $250-Laura & Gerard Chalifour; $200-Deborah Jeram, Edward & Virginia Lambert; $150Arlene & Arthur Spencer; $100-Helen Brauner, Colleen Buckley, Richard & Lisa Burns, George Darrah, M&M William Roy, M&M Joseph Smith, Rosemary Toole, Joseph Santoro. North Dartmouth St. Julie Billiart: $500-Ruth Weaver; $250-Eugenia Mathews; $200M&M Robert Ouellette; $125-M&M Richard Brown, M&M Thomas S. Bancroft; $120-M&M Gerald H. Crofford; $100-M&M Alan Alves, Lorraine M. Vital, M&M Jasper Parnell, M&M Steven J. Giampa. North Dh:hton St. Joseph: $600-Vincent Scully; $100-Joseph Jackson, Robert Murray. North Easton Immaculate Conception: $1,500Rev. Thomas C. Lopes; $600-M&M Anthony Cerce; $300-M&M Richard Rhodes; $160-M&M John Norton, Jr.; $100-M&M Lawrence Grey, M&M Charles Hampston, Jean Larkin. North Falmouth St. Elizabeth Seton: $2,000Atty&M David Gay; $1,OOO-William Maher, M&M George Power, Robert Williamson; $500-Msgr. John J. Regan, M&M Ralph Vaccaro; $400-Helen Dixon; $300-M&M William Black, M&M Robert Desmond; $250-M&M Joseph Coughlan, M&M William Dillon, Robert Ha!lgring, M&M George' Pelletier; $200-M&M Thomas Chadie, M&M Paul McAllister, M&M Richard Pierce; $125-M&M Donald Hassett, . M&M John Maguire; $100-Elizabeth Coggeshall, M&M Daniel Dennehy, M&M Charles Howard, M&M Jack Howard:M&M John Kirby, M&M William Kirk, M&M William Lane, Lillian Laurendeau, Elizabeth Leavey, Dr&M John Manning, M&M John McArdle, Barbara McSherry, M&M Arthur Miller, M&M Joseph Miskell, Ruth Place, M&M Robert Rudden, M&M Harry Scanlan, M&M John Segadelli, M&M J. Thomas Smith, Mary Sullivan, Veronica Weidman, M&M David White.

Nmml St. Mary: $300-M&M Norman Corriveau; $100-M&M Joseph R. Daley, M&M Paul Varnum. Pocasset St. John the Evangelist: $6,000Rev. Robert C. Donovan. Proylncetown St. Peter the Apostle: $200-John Walsh, Jeanne Galvin/Doris Nitti; $150Walter Harding, Elizabeth Daglio; $100Leona Caton, Francis & Mary Peters, William & Charlotte Gordon, John Grace, Joseph Andrews, Annette Merrill. ~

Our Lady of Mount Carmel: $2,000-M&M Edward Reall; $1,000M&M Charles Brett, M&M Frank Gibbons; $520-M&M Edward Martin; $500M&M William O'Gara, In Memory of Angela Medeiros; $400-M&M Michael Bell, Judith Duffy, M&M Stephen Falco, M&M Ronald Larose, Joanna Medeiros; $350-M&M Alan Horton, M&M John Kelleher; $300-M&M Manuel DaSilva, M&M Jesse Hendricks, M&M Richard Johannis, Robert Propatier, Kathleen Connors; $250-M&M Anthony Alves, M&M John Ware; $Z40-M&M Joseph Mc.Cabe; $ZOO-Sandra Almeida, M&M Anthony Azulay, Jane Barker, M&M Ray Corrigan, M&M Anthony Mello, M&M Thomas Miller, M&M Michael O'Connell, M&M Edward Paolino, M&M John Petraitis, M&M Robert Stefanik, Seekonk Oil; $175-Ruth Santos; $150-M&M William Adair, M&M Michael Kelly, Charlotte Mello, M. Lois Quirk, M&M Ralph Tomei, Violet Wilkinson; $130-M&M James Drapeau; $125-M&M Joseph Costa, M&M Harold Devine, M&M 路Alfred MacTavish, Angie Mello, M&M Frank Rapoza, M&M John Whittaker; $120-Dorothy Downes; $110-M&M Norman Galimberti; $100-M&M Marc Alburn, M&M Leonardo Alves, M&M William Anthony, M&M Gene Baasch, Arthur Cabral, M&M Miguel Camelo, Mary Costa, M&M James Crandall, Joan Creighton,


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MAy 18, 2007

mati on Class; $200-Emma Andrade, ,JoAnne Maniche, Joao Reis; $160-John Barros; $IS0-M&M Mariano Carro~a, Laura Montecalvo, M&M· Ant6nio P, Reis, M&M Manuel Jorge; $125-Theres'a Camaia; $120-A Friend; $IOO-Josepb Andrade, Maria Duarte, Charles Ferreira, M&M John Gouveia, M&M Jose M&M Alfred DaPonte, Beverly Ann Moitoso, M&M Manuel Paulo, Deolinda Della Grolla, M&M Mark Derh-am, ' .Rocha, M&M Leonard F. Rocha, M&M M&M Mark DiPetrillo, M&M Robert David Cabral, M&M Ernest Enos, M&M Fuller, Lillian George, M&M Fred GorAnt6nio Medeiros, M&M John Rego, don, M&M Jeffrey Griffin, M&M M&M Jolio Reis, Anonymous, M&M Maurice Holmes, Therese Kaveny, M&M Francisco Aguiar, M&M Manuel Arruda, Matthew Keenan, John Korkuc, Ernest M&M Ant6nio Chaves, M&MLawrence DePaul, Dorothy King, Deacon&M lose Mansolillo, M&M Shawn McCormick, M&M George Mihailides, M&M Jeffrey Medeiros, M&M Manuel Moura, M&M Moitoso, M&M Samuel Mulholland, Fernando Rocha. M&M Dennis O'Grady, M&M Richard ' St. Jacques: '$SOO-M&M George Caras; $225- Yvonne Labont<:; $200Pinelle, M&M Iorge Rijo, M&M Daniel Rocha, M&M Steven Rocha, M&M Therese Blain, Paul Ouillette, William Irwin Setzer, Amelia Silva, M&M Waldron; $IS0-M&M Robert Nunes; Carleton Skinner. M&M Joseph Sousa, $12S-Louise Powell & Joan Silva; $110Marilyn Toole, M&M James'Torres, Flo- M&M George Yelle; $100-M&M Ernest renee Turner, Dr&M Jesus Valdepenas, Charette, M&M Paul Morrissey. M&M Richard Vermette, James Viara, Wareham M&M Ioao Vicente, Christine St. Patrick: $1,800-Rev. Arn'old R. Vinliateiro. Medeiros; $200-Cynthia & .Will OutSt. Mary: $600-Rev. George B. house, Mary Savignano; $IS0-Mrs. Scales. Chester Rusinoski; $12S-Mrs. Roy Somerset FrankJin; $100-ln Memory of Evelyn St. Thomas More: $300-Josephine Gonsalves, Gonsalves Deceasea, Mrs. John Lambiase, M&M George Munroe, Dube; $2S0-Mrs. Alfred. S. Buckley, Jr., M&M Dominick Massa, M&M Steven P. Mrs. Fred Ferioli, A Friend, Mrs. Iohn Sabra; $200-M&M Richard, P. Coute, Sarson, Barbara Leslie, Michael Cox, Mrs. Francis Vining, In Memory of Juli Atty&M Stephen C. Nadeau, Sarah T. Silva; $160-M&M Arthur S. Rebello; M. Babbitt, Mary An'n Marshall, Mary $IS0-Louis Fayan, M&M Charles Leary, Lawless, M&M Paul Lynch, Priscilla Cassidy. M&M Iohn T. Smith; $120-Eliza Sabra; $100-M&M Ioseph Albernaz, Jr., M&M Wellfleet Iohn Connors, Kathleen M. Gunning,' Our Lady of Lourdes: $1,OOO-Rev. Mrs. Iohn L. Mahon, Elizabeth A. ManJohn F. Andrews; $SOO-Dr&M John S. ning, M&M Paul Palumbo, Gloria McGovern; $200-M&M Robert Sroczynski, M&M James Sullivan. Donahoe, Suzanne ·B. Albee; $100-Guy South Dartmouth L. Farrell, M&M Eugene Cormier, Yvette St. Mary: $1,OOO-M&M Iohn LaRiviere, M&M Edward A. Hake, Kelleher; $600-M&M Richard T. M&M Robert Wallace, M&M William I. Saunders, Jr.; $SOO-M&M Ronald Dias, Corcoran, M&M Ronald H. Thureson, Elizabeth H. Dunn. ' Rev. Terence F. Keenan; $200-0livia M. Luiz; $ISO-Margaret Alves; $100West H'arwich Bishop Stang Council 4532-Knights of Holy Trinity: $1,SOO-Msgr. Ronald Columbus, M&M Jose Pacheco, Dr&M A. Tosti. Robert I. Lang, M&M Manuel Ferreira, Westport Theresa Aimeida. Our Lady of Grace: $1,OOO-M&M . Swansea Gregory Tetrault, Sr.; $SOO-Rev. Roland St. Dominic: $SOO-M&M I. Brian Bousquet; $200-Don'ald Maynard, Keating; $400-A Friend; $300-M&M Charles Veloza; $100-M&M John Donald Souza; $IS0-Claire Carty, Frank. 'Haggerty, M&M John Cabral, Gilbert . Flynn. Tavares, Doris Mendes, M&M Raymond St. Francis of Assisi: $SOO-Rev. Paul Lavoie, M&M Joseph Daponte, M&M E. Canuel. Christopher Lynn, M&M Raymond Petit. St. Louis de France: $I,OOO-Rev. St, George: $1,OOO-Rev. Gerard A.. Louis R. Boivin; $1,OOO-M&M Normand Hebert. Lecomte; $2S0-M&M Roger Paquette; St. John the Baptist: $1,OOO-Rev. $200-M&M Timothy Thompson, M&M Leonard P. Hindsley; $SOO-M&M John Alfred Mello; $12S-M&M William Fennelly; $2S0-M&M Kenneth Pattie; O'Neil. M&M Edward Sullivan; $120- $IS0-M&M Ron Vien; $140-Rita M&M Gerald Fontaine, M&M Edward Morotti; $100-M&M Robert M. Condon, Sullivan; $100-M&M Robert Desrosiers, M&M William Devine, R. Dorothy M&M Conrad Rousseau, M&M Cesar Jendry, Virginia King, Dr. Jean Leimert, Carvf.llho, Leo Duquette, M&M Roger M&M Charles Martineau, Linda Robillard, M&M Arthur Dallaire, M&M Franklin, M&M Paul Sullivan, M&M David Affonso, Paul Boyer, M. Patricia Donald Wilusz. Sheehan, M&M Joseph Goyette, M&M Normand Fortin, M&M Maurice BUSINESS & COMMUNITY Lincourt, M&M Roger Chauvin, M&M Attleboro Area $600-St. Vincent de Paul SocietyWilliam Courville., M&M'George Costa, Attleboro District Council; $IOO-R. A. M&M Gerald Costa, M&M Nelson Reinbold Insurance Agency, Inc. . Carpentier, M&M John Torres. Cape Cod & the Islands Area " 1'lmn!2n Annunciation of the Lord: $1,000$S,OOO-SI. John the Evangelist Bingo, Pocasset; $1,OOO-Our Lady or" M&M Richard Andrade; $500-Thomas Whalen, M&M Anthony Nunes; $300Lourdes-SI. Vincent de Paul Society, M&M Brian Carr; $200-M&M' Robert 'Wellfleet; $SOO-St. Pius Tenth Women's Mendes, M&M Ro'bert Martin, M&M Guild, South Yarmouth; $2S0-Corpus Manuel DeSousa; $IS0-M&M Edward Christi Women's Guild, East Sandwich; Trucchi;' $130-M&M Gilbert Coute; $100-Saiilts Margaret-St. Mary Guild, $120-M&M Gilbert Perry; $100-Sylvina Buzzards Bay. Fernandes, M&M Randy Silveira, Mrs. Fall Riyer Area Mary Gorman', M&M Robert Brady, $1,6S0-St. Vincent de Paul SocietyFall River District Council; $400M&M Brian. Grant, M&M William Bezok, Paula Alegi, Mrs. Barbara Atly&M Robert 1. Marchand; $3"0: Keough, M&M Kirby Sessums, M&M M&M Carlos Costa, Westport; Lavoie & lose Andrade, Arleen Booker, M&M Tavares Company; $IS0-Amaral's MarPaul Finney, Ezilda DaRosa, Mrs. Linda ket; Durfee-Buffinton Insurance Agency; Iii, Mrs. Helen Laranjo. . $100-Rua-Dumont-Audet Insurance . Holy Rosary: $SOO-Franciscan Fri- Agency, Inc. ars. New Bedford Area Immaculate Conception: $150$1,OOO-Lemieux Heating, Inc.; $500M&M Thomas Hoye, Mary Masterson; P<:rry's Funeral Home;. $2S0-Bishop $12S;.C1aire Hathaway; $100-Donna Stang High School-Ioseph's Oluoch. Apprentice's Program; State Road CeSt. Anthony: $1,400-ln Memory of ment Block Co., North Dartmouth; $100Iolio & Emilia Arruda & Son Iolio; 'Normand's Meat Specialties, Inc. $1,OOO-Anonymous; $800-Rev. Ieffrey Nationals Cabral; $SOO-M&M Rodrigo Pereira, A $1,300-Rev. William J. Shovelton, Lady Lake, FL. ' Friend; $400-St. Anthony 2007 Confir-

Continued from page one

caused in many instances by selfmed.ication. Another of the big problems is housing and we provide all the help in that direction too, to find homes for them." The complex, multi-faceted; timeconsuming task is to provide the needed stabilization via the various welfare, counseling, legal and housing agencies, many through CSS workers and programs and state and federal agencies as well. Success comes when the women, some of whom are single, are ready to assume the responsibilities inclu~ iIi Donovan House's "Am I Ready To Move" informational packet that serves as a guide to life in the community. Currently there are nine familiesconsisting of mothers and their children - in residence at Donovan House, where the normal stay is for six months or more. 'There are very few repeats;' reported Tavares. "I think we give those who come to us areally good start into a better, happier life and that might be our success story." At St Caire's on the Cape, program director Elaine ~aley has been involved since its founding in 1998, the last four years at the helm. ''We. offer a six-month-recovery program for women who were previously incarcerated, and we don't discriminate," said Haley. ''We have five ~ - ll$ually all filled an4 with a long waiting list - and those who rome to us include alcoholics, addicts, and those HIV positive," she said: Although the program used to be ofa year's duration, the growing number of applicants compelled moving to a shorten time span to accommodate those who are completing sentences in the region's correctional institutions for women. Haley, a parishioner of Our Lady ofVictory in Centerville, said the success ofSt. Caire's IS realized "because we have more than 40 people from parishes on the Cape" who volunteer daily to transport the women to the various medical, counseling, and jobtraining and career Centers and programs in which teaching life's skills is at the core;' reported Haley. Those include Alcoholics Anonymous and Carriage House, which offers residential treatment and sober liv-· ing programs; and Career Opportunities for job searches. As the women progress in the program they get help from the Housing Assistance Corporation in finding "s0ber housing" units when the leave. She also made it candidly clear ''We are Catholic-based in what we offer and what we do. Our long-tenn focus is on God, recovery and relationships. As a family member of Catholic Social Services we are funded wholly by Catholic Charities. We don't receive any other grants from state or federal sources." St Claire's residents are transported to Mass at Our Lady ofVictory Church twice week; gather to pray

a

the rosary; attend Direct retreats; and City Mental Health administers the attend a Bible study class pffered by drug testing; we have counseling serDeacon Richard 1. Mutphy Sr., of St. vices provided by Community Coun. Francis Xavier Parish in Hyannis. seling'ofBristol County that includes With an estimated 109 or more examinations by physicians and case women having been cared.for in its w~ers; and also make referrals to the programs, does St. Oaire'sfind some various daytime programs offered by returning? Pathways," Carreiro added. "The "We have some repeats:' Haley needs vary, and can include teaching said. ''While we plant the. seed, the someone such a basic as how to read." women must continue to water it ." if Through CSS and the many partthey are to live a MI and l1appy life, ner agencies, Samaritan House "offers which we stress." those who co~e to us the opportunity' At 'Samaritan House in, Taunton, to resolve dependency on narcotic program manager Benny Carreiro drugs and alcohol and we motiv~te since November 2003 has been a busy 'diem to findjobs through variollS comhost to hundreds of adult males and munity agencies and get them welfare some females who take advantage of funds and get them established on transitional housing and various allied Social Security;' the director told The support programs., . Anchor. "~ehave 14 beds formeh and four ."uR' ''We give them a new start, and beds for homeless womeri, and the from time to time we see some repeats, latterare usually filled as they currently usually many months later," reported are. Today, only one bed is, available Carreiro. ''Wl)at we commonly find on the men's side;' he said . is those repeaters are usually the ones ''We offerbreakfastand dinner, but who did not follow the programs laid no lunch, because they must leave here' out for them." at 7 a.m., and can return at ~ p.m., in Tavares, Haley and Carreiro are the winter and at 5 p.m. in the sum- also on the same track when it comes mer," explained Carreiro, ~ho lives to getting their message out: that those in Portsmouth, R.I., and is a:lparishio- reeling from hard knocks can find rener at St. Barnabas Parish th,ere. liefbecause so many generously make Operatirig imderthe aegisofCatho- it possible. lic Social Services in the Fall River DonatiOns to the Appeal can be Diocese, Samaritan House .'~is a 90- sent to the Catholic charitiesAppeal day, drug free, zero-Jolerance program Office, P.O. Box 1470, FaD River, MA with drug testing on site, and if the '02722; dropped off at any parish in person does not meet that requirement, the diocese; or mode on the Appeal our services are terminatJd," said Website:frdioc-cotholiccharities.org. Carreiro. Ii For 11J!Jre informatinn visit the ''A licensedhealth workerfrom Tri- Website or contact 508-675-1311. ,I

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Teens toreceiveSt~PiLis X Award May 22 for ,contrib'ution~ to ,diocese' By MIKE GORDON

Saturday arid lias been involved:With the choir for' several years. FALL RIVER --'- Nearly 50 teens will receive the "I know how to readmusic tmd have been a canPope Pius X Youth Award May 22 for contributions 'tor since August of 2006," said Quiet: ~'I love it'and to their parish and the Diocese of Fall River, in cer- I love to sing:' emonies at 7 p.m. at the Cathedral of St. Mary of the . The ceremony will include a prayer service with AssUmption. Bishop George W. Coleman will preside reflect!ons offeredby Joanna Levesque and Brian and a prayer service will proceed the award ceremony. Shendan. They will address the topics "Youtb and Coordinating the event with the Bi~hop's Office Scripture," and' "A Visi~n ofYoutb~n the Church," is Crystal Medeiros, assistant director oithe Youth respectively. Farnilyand friends ate welcome.to at· andYoung Adult Ministry Office who said, "It's an tend and a l'eception fOr recipients will follow. The 2007 recipients ofthe St.Pius X award are honor to recognize the youth of your diocese. "It is througb, them that we see our own faith as follows: ' . grow. They are the young Church. They are a symAttleboro DeanerY bol of hope that the Catholic faith is being' lived out Matthew J.Burke, St. Stephen Parisb, Attleboro; , in their lives." StepbenJ. Creamer, St., Mary Parish, Seekonk; St. Michael's Parish, Fall River will provide Kristen M.Fleck,St. Mary Paris~, Mansfield; Kelly music. Lynch, St. Theresa Parisb, AttlebOro; Nicole Nado, The annual award has been presented to young St. John the EvangelistParisb, Attlebon,); Elizabeth . people who serve their parish and the Church with Nolin, Sacred Heart Parish, North Attleboro; Alexdedication s.ince 2001 when Bishop Sean P. andria M. O'Gara, Our Lady of-Mount C'armel Paf~ , O'Malley sought a way to recognize the youth of ish, Seekonk; and Lindsey White, St. Mary Parish, . Norton. the diocese. Recipients are norninated by their pastors and Cape Cod Deanery according to Medeiros, "help in a wide variety of 'Philip J. AstQne ill, St. Elizabeth Seton Parish, ,ways in their parishes and schools." North Falmouth; Jean R. Cabral, St. Francis Xavier She said they assist at their parish as altar servo' Parisb, Hyannis;, DanieUe Cotellessa, Out Lady of ers, choir members, cantors; food pantry volunteers,. Victory Parish, Centerville; Tara Fuller, ,St. Patrick youth group memb~rs and leaders, lectors and ex- Parish, Falmouth; Olivia M. Hull, $t. MarylOur Lady traordinary ministers of holy Communion. , of the Isle Parish, .NantUcket; Shannon V. HurleyEach teen will receive the Pope Pius X medl,ll DelVecchio; Holy Redeemer Parisb, Chatham; Ainy which features a profile of the pope who establisbed 'Johnson, Christ the King Parish, Mashpee; Erik C. ' the Diocese of Fall River in 1904. Recipients must Plath, St. Pius X Parish, South Yarmouth; Mark . be confrrrned, at least a sophomore in highschool RealbQto, St. Joan of ArcParish, Orleans; Matthew and no older than 19. , R~gan, Our Lady oithe Cape Parish, Brewster; Col"We'rer glad to' offer it every year to those ex· leenE. Reilly;Corpus CbiistiParish, East Sandwich; traordinary young people who exemp'lify service and Justin <3, Williams, Our Lady of the Assumption . to their parish comnlUnity and school," said Parish; Osterville. Medeiros. "These are young people that other teens Fall River Deanery can look up to. The are active in the Church and MicheUeCanuel, Notre Dame Parisb, Fall River; have a voice." Jennalee Fernandes, Our Lady of tbe Holy Rosary A few of the recipients have taken on leadership Parish, Fall Rivet; Ryan FurtadQ, St.Dorninic Parroles within their parish youth groups or are part of ish, Swansea; COrey Laliberte, Our Lady of the lrnthe pastoral couneil. • maculate c<mception Parish, Fall River; K~telyn , At 18, Ryan Furtado of St. Dorninic Parish in Larrivee, St. Joseph Parish, Fall ~iver; Joanna S. , Swansea is a recipient and said the announcement. Levesque, St. Bernard Parish, Assonet; tyler "came liS a surprise" but he was bonored to be . Marchand, St.Louis de France Parisb, Swansea; named. "I'm part of the youth group and have been Sabrina ;Melo,· Santo Christo Parish, Fall River; involved for five years. I enjoy being a part of it StevenA. Rys, St. Stanislaus Parish, Fall River; Brian and it's peen a good experience. I've especially Sheridan, St. J~bn the BaptistParish, Westport; Riley enjoyed doing food collections for· the needy and Sullivan, 'Holy NameParisb,Fall River; Bridget A. Ta~'tor, St. Thom.as More Parish, 'Somerset; and being in a leadership role." Furtado attends Dighton-Rehoboth Regional Nicholas M. Wholean, St.Patrick Parish, Somerse,t. . High School and is a member ofthe National Honor . New Bedford Deanery Society, Portuguese Club, soccer team and track Brittni Couto, St. Lawrence Martyr Parish, ~ew team. He also helps with the YES! Retreat program Bedford; Christopher E. Desrosiers, St.Mary Parand has been a team leader for the Christian Lead- ish, Dartmouth; Christine EUbanks, St.Francis ership.Institute. Xavier Parish, Acushnet; Stephen Furtado, St. Mary "Faith is important,~' he said. "For me it's some- Par,ish, New' Bedford; Allyson L. Giannelli; St. ' thing I've always been able to tum to no matter what Patrick Parish, Wareha~; Rachel A. Greene, $t. An·' is going on in my life. I have a good relationship thony oiPadua Parish, New 'Bedford; Michael G. with God." Jasinski, St. John Neumann Parish, East FreetowB; His mother, AIda said, "His father Roy and I ate . Brandon M. Roderick, ,Our L,ady o(the Assumption very proud of him.. He's a great kid and he enjoys Parish, New Bedford; Gina Santos, St. Julie Billiart helping others. It's very important for young people Parish, North Dartmouth; and Stephanie Sousa, St. to be involved in the Church." . Kilian Parish, New' Bedford. Dawn Quiet from Annunciation of the Lord ParnU,JJlton Deanery ish in Taunton is also a recipient. She isa student at .LindseyP. Athiu'tasiou, '1'.tWllaculate Conception Taunton High School,where she belongs to UIe'band, Parish, North Easton;OatiielG. Brennan, 'H()lyFam~ track team and is a member of tbe National Ilonor ilyPadsh"Bast Taunton;~arabM.Pedro, St.An• thonyParish.T-aunton; Dawn Quiet, Annunciation Society. "It's a surprise to be a recipient of this award:' 'of the Lord Parish, Taunton; Mi.chelle A. Rose, St. ' said Quiet, "but it's a great honor." Peter Parish; Dig,Qton;andLaurenTomase, St. Ann She serves as a cantor at 4 o'clock Mass, each Parisb, RayDbam;' . '·,.·f···..··• .., ANCHCJ'! STAFF

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St. Francis Xavier students raise big bucks for leukemia patients ACUSHNET"':"" The old adage A special thanks went to that pennies make dollars was re- Webster Bank for counting all the alized by students at St. Francis COlDS. Xavier School, who, after three "These students serve as an weeks of collecting their 'small example, for all of us through change were..-bble to dona,te their commitment to helping oth$1,956.02 to the Leukemia & 'ers," said Stacy Parr, manager for Lymphoma Society. th~ Massachusetts Chapter of the ' "I am so proud of our stu- Society. "Their efforts will help local dents," said Principal Donald A. Pelletier. "They did a great job patients and their families along of giving selflessly and they re- with funding blood cancer really understood the mission of search at Dana-Farber Cancer the Society and what the money Institute, Boston's ,Children's Hospital, New England Medical is used for." The Society's mission is to Center and Massachusetts Gencure leukemia,' .lymphoma,' eral Hospital along with 13 other Hodgkin's disease and myeloma, institutions throughout Massaand to improve the quality of life chusetts." of patients and their families. St. Francis Xavier School is a T~ top fund-raising classes Catholic faith and academic comwere grades three and four, each munity serving the students and collecting $506.80 and thereby families of S1. Francis Xaviq earning a pizza party awarded by Parish and surrounding commuthe Society. nities.

Fellowship' and, music will highlight Christian Rock FlJst' By MIKE GORDON,

advertise. "She's done most of the work EAST SANDWICH - Seven for it," said DellaMorte. "She's local bands and performers will be done a great job and' is a natu(al featured at the Christiail Rock Fest leader." to be held May 26 at 8 p.m. at the Boyar has been a member of, parish center of CorPus Christi the parish youth group for three. "Church, 324 Quaker Meeting years and enjoys working on projects like the Rock Fest. "I'm House Road. Billed an evening of music excited about it and it will be a and fellowship great night for teens, the where teens on Rock Fest is c,\,\1'\stian RockFe~ the Cape can sponso~ed by 2007 It share music and the pariSh friendship." youth group She went on and its leader to say her hope J 0 is "it will help h n teens ,work to- . DellaMorte who, hopes g~ther for God, many will tum support Christian' music, out for the free event. build fellowship and proDellaMorte has been leadmote their ing the youth faith." group for 'a Boyar will year-and-a-half be playing pi· now and said, ano and singing "Events like this show teens that in one of the groups and is "ex-. their faith is something they don't cited to see other teens share their have to hide. They can gather with faith and talents." friends and share in music that The bands an~ duos represent praises Christ." local high school students. Among The'idea for the evening carrie the. bands playing will be The from the recent Jam Fest held at Usual Suspects, Fr<,?sh Saturday Christ the King Parish in Mashpee and Crooked Picture. Refreshand DellaMorte' said the youth ments will be available. The evening will also include group participated in it and loved it. "We wanted to do something an appearance by bass player Tracy similar and it's a form of evange- Ferrie of the Christian'rock band lization for our young people." Stryper. Ferrie joined the band in .The main catalyst for the event 2004 and lives on the Cape. "It's all for God's glory and we -has been 15-year-old youth group member Giana Boyar who spear-. hope to reach out .to teens in our he;lded efforts to secure acts and diocese," said DellaMorte. ,

ANCHOR STAFF

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YOUTH PAGES

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Expressing disappointment in a relationship By CHARLIE MARTIN -

THE POD SQUAD"":" Seminarian Brian Carpenter works at his laptop computer to record a segment of ''Your Sunday Reader," a podcast he and youth minister Dawn Burdick record each week for St. Mary Church in Canandaigua, N.V. (CNS photo/Mike Crupi, Catholic Courier) ,

Parishes go high-tech with podcasts ROCHESTER, N.Y. (CNS)Members of St. Mary Parish in Canandaigua now have a new way of reflecting on the weekly Scripture readings, thanks to seminarian Brian Carpenter and youth minister Dawn Burdick. Instead of flipping through the pages ofa Bible, parishioners now can turn on their computers or iPods, download the most recent installment of the podcast of "Your Sunday Reader," then sit back and listen as Carpenter and Burdick' read and discuss the week's Scripture selections. Many Catholics would like to . spend more time reflecting on the Scriptures but may not have time to

sit down with the Bible, said Carpenter, who has completed two years at Mundelein Seminary in Illinois and was serving his pastoral year at St. Mary. ''We thought it would be a good way to reach some people, especially the younger people who tend not to come to a lot of events," he added. A podcast is an audio file - called an MP3 file - that is distributed to subscribers via the Internet, Carpenter said. Each week a new podcast is automatically sent to the computer of anyone who subscribes to the free service througli the ilunes Web site, apple.comlitunes. The podcasts also may be downloaded from the parish's Website, stmarycanandaigua.org.

WITH LOVE I don't mind you telling me what's been on your mind lately I don't mind you speaking up I know sometimes I can be all wrapped up into me I can be in such a rush Just slow me down, slow me down Tell me tomorrow everything will be around Just slow me down, slow me down You're the one who keeps me on the ground Refrain: Baby, you can be tough Say enough is enough You can even be blunt Just do it with love, love, love, love Tell me I'm wrong That I'm coming on way "too strong Don't think I'll be crushed Just do it with love, love, love, love Just do it with love, love, love, love Just do it with love I can take your honesty, all your words. weigh heavily Listening to you all the time I wanna be there for you, the way you've been there for me Always help me walk the line And slow me down, slow me down I know you will always be around (Repeat refrain.) And this time we finally know each other Now that I've been leaning on your shoulder I can tell you baby that You're right, when you're right You're wrong, when you're wrong And I can be weak 'cause I know you'll be strong (Repeat refrain twice.) Just do it with love, love, love, love

CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

bring up your reactions to how Just do it with love another has treated you. There Just do it with love may be a fear that the person Sung by Hilary Duff won't really talk about it or will Copyright 2007 by Hollywood just disregard what you have to Records Hilary Duff has several new say. Consequently, the first step in a successful discussion is an developments in her life. She , awareness of timing. Look for an presents a distinctly different opportunity when the other can be look, just put out a new' album and now offers a new fragrance attentive and appears to be open named after the lead single off the to discussion. Don't just dump out what is disc. The result? This former bothering you. Tell the other Disney teen pop star has formed an image that is likely to appeal to person that you have something to talk about when doing so is a different audience than her convenient. Such courtesy is a previous legion~ of pre-teen fans. Pre-released off her new CD is sign of respect. Don't skip this the song "With Love;"" It invites step. It sets a loving tone that is likely to help the other person us to consider how we speak to hear what you are sharing. others, especially when we need Next, proceed as the song to speak to them about difficulties suggests. Speak witb truth but in our relationship wtth them. The girl in the sOlig tells also with kindness. Ask for the change that you want but also another that she doesn't "mind invite the other to address any you speaking" and "telling me coming problems that he or she may be that I'm wrong, that I'm II having with you. Acknowledge on way too strong." She adds, "I how important the relationship can take your honesty, just do it is to you and how you don't with love." She believes that this want any resentments to ,deindividual can be "tough ... even velop. be blunt," as long as he also speaks with kindnes~. She wants Also, recognize that one him to know that if he speaks conversation may not be enough with such an approach, '''don't to truly resolve the difficulty. Such an approach minimizes think that I will be crushed." another's possible defensiveness She is right. Whe~ ~thers that can sabotage moving beyond speak with kindness 'and concern, we are better able to hear what the hurt. At times, we 31i face the they say, more disposed to considering what they are saying. challenge of speaking about painful situations between 1\\'0 other approaches often ourselves and another. Ask God to hurt relationships. The first is to help you in such conversations. hide past hurts, refuse to discuss Then go forward "with love." what is going on. Just as ineffective is to state one's feelings so Your comments are always intensely or with so much welcome. Please write to me at: criticism that the other person chmartin@swindiana.net or at becomes defensive. 7125W 200S, Rockport, IN , Admittedly, it takes courage to 47635. !i

Come, H~ly Spirit We are preparing to celebrate the feast of Pentecost, one of the greatest feasts honoring the Holy Spirit in our liturgical calendar. So it is fitting that we spend a little time in prayerful reflection on the nature of the third person of the Trinity. In the beginning of creation, when God made heaven ando earth, the earth was without form and void, with darkness over the face of the abyss, and a mighty wind that swept over the surface of the waters (Gen. 1:1-2). Thus begins the story of creation. The Word of God and his breath are at the origin of it all. There are many symbols of the Holy Spirit. Probably the most popular are fire, like the tongues of fire that appeared on Pentecost, and the dove, which was the form witnessed at the baptism of Jesus. I tlnd it

difficult to limit the Holy Spirit to a form like a dove ... how,do you put limits on the Spirit of God? My favorite image is the one alluded to in the first verse of the Bible. "Ruah" is the Hebrew word for breath or spirit, and it can refer to the Holy Spirit. Just the sound of the word brings to mind the force of one's breath. The mighty wind that swept over the surface of the waters was indeed the breath of God. It is that same breath that God breathed into the first humans ... the same breath that he infuses in us today. Sometimes, when I'm outdoors in the sun and the breeze blows across my face, I'll close my eyes, tum my face toward the heavens and allow God's presence to wash over me. Try it.

Take a moment and look ... listen ... try to find the Spirit around you. We can't see the Spirit, but we can see, feel and sense the effects of the Spirit

everywhere. I'm a visual learner so I use props to teach certain concepts. To help visualize the life-giving power of the Holy Spirit, I often use a bottle of bubbles and a bubble wand., This simple child's toy provides a great illustration. A bottle of bubble juice is not very exciting in and

allow the Spirit to enter in and of itself. Pour it out and not flow through us. That means we much happens ... itls not very have to allow God to breathe his entertaining. But, put.the Spirit into us like we blow our smallest amount of bubble juice breath into the bubble juice. on a wand and slo~ly pour That breath will give us form, breath into it and a and flight, and the grace of bubble risJs forth, transformation. In the bubble, catch€;s the breeze and the breath stays inside until it floats on the wind. pops. But we are not called to Eyes watcp, hands keep the breath inside. In reach, chil~ren smile, opening ourselves up the Holy and the child's world is Spirit we allow the wind of God, transformed. So it is the breath of God, to move us when God's breath I and move through us. W,e float pours forto and on his love. We are called to indwells each of us! Without the Holy Spirit, we are like so much' speak his Word, do his work and, each in our own time, come bubble juice. With the Holy Spirit, we are transformed in life to rest in his hand. Imagine God's smile! giving forces in the;I, world. Jean'Revil is director of CamEven though this is a great p~ Ministry at Bishop Stang High illustration, we know we are so SchOol, where she has taught for much more than bubble juice. Through our baptism, each of us 27 years. Comments welcome at: jrevil@bishopstang.com. is called to be poro~s enough to


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Visit to Latin America ,

Mw 18,2007

Pope tells enthusiastic Brazilian youths to live fully, responsibly By JOHN THAVIS CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

EAGER ANTICIPATION - Members of religious orders raise their arms as they sing prior to the arrival of Pope Benedict XVI at Paulo Machado de Carvalho stadium in Sao Paulo, Brazil. (CNS photo! Alessia Giuliani, Catholic Press Photo)

Pope warns Latin American bishops of faith challenges

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APARECIDA, Brazil-In calling This gathering ofbishops is the fifth for a ''renewal and revitalization of in a series that began in 1955 in Rio faith" in LatinAmerica and the Carib- de Janeiro, Brazil, and continued with bean, Pope Benedict XVI- warned meetings in Medellin, Colombia, in against a revival of indigenous reli- 1968; Puebla, Mexico, in 1972; and gions, said the Chmch should work Santo Domingo, Dominican Repubfor justice but not become directly in- lic, in 1992. While the May 13-31 volved in pOlitics, and criticized both meeting is a continuation of those deMarxism and capitalism for their de- h'berations, the pope said''many things tachment from "the decisive reality have changed in society" since the last which is God" meeting. Speaking at the opening session The pope noted weaknesses in both May 13 of a meeting of Latin Ameri- politicalrespOnses to the region's chalcan and Caribbean bishops. that will lenges and the response by Chmch set directions for the region for the next communities. . decade, the pope said the faith ''has In the political realm, he criticized serious challenges to address, because both Marxist-inspired governments the harmonious development ofsoci- and those that have implemented ety and the Catholic identity of (the neolibera1 economic policies. He expressed concern about "authoritarian region's) peoples are in jeopardy:' Looking backat the more than 500 'forms of government and regimes years since Catholic missionaries first wedded to certain ideologies that we arrived in the Americas, the pontiffsaid thought had been superseded," an apearly evangelization was not ''the im- parent reference to tlie election ofleftposition of a foreign culture" on the leaning governments in countries such region's indigenous peoples, but led as Venezuela and Bolivia. to "a synthesis between their cultures While praising the efforts of catechists and lay movements and the and the Christian faith." In recent years there has been re- Chmch's educational and charitable newed interest in traditional indig- works, the pontiff said there has been enous religions, particularlyinAndean "a certain weakening of Christian life . and Central American countries; an in society overall" and in the Ch~h Indian theology movement of indig- "due to secularism, hedonism, indifenous Catholic theologians also has ferentism and proselytism by numerarisen. ous sects, animist religions and new In an apparent reference to more pseudoreligious phenomena." Calling Sunday Mass "an effective radical movements that promote arevival ofindigenous religions, the pope way of teaching the faith;' the pope wamed that "the utopia of going back urged families to participate together to breathe life into the pre-Columbus in the weekly Eucharist. He made 'no religions ... would be a step back." mention ofthe particularchallenge this He underscored the "rich and pr0- poses in LatinAmerica, which is home found popularreligiousness" that grew to 43 percent of the world's Catholics out of the melding of indigenous and but has about 7,000 laypeople per Christian beliefs and is one ofthe most priest, the highest ratio in the world. obvious outward expressions of CaLay Catholics, meanwhile, have as tholicism in LatinAmerica He called ''theirreSponsibility and their mission" that tradition a "precious treasure" that the task of bringing ''the light of the "must be protected, promoted and, Gospel into public life, into culture, when necessary, purified." economics and politics."

SAO PAULO, Brazil - Pope Benedict XVI addressed a stadium full of enthusiastic Brazilian young people, telling them that a life lived without moral responsibility is a life wasted. At a rally May 10 in Sao Paulo, the pope warned against sexual infidelity, drug lIse and unethical shortcuts to success and said the desire to build a more just society. depends on following God's law. "Stretching out in front of you, my dear friends, is a life that all of us hope will be long; yet it is only one life, it is"unique; do not let it pass in vain; do not squander it," the pope said. "Live it with enthusiasm and with joy, but most of all_ with a sense of responsibility," he said. About 40,000 young people crowded into the Paulo Machado de Carvalho soccer stadium for the papal encounter, and others spilled out into the Pacaembu neighborhood of Sao Paulo. Many arrived hours before the event. A large group of young people from Rio de Janeiro sang and played tambourines as they walked toward the stadium, stopping to wave at busloads of passing bishops. "What Catholic youth lack today IS fervor," said Juliana Moura, 21, of Rio de Janeiro. ''There's got to be more enthusiasm." There. was plenty of energy inside the stadium, where the pope, smiling and waving, rode in a popemobile through the cheering throng. He sat on a white platform built in the shape of a dove and listened as a young Catholic, Rodrigo Mendes, told him about youths who had traveled days to be there with him, to share their "joys, sorrows, accomplishments and challenges." Brazilian young people know that following Jesus is the' only real way to bring revolution to society and overcome violence, Mendes said. Then he went up to the pope, kissed his ring and gave him a hug. The program included a song calling for protection of the environment and an end to burning and killing in the Amazon region. As the music rang out, video projections of threatened Amazon species were shown on a giant screen. The highlight of the evening was the pope's talk. In a country where Christian televangelists have attracted millions with emotional and simplistic preaching, the pope offered a stark contrast: He sat on a chair and read a 4,000-word speech - mostly in Portugu~se that presented a carefully delineated ar-

gument for Christian virtue. The pope's talk was structured around the Gospel story of the'rich young man who seeks out Jesus for advice about salvation but cannot bring himself to commit fully to Jesus' message. The pope said the young man had asked a crucial question that is just as relevant today: What must I do to gain eternal life? The answer, the pope said, begins with the recognition that life transcends the "here and now" and that God and his creation are good. When people see the beauty of creation, he said, "it is impossible not to believe in God." He said Brazilians' desire to protect the country's natural environment, especially the vast forests of the Amazon region, reflects this awareness of the creator. He said that is not always easy in a modem society characterized by "assaults of materialism and secularism," the lures of corruption and the tendency to impose one's own economic or political aspirations on others. . He called on young people to avoid these "snares of evil," particularly when they involve marriage and the family. True domestic happiness depends upon fidelity between spouses, and couples inside and outside martjage should practice sexual responsibility, he said. The pope also urged young people to be guided by the values of their faith in building a more just and peaceful society. GROUP HUG .- Pope Benedict XVI embraces a group of children during his visit to Guaratingueta, Brazil. (CNS photofTony Gentile, Reuters)

Pope canonizes Brazilian friar renowned for charity, healings .SAO PAULO, Brazil - Pope Benedict XVI canonized Brazil's first native-born saint, an 18th-century Franciscan friar re-. nowned for his charity to the poor and his legacy of miraculous heatings. At outdoor Mass May 11, the pope read a decree proclaiming sainthood for Father Antonio Galvao, prompting a surge of ap-

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plause among the hundreds of thousands of people who gathered at Sao Paulo's Campo de Marte Airport for the liturgy. As the saint's relics were brought in procession to the altar, the crowd sang and waved banners and flags in the sunshine. In the front row, wearing bright blue habits, were Conceptionist nuns, whose order used St.

Galvao as a spiritual adviser in the late 1700s. In his homily, which the pope read in Portuguese, he said St. Galvao, who died in 1822, was a model of Christian charity and service in Brazil, especially toward the poor and sick. He was sought out as aconfessor and inspired people by his attitude of constant devotion to God, the pope said.

''The renown of his immense charity knew no bounds. People from allover the country went to Frei Galvao, who offered a fatherly welcome to everyone," the pope said. The pope said St. Galvao reminded people above all of the importance of God in their lives. That has significance for those seeking social progress and justice today, he said.


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I MAy 18, 2007

Fate

Around the Diocese ~ .1'-' ..... ~llaristiC Adoration

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ATTLEBORO - Perpetual eucharistic adoration is held at St. Joseph's Church, 208 South Main Street. For more infor· mation call 508-226-1115. FALL RIVER - Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament takes place weekdays following the 7 am. Mass at Holy Name Church, 7Cf) Hanover Street. It continues in the parish adoration chapel until 9 p.m. For more information call 508-679-6732.

IHe~ng S e r v i c e s l ATILEBORO - A healing service in Portuguese will be held Sunday beginning at2 p.m. at the National Shrine ofOurLady of La Salette. For more information call 508-222-5410. NORTH DARTMOUTH - The parish nurses ofSt. Julie BOOart Parish will sponsor a Healing Mass on May 23 at 6 p.m. For more information call 508-993-2351. WAREHAM - A Mass of anointing for all who wish to receive the sacrament of the sick will be held Sunday at 2 p.m. at St. Patrick's Church, 82 High Street. For more information call 508-295-0799. If you need transportation call Debbie Clark at 508-291-2155.

1LectureslPresentations

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ATTLEBORO - Singer musician John Polce will present his Bethany Nights pr0gram May 25 at 7:30 p.m. at the National Shrine of Our Lady of La Salette. It will feature music, prayer and the opportunity to be prayed over individually. For more information call 508-222-5410 or visit the Website wwwJohnpolce.com. ATTLEBORO - A Bible study on the Gospel ofJohn will be held tomorrow and May 26 from 11 am. to noon in the Reconciliation Chapel at the National Shrine of Our Lady of La Salette. For information call 508-222-5410.

IMiscellaneous ATTLEBORO - The feast of the Holy Spirit will be celebrated June 3 beginning at 10 am. at Holy Ghost Church. A pr0cession will begin from 77 Fisher Street and Mass will follow. Traditional free sopas will be served in the church hall following Mass. For more information call 508-222-3266. FALL RIVER - The St. Stanislaus Parish Community is sponsoring a breakfast fund·raiser on May 27 from 8:15 to 11:30 am. at St Stanislaus Hall, to benefit Rachel Coumoyer, a parishioner battling a serious illness since 1999. TIckets are available after the 4:30 p.rn. Saturday Mass and the 7:30 and 10 am. Sunday Masses. D0nations can be sent to the parish at 37 Rockland Street, Fall River, 02724. FALL RIVER - Volunteers are needed to provide companionship and friendship to hospice patients at Beacon Hospice, 45 North Main Street Free training is pr0vided. Volunteers are also needed to knit blankets for patients and make memory quilts for families of patients. For more information call Christine Millerat 508-3241900. FAIRHAVEN - Volunteers are needed to help with a door-to-door can food drive to benefit the M.O. Ufe Food Pantry on June 2 beginning at 10 am. It is sponsored by St Mary's Family Youth Mass group. For more information call Dorothy Cabral at 508-995-0776. FALMOUTH - A Mass in Italian will be celebrated Sunday at 2 p.m. at the St Thomas Chapel, Falmouth Heights, by FatherTad Pacholczyk. Formore information call 508-548-1065. MASHPEE - The Third Order of Carmelites will meet Sunday for an evening of prayer and study following the

5:30 p.m. Mass. For more information call Dottie Cawley at 508-477-2798. SOUTH DARTMOUTH-The Knights of Columbus Bishop Stang Council No. 4532 is seeking good Catholic men to become new members. It meets on the first Thesday ofeach month in the basement of St. Mary's Church, 783 Dartmouth Street. For more information call Brock Cordeiro at 508-979-8930. WEST HARWICH - A reunion of the Charismatic Prayer Group will be held May 24 at 7:30 p.m. at Holy Trinity Parish. Father William Rodrigues will be guest speaker and refreshments will be served. For more information call Fran Lynch at 508-432-2939.

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IL::...: Pro-Life Activities . ...

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HYANNIS - The Cape Cod Pro-Life Group welcomes volunteers to pray the rosary on Wednesday mornings at 10 am. in front of the abortion clinic located at 68 Camp Street.

IRetreats ATTLEBORO-A retreat for breast cancer survivors will be held June 1-3 at the La Salette Retreat Center, 947 Park Street It will begin at 7 p.m. on Friday. Claire Lamoureux will lead it For more information call 508-222-8530.

ISocial Events ATTLEBORO-The National Shrine of Our Lady of La Salette is sponsoring a carnival May 23-27. Rides, games and food will be provided by Fiesta Shows. For more information call 508-222-5410 or visit www.lasalette-shrine.org. DARTMOUTH- The second annual St. Stanislaus School golf outing will be held May 21 beginning with registration at 11:30 am. at the Allendale County Oub. Lunch will be served at noon and golfers will tee off with a shotgun start at I p.rn. For more information call Pam Sefrino at 508-264-0650. WEST PLYMOUTH - The St. Vmcent de Paul Society of Sacred Heart Parish in Middleboro will host a charity golf tournament June 3 at 9 am. at the Squirrel Run County Oub to benefit the Sacred Heart Food Pantry. For information call Bill Pye at 508-947-8192.

ISUpport GroUps

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BUZZARDS BAY - The Guild of St. Benedict Joseph Labre, a support group for families and friends ofthose with emotional troubles, depression and mental illness, will meet May 27 at 3 p.m. at St. Margaret's Church. Meetings include prayer and an opportunity to share with one another. For more information call Tunothy Duff at 508-759-1903. FAIRHAVEN-FoodAddictsin Recovery Anonymous will meet Sunday at 6:30 p.m. at St Joseph's Church. There are no dues, no fees and no weigh-ins. For more information call 508-758-8418. NORTH DARTMOUTH - Project Rachel, a ministry of healing and recon· ciliation for post-abortion women and men is available in the diocese. If you are hurting from an abortion experience and want help call 508-997-3300. All calls are confidential. NORTH DARTMOUTH - The Diocesan Divorced-Separated Support Group will meet May 30 from 7-8:30 p.m. at the Family Ufe Center, 500 Slocum Road. Refreshments will be available. For more information call Bob Menard at 508-9652919. NORTH FALMOUTH - A Cancer Support Group meets at St. Elizabeth Seton Church every third Wednesday of the month at 7 p.m. For more information call 508-563-7770.

Continued from page one

brought a federal lawsuit against those legislators who in November had tried to kill the ballot question by procedural maneuvering. So although Murray opposes the amendment, noted Kris Mineau, spokesman for VoteOnMarriage.org, "(She) gave her word that a vote would be taken on the Marriage Amendment after the state budget deliberations were concluded, and we take her at her word." More than 170,000 signatures were collected in 2005 in support of the amendment, which has the backing of all four Massachusetts bishops. In a May 7 letter to legislators, the bishops reminded them of this record-breaking signature drive. They noted also that a recent Suffolk University poll showed that two-thirds of registered Massachusetts voters want a vote taken on the amendment. ''We believe that society has a

moral responsibility to foster the who oppose a vote have apparently good of families, sirice the good of been swayed by the gay activists' the family is closely linked to the claim that "civil rights" can't be put institution of marriage as it has been to a vote. recognized from tim~ immemorial," However, Dan Avila, MCC pubthe bishops said. lic policy director, explained in his The Massachusetts Catholic Con- May 4 "Notes from the Hill" colference (MCC), which represents the umn: "It's not true that 'civil rights Church on public policy matters, is are not to be put to a vote,' since evurging people to contact their legisla- ery time we vote on a ballot questors by phone at 617-722-2000, or tion, we affect someone's rights unemail in support ofthe amendment. A der the civil law. list of email addresses can be found "In the case of 'same-sex maronline at www.macatpconf.org. riage,' whatever right that adults Those representatives still in of- think they may have to marry anfice who voted January 2 to advance other adult, that claim directly affects the measure should receive thanks, the rights of children. A profound Martins noted. Withih the Fall River regard for the rights of children is Diocese this includes Reps. Robert what ultimately persuaded the Correia, Fall River;' James Fagan, United Nations to reject same-sex Taunton; Susan Gif(ord, Wareham; marriage as a human right in 2002," John Lepper, Attleboro; Jeffrey -il~e said. Perry, E. Sandwich; and Elizabeth Gail Besse is a Massachusetts Poirier, N. Attleboro. freelance writer. She can be Martins said some lawmakers reached at gailbesse@comcast.net.

Pap named to lead Catholic Citizenship BOSTON - Victor Pap III has been appointed executive director of Catholic Citizenship, its board of directors announced. Catholic Citizenship is a nonpartisan grassroots organization, which promotes public poliCy education and Catholic laity involvement in the p0litical pr<X;.eSs. . "VictorPap is a committed catholic, who, like me, believes our faith must infonn our politics and we must be a voice for the voiceless," said Ray Aynn, fonner mayor of Boston and fonner ambassador to the Vatican, the National president of Catholic Citizenship. Pap served as a legislative aide and press secretary on Beacon Hill working for Rep. George Peterson and Sen. Bob Hedlund. He also worked in party politics organizing the grassroots, fund-raising, and providing campaign strategies for numerous successful candidates. The newly installed executive di-

. . . !!!.y.~_~_~!_~X~£~ __ Please pray for these priests during the coming weeks May 16

Rev. William McDonald, SS., St. Patrick, Falmouth, 1941 Rev. Msgr. J. Joseph Sullivan, P.R., Pastor, Sacred Heart, 1960 Rev. Arthur dosReis, Retired Pastor, Santo Christo, Fall River, 1981

rector took charge of the organization on the eve of May 9's Constitutional Convention, where a second legislative vote on the Marriage Amendment was on the agenda ContinJring its role in moving the question to the 2008 ballot, Catholic Citizenship sees the M~age Amendment as particularly ;mportant. "I see my role as afacilitator, helping Catholics put their faith into ac-

tion on the issues that impact ourlives and values," said Pap, a lifelong Catholic. Pap is a parishioner of St. Jerome Parish in Boston and a member of its parish council. He also serves as commissioner ofthe Weymouth Housing Authority. Auent in Spanish and Brazilian Portuguese, Pap resides with his wife Mary, and daughter, in Weymouth.

CCA video' continues to air on cable TV FALL RIVER - A video offering alook at someofthe programs and ministries that are funde4 by the Catholic Charities Appeal is airing on cable TV public access channe4; in communities throughout the Fall River Diocese. As The Anchor went to press airings were scheduled as follows: Acushnet and F;m.haven, cable I' Channel 95, May 23 and 30 at 6 p.m. and May 24 and 31 at 10 a.m. !I

Dartmouth, Fall River, New Bedford: ComcastChannel 9, May 18 and 19 at 6 p.m.; and May 20 at 8:30 p.m. Easton, cable Channel 9, May 24 and 31 at4p.m. Lower Cape Cable TV (in Brewster, Eastham, Orleans, Provincetown, Truro and Wellfleet), cableChanne117, May 21 at 6:30 p.m. Mashpee, cable Channel 17, May 22 at6 p.m.

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May 17

Most Rev. James E. Cassidy, D.O., Third Bishop of Fall River, 193451, 1951 Rev. Albert Evans, SS.CC., 2003, May 19

Rev. Ambrose Lamarre, a.p., 1940 Rev. Thomas Trainor, Pastor, St. Louis, Fall River, 1941 Rev. Arthur C. Levesque, Pastor, Our Lady of Fatima, New Bedford, 1988 . May 20 Rev. Antonio L. daSilva, Pastor, Our Lady of Health, Fall River, 1952

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The Anchor ,

Diocesan deacons, wives, gather in Wareham for annual convocation WAREHAM - Deacons, deacon candidates, and their wives gathered recently for the fourth annual deacons convocation. Each year the pennanent diaconate family gathers to enhance its fonnation for ministry, to pray together, and to socialize. This year, the community was hosted by Father Arnold R. Medeiros and the S1. Patrick Parish Family in Wareham. Msgr. Thomas J. Harrington, retired priest ofthe diocese, was the featured speaker. For some time the deacons had been requesting information about annulments. Questions surfaced regarding not only the process, but how to assist people who find themselves in a situation that can be rectified. Msgr. Harrington holds a degree in Canon Law and has served in various capacities in the chancery and the Tribunal, currently assisting as defender of the bond. Msgr. Harrington has worked tirelessly in the Tribunal for many years. The deacons appreciated his information, insights and pastoral manner expressed to them. At the convocation, Msgr. John J. Oliveira, diocesan director ofthe Permanent Diaconate, announced changes to the structure of the diaconate program. With the approval of Bishop George W. Coleman, Msgr. Oliveira announced two new po~itions in the Office of the Permanent Diaconate. Deacon Frank Fantasia has been appointed as assistant director for Can-

didate Formation. He will work with the candidates in all areas leading to ordination to the diaconate, including initial interviews, family visits, mentoring programs etc. Deacon David Boucher was appointed assistant director for Deacon Formation. He will be responsible in the fonnation ofdeacons after ordination, including the annual convocation, retreats, and days of recollection. Msgr. Oliveira noted these two p0sitions are important for the diaconate family and are suggested in the National Directory for Formation, Ministry and Life of Permanent Deacons issued by the bishopsforose in the U.S. ''With the forthcoming ordination of 13 men as permanent deacons, I look forward to beginning a new class in the future and having all in place to comply with the National Directory;' he said. ''It is my hope that the experience gained from this class' journey will serve well for the future class. 'The diaconal ministry is an important service in the Church and here in our diocese. Hopefully we can send well trained and prepared men to diocesan parishes and apostolates to serve the people of God in our diocese." Msgr. Oliveira expressed his gratitude to the parishes that have supported candidates during their formation, and parishes with deacons that support program expenses. He also thanked contributors to the Catholic Charities Appeal which funds the budget for the Office of the Permanent Diaconate.

, Stay informed and stay enlightened.

ALL ABOUT WOMEN - At the recent annual convention of the Diocesan Council of Catholic Women at St. Anthony's Church in Taunton, speakers included, top left, former Boston Mayor and Ambassador to the Vatican Raymond Flynn, and center, Atty. Philip Moran. At right is Bishop George W. Coleman and DCCW Moderator Sister Eugenia Brady; and at left is DCCW President Maureen Papineau. At bottom, from left, District One President Helen Flavin, Lorraine Gagnon of St. Lo~is de France Parish in Swansea, a recipient of the Our Lady of Good Counsel Award; and Convention Chairman Adrienne Lemieux. (Photos courtesy of Maddie Lavoie)

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PRAYING FOR VOCATIONS - The Diocesan Council of Catholic Women and the Diocesan Vocations Office sponsored a Holy Hour for Vocations recently at the Cathedral of St. Mary of the Assumption in Fall River. From left: Maddie Lavoie; Maureen Papineau; assistant director of Vocations Father Karl C. Bissinger; Bishop George W. Coleman; Lynette Ouellette; Helen Stager and Dorothy Curry. .

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05.18.07  

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