Page 1

the

Roar

A&M Consolidated High School

Twirl around with Color Guard on page 11

1801 Harvey Mitchell Pkwy. S., College Station, Texas 77840

Friday, Sept. 23, 2011

Vol. 17 No. 1

ONE SCHOOL, ONE POWER

School theme encourages student body to come together in final year of unity The Power of One. It’s a phrase that every student by kendra spaw, executive editor at our campus has heard probably more than once in

these first five weeks of school, but many students don’t understand the purpose of the slogan and how it has shifted Consol into a new direction. Last year, as student body president Celina Malave thought about her election videos for Student Council, she realized that the 2011-2012 school year would be the last year the student body was together before the split with the new high school, College Station High School. “Originally, it was a StuCo idea to be the Student Council theme, but then Mr. Reed contacted me and told me he wanted to have a school theme,” Malave said. Soon after, her StuCo plan would turn into the school motto for the year.

see "power of one" on page 3

tolook

PHOTO BY AMY ZHANG

where News Viewpoints Snapshots Student Life

pages 2-5 People

pages 14-17

pages 6-10 Sports

page 18-20

page 11 Health and Rec

page 21

pages 12-13 Entertainment/Etc. pages 22-24

nthis ssue

After a petition by College Station students, the new skate park opened on Sept. 3. PAGE 14

With the beginning of football season, spirit has permeated throughout the school. PAGE 23


n the news

2 | news | the roar

friday, sept. 23, 2011

A qu ck view

Eleven seniors selected as National Merit semifinalists

Forensics Team competes in Houston tournament

Eleven seniors were named semifinalists in the 57th-annual National Merit Scholar Program. The semifinalists are seniors Franco Bettati, Kyle Campbell, Alex Carstens, Dustin Fry, Tom Li, Austen McDougal, Karen McVay, Sid Mitchell, Serena Wang, Glenn Welch and Dean Zhu. The CSISD students are in a pool of 16,000 semifinalists nationwide and are competing for 8,300 National Merit Scholarships worth up to $2,500 each. About 90% of the semifinalists are expected to be named finalists and of those, around half will win a National Merit Scholarship and earn the prestigious Merit Scholar title. Scholarship winners will be announced beginning in April and concluding in May.

The Tiger 4n6 (forensics) competed in the Alief Elsik Speech Tournament in Houston last weekend. Consol placed sixth overall. Kathleen Dill placed first in Novice Extemp speaking and first in Novice Public Forum Debate. Patrick Lynch placed first in Novice Public Forum Debate and second place in Impromptu Speaking. Ian Ray placed first in poetry and fifth in prose. Abbie Craigen recieved second place in Novice Original Orator. Sara Krusekopf placed third in Duet Acting and Duo Acting. Zachary Bradford got fifth in Humorous and third in Duet Acting and fourth in Duo Acting. Jeffrey Kettle placed fifth in Humorous and fourth in Duo Acting. Austin Anderson placed fourth in Duo Acting and Franco Bettati placed sixth in poetry.

Homecoming Court honored this week This year’s senior Homecoming nominees include Adrienne Adamson, a Bengal Belle; Abbie Craigen, a drum major; Alina Dattagupta, senior class president; Joanne Koola, Interact club president; and Claire Warlick, Student Council historian. The boys nominees are Zach Carstens, swim team member; Will Davis, Consolidated Cycling Club founder; Peter Lambert, drum major; Kevin Li, science bowl captain; and Quinton White, football running back. Junior Duchesses are Emily Hall and Tiffany Wu. Sophomore Duchesses include Blair Schaefer and Camille Castleberry. The freshman Duchesses are Megan Paradowski and Natalie Colunga. The king will be announced at today’s pep rally, and the queen will be crowned at half-time of tonight’s football game.

Life after high school presentation set for next week The counseling department will be hosting the Life After High School Program on Monday, Sept. 26 from 6-8 p.m. The program will be in the auditorium and will be geared toward 10th-12th graders and thier parents. The purpose is to inform attendees about getting prepared for post secondary opportunities such as applying for college, financial aid and SAT/ACT testing.

GSA hosts guest speakers at next meeting The Gay-Straight Alliance will be having guest speakers from TAMU’s GLBT Resource center at the next meeting after school on Wednesday, Sept 28 at 3:50 p.m. in Portable 9.

Seniors Celina Malave and Joe Waithaka take part in the fun on Kiss a Senior day. This is a tradional part of Howdy week that is a large project for student council. The week- long project, which also included saying hi, shaking hands and hugging raises money for future dances. PHOTO BY HOLLAND KNAPP

Com ng up Sept. 23:

Homecoming football game against Westlake at 7:30

Sept. 24:

Homecoming dance from 8-12 p.m. at Expo Center

Sept. 24:

Leo Club car wash- Kroger Parking Lot, 11-4 p.m.

Sept. 24:

Swim meet vs. Tyler Lee at 1 p.m. in the Natatorium

Oct. 1:

SAT Test offered at Consol

Oct. 5:

College Night at the Brazos Center 6-8 p.m.

Oct. 10:

Student Holiday for Columbus day

Oct. 12:

Senior Skate Day

Oct. 12:

PSAT and EOC testing for grades 9-11

Oct. 22:

Car, Truck & Bike show in School Parking lot, 10-2 p.m.

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the roar | news | 3

friday, sept. 23, 2011

“power of one” continued from page 1

Power of one theme celebrates Consol’s last year together Principal Buddy Reed hosted a meeting at his home where students from various clubs and organizations met to discuss what theme the high school should adopt this year. “The power of one, to me, encompasses a lot in regards to our expectations on the campus,” Reed said. “It’s imperative for us to have a safe, disciplined learning environment where teachers feel good about teaching here and students feel good about being on the campus.” The purpose of this year’s theme is to promote the success individuals and our student body can receive by working together to make each day special, Reed said. “We wanted [a theme that] our students would want to buy into it. And, not only our students, but our staff too,” he said. An important factor in maintaining a unified student body is to have a unified faculty. At one of the staff development meetings associate principal Gwen Elder and the staff development committee used the concept of The Amazing Race and incorporated it with the school theme to create an effective way to teach the staff that working together can benefit the school, Elder said. “Our staff members competed in different games, [such as] board games, games on video, and old-school games like four square, knock out and Bunco. The staff, in teams of 10, signed up for different activities, and before they could move on to the next activity, they had to compete [as a team], because it was about working together,” Elder said. “[With each activity] they earned a puzzle piece, and at the end it was about working together with the puzzle pieces to make an impact and create the big picture.” Consol faculty learned that working together can help encourage this school to collaborate with one another and encourage each other each and every day, Elder said. “Every student on this campus is important,” Reed

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said. “If we can embrace that concept of making every student feel like they are important on the campus, and that they influence the actions and the attitudes of others, then it reverts back to what our initial goal is: Having a great disciplined learning environment.” Student Council has created many ways to express to the students the importance of working together, Malave said. Students who wore their Tiger spirit shirt on Friday, Sept. 3 received a free pair of sunglasses as a reward for expressing their unity with fellow Tigers at Consol. Also, to further promote spirit and unity, teachers received mouse pads and key chains, while the school gets to show their spirit at athletic events with “Tiger Power” spirit towels. Student Council hopes to continue promoting the year’s theme, as well as maintaining school spirit throughout the entire year, Malave said. In order to get students more involved, there will be a club wall in the cafeteria. “Every club gets a scrapbook square, and they get to design it with their club name and [important information such as] when and where their club will meet,” Malave said. “It will be a wall that shows how we have all these different clubs, and we are all united in the end.” All of the changes this year started with an idea, by one person. “Every idea on this campus that students share with us, teachers share with us, they’re all important to us because those ideas turn into something special to help our school become better,” Reed said. If a student uses the power of assistance from others, they can achieve any idea that comes to mind, Malave said. “We each hold our own power and potential to do something great, and it becomes even better when we all join forces,” she said.

Future plans to promote the Power of One: Club Corner:

Each school club will decorate a scrapbook square and display it in the cafeteria to promote each club and express how the school contains so many diverse qualities to create one united school.

Banner Signing:

All seniors will sign the large banner by the bus loop to commit students to working together to impact one another each day and make the school a special place.

Promotional Items:

Sunglasses, pens and spirit towels have already been given to promote this year’s theme and constantly remind our students of the meaning of the power of one and how it can impact our students. Compiled by Kendra Spaw


4 | news | the roar

friday, sept. 23, 2011

Heat, lack of rain intensify drought throughout Texas BY DEVIN DAKOTA [STAFF REPORTER]

100-degree temperatures are the usual for southeast Texas in July and August, but the 2011 summer drought has managed to make an enormous impact on Bryan and College Station by breaking all-time temperature records, maintaining longstanding burn bans and limiting the cities’ water and power resources. “This is very unusual for east Texas,” KBTX Meteorologist Ashley Batey said. A weather pattern called “La Nina” in the Pacific is creating these hot, dry days. “There were signs of a La Nina pattern, which is basically just cooler waters near the equator, and since that is such a large body of water, that has world wide consequences,” Batey said. Meteorologists like Batey noticed high-pressure systems over Texas in early June, but were not able to predict just how serious this drought would get. “It’s pretty much persisted the entire summer,” Batey said, “and dryer air heats up much more easily than warm, moist air, so that’s another reason why were seeing these triple digit temperatures.” The record for days over 100 in College Station tied with the all-time record from 1917, 58 days, according to The National Weather Service on Sept. 5. On Aug. 27 and 28, College Station hit 109 degrees, three degrees lower than the hottest temperature ever in College Station, 112 back in 2000. “The city also had the hottest months of July and August,” Batey said. The lack of precipitation has also affected much of the population of southeast Texas. College Station is behind 25.87 inches of rain due to a shortage of rain from the last few years, according to The National Weather Service on Sept. 21. In addition, dry ground is the main reason for the recent wildfires scattered all over Texas, including Leon, Grimes and Houston County. “The people probably facing it the hardest are the farmers,” Batey said. “People are definitely having to adapt and start making decisions.” FFA officer junior Alexis Roach is doing just that. “We noticed it was getting really bad around mid-July,” said Roach, who shows animals for FFA. Due to the high temperatures, Roach has spent much of her time this summer caring for her cattle and goats. “My steer is dealing with heat stress and isn’t taking in as much feed, so we’ve been putting electrolytes in their water,” Roach said. The heat has also caused one of Roach’s goats to acquire a thiamine deficiency and become temporary blinded. “We’ve had to pay for extra medicine, electrolytes for the water and the price of feed has increased,” Roach said. “The amount of time and money we’ve spent has definitely gone up.” This summer has not only taken a significant financial toll on people with livestock, but the heat has made dealing with the school’s financial cutbacks more challenging. Due to the addition of a new elementary school and College Station High School, and a reduction in revenue from the state, the district’s budget has been stretched. “The district has enforced more stringent regulations on the temperatures in all rooms and buildings,” Director of Communications Chuck Glenewinkel said. Consol now keeps their air conditioners at 74 degrees in the summer, and 68 degrees in the winter. “A lot of times, you’ll see very hot summers coupled with colder winters,” Batey said. “So, the best thing we could get would be a nice low pressure system, with some light to moderate rain for a few days. It’s going to be pretty hard to recover from something like this.”

PHOTO BY KELSEY GAINES

August 2011 was the Warmest Month Ever Recorded Across Southeast Texas

Hottest Temperature Recorded in College Station 112° F Sept. 4, 2000

RECORD BREAKING STATISTICS College Station Received 1.74 in. of rain in September

Hottest College Station Normal Rain Temperature is Behind Level for Recorded in Texas 25.87 College Station 120° F Inches of Rain is Aug. 12 1936 as of Sept. 5 39.67 in. Seymour, Texas Sources: National Weather Service, USA Today


the roar | news | 5

friday, sept. 23, 2011

ADD, ADHD symptoms can cause academic difficulties for students However, Nick Dill, a senior diagnosed with ADD in 1999, does not take medication and describes himself Their feet tapping, their fingers drumming, their mind as “efficient” and a “hard worker.” He said he does not somewhere else and their thoughts unfocused—maybe experience any struggles with his ADD aside from the that’s how the student body pictures a peer with ADD or occasional daydream. ADHD. Truly, though, these students can function and are “I think that over the years, I’ve gotten better about capable of accomplishing the same work as any student keeping up with my work,” Dill said. “I always do the without one of these disorders. best I can—I’ve had the attitude that I’m going to do the That’s not to say, however, that school is a breeze for best I can since I was young.” these students. Because Dill’s struggles with his ADD are so few, “It’s just harder for me to focus in class,” said he feels strongly about the stereotypes of ADD students. an anonymous junior female, diagnosed with ADHD “In our culture, people stereotype that we’re people (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) just before who randomly shout out swear words and stuff like that, ninth grade. “I understand which I don’t think is what’s going on, but I have to true,” Dill said. “I want make myself care.” people to know that Senior Bree Yuodsnukis “I think people think that ADHD people who have [ADD] has learned through her younger are very intelligent sister’s struggles with ADHD is just about being hyper and people.” just how difficult school can be out of control, and really it’s The anonymous for an affected student. junior female feels more than that.” “It’s really hard for her, similarly to Dill about senior BREE YUODSNUKIS especially in reading, because stereotypes that come she’s so smart and you know it, along with her ADHD. but it’s just so hard for her to focus,” Yuodsnukis said “You picture some little hyperactive kid who looks about her sister. “I’ll see tears coming out of her eyes like he’s eaten too much sugar, when really, that’s not because she’s just so sad that she’s not as ‘good’ as the exactly what it is,” she said. “You just lose interest in other students.” things quickly.” For students with such problems focusing in class, Yuodsnukis agrees that children and teens with Consol can provide help, counselor Anne Hoffman said. ADHD, like her younger sister, are unfairly stereotyped. “Sometimes, the students will take tests in another “I think people think that ADHD is just about being room where it is quieter, so they can focus more easily,” hyper and out of control, and really it’s more than that,” Hoffman said. “Some students will need a copy of notes she said. “I think it’s just a lot harder than a lot of people after class, because they may have gotten distracted and imagine.” missed a section.” Though Yuodsnukis has not had to deal with ADHD These little steps can help put a student with ADD in her life, she is a supporter of her younger sister and or ADHD on a level playing field with a student without hopes for a day when her sister will be a happier person, these disorders. However, these are not the only things without the burden of ADHD on her shoulders. that keep a student’s ADD or ADHD under control. “For a seven year old, to be facing such struggles, Dr. Maria Cristina Soriano explained that students I don’t know what it’s like, but it’s amazing to see her with ADD or ADHD are most successful in school and work so hard,” she said. “It really pushes me to become in general through a combination of both medicine and a better person.” behavioral therapy.

BY DANA BRANHAM

features editor

Differences between

ADD & ADHD

ADD-Attention Deficit Disorder

Children and teens diagnosed with ADD generally have trouble focusing and may be inattentive in class, and/or may experience the following symptoms:

• Difficulty sustaining attention • Often does not seem to listen to what is being said • Tendency to lose things necessary for tasks or activities • Difficulty organizing goal-directed activities • Often shifts from one uncompleted activity to another

ADHD-Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Children and teens with ADHD experience similar symptoms to patients with ADD, but also experience hyperactivity and have more noticeable academic struggles.

• Often fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, work, or other activities • Often has difficulty sustaining attention in tasks or play activities • Often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace • Often avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to engage in tasks like homework or schoolwork • Is often forgetful in daily activities

Sources: http://web4health.info/en/answers/adhd-def-inattentive.htm and interviewees Mrs. Anne Hoffman and Dr. Maria Cristina Soriano


6 | viewpoints | the roar

friday, sept. 23, 2011

New steps should be taken to prevent, report bullying

Political activism by students can lead to community change

CONTACT US

“No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.” So said Robin Williams in his role as John Keating in the movie Dead Poets Society, the story of how boys at a strict boarding school were introduced to the concepts of free thought by Keating, their liberally-minded English teacher. While Consol certainly does not embody the characteristics of a boarding school, streams of negative thought still occasionally permeate through the student body. “We’re just kids, what could we possibly do?” some may think. However, this is not the kind of mindset that should be filling the campus. Contrarily, students should realize that they could make a difference if they put in effort towards a good cause. For example, turn to the center of this newspaper and read about the new skate park. This new facility would not have been possible without the efforts of former Consol students. Without their initial inspiration to make a difference, honoring their friend, College Station might not have a skate park right now. The evidence of student action is everywhere, if you look closely. The sidewalk that winds in front of the school was the result of a student petition a few years ago. Every day, fundraisers and projects for good causes are announced over the intercom. So students, why get discouraged? If you have a problem with how something is run or done, actively strive to change it. While doing so should not involve breaking laws, there are many ways for students to make a difference through merely contacting their state representatives, petitioning for their rights or even just talking to an adult. Just remember—you’re never too small to make a difference. If you would like for your opinions to be read, contact the editorial board by sending your letter to the editor. Review our policy for letters before submitting. E-MAIL the.roar@ymail.com

it makes the attacker a hot-headed person now with a likely bruised hand. Teasing the girl who wears strange clothes does not necessarily make the offender any better dressed; it makes her rude. Lastly, posting anonymous and degrading comments about others online is cruel and unnecessary, not “cool”. Second, punishment does help to an extent; however, not all offenders fear the dreaded D-Hall. It seems like a plausible idea to focus on the bullied also. I can say from personal experience that self defense courses build immense confidence. Although these courses seem like an extreme Prowling the ominously vacant hallways of the school alternative considering a good portion of bullying is verbal, it with his restroom pass, a heavyset boy called Stuart hones could certainly boost the victims’ self esteem while teaching in on a rather small freshman at his locker. He advances on them how to protect themselves physically if necessary. As a part of the student body, we all have a the boy and slams the metal door shut, pushing the younger responsibility as a whole to help each student against the lockers. Met with wide eyes full of terror, other out and make our school a healthy Stuart cocks him arm back sharply, receiving a flinch in environment. The government of Texas response. Cackling, he gives his victim one last shove and has recently put a new website into proceeds to wreak havoc on the rest of the school. effect called www.reportabully.com. Public school students have The website is essentially designed become too accustomed to this to help Texas schools reduce scenario. It appears that some this kind of behavior on campus. students seem to feel the need to Basically, those who witness a student show their dominance by putting picking on others can literally, report down their weaker peers and a bully. The website is anonymous, uplifting themselves. This kind of and after the student identifies the behavior shows similarity to school and submits the report, an some of the nature clips on email will be sent to the school. Animal Planet; alpha males Now, it is possible for other in the group pick fights with bystanders to take a stand others to demonstrate their as well as help improve the strength. The only problem is atmosphere of public schools. that we are humans, yet we So, to all the students of are behaving like apes. Consol reading this article and Bullies create thinking to themselves that this is an unhealthy school overrated and silly, take a step environment in which back and think about the nerdy some students dread boy whom everyone makes fun setting foot on campus. of. Instead of chiming in with Additional to lowered student laughter when someone confidence, recent studies cracks a joke about him show that schools infested with (which admittedly most these aggressive students tend to have To listen to the writer read his editorial, have done), perhaps take lower standardized test grades than those go to http://www.theroarnewspaper. the time one day to ask that are violence-free. Now that bullying is blogspot.com for the podcast if you can join him for beginning to affect grades, which essentially Artwork by Joy Cope lunch. After all, ten years affects whether a student will become the town hobo or not, down the road that nerdy boy might be the first person you it is time to find a new solution to the problem at hand. First of all, high school students need to get their act invite to your wedding. Janet Ni is a staff reporter for The Roar. If you have together. I fail to see the fascination with publicly putting others down verbally or physically. Socking a random other ideas to prevent any form of bullying, please contact student in the face does not instantly boost one’s popularity; her by email at the.roar.ni@gmail.com.

janetni

The Roar Staff Editor-in-Chief: Amy Zhang Managing Editor: Alina Dattagupta Senior Editor: Kate Williams Executive Editor: Kendra Spaw Photography Editor: Laura Everett Opinions Editor: Elena Edwards Features Editor: Dana Branham Sports Editor: Rachel Kagle News Editor: Abigayle English Assistant Sports Editor: Kimmie Cessna Assistant News Editor: Kelsey Gaines Assistant Editors: Isabel Drukker, Anne Finch Staff Reporters: Devin Dakota, Janet Ni Faculty Adviser: Courtney Wellmann Assistant Adviser: Michael Williams

The Editorial Board TheRoar Roar Editorial Board Amy Zhang, Editor-in-Chief Alina Dattagupta, Managing Editor Elena Edwards, Opinions Editor

The Advanced Journalism class at A&M Consolidated High School, 1801 Harvey Mitchell Parkway South, College Station, Texas, 77840. The opinions expressed are those of the writers and are not reflective of the administrators, faculty or staff of the College Station Independent School District. Submissions to the editors are welcomed but must be signed and should not exceed 300 words. The editor reserves the right to edit submissions in the interest of clarity and length or to not print a letter at all. Letters containing obscene or libelous material will not be considered. The Editorial Board consists of the editor-in-chief, managing editor and opinions editor. The Roar is a member of the Interscholastic League Press Conference (ILPC), the National Scholastic Press Association (NSPA) and the Columbia Scholastic Press Association (CSPA). The Roar is a winner of the CSPA Gold Crown, the 1997, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011 ILPC Award of Distinguished Merit, the CSPA Gold Medal Award, the NSPA All-American distinction and 2005 ILPC Bronze Star and 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011 Silver Star. College Station Independent School District does not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, color, national origin, sex or handicap in providing education services. Glynn Walker, Director of Human Resources, 1812 Welsh, College Station, Texas 77840 (979-764-5412) has been designated to coordinate compliance with the nondiscrimination requirements of Title IX. Catherine George, Director of Special Services, 1812 Welsh, Suite 120, College Station, Texas 77840 (979-764-5433) has been designated to coordinate compliance with the nondiscrimination. requirements of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act.


the roar | viewpoints | 7

friday, sept. 23, 2011

Dress code restricts student body individuality bottoms that meet those requirements is easier said than done. The popular argument that students can express their creativity through their attire continues to be a major point. When administrators take away students’ creativity, it takes away diversity. Students do not want to be forced to look like every other teenager around them. Diversity and a wide range of students make the public school systems appealing. It is fun to walk into a school and be able to see what clubs people are involved in, what their interests are, and what their personality may be like. There Polo shirts tucked into khaki pants line the halls of is a reason why we have so many some high schools, while ripped jeans and tank tops may fill different types of clothing. Everyone up another. Rules regarding dress are interpreted differently likes something different, and students in every student’s eyes and schools everywhere should be allowed to share that with constantly battle with their students to enforce a their peers. reasonable dress code. The Bryan School District A high school needs recently modified their dress code in order to different types of students to make it more specific and understandable create a “real-life” experience. for the students and When every student is dressed parents. the same, instead of seeing S c h o o l students as individuals, administrators students are even more likely believe dress can to be seen as a whole, with change students’ similar opinions, goals, attitudes and create a and feelings. A dress more professional appearance for the code that allows campus. Contrary to this popular belief, the clothes students to people are forced to wear cannot determine their e x p r e s s actions and attitudes. It does not matter how hard themselves teachers try, a student will still continue to create in a creative, trouble in the hallways, even if he has “pants that yet healthy are appropriately sized and worn at the waist and and respectful belted.” way, remains I personally think that Bryan has gone the best solution for Consol. completely overboard, banning “costumeDevin is a Staff Reporter for The contact lenses” and forbidding lengthy Roar. If you would like to discuss school sideburns. The new “top of the knee” dress codes with her, email her at the. rule for shorts, skirts and dresses can be roar.dakota@gmail.com. incredibly difficult to follow. Finding Artwork by Maurice Vellas

W hat is your goal this year?

devindakota

“I want to have a flash mob dance with my friends.”

-Travis Hamilton, freshman

“To meet someone completely dif ferent than me.”

- Marianne Muyia sophomore

has “To be the best mascot this school !” lish Eng AP fail ever seen and to not -Ty Thomas, junior

[insert creativity] By Maurice Vellas

“Politics”

“To be as involved with extracurriculars and to obtain as much knowledge as physically possible while having the time of my life!”

How often do you drink caffeine? Multiple times a day.

16%

Once a day.

17%

Multiple times a week.

26%

Rarely.

29%

Never.

12%

= 70 students

747 students surveyed

- Peter Lambert, senior “To teach my baby boy how to change his own diaper.” -Aaron Hogan, English teacher


8 | viewpoints | the roar

friday, sept. 23, 2011

Senior says big goodbye to family traditions at Aggie games

kendraspaw Every Thanksgiving I spent my holiday in one of two Texas towns: Austin or College Station. These specific locations are centered around the annual rival football game between the University of Texas and Texas A&M University. It has been tradition for as long as I can remember to gather around the turkey at the tailgate and enjoy a family meal with hundreds of eager football fans. However, in the coming years, this family tradition has been compromised by the decision for Texas A&M University to leave the Big 12 Conference. Sadly with the switch, our town will lose some traditions and miss out on highly anticipated games, yet we will have the opportunity to watch never before seen competition. The A&M athletic program has the ability to be great and is already recognized with multiple national championships in various sports including men and women’s outdoor track and field, men’s golf, women’s basketball and the equestrian team.

The SEC would give A&M the opportunity to test its strengths and overcome the status of “the underdog” by proving to universities nationwide that they have the athleticism to defeat some of the most acclaimed athletic teams. For the skeptics that do not believe the Aggies have what it takes to maintain success in the SEC, they must realize what great motivation this transition will have on the athletes. After all, if you want to be the best, you play the best. It may be hard to do without the previous football traditions, but the upcoming years are looking bright with change. A&M has officially withdrawn from the Big 12 and has received an invitation from the South Eastern Conference, but legal issues by Baylor University are

Artwork by Maurice Vellas

speak out Discussion Board Each issue, students can submit responses to The Roar’s Speak Out forum. These questions will be posted on Facebook.

Question: What are your feelings about A&M moving to the SEC? Josh Simon, senior I’m super stoked! We’ll be going to a much more experienced and skillful conference! It’ll be more challenging! Karla Montes, junior I’m pretty excited because now A&M is going to have more TV time [since] the SEC is the best conference and has more teams ranked in the Top 25 like LSU, Auburn, Mississippi State, Arkansas, Alabama and Florida. But at the same time I’m going to miss rivalry games against Oklahoma, Baylor and Texas. Mary Catherine McCord, junior Please not yet! As good as many of our athletic programs are becoming, I think we still need a few more years before we can really compete in the SEC. Plus, I’ll miss the games against TU, Baylor and Oklahoma every year.

Add your opinion and see more responses: Friend Roar Newspaper on Facebook. it’s fridayyyy fridayyy gotta get down on fridayyy

delaying the move. Baylor’s retraction of their original approval to allow A&M to withdraw from the conference has caused uproar among Aggie fans as well as many other sports enthusiasts. Not only has this disturbance cost time and money sorting out legal documents and lawsuits, but also the conflict has caused much dislike for Baylor. No matter what the outcome, Texas A&M will have the opportunity to be a part of a revolutionary change that could not only change the game, but change the plans of family football fans all over the United States. Kendra is Executive Editor for The Roar. If you would like to share your thoughts with her, you can email her at the.roar.spaw@gmail.com.

Paper Clips By Joy Cope

“High School Hallways”


the roar | viewpoints | 9

friday, sept. 23, 2011

Celebrity’s death emphasizes beauty of life For a moment, sixteen stopped being just another year I could flop around being a teenager and complaining about whatever cliché woes I was suffering f r o m . Sixteen became more than halfway to thirty, four years away from being two decades old

isabeldrukker

My eyes clouded slightly as I gazed over the computer, reading about the sudden death of Amy Winehouse, aged 27. Pictures collaged around the story, showing her partying, singing, dancing, crying, laughing and simply looking in the camera. Pictures of having fun, of everyday life, of getting caught off guard with a camera, similar to anyone’s collection of pictures, similar to mine. As a teenager, everything looks endless at this point. My education, my career, my entire life can wait for a second as I check my Facebook or text my friend. I never thought about how death could end it all completely. These questions bombarded me as I sat in my bed, unable to look away from the glamorous photos and morbid story. I was on the brink of being sixteen, at which point Amy Winehouse in her life had already dropped out of school, joined a jazz band and pierced her nose. It was there, sitting on my bed and staring at a picture of Amy Winehouse tossing her hair that I experienced that awkward moment when you realize the wildest thing you’ve ever done is stolen a pack of M&Ms. From your brother. Artwork by Maurice Vellas

speak out

and dangerously close to eighteen. Which, if all goes to plan, means moving out and entering the real world, where people assure me, things are serious and there is no time for waltzing around the kitchen with my chihuahua. Those dances are limited, apparently. I’m not saying Winehouse’s death has given me a fresh inspiration to suddenly go crazy and get a piercing or anything. But I do feel that it’s time I start taking advantage of my ability to get off the couch. I mean, I’m at the age that for some reason, every adult wishes he or she could go back to. Surely I’m missing something through the blur of high school drama and homework. People have told me that these would be the best years of my life, the ones that I will remember as I sit in a cubicle typing up work that doesn’t seem to matter. T.V. has told me that I will make my best friends in these years, music has told me I will have my first and true love in these years, and Amy Winehouse’s death has told me that these are the years where I need to stop looking up random news and movies on the computer. Life ends, no matter how young or golden everything seems. It’s time to take advantage of it. So yes, I do plan on learning how to juggle. Isabel Drukker is an Assistant Editor for The Roar. Life is too short to waste, so if you have something to say, email her at the.roar.drukker@gmail.com.

Caps lock key allows student to express intense emotions

annefinch I owe a lot in my life to my friends. My happiness, the great time I consistently have at our theater group, some of my grades. But upon sitting down to reflect on which of my friends has most affected my life and happiness, I have to say that my best friend is the Caps Lock key. No one, not even my best buddy Sylvia or my close pal Hannah, understands me better than the key on the far left of my laptop’s keyboard. Possibly the best thing about my Caps Lock key is that, like any good friend, it encourages me every day to express my stronger emotions. Instead of rolling its eyes at me or quietly questioning my sanity, Caps Lock enables and fully approves of my ALL CAPS rants about my favorite TV shows and celebrities I despise

and love to criticize LOUDLY . After all, nothing says I’M SO MAD AT YOU or I JUST HAVE SO MANY EMOTIONS like some good ol’ ALL CAPS YELLING. Because of this close personal friendship with my Caps Lock key, I was understandably baffled when I read an article titled “A Key Google Wants to Delete” in the Christian Science Monitor a few months ago, stating that Google hopes to manufacture new computers with a search key where my favorite text enhancer should be. Also included in the articles was that some experts believe that the Caps Lock key is unnecessary, used accidentally a majority of the time, and generally only employed to express YELLING. I, however, believe that Google is complete missing the point. I would much rather ACCIDENTALLY HIT THE CAPS LOCK KEY than accidentally initiate a Google search. Most people believe the Caps Lock key is used mainly for YELLING. Even som that doesn’t mean it’s not important and completely beneficial. Without Caps Lock, how would passionate fan girls everywhere truly express their feelings? How would people send angry text messages to friends they don’t like? Brag about an excellent test grade in an email to a distant relative who, in all honesty, doesn’t really

care? Without my favorite key, fan girls would have to use coherent and intelligently worded sentences in order to convey their point. People would have to actually talk through their problems, instead of simply passive-aggressively yelling about them through a mobile device. The relatives who don’t really care would care even less. Unless, of course, one simply took the time to press the shift key every time they typed a letter, and who wants to do that? Although it remains unclear whether plans to delete the Caps Lock key will actually be carried out, I firmly believe that the key should stay, for those of us who simply don’t have the emotional maturity necessary to carry on without it. No matter if Google actually decides to remove the key from its standard keyboards, apparently revolutionizing computer use or something, I WILL ALWAYS STICK BY THE CAPS LOCK KEY. (Oops, sorry. Accidentally hit Caps Lock…) Anne Finch is an Assistant Editor for The Roar. Send her an email, preferably in all-caps, to the.roar.finch@gmail.com. Artwork by Joy Cope


{opposing viewpoints} Is planking a practical hobby? 10 | viewpoints | the roar

YES

friday, sept. 23, 2011

NO

by Kimmie Cessna, Assistant Sports Editor

While enjoying my summer nights hanging out with friends, watching movies and staying up late, I noticed people from school obsessing over the latest fad, planking. Eating dinner at a fast food restaurant or even working, I would see people from our school planking. Planking is a sort of game where a person lays down in an unusual place with both hands touching the sides of his or her body. From there, a picture is almost always taken and posted on the internet. At first when I saw this, I was confused about what was happening. As more pictures clogged my Facebook, I got annoyed with the idea of planking. Soon after, my friends started participating in this event, and I evaluated planking for myself even further. As I was looking at planking photos, I came to realize it was actually funny. It was interesting to see the different places people were planking. I think planking is not as harmful as going out and doing illegal things like drinking alcohol, smoking or doing drugs. I would much rather see teens planking on a late night than at a party forgetting everything they did. I do not know how planking got started, but I enjoy the thought. I think as long as people are planking in appropriate places and not harming anyone or anything in the process, there is nothing wrong with a little clean fun every once in a while. I have not gotten the chance to go planking regularly, but when I start planking, I hope I can choose the most unusual places and start my own picture album.

by Dana Branham, Features Editor

No more than a few months ago, headlines of newspapers told of a “planking” death. Maybe I’m just terrible, but I laughed. I simply couldn’t believe this was serious. So, I read the article and was shocked and even disappointed that someone actually lost his life for this silly Internet phenomenon.    I’d like to believe that no one in College Station is stupid enough to attempt to balance on a seven-story-high balcony railing for a picture to put on their Facebook profile. But some guy in Australia decided that it would be a good idea, and maybe didn’t quite think of the consequences. I’m not here to condemn planking. If you want to lie down on various objects and buildings and take pictures of it, by all means, go for it. I just worry that we, as students, people, and humans, take life too lightly.     Life is precious, and it’s taken for granted almost every day.     I wake up every morning generally just wanting to go back to sleep, rather than being thankful that I even woke up--taking life itself for granted. Plenty of people in this world are battling disease, hunger, infertility—struggling for life. And then, there are other people in this world—people who “plank” on balcony railings, people who drive drunk, people who otherwise throw their lives around like they have an endless supply of do-overs.     All I’m saying is that I value the lives of my friends, family and acquaintances. So, plank all you want, but the next time you’re about to do something not-so-bright, remember that your risky behavior is not only endangering your life, but also has the potential to devastate others. Each life on this Earth is one

68

to be cherished, so treat yours as such.

student responses. The Roar surveys students to find out their opinions on planking. Have you ever planked?

46% yes

Never

it’s not safe in some places,

A Few Times

so be reasonable about the

Once

Ryan Murphy, sophomore

How many times have you planked?

fun, and car planks are best,

location.

54% no

Even though the activity is

I plank for 8 hours a night, every night, on my bed... that’s pretty impressive, huh?

Yanni Georghiades, junior

A lot

Have you ever planked in an unsafe place or position?

28%

11% 11%

17% Yes

83% No

32% Yes

50%

68% No

Have you ever posted planking pictures online? 92 students surveyed


true

the roar | snapshots | 11

friday, sept. 23, 2011

COLORS

Color Guard performs artistic routines

By Rachel Kagle, Sports Editor

Brilliant colors flash and soar through the sky during halftime as the 22 members of the Color Guard not only dance, but also toss and spin their rifles, sabres or flags while performing on Friday nights. “It’s so fun being in front of that many people,” captain Cayley Elsik said. “It’s just such an amazing feeling.” Presented with the band during halftime at all football games, the Color Guard performs choreographed dance moves while tossing and spinning flags, rifles or sabres. “Color Guard is very complicated,” senior Paxton Hunter said. “[With the amount of required] hand placement, feet placement, body movement, flag or weapon movement and more, practice is definitely a must.” After the great amount of time put into practice, performing is always exciting and rewarding, Hunter said. “It’s great to receive compliments because you feel appreciated,” junior Laura Woods said. “When you perform, you’re finally showcasing all of your hard work after so much practice.” While performing is fun, a necessary part to making the performance a show is enthusiasm. Both Woods and Hunter encourage other members to convert nervousness into spirit. “You have to add energy, not just go out there and perform,” Woods said. “It has to be made into a performance through enthusiasm.” They are more than just performers, Color Guard has become like a family. “Guard has taught me loyalty, how to be brave and how to go for your goals,” Elsik said. “It’s like a family, so if you were to leave, you would feel like you were abandoning your family.”

Junior Laura Woods and sophomore Emma Royder twirl flags during the halftime performance of the first home game against Klein Oak on Aug. 26. The Color Guard has rehearsed their show since the beginning of August. PHOTO BY AMY ZHANG

Sophomore Cayley Elsik twirls her flag on the sidelines after the halftime performance on Aug. 26. As a captain, Elsik considers the Color Guard to be like a family. PHOTO BY RACHEL KAGLE

Freshman Natalie Hassan, junior Laura Woods, freshman Ellen Hennings, senior Paxton Hunter, sophomore Hannah Ridgeway, freshman Hannah Lind, sophomore Cayley Elsik, junior Laine Huebner and sophomore Emma Royder dance on the sidelines as the football team returns to the field after halftime on Aug. 26. PHOTO BY LAURA EVERETT

Sophomore Hannah Ridgeway poses at the end of the show on Aug. 26. Ridgeway joined Color Guard earlier this year. PHOTO BY RACHEL KAGLE


12 | student

life | the roar

the roar | student

friday, sept. 23, 2011

life | 13

City opens new skate park in response to student requests By Kate Williams senior editor Some people would call it crazy to drop fourteen feet into a bowl of slick cement. Some would not dare to take flight with only a piece of wood and four rubber wheels to land on. Some people, however, live for soft cement, kick flips and spending hours on end, perfecting tricks in midair. To those people G. Hysmith Skate Park, which opened on Sept. 3 is now a home away from home and a place to remember a life full of passion and love of skateboarding. Located next to the Southwood Community Center on Rock Prairie Road, the newly designed and constructed skate park took years of planning and much deliberation. “It all started when I sat down and wrote a letter to the city,” skate park advocate and former Consol graduate Kara Schonemann said. “That’s when I realized I would need to do a lot more than just write a letter for it to happen. So, I talked to personal injuries lawyer Jeff Paradowski about liability issues, and Peter Lamont, who is on the Parks and Recreation board, who led an endeavor to get a skate park in 2001.”

In Honor of Garrett Hysmith

Another reason the park was built was to honor a friend, Garrett Hysmith, who died at the age of 13 of brain cancer. “We decided to make Garrett the poster child of the movement, because his life stood for so much and he was so loving and passionate,” Schonemann said. “It seemed like the best way to memorialize Garrett, with something that’s so fun and energy filled and with such a passionate sport such as skate boarding.” Hysmith’s condition never impaired his love for skating, even up to the time when his condition grew more serious. “The day after surgery, he would be out on

his skateboard with his head wrapped up from a brain procedure,”skate park advocate and former Consol graduate Morgan Murgia said. “That’s just how determined Garrett was.” The memory of Hysmith was the underlying reason and the inspiration for the skate park. “I want people to skateboard, and never give up and remember the way Garrett lived,” Shonemnam said. “I want people to realize what kind of person Garrett was and take that to heart.”

for the skate park,” Schonemann said. “All the kids and their parents came and talked about why they wanted a skate park, and how they were going to fight for it. We didn’t give [people] the passion. We just put them in the right place at the right time to talk to the right people and gave them a chance to express why they loved skateboarding.” Those interested in a skate park had to prove why the skate park would be beneficial to the community. “In order to get this built, we had to examine it from a 360 view,” Murgia said. “We had to take into consideration all the reasons people would say ‘no this is why not’ and then come back and say ‘no this is why we should’ [build a skate park].”

Helping the Community

One of the pushes for the park was that it would help aspects of the community in several ways other than just the catering to the needs of the teens in the area. “Economically [the skate park] will be great for the city,” Murgia said. “[With it] you’re bringing in tourists and all kinds of revenue. Eventually, the money that was Construction spent to build the skate park will Approval trickle back down into our local After several years of economy.” the local council meetings and Another main argument for the approval at the state and city level, skate park was the lack of a place the skating facility was voted to for skaters to enjoy the sport be built in a bond election in without interfering with the 2008. law. “I think the reason “Skateboarding has kind the skate park was of a negative image a lot of the successfully built time,” Murgia said. “We had to now rather than convince people that its really not in 2001 was like that, and it should be accepted just because at one of like soccer just like basketball and baseball. S the meetings, 80 AM And kids need a facility to go to just like they LI L I percent of have for all the other recreational sports.” W the people TE The skate park is one of the first facilities of A K there were its kind in College Station that is not affiliated BY O OT H P

with the university. “This is one of the first alternative places in town where people can feel more free to just be who they are,” Murgia said. According to Community Center Supervisor Kelly Kelby, the park was designed for every skill level. “Here it doesn’t matter how great you are at skating. It just brings everyone together in one place to do what they love,” junior Daryl Taylor said. A hope for the park is that it will have a positive impact on several age groups in College Station. “There are a lot of older kids [coming the park] that influence the younger ones,” Community Center employee Graham Hollister said. “Positive peer influence is definitely a big part of the skate park.” The combined efforts to make a skate park naturally put a community desire into action. “The skate park is a great example of showing how the city works and that if the passion is there the city will listen,” Schonemann said.

A teen skater jumps over the wall after a 10ft. drop a couple days before the grand opening of the skate park. On Sept. 3, more than 500 people attended the opening. PHOTO BY KENDRA SPAW

A local skate boarder makes a jump off the ramp as the crowd watches. Community members joined at College Station’s G. Hysmith Skate Park for the grand opening on Sept. 3. PHOTO BY KATE WILLIAMS

Consol student and avid biker, senior Will Davis, rides over the wall in the large bowl at G. Hysmith Skate Park. Davis also founded the mountain biking club at Consol. PHOTO BY KATE WILLIAMS

“Ramp the Amp” ( upcoming events at the skate park]

Friday, Sept. 30 7-8 p.m. -A night of skating and music -Featuring music artist “Ben Baxter” -Sponsored by Thank Tank -Food provided by Freebirds

Saturday, Oct. 29 7-8 p.m. -Featuring artist to be determined –Sponsored by Cement Skate Shop -Food provided by Freebirds Source: Southwood Community Center


12 | student

life | the roar

the roar | student

friday, sept. 23, 2011

life | 13

City opens new skate park in response to student requests By Kate Williams senior editor Some people would call it crazy to drop fourteen feet into a bowl of slick cement. Some would not dare to take flight with only a piece of wood and four rubber wheels to land on. Some people, however, live for soft cement, kick flips and spending hours on end, perfecting tricks in midair. To those people G. Hysmith Skate Park, which opened on Sept. 3 is now a home away from home and a place to remember a life full of passion and love of skateboarding. Located next to the Southwood Community Center on Rock Prairie Road, the newly designed and constructed skate park took years of planning and much deliberation. “It all started when I sat down and wrote a letter to the city,” skate park advocate and former Consol graduate Kara Schonemann said. “That’s when I realized I would need to do a lot more than just write a letter for it to happen. So, I talked to personal injuries lawyer Jeff Paradowski about liability issues, and Peter Lamont, who is on the Parks and Recreation board, who led an endeavor to get a skate park in 2001.”

In Honor of Garrett Hysmith

Another reason the park was built was to honor a friend, Garrett Hysmith, who died at the age of 13 of brain cancer. “We decided to make Garrett the poster child of the movement, because his life stood for so much and he was so loving and passionate,” Schonemann said. “It seemed like the best way to memorialize Garrett, with something that’s so fun and energy filled and with such a passionate sport such as skate boarding.” Hysmith’s condition never impaired his love for skating, even up to the time when his condition grew more serious. “The day after surgery, he would be out on

his skateboard with his head wrapped up from a brain procedure,”skate park advocate and former Consol graduate Morgan Murgia said. “That’s just how determined Garrett was.” The memory of Hysmith was the underlying reason and the inspiration for the skate park. “I want people to skateboard, and never give up and remember the way Garrett lived,” Shonemnam said. “I want people to realize what kind of person Garrett was and take that to heart.”

for the skate park,” Schonemann said. “All the kids and their parents came and talked about why they wanted a skate park, and how they were going to fight for it. We didn’t give [people] the passion. We just put them in the right place at the right time to talk to the right people and gave them a chance to express why they loved skateboarding.” Those interested in a skate park had to prove why the skate park would be beneficial to the community. “In order to get this built, we had to examine it from a 360 view,” Murgia said. “We had to take into consideration all the reasons people would say ‘no this is why not’ and then come back and say ‘no this is why we should’ [build a skate park].”

Helping the Community

One of the pushes for the park was that it would help aspects of the community in several ways other than just the catering to the needs of the teens in the area. “Economically [the skate park] will be great for the city,” Murgia said. “[With it] you’re bringing in tourists and all kinds of revenue. Eventually, the money that was Construction spent to build the skate park will Approval trickle back down into our local After several years of economy.” the local council meetings and Another main argument for the approval at the state and city level, skate park was the lack of a place the skating facility was voted to for skaters to enjoy the sport be built in a bond election in without interfering with the 2008. law. “I think the reason “Skateboarding has kind the skate park was of a negative image a lot of the successfully built time,” Murgia said. “We had to now rather than convince people that its really not in 2001 was like that, and it should be accepted just because at one of like soccer just like basketball and baseball. S the meetings, 80 AM And kids need a facility to go to just like they LI L I percent of have for all the other recreational sports.” W the people TE The skate park is one of the first facilities of A K there were its kind in College Station that is not affiliated BY O OT H P

with the university. “This is one of the first alternative places in town where people can feel more free to just be who they are,” Murgia said. According to Community Center Supervisor Kelly Kelby, the park was designed for every skill level. “Here it doesn’t matter how great you are at skating. It just brings everyone together in one place to do what they love,” junior Daryl Taylor said. A hope for the park is that it will have a positive impact on several age groups in College Station. “There are a lot of older kids [coming the park] that influence the younger ones,” Community Center employee Graham Hollister said. “Positive peer influence is definitely a big part of the skate park.” The combined efforts to make a skate park naturally put a community desire into action. “The skate park is a great example of showing how the city works and that if the passion is there the city will listen,” Schonemann said.

A teen skater jumps over the wall after a 10ft. drop a couple days before the grand opening of the skate park. On Sept. 3, more than 500 people attended the opening. PHOTO BY KENDRA SPAW

A local skate boarder makes a jump off the ramp as the crowd watches. Community members joined at College Station’s G. Hysmith Skate Park for the grand opening on Sept. 3. PHOTO BY KATE WILLIAMS

Consol student and avid biker, senior Will Davis, rides over the wall in the large bowl at G. Hysmith Skate Park. Davis also founded the mountain biking club at Consol. PHOTO BY KATE WILLIAMS

“Ramp the Amp” ( upcoming events at the skate park]

Friday, Sept. 30 7-8 p.m. -A night of skating and music -Featuring music artist “Ben Baxter” -Sponsored by Thank Tank -Food provided by Freebirds

Saturday, Oct. 29 7-8 p.m. -Featuring artist to be determined –Sponsored by Cement Skate Shop -Food provided by Freebirds Source: Southwood Community Center


14 | people | the roar

friday, sept. 23, 2011

STraight Shooters Archers discover passion, develop technique over time By Alina Dattagupta, Managing Editor

F

rom the moment he picked up his first plastic Walmartbrand Banshee bow as a 5th grader and watched as the arrows that he lobbed into the air in his backyard fall over his house, senior Nick Hoganson knew that he wanted to As an archer, Hoganson has had to continuously travel for meets and practices. “The first two years of high school we spent a lot of time commuting, but now towards the end of high school we are kind of plateauing,” he said. “[I have been] to competitions in Oklahoma and Pennsylvania, but since nationals are here at A&M, it’s nice.” Nick’s brother Alex started competitive archery two years later. “I started in 7th grade when I saw how much fun my brother was having after he started and also because of the whole sibling rivalry thing,” senior Alex Hoganson said. Nick shoots in the Compound Bow category, which involves pulleys, while Alex shoots in t h e Olympic-style Recurve Bow category. “Part of the reason we shoot in different categories is so that we can avoid the aspects of shooting against each

become an archer. “Archery is about being able to take what your coach tells you and to take what you know and put that knowledge to the test and to be all you can be with what you have,” he said.

other,” Alex Hoganson said. For Nick, the best part of being an archer is the actual shooting. “A lot of people say their favorite part of the Archery Club is the socialization, but my favorite part is actually shooting competitively and honing the skills that it takes to be one of the best shooters in the state,” he said. While both brothers enjoy the sport, they said that it acts as a time constraint, so they are not sure whether they will continue it in college. “Archery is really fun, but it takes a lot of time, and I would get really frustrated if I didn’t put the time in, because then I wouldn’t be shooting as well,” Nick Hoganson said. Junior Quianna Hebert, who is a part of the Brazos County 4-H team and shoots Recurve, wanted to become an archer when she saw her friends participate. “I have friends who do it, and they showed me shooting,” she said. “I got

really excited and wanted to try it out.” Alex Hoganson says that in the Recurve competition, muscle memory is required. “I have to do stretch band training, where you stand in front of a mirror and have a weighted rubber band that you draw back about 500-600 times,” he said. “Archery isn’t really a sport of physical strength. It’s more muscle memory.” Hebert feels that there is more to archery than what many people commonly perceive. “I just really enjoy [being an archer] and it take a lot more strength than people expect,” she said. For Alex, being able to shoot without error is his favorite part. “Being a Recurve, there’s a lot of effort into shooting,” he said. “So, I’d say after shooting the perfect shot, it feels really good. You see the arrow going towards the ten, and you know that you did everything 100% correct.”

Weapon of Choice Recurvebow The longbow is the most basic

of bows. A small shelf is cut into the side of the bow for the arrow to rest on. The tip of the arrow is kept at full draw to shoot.

Longbow Compound bow PHOTO OF NICK HOGANSON BY LAURA EVERETT

Source: http://www.clearleadinc.com/site/archery.html

The bow’s ends curve away from the archer when the bow is held in the shooting position. This is the type used in the Olympics. A compound bow has pulleys set at the end of its limbs. The purpose of these pulleys is to make the cocked, ready to fire position of the bow easier to hold.


the roar | people | 15

friday, sept. 23, 2011

LIFE IN GRAYSCALE

Color-deficient students, staff find unity in retinal disorder By Janet Ni Staff Reporter After he splattered the canvas with one last vibrant drop of paint, junior Aidan Riley stepped back to admire his artwork. The variety of colored streaks and blotches appeared accidental, but right in place. Yet, something held Riley back from completely absorbing the aesthetic appeal of his colorful masterpiece. Riley is part of a small percentage of the population who has a retinal disorder resulting in color blindness. “It’s something that makes me special, makes me a minority. I like it,” Riley said. Riley is slightly red-green color blind, meaning he has trouble distinguishing the difference between red and green. He discovered his condition when he was in sixth grade and picked up a color blindness test while waiting in the eye doctor’s office.

“I suppose I would want to be color-normal for a day, just to see what it’s like, but I would definitely want to go back.”

junior

PATRICK LENZ However, color blindness does not pose many difficulties to him aside from seeing colors on Smart Boards or other screens. When he does encounter obstacles, Riley said that he takes them lightheartedly and considers the incidents funny rather than frustrating. Riley said that he feels color blindness is something that makes him unique, and that he would not gain vision of all colors given the option. “I am happy where I am,” he said. Junior Patrick Lenz, also red-green color blind, agrees. Lenz’s condition is not severe and consequently does not have a big impact on his daily life. “Lots of people assume [red-green colorblindness] is

more distinguishable than it actually is,” Lenz said. Still, Lenz faces some small inconveniences on a dayto-day basis such as determining color indicators in chemistry. Lenz also said he only recently discovered the full color range of Sour Patch Kids, having assumed they were all green. Riley and Lenz additionally both appreciate the unique bond they form with others who are color blind. “My grandfather is also color blind, so it gives us something to talk about,” Riley said. Coach and statistics teacher Stoney Pryor also has been diagnosed with red-green color blindness. However, unlike the two juniors, Pryor did not find out about his color blindness until much later in his life when he was taking a physical while working for Consol. Pryor said that he has trouble telling what clothes match, so his wife helps pick out his attire in the mornings. “If I clash, you can bet that I chose my own clothes that day!” Pryor said. As for coaching, Pryor additionally struggles to tell soccer teams apart if they are both wearing dark jerseys. “This happens especially when our maroon school plays a red school,” Pryor said. Pryor stated that he would prefer to have vision of the whole color spectrum. “I think it is like when we went from black and white TVs to full color ones.” Pryor said. “The black and white seemed pretty good at the time, but I’ll bet you can’t even buy one now.” Aquatics science teacher Matthew Young’s condition is slightly more drastic. Young is both red-green and redbrown color-blind. Therefore, a rainbow appears as mostly hues of blue and yellow to him. Young has trouble with some minor tasks, such as picking out ripe fruit or matching a tie to his shirt in the mornings. However, distinguishing shapes and spotting out camouflage is much easier for him, he said. When asked if he would gain vision of all colors if possible, Young also said that he would. “There’s no reason not to, I would think. [Having vision of all colors] would open up other avenues I wouldn’t have been able to do before,” he said. Although color blindness can prove limiting in some aspects, the disorder makes those diagnosed with this retinal disorder unique. “I suppose I would want to be color-normal for a day, just to see what it’s like, but I would definitely want to go back,” Lenz said. “Colorblindness is an individualistic characteristic.”

Shades of Color Deficiency Red-Green:

- also called protanopia - most common type of color blindness - affects 8.0% of men and 0.5% of women. - Those affected find red and green difficult to identify; shades of other colors of the spectrum are slightly altered

Blue-Yellow:

- also called tritanopia - much less prevalent than red-green color blindness - Those affected tend to confuse blue with green and yellow with violet

Monochromacy:

- total color blindness - very rare form of color blindness - Those affected have no vision of color whatsoever

source: http://www.colblindor.com/ PHOTO BY LAURA EVERETT


16 | people | the roar

friday, sept. 23, 2011

Staff, administration express educational background, interests Compiled by Anne Finch, Assistant Editor

Jeffrey Mann Principal (A-Da) When did you decide you wanted to go into education? I knew since I was in undergraduate school at Angelo State University that I wanted to work in education, working with students and athletes alike. What is your favorite thing about being an educator at Consol? We have a fantastic faculty and staff and awesome students that make working at Consol a joy, day in and day out!

Matt Caffey Principal (De-Hs) What’s your favorite thing about being an educator? The opportunity that you have to help kids on their journey to whatever it is they’re going to do with their lives. I like being a part of that. I like that I can help somebody with whatever it is they want to do. What hobbies do you have outside of school? I like to fish and to hunt, but I don’t get to do it as much. I read a lot, and I have a sixteen-month-old son, so he takes up a lot of my hobby time, but he’s a pretty fun hobby.

Photos by Janet Ni and Devin Dakota

Leigha Gautreaux Principal (Hu-Mon)

Ronnie Helm Principal (Moo-Sil)

Courtney Smith Principal (Sims-Z)

When and why did you decide you wanted to go into education? I had a different career path chosen. I was talking to someone in that profession one day and they asked me, “If money and time were not an option, what would you do with your life?” My answer was that I would become a teacher. I have a passion for learning and wanted to share that with others. What is your favorite thing about Consol? The people are great and make this a fun place to work.

When did you decide that you wanted to go into education? I decided to change my business major to a math major because I wanted to teach. I really like education. It runs in my family, so it was important for me to help. What’s your favorite thing about being an educator? My favorite part is graduation! It means you were successful at Consolidated. It means you did your job as a student, and we did our job as a staff.

What is your favorite thing about Consol? We really have incredible students. I’ve taught in three different schools, large and small, and I’m always amazed at how despite having over 2,800 students, we have very few serious behavior issues. Our students make it fun to come to work every day. What are your hobbies outside of school? I have two small children, so there isn’t much time for hobbies at this point in my life.

Anne Hoffmann Counselor (A-Da)

Mindy Casper Counselor (De-Hs)

Maria Haliburton Counselor (Hu-Mon)

What is your favorite thing about being an educator at Consol? Each student is unique and I love getting to know them and discovering what makes them special! High school students bring me joy! What’s your favorite TV show? Amazing Race, because we watch it as a family and talk about who would be best at performing each task and dream about being on the race one day.

When and why did you decide that you wanted to go into education? I decided years ago that I had a passion for making a difference for kids, by helping them learn or by helping them with problems. What’s your favorite thing about being an educator at Consol? It is really cool to have had many of the students here, whom I have had at College Hills, and to see how they have grown to become such great high schoolers.

When and why did you decide that you wanted to go into education? I taught Sunday school and vacation bible school in church and absolutely loved teaching, so I decided to add education courses to my degree What was your first job as an educator? Sunday school teacher for preK -Kindergarten while in college; my first paid teaching job was in high school special education.

Paul Hord Counselor (Moo-Sil) What’s your favorite thing about being an educator? The best part is being able to interact, talk and help the students. What hobbies do you have outside of school? My biggest hobby is my family, so I spend most of my time with them, either playing games with them doing things outdoors with them, reading books with them and helping them with their homework. I also love to play golf and watch other sports.

Jamie Boyd Counselor (Sims-Z) When and why did you decide that you wanted to go into education? The main reason is because teaching runs in my family. I have a very high level of respect for educators. Additionally, I was not a "studious" student, but there were several teachers who made such an impact on me, I wanted to have the same impact on students like me. What’s your favorite thing about Consol? The students here impress me daily and never let me get lazy.


the roar | people | 17

friday, sept. 23, 2011

standing

the crowd

Tall stature can offer benefit, detriment to teen lives By Kelsey Gaines, Assistant News Editor hile most students at Consol tend to stand around the average height of five feet nine inches for a man and five feet five inches for a woman, a few unique students exceed the average height and stand impressively taller than the majority of the student body. “I’ve been relatively taller than the people around me all of my life, and I’ve always been the tallest kid in my class,” said senior Jaclyn Roddy who stands eight inches above the average height of an American woman at six feet three inches. Roddy said she uses her height as an advantage when playing for the Lady Tiger volleyball team. The students who stand well above six feet agree that being tall has its advantages. “I can see over everyone in the hallway and if I’m looking for someone I can see where they are,” six-foot-nine-inch senior Clayton Parks said. Having the ability to spot certain people out of crowds is a commonly enjoyed advantage, as well as being able to reach things on high shelves without a step stool, and being able to taunt friends by holding their things in the air are a few other small joys the students shared. “The air is also a lot cleaner up here, as opposed to the smog that all the short people [have to breathe],” six-foot-seven-inch junior Jacob Dysart said. While being tall does have its perks, there are also times that the students find themselves frustrated by their height. “I’ve been told by girls that I’m too tall to date,” Dysart said. He also composed a list of a few things that he has found to be frustrating due to his height, such as: buying jeans, fitting in cars, dancing, sneaking past teachers, kissing short girls, hide and seek, hanging objects and finding snuggies that fit.

W

Being tall makes doing everyday tasks harder for Dysart as compared to his average standing friends. Of course, this hasn’t stopped him. He’s learned to cope and has found certain stores that sell longer jeans and bigger shoes that fit him better. Parks has also had to adjust his life to fit his height by buying a custom-made bed with two feet added on the end to ensure that his feet wouldn’t dangle off the end at night while he sleeps, he said. While there are things that these students find frustrating, nothing seems to agitate them more than when people comment on their height, something that they feel doesn’t need to be brought to their attention. “[Comments about my height] are so unbelievably irritating,” Dysart said. He becomes frustrated when people stop him to simply to let him know how tall he is. Roddy said, “I don’t need to hear how tall I am five times a day.” Growing up multiple inches above everyone isn’t as challenging for guys as much as it was for Roddy. Growing up, she had to endure numerous nicknames and daily comments from ignorant peers, but through those situations and constant encouragement from her mother, who is her “champion,” she learned a lot about herself and became a stronger person, she said. “It taught me not to take myself too seriously and to value the [people] who actually are worth valuing,” Roddy said. “I found out that tall is beautiful.” In the end, the advantage of being tall outweighs the drawbacks. “I’ve never met a tall person who’s ever said ‘I wish I was short,” Parks said. “There are too many benefits of being tall.”

How do they measure up? Clayton Parks is...

exactly one foot taller than Principal Buddy Reed and two inches shorter than Shaquille O’Neal

Jacob Dysart is...

as tall as Lebron James, two inches shorter than Clayton Parks and four inches taller than Jaclyn Roddy

Jaclyn Roddy is...

two inches shorter than the typical school door frame and four inches shorter than Clayton Parks compiled by Kelsey Gaines

Junior Jacob Dysart (left) and senior Jaclyn Roddy (right) stand at the top of the staircase. Dysart measures six feet seven inches tall, and Roddy’s height is six feet three inches. PHOTO BY LAURA EVERETT


18 | sports | the roar

tiger football works to overcome recent losses despite changes and injuries

Coach Brian Edwards conferences with Demetrius Willingham at the game against Klein Oak on Aug. 26. The Tigers lost the game 17-9. PHOTO BY RACHEL KAGLE

friday, sept. 23, 2011

THE BOYS By Laura Everett, photography editor

All eyes watch as the Boys of the Fall run down the field, high-five-ing and hip-bumping. The roar of the crowd intermingles with the band’s rendition of the Eye of the Tiger. It is another Friday night at Consol. “It is such a good feeling to run out of the tunnel and down the field,” senior linebacker Marshall Strain said. “I love it. Even if you don’t get in the game at all, or you’re not that good at football, it is just so fun to be a part of it. The feeling of running out of the tunnel and doing the little hip thing is indescribable.”

changes After Coach Jim Slaughter’s departure last spring, the Tiger Football program has welcomed Head Football Coach David Raffield, offensive coordinator Brian Cope and defensive coordinator Dale Williams to Consol. “The kids are great,” Coach Cope said. “The faculty is awesome. They’ve welcomed all of us with open arms and I am excited to be here.” Senior quarterback Jacob Bronowski commends Coach Raffield for his determination. “[Raffield] has been to the state championship,” Bronowski said. “So, that’s a positive thing for us to see around. He’s very determined, he works hard and he cares about each one of us so much. I think he’s a great fit for Consol and the atmosphere here.” Senior kicker Jeff Steines adds that the coaching staff’s goals align with those of the students. “They really like to get in touch with their players,” Steines said, “and make sure that the whole team is a really combined unit, and we are striving for the same goals.” Along with the new coaching staff, the Tigers have to adjust to the new spread offense. “They’re picking up on the new system,” Coach Raffield said. “It has been a little slow at times, but they’re getting better and better every day.” Not only has strategy for Friday night games changed, but the players’ practice schedule has also seen alterations. “On Wednesday mornings, we’ve been practicing early, trying to beat the heat,” Coach Cope said. “Our kids come out with a lot of enthusiasm and have really understood why we are trying to do it. They have a lot of excitement in the mornings. It is great. They’re doing great about watching film and learning, and that’s all you can ask. They’re going above and beyond, from a learning standpoint.” While the coaches commend the players for their hard work during practice, Coach Williams acknowledges the great expectations that have evolved from last year’s 9-1 season. “We, as coaches, always believe we are going to exceed what we did last year,” Coach Williams said, “and live up to all the expectations and hype that is built up for this season. You won’t ever know the outcome of that until it happens, because sometimes it is better to be lucky than good. There are some things you can’t control. So, we gotta go out there and control the things we can control from the point of the football program and keep growing as a football family.”

Bronowski affirms. “It was great for us to see that we could actually run this offense and thrive in it,” Bronowski said. The team consisted of seniors Justin Benden, Bronowski, B.J. Crouch, Eric Gan, Adriel Grant, Charles Hopkins, Javier Jones, Brett Mahnke, Durasis Nutall, Josue Ordonez, Strain, Aaron Terry, Joe Waithaka, Quinton White, Demetrius Willingham, and juniors Kohl Anderson, Jaylan Cheshire, Weston Garner, Daniel Hulse and Austin Stephens. “That’s when our offense really started clicking,” senior defensive back Brett Mahnke said. “We put a lot of points on the board.”

On THE FIELD

Despite the promising new spread offense, the first game against Klein Oak resulted in a 9 - 17 loss for the Tigers. “Nine points looks bad,” Bronowski said, “but it was just some small execution [issues].” Steines agrees, explaining the loss as a product of becoming accustomed to the new spread offense. “I think it is more technical difficulties,” Steines said, “just working things out. I don’t know if we totally had the offense under control yet.” Senior defensive lineman J.J. Bynum adds that the team faced unexpected challenges. “I think they really caught us off guard with the quick game,” Bynum said. “We weren’t expecting that, and we [hadn’t] practiced it yet this season.” While the scoreboard did not favor the Tigers, Bronowski completed 70 percent of his throws during the first game, which is “more than he has ever completed in his whole life,” Bynum said. “There is pressure on everybody to perform on a high level,” Bronowski said. “I’d definitely say that [there is additional responsibility as the quarterback] because it is the nature of the position. When you’re playing a position where you’re touching the ball every play and you have to make decisions every play, especially in a spread offense, then I’d put a lot of pressure on myself if the team doesn’t win, and I take a lot of that on me.” The Tigers’ battle with Cy-Woods on Sept. 2 also ended in a loss, with a final score of 20 - 27 points. “It was close,” Mahnke said. “It all came down to our defense on our last drive, and unfortunately we couldn’t hold them on more drives. We had more than 80 plays that night, so we were just tired. Starting out with a new offense and defense is going to be hard. But once we settle in, I think we’ll be fine.” During the Cy-Woods game, Bronowski received a concussion that prevented him from playing during the following week’s game against Austin Westlake on Sept. 9, which resulted in a 39 – 29 point loss for the Tigers. Junior Weston Garner took Bronowski’s place as starting quarter back. “[Garner] did well for being his first start,” Bronowski said. “He did some really good things, and that’s important.” Despite the losses, the team has maintained a rather positive outlook. 7-on-7 SUCCESS “We need to improve on a lot of things,” senior running Tiger football’s promising season began to heat up when back Durasis Nutall said, “but other than that, it is a great the 7-on-7 team played in the semi-finals on July 14, going season.” further than any previous Consol team, Bronowski said. injuries “We got fourth in the state in the tournament,” The team may have suffered heavy losses on the field, Strain said, “so that was like a huge, huge booster for our but for senior Thomas Vasquez, the sacrifice cuts much confidence.” deeper to the bone. Literally.


the roar | sports | 19

friday, may 2011 friday, sept. 23,13, 2011

OF FALL “My finger got stepped on while I was on the field,” Vasquez said. “Pretty much the top knuckle up was completely removed.” Vasquez lost a portion of his left ring finger during the game after the community-wide pep rally on Aug. 12, but said he did not notice until roughly seven plays later. “I thought it was just my glove that ripped [because] my adrenaline was so high,” Vasquez said. “I didn’t notice it until I looked down [and saw] blood dripping from my glove.” While Vasquez returned to the field for the CyWoods game on Sept. 9, senior wide receiver Eric Gan is confined to cheering on his team from the sidelines after lacerating his kidney during the Stoney Point scrimmage on Aug. 19. “This wasn’t the way I wanted to start off my senior year,” Gan said, “but I have come to terms with it now. So, I have accepted it, and I have moved on from it.” Gan expects an eight-week recovery period and, therefore, is unlikely to play for the rest of the season. “Sometimes it is hard to watch,” Gan said. “You wish you could be out there playing and helping your team out.

THE TOUCHDOWN TEAM

But, it is also good to cheer them on.” Off the field, however, the rest of the team has supported Gan by pushing his wheel chair around the school and assisting him to classes, he said. “It is football,” Gan said, “so there is always risk of injury. So, it sucks to see one of your teammates go down, but you [have] got to keep on playing and not worry about it.” Coach Williams concurs. “The game of football is a game of contact, so there is always a possibility [of serious injuries],” Coach Williams said. “We try to limit how much contact we do have during the week, so that when Friday night comes, we are able to be as healthy as possible.”

hope for future games

Tonight, the Tigers face Temple for homecoming. “I don’t think a little adversity is going to affect them negatively,” Coach Williams said. “We just have to have some positive things happen for us. I don’t think they look to the past very much, [but rather] just keep moving forward.”

VARSITY: Team Results: Aug. 26: Klein Oak- 17-9 (loss) Sept. 2: Cy-Woods- 27-20 (loss) Sept. 9: Westlake- 39-29 (loss)

Upcoming Games: Tonight: Temple @ Tigerland, 7:30 p.m. Sept. 29: Killeen Ellison @ Killeen, 7:00 p.m. Oct. 7: Bryan @ Kyle Field, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 14: Shoemaker @ Tigerland, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 21: Copperas Cove @ Copperas Cove, 7:30 p.m.

Key Players: 01. Jacob Bronowski - Quarterback 04. Durasis Nutall - Running Back 09. Brett Mahnke - Defensive Back 17. Marshall Strain - Line Backer 37. Quinton White - Running Back 99. J.J. Bynum - Defensive Lineman

Junior VARSITY:

The Tigers line up against Klein Oak on Aug. 26. The Tigers trained all summer in preparation for this season. PHOTO BY JANET NI

Silver Team Results: 0-3

Freshmen: Silver Team Results: 3-0

Maroon Team Results: 2-1

Maroon Team Results: 3-0

Seniors Jacob Bronowski, Brett Mahnke, Quinton White and J.J. Bynum prepare for the game against Klein Oak on Aug. 26. Seniors usually hold hands before the coin-toss to show solidarity. PHOTO BY KENDRA SPAW Senior Jacob Bronowski expresses anger after an interception. Bronowski received a concussion on Sept. 2. PHOTO BY AMY ZHANG


20 | sports | the roar

friday, sept. 23, 2011

Volleyball captains motivate players

Serving the Ball

BY KIMMIE CESSNA

Sophomore Ashlynn Ford waits for the serve against Bryan High on Sept. 13. She is an outside player this year. PHOTO BY LAURA EVERETT

Freshman: Freshman A team Results: 4-0 Freshman B team Results: 3-0

Junior Varsity: Team Results: 4-0 district record Upcoming Games: Tuesday, Sept. 27, against Copperas Cove at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 30, against Killeen Ellison at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 4, against Harker Heights at 6:30 p.m.

Junior Jordyn Slocum serves the ball over the net during the game against Bryan High on Sept. 13. Slocum made varsity her junior year. PHOTO BY LAURA EVERETT

Schedule

varsity

Next Game: Tuesday, Sep. 27, against Copperas Cove at 6:30 p.m. It will be teacher night, dig pink and middle school night.

Statistics Team Results: 4-0 in district A&M Consolidated def. Bryan 25-16, 25-15, 25-15.

assistant sports editor

She is dedicated to volleyball. She is someone players look up to in times of struggle. She pushes the team to do their best for a victory. She is someone who coaches can rely on. She is team captain. “I’ve been a part of the team for about two years, [so it] feels good to be in a leadership role,” Jaclyn Roddy said. Being a team captain and interacting with the team allows different sides to come out of teammates. “I would describe our team as diverse,” senior Casey Shomaker said. “Our team has a lot of different ages from sophomores to seniors and we each have a good quality.” The players and captains have set goals for themselves and as a team for the upcoming season to ensure the best performance is achieved. This season the Lady Tigers have four captains. “Some of my goals this season are to commit to college, finish off the season and beat Cove,” senior Roddy said. The team captain position entails qualities in an individual and can help make the team better as a whole. “Some things team captains are in charge of are warm ups and to be a spokesperson between coaches and other players, Roddy said. Having a successful season can be accomplished with hard work, but also an excellent coach who can relate to the players. “I like Coach Mac because I feel like she knows what she is talking about and when she gives instruction it is something you can trust,” Shomaker said. Playing a volleyball game is a way to show off all the practice and hard work. Getting rallied up for a game can help players get ready. “I get pumped up for games by the fun games the team plays before a match, it gets us warmed up,” Jordyn Slocum said. Being close to a team can help the atmosphere on the court and off. Having friends feel like family is a benefit within itself. “Our team is like a walking party. We are very spontaneous,” Roddy said. Leading the team and keeping focused is another responsibility the captains have. “As captains we try to motivate and keep the team focused, and we also try to mediate any problems that occur,” Slocum said. Spending time with the players can build lasting relationships. “Some of my best friends have come out of volleyball from spending time together during the season,” Shomaker said. Spending many hours practicing and making every effort to win, balancing all of the practices and school can become a challenge. “I balance volleyball and school by managing my time and not wasting it by doing my work during study hall,” junior Jordyn Slocum said. Looking for team captains is a process to evaluate all the different skills needed. “In a team captain I look for responsibility, accountability, maturatiy and someone who can communicate well with others,” Coach Cydryce McMillian said.

Top Players Sophomore Kaycey Cermin Junior Jessica Wagner Junior Hayley Cmjadalka Senior Mandy Nelson

Senior Kailey LaBove:

“I hope to accomplish as a team my senior year winning district, doing well in playoffs and having fun.”


the roar | health & rec | 21

friday, sept. 23, 2011

Drastic fears can be limiting, but manageable Fear. Some people fear snakes or bugs, some are petrified at the thought of public speaking, and others really don’t like heights. For some individuals, however, their fear becomes a more serious, debilitating, terrifying experience... a phobia. A phobia is a diagnosed condition in which a person fears an object or situation so much that their life is disrupted. “There’s a point in which a phobia is so disruptive in one’s life that it crosses over and becomes a diagnosable condition, and it really does depend on the degree in which it interferes with one’s life,” Psychiatrist Michael Brown said. “If someone’s afraid of heights, but there are no stairs, no problem. If they’re afraid of elevators but they work in a skyscraper, then you’ve got a problem. So, the diagnosis does depend very much on how severe the impact is on a person’s life.” A person’s phobia can range from a wide variety of topics. However, they often stem from a traumatizing or unpleasant experience. “There are a couple of theories on how phobias are developed,” Brown said. “The most likely is called classical conditioning, which is when the event or object that the person avoids is associated with anxiety, fear of harm or fear of loosing control. The connection can be from a real experience or it can be a symbolic condition as well.” Senior Maci Greene’s mild fear of the dark heightened to an extreme phobia after two of her family members were murdered at night. “I’ve always been pretty scared of the dark, but a year ago my grandparents were killed at night, and after that it became more of a real-life genuine fear instead of something silly,” Greene said. “Things so unexpected can happen in the dark. The fear of the unknown and the possibility of bad things happening gives me an immense sense of fear [because] in the dark I can’t look around and know that I’m safe.” After experiencing several messy

incidents throughout her childhood, along with never having vomited herself, senior Claire Warlick now finds herself unable to see, smell, or hear the sound of vomiting without feeling deep discomfort. “I’m afraid of [vomit]. I don’t want to see it, I don’t want to hear it, and I don’t want to smell it. When I do, I get really freaked out. I get this uncomfortable tingly feeling, and my breathing and heart start beating faster,” Warlick said. “A phobia is more than just being scared of something; it affects the way you act when you’re around it. I feel like I change into a different person.” Extreme reactions to a phobia are not uncommon, and both Greene and Warlick have had moments when their fear has become uncontrollable. “Two years ago my sister’s friend threw up on our couch at my house, so I ran into my closet and hid there for an hour and cried,” Warlick said. “I called my mom and was just freaking out. It was like a panic attack. [After an hour] I went outside because I couldn’t stand the thought of breathing the same air.” Greene has experienced a similar reaction to the dark. “When I’m alone in the dark, I feel like there’s something behind every corner, that something or someone’s going to pop out at me or grab me, and there here have been times when people have tried to play jokes on me without realizing how afraid I get in the dark,” Greene said. “[One time] I was walking outside, and my friend popped out of the bushes and scared me. I dropped to the ground and started crying and shaking really badly. I don’t have control over my response. It’s just instinct.” Although phobias can not be instantly cured with just a shot or medical procedure, there are methods used to ease the anxiety a person feels when exposed to their fear.

artwork by Fallon Wenck

“Phobias are definitely curable,” Brown said. “Part of treating phobias involves something called stimulus exposure, which is when you go and expose yourself to the thing that you have a phobic avoidance of, but you don’t do it all at once. It involves a process called systematic desensitization, which is when you slowly move yourself up to facing your phobia, step by step, until finally you’re desensitized to the fear.” Greene is slowly undergoing this process, and feels that instant exposure to her fear would only make matters worse. “I don’t think you can necessarily face your phobia all at once,” Greene said. “Facing my fear would only make it worse. Putting myself in that situation and having a panic attack because of it definitely doesn’t make me want to go in the dark again. I think that having nothing bad happen over a period of time is the only thing that will ease my fear.” Brown believes that phobias, which impact almost 10 percent of the population, are irrational fears that harbor in the lives of perfectly normal people. “A phobia is a specific fear of a specific object. It’s not generalized. It’s just of that,” Brown said. “They’re this weird, very specific little slice of our life that’s irrational and intense. And the thing is that we know it’s irrational, but we just can’t stop it.”

Famous Phobias Madonna suffers brontophobia, the fear of thunder. David Beckham suffers from ataxophobia, a fear of disorder or untidiness. Nicole Kidman has been afraid of butterflies since her childhood. Jennifer Love Hewitt has revealed that she has a number of phobias, the worst of which is a fear of elevators. Billy Bob Thornton is chromophobic, (the fear of bright colors) and has a fear of antique furniture. The star refuses to stay in a room with furniture built before 1950. Keanu Reeves is a scotophobic, fearing darkness. Source: http://listphobia. com/2010/08/10/10-most-weird-phobiasof-hollywood-celebrities/


22 | entertainment | the roar

friday, sept. 23, 2011

New local eateries offer various dining options reviewed by Rachel Kagle As I entered The Original Fried Pie Shop on University Drive and Earl Rudder Freeway, next to Chicken Express, I completely forgot that the building I was in was half gas station. The inviting and homey atmosphere was very relaxed and old fashioned with intriguing local pictures from the early 1900’s and a wall of various Texas license plates. Not only were the decorations

inviting, the wonderfully fresh, sweet aroma instantly made me eager to order and the employees just added to the great environment. The prices, all around $3, were definitely exciting because just one pie is quite filling. I ended up eating half of the broccoli and cheese savory pie and half of the cherry pie and they both exceeded my expectations. The food came out hot, and

the taste was spectacular. I instantly felt like I was eating a homemade pie that took hours to prepare. There is a drive through as well, so you can get fabulous pies without even having to get out of your car! This quick, easy and delicious treat is definitely appealing, even if it’s far from health conscious. The Original Fried Pie Shop exceeded my expectations and is definitely a fun and unique place to go.

reviewed by Laura Everett After this year’s hot summer, How Do You Roll on Harvey Road offers the perfect escape from the heat with its cool, simplistic atmosphere revolving around bright orange and brilliant lime green. How Do You Roll stands apart from other sushi restaurants as the sushi is prepared right in front of the customers. Additionally, the customer can explore beyond the somewhat limiting menu of “classics” (such as California and Philly

rolls – the latter of which were particularly delicious), opting instead to create their own combination of ingredients. During this process, customers can choose between the traditional seaweed or soy wrapping, white or brown rice, cooked or raw meat, and a wide variety of vegetables and condiments. The sushi was not only beautifully prepared, but also tasted delightful. For less than $10, I was able to buy myself a

satisfying dinner and have leftovers. How Do You Roll’s only notable flaw was the seemingly limited selection, as there were no options for a “mix-and-match” style dish that included an assortment of types of sushi. Overall, I was impressed with How Do You Roll and would recommend a visit for a somewhat casual, but decent quality, meal.

reviewed by Kate Williams After walking in at prime time dinner time (7:30 p.m.) at BJ’s Brewhouse, loated at the Post Oak Mall shopping center, I barely escaped getting almost eaten alive by a revolving door preparing myself for a long wait. It was a full house, with not a single place to sit and wait. Thankfully, a helpful waitress mentioned that the cocktail area was first come, first serve, seating and my date and I managed to snag a spot immediately into a roomy booth. The atmosphere is beautiful, with

high ceilings, great lighting, and the walls have color palette of rich reds and deep browns that screams, great American food. After about a twenty-five minute wait my dish arrived. The pasta was excellent, but with excellence comes a price attached. No meal was less than $9 on the menu and that is without a drink or tip. After a filling meal, I looked at the dessert menu that I had heard stories about. It catered to every type of sweet tooth. We chose the Triple Chocolate Pizzookie. My date and I shared

this warm cookie topped with melting ice cream for $7, but it was worth every penny. The service provided everything in a timely manner and with a smile and a joke here and there to lighten the mood. Overall, the experience was fantastic and I will make my second visit as soon as I get the chance. BJ’s was perfect for a family dinner or casual enough night out with friends, or even a hot date!

Seasonal Senses

for October

TOUCH fresh pumpkins at the Aggie Habitat for Humanity sale at Covenant Presbyterian Church Rock Prairie and Wellborn For more information, go to aggiehabitat.com.

HEAR

the bands play at MuSECCfest on Saturday, Oct. 14 from 2 p.m. to 11 p.m at Wolf Pen Creek Amphitheater. For more information, go to museccfest.org. All donations benefit local children’s charities.

SMELL steak at the Texas Reds Festival in downtown Bryan from Oct. 7 to Oct. 8. For more information, go to tr.blog.bryantx. gov.

SEE

A Midsummer Night’s Dream at Stage Center Theatre in Bryan showing from Sept. 29 to Oct.1. For more information on tickets and show times, go to stagecenter.info.

TASTE fried bubblegum at the State Fair of Texas in Dallas from Sept. 30 to Oct. 23. For information on the events and contests associated with the fair, go to bigtex.com.

Compiled by Alina Dattagupta


the roar | entertainment | 23

friday, sept. 23, 2011

by amy zhang, editor-in-chief Tiger Spirit. The phenomenon is known to spread through the student body like a disease each Friday, establishing itself in cheers, chants, and catcalls. “School spirit makes the school environment more energetic,” senior and cheerleading captain Holland Knapp said. “It makes people more excited to learn and participate!” Indeed, school spirit is a miraculous spectacle. It entices some to wake up at dreadful hours of the morning to rehearse marching steps. Others eagerly put together their craziest themed

Students encourage football team through school spirit outfits, anticipating the glorious walk down the hallway, stares and compliments following behind them. And for some, school spirit just means going to the football games and screaming their hearts out for their team. “As cheesy as it may get, school spirit binds the school together,” Knapp said. “The traditions and rituals create the memories that we’ll remember.” From freshmen to seniors (however reluctant they may initially be), many students find ways to motivate themselves through school by taking it upon themselves to embody Tiger Spirit. Seniors Laura Casper and Sarah Morgan give senior Joanne Koola kisses on “Kiss a Senior Day” during Howdy Week. Howdy Week gives students the opportunity to meet and interact with each other. PHOTO BY AMY ZHANG

Seniors Samantha Lopez, Celina Malave, Paige Blomstedt and Lisa Hsiao cheer for the football team on Aug. 26. Seniors typically stand along the fence at the game to support the players. PHOTO BY AMY ZHANG Head football coach David Raffield encourages the crowd to support the football team at the first home game on Aug. 26. The Tigers have their second home game tonight. PHOTO BY AMY ZHANG

Mascot Ty Thomas “walks it out” at the first pep rally on Aug. 26. Thomas chose to perform a dance medley that can be viewed on Youtube by searching “Eye of the Tyger.” PHOTO BY AMY ZHANG

Seniors Marshall Strain and Jacob Bronowski react to the excitement of the crowd during the first pep rally on Aug. 26. Senior football players usually give speeches to excite the crowd. PHOTO BY AMY ZHANG


24 | etcetera | the roar

CaffEine Craze Caffeine use among teens becomes more prevalent issue

friday, sept. 23, 2011

by Isabel Drukker, Assistant Editor For some, the simple smell of coffee or the quick click from opening the can of an energy drink is enough to feel open eyed and awake for the rest of the morning. Others, however, need to down a bubbly rush of soda to get the necessary energy to not only stay awake, but to avoid crashing completely. While the quick benefits of drinking a caffeinated beverage are obvious, being addicted brings a number of harmful effects that lie underneath the speedy rush. “Too much caffeine can give you an upset stomach, increased irritability, a lack of sleep and an increase of heart rate,” school nurse Elizabeth Amdor said. “It can be dehydrating as it normally increases the function of your kidneys, and it can affect your eating habits, so you won’t have as good nutrition.” Caffeine is safe in small amounts, though, meaning the occasional mocha or soda can be harmless. However, the danger begins when occasional becomes frequent, when a tall becomes a venti and when a habit becomes an addiction. “It worries me when I see a student drinking [an energy drink] all the time,” chemistry teacher and former caffeine addict John Pearson said, “because I know that path and I know it ends in a headache.” Besides the headaches after “crashing”, those accustomed to a regular dose of caffeine can feel even more severe pains when attempting to quit. “[When I quit] it was the worst week of my life, I had the worst migraine,” said senior Chandler Lawless, a self professed caffeine addict. Not only does quitting become increasingly difficult, but the body soon

requires more caffeine to obtain the original rush. “[Caffeine] used to make me not be able to go to sleep, but I feel like it doesn’t affect me anymore,” senior Will Davis said. Contrary to this, after the initial distress, quitting caffeine can actually make one feel better, along with the numerous health benefits. “I had headaches for about two or three days,” Pearson said. “But now I don’t feel the need for that cup of coffee and knowing I’m in control of myself feels fantastic.” Also, decreasing caffeine intake easily helps prevent damaged teeth, altered blood sugar levels and bad breath. “I’ve been drinking pointless calories,” Lawless said, “because I drink it like water.” Regardless of these health effects though, some students find caffeine necessary to stay awake and keep up with their work load. “It helps me with schoolwork, it gets me awake,” Davis said. “That’s probably how I started.” But sometimes students can harm themselves in the effort to obtain the energy needed to face the day. “I’ve had a student come in nauseated because he drank two energy drinks on an empty stomach,” Amdor said. “I had to send him home.” Besides this, caffeine can cost more than healthier options, making it an expensive, as well as dangerous habit. “It dwindles fast, all that money goes down the drain and it’s not very cool,” Davis said. “But I don’t think I’ll ever stop drinking [caffeine]. I enjoy [energy drinks] but I should just definitely drink more water.”

“The number of teens drinking coffee in restaurants has increased

12%

since last year.”

Photo Amy Zhang Photo byby Amy Zhang

Four ways to to stay awake without caffeine 1. Exercise. A quick jog or a set of crunches gets your blood flowing. 2. Take a short nap. Sleeping for fifiteen minutes or so can restore your energy, as long as the nap is less than thirty minutes. 3. Eat lightly. Foods with carbs can make you sleepy, while fruit, like bananas, can make you feel awake. 4. Go outside. Your immediate reaction to the fresh air is to wake up. Source: http://genesisdavies.articlesbase.com/sleep-articles/tips-for-stayingawake-without-caffeine-1187855.html

Washington Post

The Roar Vol. 17 No. 1  
The Roar Vol. 17 No. 1  

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