Issuu on Google+

Sports, Page 5.

News, Page 9.

SCOUTING

238,000

sign petition for extra spending in state schools.

THE SOONERS The Daily takes a look at the men’s basketball team. THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA’S I NDEPENDENT STUDENT VOICE

VOL. 93, NO. 43 FREE — Additional Copies 25¢

TUESDAY, OCT. 21, 2008 © 2008 OU Publications Board

Norman bank evacuates after receiving threatening letter • Chase branches in three cities receive mail claiming to contain hazardous chemical JERRY WOFFORD Daily Staff Writer Employees were evacuated from a Chase bank Monday at the intersection of 36th and Robinson Streets Amy Frost/The Daily after an employee opened a letter that Haz-mat team members spray each other down after a threatening letter arrived Monday morning at the Chase bank on 36th and Robinson Avenue. The said it contained hazardous chemicals, police said.

FBI special agent Gary Johnson said the letter stated that the person who opened the letter had been subjected to a harmful substance and would die. Capt. Leonard Judy said the 10 employees who came in contact with the letter were sprayed with water in the bank’s parking lot in an attempt to wash off any potential contaminants, but officials do not believe anyone was harmed. One person was transported to Norman Regional Hospital, Judy said. He said the person complained of discomfort, but there are no signs that the discomfort was the result of any hazardous substance that may have been in the letter.

team entered the building to inspect.

BANK Continues on page 2

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT This week in New Music Tuesday, the latest from Oasis, Jack’s Mannequin and more. Also, Japanese music is returning to Catlett Music Center. Page 7.

INSTITUTE FOR U.SCHINA ISSUES

Panelists: US and China must solidify relations • U.S., China mark 30 years of normal relations

SOONER SPORTS After the loss of linebacker Ryan Reynolds, the Sooners were looking for veteran players to step up and lead the defense. They found that in safeties Nic Harris and Lendy Holmes. Page 6.

MELISSA MORGAN, JESSICA JERNIGAN AND JAMIE HUGHES Daily Staff Writers

CAMPUS BRIEFS

W

Religious studies director to lecture tonight in the Union Religious Studies Program Director Charles Kimball will lecture at 7 p.m. in the Molly Shi Boren Ballroom of the Oklahoma Memorial Union. Kimball’s lecture will focus on religion and politics in the U.S. and the Middle East, and how ignorance in the two areas can have a major impact on world issues, especially CHARLES in the context of the KIMBALL 2008 presidential election.

TODAY’S INDEX A&E Campus Notes Classifieds Crossword Horoscope

7 10 8 8 9

News 9 Opinion 4 Police Reports 10 Sports 5, 6 Sudoku 8

WEATHER FORECAST

Amy Frost/The Daily

Richard C. Bush, former managing director for the American Institute in Taiwan, speaks at the U.S.-China relations conference Monday in Beaird Lounge. Bush discussed what actions the next U.S. president should take to maintain good relations between the two superpowers.

LOW 55° HIGH 76°

WEDNESDAY LOW 55° HIGH 58°

30%

Source: Oklahoma Weather Lab

CHINA Continues on page 2

OU Physicians’ clinic opens • Director: Primary care clinic helps provide better specialized future care MEREDITH MORIAK Daily Staff Writer

TODAY

orld leaders and experts on U.S.-China affairs spoke Monday about the growing importance and necessity of positive relations between the two superpowers. The Institute for U.S.-China Issues held the symposium in Beaird Lounge and the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the normalization of U.S.-China relations. “U.S.-China relations is one of the most important bilateral relationships of the 21st century,” said Peter H. Gries, director of the Institute for U.S.China Issues at OU and a panelist. Panelists included Chinese Ambassador to the U.S. Zhou Wenzhong; former U.S. ambassador to

China J. Stapleton Roy; David D. Gries; former CIA director of Congressional Affairs Richard C. Bush III, director of the Center for Northeast Asian Policy Studies; associate professor Peter H. Gries; and Wu Xinbo, deputy director of the Center for American Studies and associate dean of the School of International Relations and Public Affairs at Fudan University in Shanghai. The symposium gave students, faculty and community members the unique chance to hear experts on U.S.-China relations sound off from both sides of the issue. “[The event was] a great opportunity for students,” said Katie Garner, a graduate student in international area studies. Panelists focused on the importance of future relations between the United States and China because the two are among the world’s largest countries with the largest economies. Although many are skeptical of future relations between the two countries, Monday’s speakers assured the audience that relations are stable. “[It’s] foolish to be pessimistic of future relations,” Roy said.

Even though permanent furnishings haven’t yet to arrive, OU Physicians opened a new clinic Monday that will offer primary care to patients in Norman. Holly Adams, OU Physicians executive director of operations, said Norman was an ideal place to open a clinic because a large number of OU employees live in the area. “It is important we offer good care for our employees,” Adams said. “By growing primary care, we build convenience when or if a patient ever needs specialized care.” The clinic, located at 1139 N.W. 36th Ave., Suite 110, had six scheduled appointments upon opening, said

Darla Hale, clinic manager. “They [OU Physicians] wanted to open the doors for business and we are just real excited to be in the Norman area,” Hale said. Lubna Wani, the primary doctor at the clinic, is a board-certified internist. Adams said she hired Wani because she thinks highly of her and the way she interacts with patients. “She’s amazing, compassionate and connects with patients,” Adams said. Wani said she is very happy to be opening and running a clinic in Norman. “I live in Norman, and it is a dream come true to work in my community,” Wani said. “I like being part of a community that I am close with and live in.” The clinic will be open five days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and will have lunchtime appointments available so patients do not miss work, Wani said. “I want to concentrate on the clinic and make sure that patients come first and I will try to see them everyday to accommodate their schedule,” Wani said.

PHYSICIANS Continues on page 2

Merrill Jones/The Daily

Dr. Lubna Wani sits in a new exam room Monday during the opening day of the OU Physicians clinic on 36th Avenue.


2

News

Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2008

Bank Continued from page 1 The letter was opened at about 11:18 a.m. Chase bank is taking the threats seriously and working closely with law enforcement, said Greg Hassell, a spokesman for Chase bank. He said no serious injuries have been reported. Judy said police are not sure if there were chemical agents in the letter but are proceeding on the assumption that the note contained hazardous materials. “The substance of the letter was threatening in its tone,” Judy said. Two Chase branches in Oklahoma City, located on May Avenue and Northwest 63rd Street, also received a threatening letter, as well as

branches in Denver, Colo., said Greg Hassell, a spokesman for Chase bank. He could not confirm whether the other banks had been evacuated. The Norman branch will be open Tuesday. The Northwest 63rd Street location re-opened Monday, but a representative at the May Avenue location declined to confirm whether the branch was re-opened Monday. The FBI, Oklahoma National Guard Civil Support team, federal postal inspectors, police, firefighters and paramedics responded to the situation in Norman. — CAITLIN HARRISON, WILL HOLLAND AND NANETTE LIGHT CONTRIBUTED REPORTING.

Amy Frost/The Daily

A haz-mat oversees the evacuation of 10 employees at the Chase bank Monday on 36th and Robinson Avenue. The employees had handled a letter claiming to contain toxic materials.

Physicians

China

Continued from page 1

Continued from page 1 “In the last several years, we’ve seen improvement in relations on both sides,” Wu said Mary Beth Jackson, Asian studies senior, said she hopes the countries will continue to have positive and peaceful relations. “[I hope] they keep in mind the best interests of both countries,” she said. Roy said current relations are in good shape, but the next president will have many crises to deal with and will have less time to focus on Asia. “President [George W.] Bush has met with President Hu so much more frequently … than any previous president,” he said. “It has paid dividends in terms of the ability to communicate easily.” Roy said it is imperative that the next president keep lines of communication open, because now is the first time in history

top economic officials from both countries have begun developing personal relationships. Presidential candidates Sens. Barack Obama, D-Ill., and John McCain, R-Ariz., and their policies on U.S.-China relations were also discussed by the panelists. Richard C. Bush III said Obama is willing to cooperate with China, and he will work to expand that fellowship while limiting competition. He said he thinks if McCain were to win the election he would put individual interests over the shared values of the two countries. Despite differing individual opinions, the majority of Chinese want Obama to take office in January, Wu said, but either candidate will have hurdles that need to be cleared in order for friendly relations to continue. Both Zhou and Roy said the

U.S’s involvement with selling arms to Taiwan will be a major issue in the future of the relationship. Zhou said the U.S. has breached the contract formed by the Joint Communique of the United States of America and the People’s Republic of China. In the Communique, the United States recognized that Taiwan is a part of China. By selling the arms, the U.S. breached the contract by overstepping China’s sovereignty, creating a possible rift between the two nations. The problem should be approached carefully and with a sober and daring mind, Roy said. Jackson also said she thinks the countries need to be careful on how they approach the issue. “[It’s] a sensitive topic [they should] approach together,” she said.

Wani said there are a few appointments scheduled for next week, but she will spend the majority of the week setting up the clinic and getting things organized. Permanent furniture has been ordered and will arrive within a month. Before moving to Oklahoma for a fellowship at the Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City, Wani, who is originally from India, worked in the medical field in New York, Connecticut and Missouri. The clinic is overseen by OU Physicians at the OU Health Sciences Center. OU Physicians is made up of more than 400 doctors and is the state’s largest physician group. It includes a variety of specialties for adults and children, according to a press release. Adams said patients who use OU Physicians for primary care will be guaranteed access to specialists should they ever need them. Within a year, the Norman clinic will use electronic medical records that connect all OU Physicians’ patients in a digital health care network, Adams said. “This allows connections to specialists and the ability to share info in emergency situations,” Adams said. She said this is beneficial because if a patient at

the Norman clinic ever has an immediate injury, they will be able to automatically access their records at OU Medical Center and be able to treat them more efficiently with better care. “Should folks need a specialist, we can get them that help quickly,” Adams said. OU Physicians plans to expand their primary care clinics in the future. These plans include adding more doctors to the Norman practice and opening clinics in other cities, Adams said. “It is very exciting that OU Physicians has [the expansion] in their plans for the future,” Wani said. “OU Physicians has so many super specialists who can offer services to patients.”

OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY The Daily has a long-standing commitment to serve readers by providing accurate coverage and analysis. Errors are corrected as they are identified. Readers should bring errors to the attention of the editorial board for further investigation.

ERROR SUBMISSIONS e-mail: dailynews@ou.edu phone: 325-3666

PLEASE JOIN US FOR OUR GRAND OPENING! TRY FREE SAMPLES OF OUR TASTY SELECTIONS.

TODAY, OCT. 21

1 p.m. - 3 p.m.

Oklahoma Memorial Union, First Floor Hours of operation: 7 a.m. - 11 p.m., Monday-Friday Housing and Food Services is a department in OU’s division of Student Affairs. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution.

housing&food

CAMPUS DINING


Ellis Goodwin, managing editor dailynews@ou.edu phone: 325-3666 fax: 325-6051 For more, go to oudaily.com.

Campus News

OU Puterbaugh fellow receives Nobel Prize who is a cousin of Le ClĂŠzio, said he is a dreamer. She first met her mother’s cousin at their family home on the island of Mauritius, located in the Indian Ocean off the coast of southeast Africa. Valet said this island has played a big role in Le ClĂŠzio’s life because he grew up there. Valet said some people think his NATASHA GOODELL writing is long and slow-paced, but Daily Staff Writer to her it is poetic and good for her when she is in a quiet mood. A French author and OU Warren Motte, professor of Puterbaugh Fellow recently won French and Comparative Literature the Nobel Prize for Literature, at the University of Colorado wrote making him the sixth a story about Le ClĂŠzio in Puterbaugh Fellow to win 1997 for World Literature the prize, according to an Today. He said Le ClĂŠzio is OU press release. very interested in people In 1997 Jean-Marie who are not easily definGustave Le ClĂŠzio visited able in terms of nationalOU for the Puterbaugh ity, class or social status. Conference on World “His writing is very Literature and left honattentive to human differored as a Puterbaugh JEANďšşMARIE ence and diversity,â€? Motte Fellow. LE CLEZIO said. In awarding the prize, After writing for 40 the Nobel committee years, Le ClĂŠzio’s prize is called Le ClĂŠzio “an author of the culmination of a prosperous new departures, poetic adventure career. and sensual ecstasy, explorer of “I think [the Nobel Prize for a humanity beyond and below the Literature] is really recognition reigning civilization.â€? of a lifelong achievement,â€? Simon Daniel Simon, assistant direc- said. tor and managing editor of Out of 20 Puterbaugh fellows, World Literature Today, said the six have gone on to win the Nobel Puterbaugh Conference is a rich Prize for literature. The success of tradition at OU that brings in the the conference prompted OU to world’s top authors to promote spread the format to other conferworld literature. ences. The conference is sponsored by The Neustadt Conference is now OU’s international literary maga- structured in much the same way zine, World Literature Today, in as the Puterbaugh Conference, and collaboration with the depart- it seeks to bring highly talented ments of modern languages, lit- scholars and writers to OU. erature, linguistics and English, The public lectures held during according to OU’s Web site. the conferences bring in 400 to “We’ve had several Puterbaugh 500 people each time, and OU can Fellows go on to win the Nobel be proud of the distinctions these Prize, â€? Simon said. “It marks the programs have around the world, number of times we’ve had a con- Simon said. vergence of those who have won “It’s a great achievement for OU the Neustadt and Puterbaugh who to be so well known internationhave gone on to win the Nobel ally for these programs,â€? he said. Prize.â€? “I think it reinforces OU’s internaFrench professor Aglae Valet, tional stature.â€?

��€˘ Six Puterbaugh Fellows have gone on to win the Nobel prize

Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2008

3

24-hour film contest begins Friday night • Students will have one day to write, shoot, edit short film CAITLIN HARRISON Daily Staff Writer The adrenaline and caffeine will be flowing Friday night during a new film production contest for OU students. The 24-Hour Filmmaking Blitz will require competing groups of students to write, shoot, edit and produce a three- to five-minute film within 24 hours beginning at 9 p.m. Friday. Audience members will judge the winning film at a screening Saturday night, said Katrina Boyd, Student Film Production Club adviser and film and video studies professor. “The idea is that people who don’t have production experience can get in and learn in this venue,â€? she said. you have months of preparation,â€? he said. The event is open to anyone. “You have tons of light in possibly a studio This is the first film competition of its kind set and costume people and set designers,â€? at OU, said club president Jack Patchell. He he said. said he thinks the contest will bring filmBut with only 24 hours, students in the makers together from different colleges on contest will have limited options. campus and give them an opportunity to be “You have a camera, maybe one or two involved in produclights and just a short tion. little three- or fourEach film will be page script,â€? Patchell required to follow said. “It would be wise guidelines set by club to shoot at not more • Students who want to participate will officers, including than one or two locameet at 8:30 p.m. Friday outside Dale Hall. incorporating certain tions.â€? The contest will begin at 9 p.m. elements to ensure Andrew Hajek, the that students don’t club’s Web master, • There is a $5 entry fee per person. cheat and shoot the said he has participat• All group members must be present at the film in advance, said ed in two 24-hour film start and ďŹ nish of the contest. Patchell, film and contests before, and it • For more info, e-mail club adviser Katrina video studies junior. was his idea to bring a Boyd at kgboyd@ou.edu. He said these items competition to OU. include a theme, spe“It’s definitely mencific lines of dialogue, tally challenging, not props and location. The film will be judged only because you’ve been up for 24 hours, but based on how well these elements are incor- because you’ve used a lot of mind power to porated. The requirements will be announced get it done,â€? said Hajek, film and video studat the start of the contest. ies junior. The contest is like a crash course in filmStudents who want to make a quality film making because students have so little time will probably stay up all night and use the to produce a film, Patchell said. entire 24 hours, Hajek said. “Typically, with a large-scale production “It’s one of those things where you’d rather

INTERESTED?

Photo Illustration by Photos.com

get done early than push down to the last second,� he said. “There’s so many things that can go wrong.� Film production can be an intense but rewarding process, Patchell said. “You never know where the genius will come from,� he said. “Sometimes 24 hours is all they need.� Groups will be comprised of three or four people. Hajek said the club plans to group more experienced filmmakers with freshmen. He said the participants in the contest will be able to gain experience in every aspect of production. Groups can decide among themselves how to assign jobs such as writing, editing and directing, Patchell said. Group members can act in the film, but they can bring in extra actors also. Hajek said the club has seen a lot of interest in the contest so far. He said the goal is to have 10 teams compete. “There’s a lot of really talented filmmakers on campus, but there isn’t really a venue for it,� he said. “Our main goal would be to get people to start working together.� The club will host a free public screening of the films at 9 p.m. Saturday in a location to be determined, Patchell said. The audience will vote on the winner and awards for the films.

STUDENT LIVING AT IT’S BEST

INDIVIDUAL LEASES

SHUTTLE TO CAMPUS FULLY FURNISHED UNITS 24-HR FITNESS CENTER COMPUTER LAB FREE TANNING MOVIE THEATRE RESORT-STYLE POOL & HOT TUB GAME ROOM WITH POOL TABLES & FOOSBALL LIGHTED BASKETBALL, SAND VOLLEYBALL, & TENNIS COURTS

"!!#"" 

    $

2900 OAK TREE AVE | 405.292.4044

   

NORMANSTUDENTHOUSING.COM


4

Opinion

Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2008

OUR VIEW

Hailey Branson, opinion editor dailyopinion@ou.edu phone: 325-7630, fax: 325-6051 For more, go to oudaily.com.

Matt Reed — broadcast and electronic media senior

STAFF CARTOON

Students worth money Oklahoma’s per-pupil education funding is shameful. The state’s expenditure of $6,900 per student is far below Oklahoma’s neighboring states’ average spending of $8,300 per pupil, which puts Oklahoma 48th in the country for such spending. Thus, we are happy the Oklahoma HOPE (Helping Oklahoma Public Education) Ballot Initiative is gaining support. If passed, HOPE Ballot Initiative, or State OUR VIEW Question 744, will amend Oklahoma’s constitution to require the state legislature to is an editorial fund public education to a minimum of the selected and debated per-pupil average of neighboring states. (See by the editorial board and written after a page 11 for details.) majority opinion is This is an important initiative because eduformed and approved cation is a big issue in this election though it by the editor. Our View is getting little attention. is The Daily’s official Oklahoma education is chronically underopinion. funded by the Oklahoma legislature, which, by the way, has plenty of money. In the first quarter of the new fiscal year, the state has collected 106.5 percent of its expected earnings and has $169.9 million more than it needs to pay its bills, according to a press release from State Treasurer Scott Meacham. If the HOPE Ballot Initiative passes, it will force legislators to pay attention to where they are shoveling funds and make them send some toward education, which sorely needs money. If the referendum is improved, Oklahoma legislators need to do everything they can do improve public education as they fund it more. Legislators need to spend money allotted for education more equitably. Instead of passing across-the-board education spending increases, legislators should allocate funds where they are desperately needed, like rural schools that struggle just to keep their doors open. It also is important for the state to retain quality graduates to stay in the state to teach. With extra funding and good instruction for students, we think the quality of education in Oklahoma public schools will improve dramatically. We hope HOPE succeeds in making the ballot in 2010, and we hope Oklahomans head to the polls to vote for it with the same enthusiasm they are expected to show on Nov. 4, 2008.

STAFF COLUMN

STAFF COLUMN

Powell’s endorsement huge for Obama

T H E

have to compete with another state with a potentially higher payout. Texas has a payout of 67.5 percent, and Missouri has a payout of 68.5 percent. Since the Oklahoma lottery has already fallen short of the projected $300 million, Oklahoma could not compete with a higher payout and another neighbor seeking the money of jackpot hunters. It is simply inefficient to have the lottery as a funding source when so much of the income, 65 percent, has to go into keeping it running. To underscore this point, the revenue for the latest fiscal year was $14.6 million below projections. If a state tries to plan an education budget, having its expected income from the lottery fall short repeatedly makes it difficult to plan ahead. Oklahoma public schools already receive money from income and property taxes, and they were run sufficiently before any additional lottery income. Of course, schools always need money, but the trouble comes with how the money is handled, not how it is spent. In 2005, Oklahoma spent about $6,613 per pupil. That is enough money to send every student to a decent private or parochial school and high school. It is also enough money to pay my tuition for two semesters at OU. So, the question is not whether there is enough money, but whether it is being spent wisely. Thus, the lottery is not only excessive, it is also unwise because it encourages gambling for a good cause. Buying the occasional lottery ticket or playing the random game of poker is not going to get you addicted, but widespread lottery ticket sales are a source of temptation and exploitation for people with low incomes. Oklahoma should not have to stoop to using a game of chance to fund something that should be as certain as education. Doing so is a gamble with unearned money, and it lowers the image of the state and feeds false hope. SARAH ROSENCRANS IS A ZOOLOGY AND BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE JUNIOR. HER COLUMN APPEARS EVERY OTHER TUESDAY.

I N D E P E N D E N T Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor Assistant Managing Editor Night Editor Assistant Night Editor Opinion Editor Photo Editor

Dane Beavers Kevin Hahn Corey DeMoss Adam Kohut Judy Gibbs Robinson R.T. Conwell

international terrorism as it exists today, and they did not certainly did not have to sell an unpopular war to a world generally opposed to it. Simply put, the other secretaries of state dealt with a world far removed from today’s world. Not only has Powell dealt with the foreign policy climate as it exists today, but he was a major player in the Cold War era, as well. He served as secretary of state under former President Ronald Reagan and also as chairman of the joint chiefs of staff under former president George H. W. Bush. Powell uniquely possesses the military and political experience of the Cold War era and the international political experience of the post 9/11 world. This combination of experience and the resultant perspective is matched by few, if any, well-known figures. As it has through the entire presidential campaign, the issue of race has again been brought to the forefront by Powell’s endorsement. Many grassroots Republican supporters, as evidenced by comments on news Web sites, view Powell’s endorsement of Obama as nothing more than one black politician supporting another. Even the McCain campaign has hinted at racial undertones, saying the endorsement didn’t come as a surprise. To assert that Powell is supporting Obama solely due to race disrespectfully ignores Powell’s credentials and long service to his

country and government. The argument also has two major holes. First, if race had been the only or primary motivation for the endorsement, why would Powell come forward now, just two weeks before the election, when Obama is leading in almost every poll anyway? His endorsement would have been much more helpful a few months ago, when McCain was tied with or leading Obama nationwide. Secondly, if a black person supporting a black candidate is racism, then so is a white person supporting a white candidate. If Powell is guilty of racism, then so are the white Americans who support McCain. Accusing Powell of racism but not accusing the white McCain supporters is a double standard. Colin Powell is respected by many Republicans, Democrats and Independents alike. He is perhaps the only member of the Bush administration to enjoy this kind of support and is often mentioned as a possible presidential candidate himself. His endorsement of Obama, therefore, carries real weight. Even though Obama probably could win any election held today without it, Powell’s endorsement gives added credibility to his campaign. MUNIM DEEN IS A MICROBIOLOGY SENIOR. HIS COLUMN APPEARS EVERY OTHER TUESDAY.

YOUR VIEWS ity of the prison guards and the prison system in stopping the violence, but it also condones the perpetrators of the violence. Where does this stop? Maybe with the thought that people are going to starve anyway around the world, so lets make sure Third World countries set aside proper burial areas for the dearly departed? Or, people are going to drink and drive anyway, so lets make sure we build drunk driving lanes so no one gets hurt? Both those ideas sound absurd, and they should. They also sound like the main point of Monday’s column. 2) Civilization is based on the idea that people must make difficult choices. Strict adherence to purely economic pro and con is NOT the way to run our society. The notion that providing condoms and lubrication saves money because it is less expensive than taking care of inmates with diseases is outlandish.

Column about prison rape ‘asinine’ There is quite a difference between “out of the box thinking” and asinine opinions presented for the sake of shock. I shudder in deciding which category to place Monday’s column about making condoms and lube available to the incarcerated. In either case, it is a sad commentary about where the Oklahoma Daily editorial page is headed. This column was insane on so many levels that it’s hard to know where to begin. These two lines of criticism are as good a start as any: 1) The idea that prison rape and abuse “is just something that happens” so we might as well make it as safe and easy as possible is the worst kind of shirking of responsibility a society can make. This not only alleviates the responsibil-

S T U D E N T

V O I C E

NEWSROOM DIRECTORY Meredith Simons Ellis Goodwin Nanette Light Amanda Turner Nijim Dabbour Hailey Branson Amy Frost

nation, Powell continues to command much respect, as evidenced by the huge turnout for his speech at OU last year. Having the endorsement of a Republican of this prestige and with these credentials would be a boon to any candidate, particularly to a candidate of the Democratic Party. Obama was, understandably, delighted at the endorsement, calling Powell to thank him and issuing a respectful communiqué almost immediately. Meanwhile, while McCain stated his respect MUNIM and admiraDEEN tion of Powell, McCain attempted to diminish the value of Powell’s endorsement, highlighting instead the four secretaries of state who have endorsed the McCain-Palin ticket. There is a crucial difference, however, between Powell and the four secretaries of state who have endorsed McCain — Henry Kissinger, James Baker, Lawrence Eagleburger and Alexander Haig. The latter four served during or immediately after the Cold War. Theirs was a time when fighting the spread of Communism and countering the Soviet Union was the main focus of U.S. foreign policy. They did not have to deal with

Senior Online Editor Multimedia Editor Sports Editor A&E Editor Editorial Adviser Advertising Manager

O F

160 Copeland Hall 860 Van Vleet Oval Norman, Okla. 73019-0270 phone: (405) 325-3666 e-mail: dailynews@ou.edu

T H E The Fine Print:

I’m sure many have seen the billboards with pictures of cute children and the bragging claims that the Oklahoma Lottery has raised $220 million for education since 2005. Those signs are misleading about the merits of the lottery. Oklahomans voted in favor of the Oklahoma Education Act in 2004, which introduced the lottery to supplement funding of public education from prekindergarten to the university level. With such an innocuous and noble sounding title, people were misled into thinking the lottery would solve Oklahoma’s funding woes through generating money by joining the 42-state bandwagon that has a state lottery. However, using the lottery to fund education is a ridiculous idea because it is funding the one thing that would SARAH eventually ROSENCRANS keep people from playing it by teaching them how to live off money they earn themselves instead of relying on outrageous odds. Such funding is similar to using cigarette taxes to fund a cancer hospital; a hospital is a good thing, but not if it is funded by something that can cause cancer in the first place. Using the lottery to fund public education is similar to taxing the poor over the rich. Rich people typically do not play the lottery since they already have plenty of money. Educated people typically do not play the lottery since they understand extremely poor odds. Lottery players who buy tickets on a regular basis are typically people with low incomes hoping for that elusive bit of luck. The lottery also is a poor source of funds since part of the income from ticket sales must go toward the winnings. The current act sends 35 percent of the proceeds to the education fund and the jackpot payout of 54 percent. Additionally, with Arkansas putting a lottery proposal on its November ballot, Oklahoma will

Former Secretary of State Colin Powell formally endorsed Sen. Barack Obama’s for president on NBC’s Meet the Press Sunday. Powell described Obama, D-Ill., as having the “ability to inspire” and said he meets the “standard of an exceptional president.” Powell also described his admiration for Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., saying it wasn’t easy for him to disappoint McCain by backing Obama. Nevertheless, Powell said he intends to vote Obama in November. Powell’s endorsement is very important for the Obama-Biden ticket. It is hugely significant that Powell is a Republican. He was a member of several Republican presidential administrations starting in the Reagan era and served as secretary of state during President George W. Bush’s first term. For the first few years of Bush’s presidency, Powell was the face of America to the United Nations and other countries. Thanks to his urging and because of his personal reputation, several countries initially backed the United States’ military action in Iraq. Much of the intelligence supplied to Powell’s office was later proved doctored and even downright false, with the Bush administration essentially complicit in the process. Partly as a result of what he calls a “blot” on his record, Powell resigned as secretary of state in 2004. Probably because of his resig-

Contact Us:

Lottery’s problems outweigh its merits

U N I V E R S I T Y

The Oklahoma Daily is a public forum and OU’s independent student voice. Letters should concentrate on issues, not personalities, and should be fewer than 250 words, typed, double spaced and signed by the author(s). Letters will be cut to fit. Students must list their major and classification. OU staff and faculty must list their title. All letters must include a daytime phone number. Authors submitting letters in person must present photo identification. Submit letters Sunday

If this is the end goal of our corrections system, then why not just release all of the prisoners including those guilty of capital offenses? It would save us some money in the long run. Why build hospitals? They are expensive, and the people are just gonna die anyway. No one is arguing that our prison system is not flawed or that there is not a problem of violent sexual abuse, but the ideas presented in the column do not in any way begin to form a solution. Grow up. This kind of garbage from the editorial staff is becoming an unpleasant habit. MARK WRIGHT CIVIL ENGINEERING JUNIOR Letters can be brought in person to The Oklahoma Daily newsroom, 160 Copeland Hall, or submitted to dailyopinion@ou.edu. Letters must include the author’s name, year, major and phone number.

O F

O K L A H O M A

through Thursday, in 160 Copeland Hall. Letters can also be submitted via e-mail to dailyopinion@ou.edu. Guest columns are accepted at editor’s discretion. ’Our View’ is the voice of The Oklahoma Daily. Editorial Board members are The Daily’s editorial staff. The board meets 1 p.m. Sundays in 160 Copeland Hall. Columnists’ and cartoonists’ opinions are not necessarily the opinions of The Daily Editorial Board.


Corey DeMoss, sports editor dailysports@ou.edu phone: 325-7630, fax: 325-6051 For more, go to oudaily.com.

Sports

Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2008

5

Men’s basketball thriving on high hopes • Newcomers bring added depth and expectations ERIC DAMA Daily Staff Writer The players on the OU men’s basketball team have fielded dozens of questions about the hype and excitement surrounding the upcoming season and the team’s lofty expectations. The influx of talented newcomers, coupled with the maturation of returning players, has confidence running high. Meanwhile, a steady stream of preseason polls, awards and media predictions have kept the Sooners in the headlines. And now, with several practices behind them, the buzz is only getting louder. “I’ve been waiting for this since we ended the season last year,” said sophomore forward Blake Griffin, who was recently named the Big 12 Preseason Player of the Year. “I think everybody’s excited about getting out and showing what we’ve worked on individually.” The team held its first official practice last Friday, and while players and coaches have only had a few days to assess what they’re working with, two words echo off the walls of the practice gym more than any others: depth and health. “I think as a team we’ve added a lot of depth, which is something we definitely lacked last year,” Griffin said. “At certain points last year, with different injuries, we were only playing six or seven guys.” The team lost so many players during the second half of the season last year that head coach Jeff Capel was forced to suit up with his players during practice. This year, however, the arrival of six newcomers has given a new look to Capel’s practices. For starters, Capel can now direct drills from the sidelines, not while he’s having to run them himself. More importantly, the full roster has promoted more competition for playing time, something Capel said is a good thing. “[Competition] always helps,” Capel said. “It helps guys individually; it helps our team. Hopefully we can have that. Hopefully our guys earn the right to be in that position, or they put me in a tough position where I have to make a choice.” The Sooners’ returning players are one of the biggest reasons OU has been ranked in the preseason top 10 — and No. 3 by Slam magazine. Consequently, OU’s success will depend on how

SPORTS BRIEFS Football The start time for OU’s Nov. 1 home game against Nebraska has been set for 7 p.m. The game will be shown on either ESPN or ABC, and will include a ceremony recognizing the 1971 Game of the Century between the two teams. The ceremony will include players from both teams who participated in that game.

Volleyball OU sophomore middle blocker Sarah Freudenrich received Big 12 Rookie of the Week honors, becoming the first Sooner this season to win a weekly award and the fifth in school history. Against Colorado and Kansas, she averaged 3.29 kills per set and hit .283 on the week. Freudenrich had 15 total blocks, four of them solo. “She did a very good job offensively during this past week,” said OU head coach Santiago Restrepo. “She gave us some options and did very well blocking. That’s something we need in that position. She’s deserving of the honor.”

Baseball Two former OU baseball players will be taking part in this year’s World Series between the Tampa Bay Rays and Philadelphia Phillies. Jason Bartlett, who lettered at OU in 2000 and 2001, has started all 11 postseason games for the Rays at shortstop. Greg Dobbs, who also lettered in 2001, played 128 games for the Phillies this season, recording a .301 batting average with nine home runs and 40 RBIs. — DAILY STAFF

Amy Frost/The Daily

Sophomore forward Blake Griffin dunks during OU’s first official practice last Friday. Griffin has been voted the Big 12 Preseason Player of the Year, and is expected to be one of the nation’s most productive players. With Griffin returning and the arrival of six new players — most notably freshman Willie Warren — expectations of the Sooners are high. the new players are able to make the transition and gel with the rest of the team. Junior guard Tony Crocker said things look like they’re beginning to come together so far. “They’re catching on good, and they’re going to help us out a lot,” Crocker said. “We didn’t have all the new guys last year. We got about six new people that haven’t played yet, so right now it’s all about learning.” Freshman Willie Warren is the headliner of the recruiting class, and has been one of the main reasons OU is receiving so much national attention. Warren has heard all the hype surrounding the team, but the versatile freshman said he is doing his best not to listen. With the official preseason

only a few days old, Warren is focused on the transition to the college practices. “It’s a lot different from high school; it’s real intense,” Warren said. “That’s the main difference, and I’m trying to adjust right now. You constantly have to bring it. You can’t slack at all because if you look at everyone out here, everyone is going hard and sweating.” That’s because the players have found motivation in their preseason accolades. Crocker admits nobody can really tune out the buzz, so the players have turned it into a positive. “I can’t say we don’t think about it,” Crocker said. “It’s on our mind, but it pushes us to work even harder. We want to be what everyone expects us to be.”

“I can’t say we don’t think about [the hype]. It’s on our mind, but it pushes us to work even harder. We want to be what everyone expects us to be.” — Junior guard Tony Crocker


6

Sports

Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2008

Harris and Holmes step in as leaders

STAFF COLUMN

MLB’s basement-dwellers moving to the penthouse t’s late October. That means the temperature is dropping, the leaves are turning and you’ve been asked no less than 30 times what you’re going to be for Halloween. It also means just one more series remains in Major League Baseball’s postseason. And it’s the big one, the one that will determine the champion of the 2008 season. The World Series kicks off tomorrow in Tampa Bay with the Rays playing host to the Philadelphia Phillies. Now, 90 percent of the people reading this probably re-read that last sentence, and that’s because it didn’t say New York or Boston or Los Angeles. It said Tampa Bay and ERIC Philadelphia. Of all the major sports, baseball relies DAMA most on the success of its traditional powers, like the Yankees and Red Sox. As such, casual fans will probably find it very hard to take a significant interest in this year’s edition of the Fall Classic. But just because the traditional names are absent, that doesn’t mean the storylines are too. In fact, this year’s World Series might have the most background storylines of any in recent memory simply because of these two teams’ histories. Both the Rays and Phillies, historically-speaking, are probably two of the biggest losers in all of sports. Both teams lose games like John Daly loses money when he sits down at the blackjack table. In order to understand what a championship would mean to either of these franchises, and their respective cities, you first have to understand their histories. For any Philadelphia sports franchise to be in the finals is a story in itself, considering no Philly sports team has won a championship since the 76ers of the NBA brought home a banner in 1983. The Phillies’ lone World Series championship came three years prior in 1980. At least they have one, the Rays would say. This is the first postseason appearance for the Rays in their lowly 11-year existence. In fact, this is the first time the Rays have turned in a winning season, and they ended up having the second-best record in the American League. Talk about being darkest just before dawn. Tampa Bay has been blacked out for the past ten years. In the 10 years prior to this season, the young club finished in dead last nine times. They had never won more than 70 games in a season before this year, when they won 97. Not to be outdone, of course, Philadelphia fans would tell you the Phillies have not only lost more games than any other team in Major League Baseball, but more games than any other sports franchise on this continent. They surpassed 10,000 losses last year. And it’s not just the Phillies. Rather than listing off the woes of the other Philly sports franchises, I’ll just tell you that several years ago, when ESPN compiled a list of the 15 most tortured sports cities, Philadelphia was ranked No. 2 behind only Cleveland. They could write a book on how historically awful these two teams are. But their pasts are what make their present situation so intriguing. So what if the Red Sox aren’t playing? We should take this opportunity to watch these two teams on this stage because, quite frankly, it may be a while before they’re back. Tampa Bay could disappear from the top just as quickly as it appeared from the cellar. And the Phillies, well, they always find ways to screw things up. They’ve found more than 10,000 ways so far.

I

— ERIC DAMA IS A JOURNALISM SOPHOMORE.

• Patchwork defense benefits from veteran defensive backs JOEY HELMER Daily Staff Writer A cloud of uncertainty settled on the OU defense after junior middle linebacker Ryan Reynolds went down with a torn ACL against Texas. The coaching staff was concerned about replacing Reynolds’ on-field production as well as his emotional leadership. But against Kansas, senior Nic Harris shifted from strong safety to middle linebacker. Defensive coordinator Brent Venables said Harris provides exactly what the Sooners need, a leader who can step up and play when it matters. “No question, you’ve got kind of a rotation there per se to say ‘Hey, here’s a couple different scenarios that could happen. How would we be?’ Venables said. “I feel much more comfortable in that regard.” The decision to move Harris wasn’t officially made until two days before kickoff last week. “The only reason was because we wanted KU to think there would be some opportunities [in the middle],” Venables said. “But it wasn’t until Thursday that we said this is going to work. We still worked our ones and twos. A lot of it too was dependent upon Quinton Carter and how

Zach Butler/The Daily

Senior safety Lendy Holmes (11) tackles Kansas running back Jocques Crawford (3) during OU’s game Saturday. Holmes was named Big 12 Player of the Week after finishing with two interceptions and eight tackles. his development looked during the course of the week and his consistency.” Carter, a sophomore, stepped into Harris’ usual safety spot and led the team with 10 tackles. “I think he’s proven that we’ve got more depth at safety and we can count on him,” Venables said. “Obviously you’re looking at a year from now as well. That’s huge for us. There’s much less uncertainty now of what he is capable of doing.” As for Harris, he said he just needs to keep focusing on film and working hard in practice to learn the position better. “Just making sure that I get

some more film work in [is important],” Harris said. “It’s not going to be perfect; I understand that. Nobody is, and the more time you spend, the better you are.” Harris adds some versatility to the defense with his ability to shift back and forth between safety and linebacker. “I just do whatever coach asks me to do,” he said. “If he wants me to work at safety, he wants me to work back there. That’s what I’m going to do.” The defensive transition was made easier by the play of senior defensive back Lendy Holmes, who has also stepped up to help fill Reynolds’ leadership role.

Holmes intercepted two passes, deflected two passes and recorded eight tackles against Kansas. “Just making plays, especially when they count [was important],” Holmes said. “I just got my hands on the ball and just came up making plays.” For his performance, Holmes was rewarded Big 12 Defensive Player of the Week. He leads the team with three interceptions and ranks fourth on the team with 42 tackles. “Lendy had a great game and made big plays to get us off the field,” Harris said. “That’s exactly what we need.”

Injuries strike Sooners again • Manuel Johnson the latest to miss time JOEY HELMER Daily Staff Writer On the fifth play from scrimmage Saturday against Kansas, senior wide receiver Manuel Johnson found an opening on the left side of the field and caught a 21-yard pass, but was popped hard on the play by sophomore defensive back Chris Harris. That pop brought Johnson to the sidelines clutching his left arm. He never returned to the field. Later in the game, he could be seen with his arm in a sling on the Sooner bench. While it looked like a serious injury at the time, head coach Bob Stoops said immediately after the game that Johnson would possibly be ready to go in OU’s next game against Kansas State.

“We expect that it’s probably likely that he’ll play this week,” Stoops said in the postgame press conference. However, Johnson’s return is dependent on his progress throughout the week. “[Johnson said] it feels better, but it’s still a little swollen,” Stoops said. “He definitely feels better, so we’ll just see as he goes through the week how comfortable he gets with it.” Injuries are becoming a more serious problem for the Sooners every week. Junior linebacker and emotional leader Ryan Reynolds suffered a torn ACL against Texas. That forced senior safety Nic Harris to switch positions. Sophomore Quinton Carter then got his first start when he stepped into Harris’ spot. Sophomore running back DeMarco Murray has been battling a knee injury, but finally looked like he had his normal burst of speed back against Kansas, rushing for 83 yards and two touchdowns. “Our run game has got to have an atti-

tude,” said offensive coordinator Kevin Wilson. “When we have the attitude and run it and get both sides going, we can be a really good offense.” Redshirt freshman defensive end Frank Alexander, who saw his first playing time of the season against Kansas, has also been battling injury. Alexander was stabbed in late August outside a nightclub in Norman, and it took him two months to recover. Junior defensive tackle DeMarcus Granger recently returned from torn cartilage in his foot, and injury that could have kept him out for the season if he had elected to undergo surgery. On the bright side, the frequency of injuries has allowed some of OU’s young backups the opportunity to show what they can do. “I was just having fun helping out the team,” Carter said. “I got my opportunity, and I tried to make the best of it. I knew if I played well that they would keep me there for more games.”

FLU SHOTS AVAILABLE October 21-22 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Goddard Health Center FREE for Students w/Valid Student ID • Aetna Filed for Employees • $20 for All Others No Appointment Necessary This clinic is for individuals age 9 and above.

Health Services ®

healthservices.ou.edu

620 Elm Avenue

M-F, 8-6

A department of Student Affairs

(405) 325-4611

For accommodations on the basis of disability, please call (405) 325-4611. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution.

Wigs

Costum es

Weapons

Black Lights Hats

Largest Selection, Lowest Prices

Masks

Fog Machines 2270 W. Main • (405) 447-1008


Arts & Entertainment

Adam Kohut, A&E editor dailyent@ou.edu phone: 325-5189, fax: 325-6051 For more, go to oudaily.com.

Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2008

7

A RUN FOR OFFICE, ‘SOUL’ SEARCHING AND MORE • This week, reviews of the latest releases from Rise Against, Murs, Jack’s Mannequin and Oasis

JACK’S MANNEQUIN “The Glass Passenger” Sire Records

Photo provided

MURS “Murs for President” Warner Bros. Records

RISE AGAINST “Appeal to Reason” Interscope Records “Appeal to Reason” is the new album by Chicago-based band Rise Against. I have to admit that writing this review was quite an emotional experience for me, because the band’s 2001 release, “The Unraveling,” changed my life when I was 14-years-old, and to this day gives me goosebumps when I listen to it. The subsequent albums since “The Unraveling” have been mediocre at best, and Rise Against’s once explosively raw and emotional punk sound became increasingly clouded with overly-produced,

Los Angeles-based rapper Murs, whose name is an acronym for Making Underground Raw S***, is an underground hip hop legend. And his major label debut, “Murs for President,” is a pretty convincing campaign for hip-hop presidency. It’s very different from his early stuff, to be fair. It’s more radio-friendly, the samples are more intricately produced and there are even some R&B hooks. But the lyrics are still intelligent, his storytelling style and West Coast flow are still large parts of the music, and it seems to me that this extremely gifted rapper used his new major label money wisely. Check out the songs “Everything,” which uses an obscure sample of James Blunt and “The Science,” which offers a political history of the origin of hip-hop, to get a feel for the album. — TYLER BRANSON/THE DAILY

— TYLER BRANSON/THE DAILY

‘Music of Japan’ performance tonight in Catlett Music Center J.B. RUBLE Daily Staff Writer After half a decade, the music of Japan will return to OU Michael “Chikuzen” Gould, Grand Master of the shakuhachi, or Zen bamboo flute, is reuniting with peers Chieko and Kuniyasu Iwazaki at 8 p.m. tonight in Sharp Concert Hall in Catlett Music Center. Gould and Chieko Iwazaki last performed at OU five years ago. The performance, entitled “Music of Japan,” is part of the Masala World Music Concert Series. Gould earned the title of Grand Master, or “Dai Shihan,” in 1995. He said he never played music prior to becoming involved with the entrancing tones of the shakuhachi. “When I was living in Japan, I kind of bumped into it,” he said. “The sound and effect it had on me just felt natural. Different types of music move people in different ways, and this just grabbed me. People get hooked on the sound and become addicted.” The music is not the only aspect of the culture that attracted Gould, he said. The related aspects of Zen Buddhism resonated with him as well, and he has taught classes on the subject at the college level. “The music originated in monasteries and the monks played solo pieces that related to nature and their surroundings for meditative purposes,” he said. Eugene Enrico, Ruth Verne Davis Reaugh professor of musicology, worked directly with Gould and his mentor, Taniguchi Yoshinobu, on a documentary about the shakuhachi. “People call playing the shakuhachi ‘blowing zen’,” Enrico said. “It’s very beautiful and ethereal. It connects to new age sensibilities even though it is ages old. It’s timeless.” The shakuhachi, which literally translates into its length of one-foot-eight-inches, is also played by Gould’s peer Kuniyasu Iwazaki. Chieko Iwazaki plays the koto, a stringed instrument that accompanies the bamboo flute on numerous songs. Paula Conlon, director of the concert series and an associate professor of ethnomusicology, said the complexity of the group’s performances surprises many spectators. “It’s striking to people how many different sounds such a simple instrument can produce,” she said. “When you add what Chieko does with the koto, the sound is so different. With only two instruments, there is so much texture.” The fourth song on the program, entitled “Nesting of Cranes” shows this depth, Conlon said. In the song, the musicians depict the life-cycle of a pair of birds, and in the process recreate the sound of their wings flapping in flight.

Photo provided

Michael Gould, Grand Master of the shakuhachi, will perform with Chieko Iwazaki and Kuniyasu Iwazaki tonight in Sharp Concert Hall in Catlett Music Center. Gould said simplicity of construction does not necessarily indicate the shakuhachi’s ease of use. “There’s no mouthpiece like on a recorder. There are also no chambers and it is open ended. It’s all up to the user to make the sound, and you have to work at it,” he said. The shakuhachi, when played properly, has greater control over intonation and pitch, Enrico said. On a recorder, this can only be altered by blowing harder or softer. With music on the program ranging from Buddhist meditation hymns to modern Japanese compositions, the concert’s program provides a varied sampling of over 400 years of Japan’s native music. “It’s very relaxing and quiet,” Enrico said. “The instrument was created for the purpose of meditation. I think people will enjoy it very much.”

‘MUSIC OF JAPAN’ PERFORMANCE When: 8 p.m. tonight Where: Sharp Concert Hall in Catlett Music Center How much: $8 adults; $5 students, staff, faculty and seniors

Photo provided

sweeping melodies, but just kind of shallow. “The Glass Passenger” doesn’t mess with the formula much. If you’ve stuck with your emo roots through the indie-rock revolution, Jack’s Mannequin probably still has something to offer you. If not, this is an album that’s arrived about five years too late. — D USTY S OMERS/THE D AILY

OASIS

Photo provided

overly-political rock songs complemented with trite lyrics and radiofriendly ballads. “Appeal to Reason,” gives me hope, however, but the catalogue of songs still reeks of banal musical themes and enough political diatribe to raise the eyebrows of “The Huffington Post.” Musically, the album is pretty tight. The songs are explosive and the melodies remind me of the early days. But I can’t help but feel like something is missing. It’s definitely a decent rock album, and to the uninitiated, a heavy alternative to the regular onslaught of commercialized crap. To the veteran fans, the best way to appreciate this album is to accept the fact that Rise Against will never be what it once was.

Andrew McMahon, frontman of the emo outfit Something Corporate, is back with the sophomore effort of his side project, Jack’s Mannequin. It’s been a while since we’ve heard from McMahon, who was diagnosed with leukemia in 2005. Now fully recovered, “The Glass Passenger” is the first album he has released with either band since the ordeal. Jack’s Mannequin is a direct descendant of the piano rocklite that Something Corporate started peddling around the turn of the century – full of

“Dig Out Your Soul” Warner Bros. Records Oasis is back. Yes, that Oasis. I’d forgive you if you’d relegated the British rockers to early ‘90s relic status. After a stint of legendary albums in that decade, Oasis hit the notso-kind new millennium, where they were plagued with lineup changes and mediocre albums. But with “Dig Out Your Soul,” Oasis has found a resurgence to some extent. They’ve piled on psychedelic guitar riffs and Noel Gallagher sings like he means it, even if his songwrit-

Photo provided

ing suggests otherwise. Mostly, “Dig Out Your Soul” is a fun album to listen to – there are some pre-packaged moments, but it rarely feels like Oasis is trying to relive the glory days. — D USTY S OMERS/THE D AILY


8

Classifieds

Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2008

PLACE AN AD Phone 405.325.2521

E-Mail classifieds@ou.edu

Fax 405.325.7517

Announcements

HELP WANTED

ENTERTAINMENT FEMALE SINGER NEEDED Local Recording/Publishing/Production Company seeking fresh, sound to develop into possible solo/collaborative projects. Song writing and live performance skills important. Please call 405945-1959 or e-mail us studio115norman@yahoo. com.

Office Copeland Hall 149A

Mail The Oklahoma Daily 860 Van Vleet Oval, 149A Norman OK 73019-2052

DEADLINES Line Ad. . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 a.m. Place your classified line ad by 9 a.m., Monday-Friday to run in the next issue.

Display Ad. . . . .3 days prior Classified Display or Classified Card Ad are due 3 days prior to publication date.

PAYMENT s r

r

For Sale PETS Adorable French bull dogs, Yorkshire terriers, and English bulldogs, male and females available for sale, full breed, AKC reg. Health guarantee, 8 wks old, $700.00. Contact Jessica for more info at jessy_jefferson@hotmail.com.

C Transportation

Credit Accounts Businesses may be eligible for credit in a limited, local billing area. Please inquire with Business Office at 405.325.2521.

RATES Line Ads Rates are determined by the price per line, per day. There is a two line minimum charge; approximately 40 characters per line, including spaces and punctuation. 1 day ............. $4.25/line 2 days ........... $2.50/line 3-4 days........ $2.00/line 5-9 days........ $1.50/line 10-14 days.... $1.15/line 15-19 days.... $1.00/line 20-29 days.... $ .90/line 30+ days ..... $ .85/line

Classified Display Ads Rates are $16.00 per column inch, per day with a minimum of 2 column inches.

Classified Card Ads Classified Card Ads are $170 per column inch with a minimum of 2 column inchs and run 20 consecutive issues. Ad copy may change every five issues.

J Housing Rentals $400, bills paid, efficiency LOFT apartments, downtown over Mister Robert Furniture, 109 E Main, fire sprinkler, no pets, smoke-free. Inquire store office.

APTS. UNFURNISHED Brookhollow & The Cedars, 1-2-3 bed apt homes, approx 1 mi from OU. Great prices & service. Your home away from home! 405-329-6652

HOUSES UNFURNISHED Near OU, 3 bed, 1.5 bth, ch/a, garage, no pets, 504 Inwood Dr, $750/mo., deposit required. Call 996-6592 or 329-1933

ROOMMATES WANTED 1 bdrm of 3 bdrm house for rent, female only to join other 2 female students. No pets/smokers, very close to OU, all bills paid, but elec has 1/3 cap., $325/mo. Call 909-238-2941.

J

Housing Sales

HOUSES Westside Norman home, 1525 sq ft., 3 bdrms, 2 full baths, carpeted bdrms, tile kitchen, Laminate wood floors in hall, and living/dining. $138,000. Go to: www.forsalebyowner.com, lising #21888775 or Call Vicki 405-414-2154.

Auto Insurance Quotations Anytime

PRE-LEASE FOR JANUARY $99 Deposit/ NO app fee! Pets welcome/ Large floor plans! 1&2 bedrooms Available! Models open 8a-8p Everyday! Elite Properties 360-6624 or www.elite2900.com

Foreign Students Welcomed Jim Holmes Insurance, 321-4664

Employment

W N G D K W N N O A X H D Q L E B R S L Q P A

E B R O L Q P U Z M Q Z P K I P W N G D K W N

Z M Q R P K I O W N G D K W N X O A X H D Q L

X O J O B S Q N E B R S L Q P A Z M Q Z P K I

P W N M D K W C X O A X H D J O B S R S L Q P

A Z M M Z P K E P W N G D K W N X O A X H D Q

L E B A U T O M O B I L E S K I P W N G D K W

N X O T X H D E L E B O S L Q P A Z M Q Z P K

I P W E G D K N N X O S X H D Q L E B R S L Q

P A Z S Q Z P T I P W T G D K W N X O A X H D

Find them in the classifieds

Q L E B R S L S P A Z & Q Z P K I P W N G D K

W N X O A X H D Q L E F R S L Q P A Z M Q Z P

K I P W N G D K W N X O A X H D Q L E B R S L

Q P A Z M Q Z P K I P U N G D K W A X O A X H

D Q L E B R S L Q R E N T A L S K P P W N G D

K W N X O A X H D Q L D B R S L Q A A Z M Q Z

P K I P W N G D K W N X O A X H D R L E B R S

L Q P A Z M Q Z P K I P W N G D K T N X O A X

H D Q L E B R S L Q P A Z M Q Z P M I P W N G

D K W N X O A X H D Q L E B R S P E T S Z M Q

Z P K I P W N G D K W N X O A X H N Q L E B R

S B I C Y C L E S P K I P W N G D T W N X O A

X H D Q L E B R S L Q P A Z M Q Z S K I P W N

G D K W N X O A X H D Q L E B R S K Q P A Z M

1/2 Mo Free-Walk To OU

Attention Student Work $15 Base/Appt Flex sched, scholarships possible, customer sales/service, no exp nec, all ages 17+, conditions apply. Norman/OKC/Moore Call Now, 405-307-0979 America’s FAST LANE is now hiring lube techs, car wash attendants, service advisors, cashiers, and management trainees. Full and part-time positions are available with no experience necessary. Fast Lanes offers competitive pay, flexible schedules, and opportunity for advancement. Apply in person at 1235 West Main Street, Norman OK or call 321-5260.

Save On Utilities w/Energy Efficient Windows Prefer quiet OU students, no pets, 2 bdrms, carpet, blinds, CH/A, appliances plus big w/d, $440/ mo. 203-3493 or 321-4404.

HOUSES UNFURNISHED

9

Near OU 1111 Louise Ln, 3/2/2, $750/mo; 826 Jona Kay, 3/2/2/2 living, $950/mo; 1301 Keystone 3/1/1, $625/mo; 910 Quanah Parker 2/1/1 $600/mo.360-2873 or 306-1970.

Earn...$$$$, Looking for a Web Development/Script Program-er to build an Interactive Website. Experience a must! Only serious inquiries apply. Email interest and resumes to donovandeanw@yahoo.com.

3

4

3 8 1 1 9 7 3 2 5 4 7 6 9 2 9 6 5 1 9 7 2 5 4 8 1

3 bd, 2 ba, 2 cr, $950+dep, ADT security, near OU, remodeled, pets ok, lg yard. 405-819-7218.

SOONERSNEEDJOBS.COM Paid survey takers needed in Norman 100% FREE to join. Click on Surveys.

Winter Specials

Bartending! Up to $250/day. No exp nec. Training provided. 1-800-965-6520, x133.

$5,000-$45,000

Previous Solution 8 5 6 7 2 4 9 3 1

1 7 3 6 9 5 8 4 2

9 4 2 8 1 3 6 5 7

3 2 7 5 8 9 4 1 6

4 6 1 2 3 7 5 8 9

5 8 9 1 4 6 2 7 3

2 3 5 4 6 1 7 9 8

7 1 8 9 5 2 3 6 4

6 9 4 3 7 8 1 2 5

Difficulty Schedule: Monday - Very Easy Tuesday - Easy Wednesday - Easy Thursday - Medium Friday - Hard

Instructions: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. That means that no number is repeated in any row, column or box.

PAID. EGG DONORS for up to 9 donations, + Exps, non-smokers, Ages 19-29, SAT>1100/ACT>24/GPA>3.00 Contact: info@eggdonorcenter.com Norman, OK Commercial Janitorial service, immediate openings for someone with cleaning experience, early riser and hard worker, M-F 2 hours a day between 6am-10am. Call or text 642-1326.

Universal Crossword

Bilingual/Bicultural Spanish/English Translators Wanted (PT) Seeking research assistant to conduct interviews w/ Hispanic youth in central OK FA08-SP09, $10/hour + expenses, days and hours will vary; applicants must be flexible, and must provide 2 professional references. Call 605-677-9303 for more info!

Edited by Timothy E. Parker October 21, 2008

ACROSS 1 Spread outward, as black-eyed Susans 6 Track-andfield activity 10 Egg holders (Abbr.) 14 Resin used to make varnish 15 “Look here, old chap!” 16 One and only 17 Lump in one’s throat 19 Pinnacle 20 Prepare for a play 21 Nursery furnishing 23 Sophs., two years later 24 One of a storied threesome 25 Badger 28 Cabbage side 29 All gone, as food 30 Arouse, as interest 33 Galway’s land 34 Sun Devils of the Pac-10 35 Jack-in-thepulpit, e.g. 36 Earth’s crust bound by faults 38 Tree trunk protuberance 39 Noted architect I.M. 40 Cartoon skunk Le Pew 41 Riveted seat

MetroShoe Warehouse Now Hiring, must work some weekday mornings. Apply in person at 1732 24th Ave, just north of Super Target. First Bank & Trust Co. has an immediate opening for Part Time Tellers. Previous banking experience is preferred or background in retail. Strong customer service skills required. Apply in person at First Bank & Trust Co., 2330 36th Ave NW Norman or send resume’ to Human Resources, P.O. Box 580, Duncan, OK 73534. EOE, M/F/D/V

1 col (1.833 in) x 2.25 inches Crossword .....$515/month #1 College Ski & Board Week

BRECKENRIDGE Ski 20 Mountains & 5 Resorts for the Price of 1

Breck, Vail, Beaver Creek, Arapahoe Basin & Keystone

O A X H D Q L N B R S L Q P A Z M Q Z P K I P

DUPLEXES UNFURNISHED

2 col (3.792 in) x 2 inches Sudoku ...........$760/month Boggle............$760/month Jumble ...........$760/month Horoscope .....$760/month

The Oklahoma Daily is responsible for one day’s incorrect advertising. If your ad appears incorrectly, or if you wish to cancel your ad, call 405.325.2521 before the deadline for cancellation in the next issue. Refunds will not be issued for early cancellation. Errors not the fault of the advertiser will be adjusted. The Oklahoma Daily will not knowingly accept advertisements that discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, religious preference, national origin or sexual orientation. Violations of this policy should be reported to The Oklahoma Daily Business Office. Help Wanted ads in The Oklahoma Daily are not classified as to gender. Advertisers understand that they may not discriminate in employment on the basis of race, color, religion or gender unless such qualifying factors are essential to a given position. All ads are subject to acceptance by The Oklahoma Daily. Ad acceptance may be re-evaluated at any time.

S M B C D G J A T Q Z P K I P W N G D K W N X

classifieds@ou.edu

Classified Display Ads located directly above the following games/puzzles. Limited spaces available – only one space per game.

POLICY

E B R S L Q P A Z M N E U H R Y A L W O O T P

Sell your stuff.

Game Sponsorships

(located just below the puzzle)

W L Q Z P K I P W N G D K W N X O A X H D Q L

VERY NICE!!!, 800 sf, 1 bdrm, living room, kitchen, bth, wood floors, 1 block OU, 1018 S College, $275/mo. Call 306-1970 or 360-2873.

AUTO INSURANCE

HELP WANTED

Payment is required at the time the ad is placed. Visa, MasterCard, Discover and American Express; cash, money orders or local checks accepted.

Looking to make a difference? Positions available PT/FT, paid training, needed male/female, starting at $7.50 and up. Working with individuals with developmental disabilities. Must be 18+. Call Panhandle Opportunities at 942-4822.

APTS. FURNISHED

TM

Payment

Employment

J Housing Rentals

R.T. Conwell, advertising manager classifieds@ou.edu phone: 325-2521, fax: 325-7517 For more, go to oudaily.com.

from only

179

$

plus tax

1-800-SKI-WILD 1-800-754-9453

covers? 42 Captivate 44 Unspecified culprits 46 Gather in, as leaves 47 Schwarzenegger’s birthplace, Thal bei ____ 48 A-E connection 51 Singer Lovett 52 So long, in Paris 54 Footnote abbr. 56 “Maybellene” singer 58 Baby’s word 59 Pain in the neck 60 Susan’s longtime role 61 Hunted animals 62 Arranges, as the dinner table 63 They fill holes DOWN 1 Brings up, as young 2 “Red” tree 3 Informal affirmatives 4 Plus-size model and TV host 5 Knock out of commission 6 Lumberyard fixture 7 According to 8 Baseball great Ripken Jr. 9 Where “E” is a line 10 Actress

Bloom 11 Head honcho 12 Mobile-toCleveland dir. 13 Item on a driver’s license 18 Kind of rug or code 22 RPM, for one 26 Sarandon of Hollywood 27 San Antonio hoopsters 28 Bottom-line figure 29 Sue Grafton’s “___ for Evidence” 30 Word with “doll” or “bag” 31 “The Faerie Queene” character 32 Plaster ingredient 33 Prior to, in poetry 36 Browbeats

37 Choose 38 F major or E minor 40 Beatle name 41 Shameless hussy 43 Period of greatest success 44 Weigh station visitors 45 “___! The Herald Angels Sing” 47 Obese’s opposite 48 Kind of acid 49 Greek temptress 50 Words with “a bone” or “dust” 53 “Alice” waitress 54 Young troublemaker 55 Chocolate unit 57 Depart in haste

PREVIOUS PUZZLE ANSWER

© 2008 Universal Press Syndicate www.upuzzles.com

www.ubski.com

“FRUIT COCKTAIL” by Linda Hoffman

Previous Answers


News

Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2008

School funding petition delivered RON JENKINS Associated Press OKLAHOMA CITY — A petition drive to force extra spending on public schools collected more than 238,000 signatures and is now on file with the secretary of state. Petitions were filed Monday bearing almost 100,000 more signatures than the 138,970 needed to place the Helping Oklahoma Public Education issue, known as HOPE, on a statewide ballot in 2010. “State Question 744 is officially in business,” declared Lisa Connery of Norman, a parent who supports the proposition. She said achieving excellence in education requires proper funding. “Our children’s future depends on us acting now,” added Connery, a family physician and mother of four. The proposed state question is a constitu-

tional amendment requiring the Legislature to fund schools at the per-pupil average of neighboring states. Supporters of the drive include education officials and parents. If approved by voters, it is estimated the proposal would increase funding for schools by $850 million. Critics of the plan say it is bad policy to place a constitutional restriction on how lawmakers appropriate available revenue. Brian Downs of Oklahomans for Responsible Government said the plan could lead to cuts in funding for other vital services, such as highway improvements. “This is not a thought-out process to improve education in our state,” he said. According to figures released by HOPE, Missouri, Texas, Kansas, Arkansas, Colorado and New Mexico spend an average of $8,300 per student on schools, while Oklahoma provides $6,900, putting the state 48th in the nation.

Petition supporters collected an average of 2,222 signatures per day after announcing the initiative on July 31. Jeff Mills, executive director of the Oklahoma School Boards Association, said supporters did not plan to file the petitions until early November, but moved up its timetable “due to the overwhelming response from the public.” “It’s time to value education in Oklahoma,” Mills said. Teri Gray, an elementary teacher in the Choctaw-Nicoma Park School District, was among those speaking out in favor of the proposition Monday. She said extra funding is needed to expand early childhood education programs that reduce the state’s high school dropout rate. Roy Bishop, president of the Oklahoma Education Association, said funding for schools would come from growth in the state’s General Revenue Fund, which he said grew by 5.2 percent over the last 25 years.

To the victor belongs the job of actually governing TERENCE HUNT Associated Press WASHINGTON — No time to celebrate. On Nov. 5, either Barack Obama or John McCain will abruptly pivot from campaigning and begin a frenzied dash to Inauguration Day. The election winner will have 77 days to put together a government, set critical priorities and rework a federal budget flooded with red ink — under the pressure of two wars and the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression. This will be the first wartime presidential transition in 40 years and the first in the age of terrorism anxieties after Sept. 11, 2001. Government planners worry about a window of vulnerability in the first days and months of a new presidency when thousands of administration jobs have not been filled yet and a newly elected Congress is just settling in. “Don’t worry about jinxing the campaign or being too presumptuous,” urged White House transition expert Clay Johnson, who said post-election planning should have been under way for months. “It is irresponsible for anybody who could be president not to prepare to govern effectively from day one.” The country — and the world — will be watching. Which campaign promises will actually be backed up with hard cash? Just weeks after taking office, the new president has to present a new budget reflecting hard decisions. More broadly, the transition will set the tone for his administration, lay the foundation for a relationship with Congress and offer the country a preview of the new president’s governing style. “How you start out is crucial,” said Martha Joynt Kumar, a Towson University political scientist who has written extensively about the presidency. “The public is listening. The Washington community is willing (to cooperate). Most presidents get time at the beginning to talk about what they want to talk about. You also establish a reputation and that can work for good or for ill.” Weary of eight years of the unpopular

administration of President Bush and fretting over the economy, the nation is eager for new ideas and fresh faces. A carefully prepared transition can buy goodwill for Obama or McCain in the administration’s opening days. Or, like Bill Clinton, a new president can get tripped up with poorly vetted nominations that have to be rescinded and campaign promises that pinch, like a 25 percent cut in White House staff. Obama has promised no lobbyist will be on his White House staff. The numbers can be daunting for any new administration. The president-elect should brace himself for 40,000 job seekers in the first few weeks — and 75,000 in the first few months. By one estimate, there are 7,840 presidential appointee jobs to be filled, including 1,177 requiring Senate confirmation. The Obama and McCain camps are loath to talk about transition efforts, but in fact their operations are under way. Obama’s transition team recently held a large organizational meeting as part of an accelerated effort to plan for a possible new administration. Led by John Podesta, President Clinton’s White House chief of staff, the team includes a dozen separate groups divided into different areas of responsibility, headed by longtime Obama associate Cassandra Butts. McCain’s transition effort is headed by John Lehman, a Navy secretary under President Reagan and a member of the commission that investigated the Sept. 11 attacks. President Bush’s transition was condensed by post-election uncertainty over who won, but he was ahead of the game because he had appointed Johnson as transition chief in the spring of 1999, more than a year before the election. Johnson, who is helping White House planning for Bush’s successor, gave Congress a detailed list of recommendations for the next administration on how to handle the turnover. Among his recommendations and observations, in addition to his estimates on the numbers of jobs and job-seekers:

New noninvasive device approved for depression sufferers WASHINGTON — The government has approved the first noninvasive brain stimulator to treat depression — a device that beams magnetic pulses through the skull. If it sounds like science-fiction, well, those woodpecker-like pulses trigger small electrical charges that spark brain cells to fire. Yet it doesn’t cause the risks of surgically implanted electrodes or the treatment of last resort, shock therapy. Called transcranial magnetic stimulation or TMS, this gentler approach isn’t for everyone. The Food and Drug Administration approved Neuronetics Inc.’s NeuroStar therapy specifically for patients who had no relief from their first antidepressant, offering them a different option than trying pill after pill. “We’re opening up a whole new area of medicine,” says Dr. Mark George of the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, who helped pioneer use of TMS in depression. “There’s a whole field now that’s moving forward of noninvasive electrical stimulation of the brain.” While there’s a big need for innovative approaches — at least one in five depression patients is treatment-resistant — the question is just how much benefit TMS offers. The FDA cleared the prescription-only NeuroStar based on data that found patients did modestly better when treated with TMS than when they unknowingly received a sham treatment that mimicked the magnet. It was a study fraught with statistical questions that concerned the agency’s own scientific advisers. For a clearer answer, the National Institutes of Health has an independent study under way now that tracks 260 patients and may have initial results as early as next year.

— AP

LONGEST Happy Hour in Norman!

4 P.M. - 12 A.M.

TONIGHT

True Sooners Don’t Haze. Report Hazing.

325-5000 All calls are anonymous.

The University of Oklahoma is an Equal Opportunity Institution.

Halloween Special

2 weeks unlimited tanning: low pressure $15 speed pressure $25 premium pressure $35

MYSTIC TAN newest technology is here!

located next to dorms on campus • 405-364-7344

$1.00 DRAFTS •Bud •Bud Light •Coors Light •AmberBock

$1.50 Bud Light Bottles

9

Taliban gunmen kill Christian aid worker AMIR SHAH Associated Press KABUL, Afghanistan — Taliban assailants on a motorbike gunned down a Christian aid worker in Kabul on Monday and the militants said she was killed for spreading her religion — a rare targeted killing of a Westerner in the nation’s capital. Gayle Williams, a 34-year-old dual British-South African national who helped handicapped Afghans, was shot to death as she was walking to work about 8 a.m., said Interior Ministry spokesman Zemeri Bashary. A spokesman for the militants said the Taliban ordered her killed because she was accused of proselytizing. “This woman came to Afghanistan to teach Christianity to the people of Afghanistan,” Zabiullah Mujahid told The Associated Press. “Our (leaders) issued a decree to kill this woman.” Britain’s secretary of state for international development called the killing a “callous and cowardly act” and said Williams was in Afghanistan to help Gayle ease poverty. Williams “To present her killing as a religious act is as despicable as it is absurd — it was cold blooded murder,” Douglas Alexander said in a statement. A spokeswoman for the aid group, SERVE — Serving Emergency Relief and Vocational Enterprises — said it is a Christian organization but denied it was involved in proselytizing. “It’s not the case that they preach, not at all,” said the spokeswoman, Rina van der Ende. “They are here to do NGO (aid) work.” Afghanistan is a conservative Islamic nation. Proselytizing is prohibited by law, and other Christian missionaries or charities have faced severe hostility. Last year, 23 South Korean aid workers from a church group were taken hostage in southern Afghanistan. Two were killed and the rest were eventually released. According to its Web site, SERVE is a Christian charity registered in Britain and has been working with Afghan refugees since 1980 in Pakistan. “[Our] purpose is to express God’s love and bring hope by serving the people of Afghanistan, especially the needy, as we seek to address personal, social and environmental needs,” the site says. A member of Afghanistan’s highest religious council said Monday that rumors have spread over the last two years that Westerners have been preaching Christianity to Afghans. “We have heard rumors that houses have been rented to preach Christianity in Kabul and some provinces, but we have no evidence that this is taking place,” said council member Jebra Ali. The council previously has made a formal complaint to President Hamid Karzai that Westerners are trying to spread Christianity in Afghanistan. Monday’s attack adds to a growing sense of insecurity in Kabul. The city is now blanketed with police checkpoints, and embassies, military bases and the U.N. are erecting cement barriers to guard against suicide bombings. Kidnappings targeting wealthy Afghans have long been a problem in Kabul, but attacks against Westerners have grown recently. In midAugust, Taliban militants killed three women working for the U.S. aid group International Rescue Committee while they were driving in Logar, a province south of Kabul. Elsewhere in Afghanistan, a suicide bomber killed two German soldiers and five children in Kunduz province to the north, said Mohammad Omar, the provincial governor. NATO confirmed some of its soldiers were killed or wounded in the attack.

HOROSCOPE By Bernice Bede Osol

Copyright 2008, Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2008 LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Even if you’d rather someone else handle a perplexing situation, you’re the one who could best manage it. It’s OK to delegate a few side projects, but not the main parts.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) -Someone you would least expect but who is in the position to help will respond more readily and favorably than you ever imagined. Don’t be afraid to express your needs.

SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Put aside your practicalities, and talk from the heart. When the real inner you speaks, people will sit up and take notice of what you have to say and willingly respond to your needs.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- For unknown reasons, your good deeds will be more readily noticed and appreciated by those who usually don’t pay any attention. Others can’t help but take note of your kindness.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- You are usually at your best when bargaining, bartering, buying or selling. You’re a natural-born salesperson, and you could do wonders with this special talent.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- You may be in for a startling discovery about yourself when a hidden strength surfaces. Something important will bring it out in the open.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Even though you might harbor strong desires to be alone, this isn’t likely to be the case at this time. Others will seek you out for the knowledge you possess and the help you can give. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Don’t be afraid to shoot for the moon, because you’re in an especially good achievement cycle where some truly significant objectives can be accomplished. Go for broke. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- A friend in the know could supply some valuable information that will help you go after something quite lofty, something you didn’t think you could handle.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) -Bold measures might be required in order to get something important working effectively. You won’t hesitate to take the necessary action when you know it will benefit everyone involved. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- You could be luckier than usual in your involvements with others. There are changes in the air that will transform an unproductive relationship into one of opportunity. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -There shouldn’t be any problem with your ability to sell yourself or anything you represent, mostly because you will make a better-than-usual impression on those with whom you have dealings.


10

Details

Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2008

POLICE REPORTS Names are compiled from the Norman Police Department or the OU Department of Public Safety. The report serves as a public record of arrests or citations, not convictions. The people here are presumed innocent unless proven guilty.

DISTURBING THE PEACE Anthony Dewann Adkins-Duncan, 23, 100 block West Main Street, Sunday Dominique Danielle Jackson, 22, 300 block 36th Avenue Southwest, Saturday

Michael Ingram, 26, 400 block Buchanan Avenue, Saturday Michael Lee McIntire, 20, 1500 block East Lindsey Street, Sunday, also possession of alcohol Sabra Ann Smith, 47, 400 block Buchanan Avenue, Saturday David Wayne Streets, 40, 200 block Vicksburg Avenue, Sunday, also possession of controlled dangerous substances Zachary Michael Walchuk, 20, Classen Boulevard, Sunday Braden Coy Tapley, 21, Asp Avenue, Thursday

DOMESTIC ABUSE Amy Nicole Aquino, 26, 1000 block West Boyd Street, Sunday

Corianthumr Gordon Hutchins, 18, 200 block Stanton Drive, Sunday

PUBLIC INTOXICATION

POSSESSION OF ALCOHOL

Christopher Lane Branum, 23, 700 block Asp Avenue, Saturday Tyler Frank Bunting, 23, Classen Boulevard, Sunday Mark Daniel Crockett, 35, 2800 block Classen Boulevard, Sunday Frank Grady Herlacher, 21, 200 block West Boyd Street, Sunday

Jodi Janice Keifer, 20, 200 block West Lindsey Street, Saturday Tyler Lee Roberts, 19, Jenkins Avenue, Saturday

The Daily draws all entries for Campus Notes from OUDaily.com’s comprehensive, campus-wide calendar. To get your event noticed, visit OUDaily.com and fill out our userfriendly form under the calendar link.

Students are invited to create a breast cancer awareness T-shirt at 11 a.m. in the Oklahoma Memorial Union food court.

the

Mark Thomas Reaves, 32, 700 block Asp Avenue, Saturday

Scott O. Smith, 20, 1300 block Jenkins Avenue, Saturday

AGGRAVATED DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCE

DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCE Bryce Buckley Warner, 24, Constitution Street, Thursday Majluf Nabil Chavez, 21, Boyd Street, Thursday Jonathan Karl Kraft, 21, 400 block West Imhoff, Sunday Jeffrey Shawn Casey, 28, Boyd Street, Saturday

PETTY LARCENY Ryan Pierce, 30, 600 block 12th Avenue Northeast, Saturday

UNION PROGRAMMING BOARD

INDIA SOCIETY •As part of India Week, a booth will be set up at 11 a.m. in the union. •Dandiya Night will be at 7 p.m. in Dale Hall.

The school presents highlights from the opera “Lakme” at noon in the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art.

WOMEN’S OUTREACH CENTER

OUTRAGING PUBLIC DECENCY

Coty Steven Woods, 20, Boyd Street, Sunday, also failure to maintain security/insurance and driving with license canceled/suspended/revoked

SCHOOL OF MUSIC

TODAY

Michael Jason Murray, 33, 3200 block West Main Street, Sunday, also petty larceny Davin Cole Watson, 24, 700 block Asp Avenue, Sunday

ATTEMPTING TO PURCHASE 3.2 BEER DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCELIQUOR OR DRUGS/ACTUAL PHYSICAL CONTROL OF THE VEHICLE

CAMPUS NOTES

COUNTY WARRANT

CHRISTIANS ON CAMPUS There will be a Bible study at noon in the Associates Room of the union.

A seminar on the pre-calculus exam will be at 3:30 p.m. in the Carnegie Building, room 200. PRE-NURSING CLUB There will be a meeting at 6:30 p.m. in the Physical Science Center, room 122. SCHOOL OF MUSIC Masala World Music Series presents “Music of Japan” featuring artists Shakuhachi Koto and Shamisen at 8 p.m. in the Sharp Concert Hall.

SOONER the better

FROM

®

for campus living.

TO APPLE PIE

WE HAVE IT ALL. visit traditions.ou.edu today! live the legend. live on campus. OU Traditions Square is a property of OU Housing and Food Services in the Divisin of Student Affairs. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution.


The Oklahoma Daily