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T u E s DaY, s E p T E m B E R 2 5 , 2 012

W W W.O U DA I LY.C O M

L&A: Neaustadt Festival to celebrate Indian culture (Page 8)

2 011 S I LV E R C R O W N W I N N E R

AimiNG ABoVE PAR

OUDaily.com: Mindy Kaling’s new show premieres tonight on FOX

Sports: Freshman has high hopes (Page 5)

Will you be eligible to vote?

ACtiViStS

Family to work with students Selmon family to share stories of work in Liberia BROOKE HANKINSON Campus Reporter

ty JOhnsOn/the daily

oU Students register to vote at the oU Votes 2012 kick-off on monday in Cate Center’s social lounge. the event was the beginning of a contest between oklahoma colleges to see which university could register the most students in a week. the event included speeches and a Q&A session by Sen. John Sparks and Rep. Scott martin.

State law shakes up ID requirements Voters must present ID at polls, but outof-state driver licenses not valid LINDSEY RUTA

Campus Reporter

Out-of-state students preparing to vote in the November elections will likely need to dig up their voter registration card or U.S. passport if they plan to cast their ballot in Oklahoma. Because of the state’s voter ID law, Oklahoma voters are required to show some form of identification before receiving a ballot. The catch, however, is driver licenses from out of state do not qualify, said Jim Williams, Cleveland County Election Board

secretary. “That is another unique feature of the Oklahoma law; it does have to be an Oklahoma driver license,” Williams said. “So if you have an out-of-state driver license, you’ll need some other form of ID for voting.” Other acceptable IDs include a state-issued ID, a U.S. passport, a military ID — all of which are photo IDs — but there is one exception: voter registration cards, he said. Voter registration cards are issued to everyone after they

AT A GLANCE Voter Registration Deadline: Oct. 12 To register: visit www.ok.gov/ elections and fill out the voter registration application. then mail the application to the Cleveland County elections

register to vote. The cards do not have a photograph or an expiration date, but people who present their card will be allowed to vote, according to the Oklahoma State Election Board website. The deadline to register to vote in the upcoming elections is Oct. 12.

board at: 641 e. robinson, suite 200, norman, Ok 73071. Info: 405-366-0210 Source: Cleveland County Election Board

Although the law states that valid IDs must have the person’s name, photograph and an expiration date, the registration cards only have the voter’s name. The reason the state allows this exception? To see LAW Page 2

FACUlty

OU faculty member fights rare disease Ellis continues teaching in spite of disability MELODIE LETTKEMAN Campus Reporter

Tonia Ellis lost her kidney, then she began losing her new one and then she lost her job, but the same day she lost her job, she was welcomed into a new family. For Ellis, the Peggy Dow Helmerich School of Drama has been a source of family,

understanding and therapy she needs while battling an extremely rare disease, even while taking disability leave. Ellis has been battling Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, a disease that causes the immune system to attack itself, ultimately causing kidney failure, since she was a teen. Currently, Ellis is taking leave while she considers transplant options, including a liver transplant that could cure her disease.

Though she’s not currently teaching, Ellis has continued to receive support from the school. “Not only do they offer support and empathy, they allow my husband extra time to take care of me when I need him and even bring us dinners to help out,” Ellis said. “They have been a true family to my husband and I. You really know your true friends in times of need.” Ellis received a kidney from her mother in 2005,

which kept her healthy as she completed graduate school and began working at Oklahoma City University as a movement professor. In 2009, her body rejected the kidney and Ellis was forced to accommodate long hospital visits into her schedule. She tried to teach courses via Skype. “The students and some faculty were ver y understanding, but others were not as sympathetic,” Ellis said. “It… led to many

misunderstandings that ultimately led to losing my job there.” The same day she lost her job at OCU, she was offered a job at OU by Tom Orr, chair and director at the School of Drama, where her husband, Matthew, is an associate professor. “Losing my previous job was a blessing,” she said. “It would have ultimately made me more sick to stay in an see ILL Page 2

hEAlth

Goddard Health Center to offer students free flu shots “During the fall Sooners can get shots from 9 a.m. to and winter months, noon starting today colds and flu visits are very common, ARIANNA PICKARD Campus Reporter but tend to decrease OU ’s Goddard Health as the temperature Center is offering free flu rises in the late shots for students this week to prepare for the upcoming spring and summer.” flu season. The clinic will be held from 9 a.m. to noon Tuesday through Thursday at Goddard, said Maggie Pool, assistant director for clinical services. Two more clinics

oud-2012-09-25-a-001,002,003.indd 1

ID can either schedule an appointment by calling Goddard or walk into one of the free clinics to receive the vaccination, Pool said. “During the fall and winter months, colds and flu visits are very common, but tend to decrease as the temperature rises in the late spring and summer,” Pool said in an email. MAGGiE PooL, Flu season usually lasts ASSiSTANT DiRECToR FoR from October through May, CLiNiCAL SERviCES according to the Centers kingsley burns/the daily for Disease Control and An average of between 3,000 and 5,000 people receive flu shots are scheduled for October P r e v e n t i o n , b u t m o s t during a flu season. Goddard health Center will offer free flu shots and November. from 9 a.m. to noon today through thursday. Students with a valid OU see SHOTS Page 3

For the first time ever, an entire family will serve as the university’s activist-inresidence this year. The OU Center for Social Justice announced the Selmon family as the 2012-2013 activists-inresidence. The annual program normally features a single activist, but the committee broke with tradition after OU graduate Lauren Selmon — who initially was offered the activist position — asked if her entire family could be involved in the program, said Jill Irvine, the director of the Women’s and Gender Studies department. “I’m terribly excited about having them,” Irvine said. “This is new for us and, it’s ver y exciting because we get so many more [people] involved.” Ir vine had Lauren Selmon in class in 2007 and said she was impressed with her activism — Selmon had just come back from working in Liberia with child soldiers. “She brought such an amazing perspective to class discussion,” she said. The center is hosting a kickoff event for this year’s program at 7 tonight in the Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Associates Room. The Selmon family will present “Stories from Liberia,” which are their personal narratives from trips to Liberia, according to a press release. “This is the big event where all of them will be see FAMILY Page 3

Name changes denied because of bad law, science Opinion: Judge’s unsettling decision to deny name changes to transgender women was based on pseudoscience and bible quotes. (Page 4)

OU football team needs to avoid complacency Sports: sooners have to stop playing down to competition if they want to win significant games. (Page 5)

VOL. 98, NO. 29 © 2012 oU Publications Board FREE — Additional copies 25¢

iNSiDE ToDAY Campus......................2 Clas si f ie ds................6 l i f e & a r t s ..................7 O p inio n.....................4 spor ts........................5 Visit OUDaily.com for more

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• Tuesday, September 25, 2012

CAMPUS

Lindsey Ruta, campus editor Chase Cook and Jake Morgan, assistant editors dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com • Twitter: @OUDaily

lAW: Registration law awareness on the rise Continued from page 1

tOday arOund CaMPus Mid Day Music will be held from noon to 1 p.m. in Oklahoma Memorial union’s food court. ivan Pena will play the guitar, and isaac eicher will play the mandolin. A lecture titled “the euro, France and the european union economy” will be presented by French Consul-general Frédéric bontems at noon in hester hall, room 170. A Student Success Series seminar titled “how learning Works” will be presented by Clarissa thompson of Ou’s psychology department at 1 p.m. in Wagner hall, room 245. thompson will discuss different styles of learning. A workshop titled “acing the interview: business Majors” will be held from 2:30 to 3 p.m. in the sooner room of Oklahoma Memorial union. the workshop will focus on helping business majors prepare for the interview process.

Wednesday, sePt. 26 A workshop titled “acing the interview: engineering Majors” will be held from 1:30 to 2 p.m. in Oklahoma Memorial union’s sooner room. the workshop will focus on helping engineering majors prepare for the interview process.

Do you want to see your organization’s campus event here? visit oUDaily.com/events/submit to add your entry.

reCOrd reQuests The Oklahoma Daily regularly asks for access to public information from Ou officials. here is a list of the most-recent requests our reporters have submitted to the university. Requested document and purpose

Date requested

the 2003 purchase and sale agreement between University North Park llC and oU — to see the contents and property involved in this purchase agreement

Monday

A database or electronic document of registered vehicles of students, staff and faculty with oU Parking Services for Spring 2012 — to see how and how many people register with Ou’s parking services.

Monday

Contract regarding purchase of 146 Page Street — to see the details of the contract such as the price of the purchase and Ou’s plans for the property.

thursday

visit oUDaily.com/openrecords for a full list of requests

COrreCtiOns The Oklahoma Daily is committed to serving readers with accurate coverage and welcomes your comments about information that may require correction or clarification. to contact us with corrections, email us at dailynews@ou.edu. Monday’s story, “ada Oko-Williams winner of international Water Prize at Water symposium,” erroneously said that Oko-Williams was this year’s winner. she is in fact the 2013 winner.

provide options to voters — and to protect the state from legal action, Williams said. There are 30 states in the U.S. with voter ID laws, and Oklahoma is one of 19 states that have a non-strict, nonphoto voter ID law, because the voter registration card exception, according to the National Conference of State Legislators website. Many of the stricter photo ID laws — such as those in Texas and Pennsylvania — are being challenged based on the claim that it is an excessive burden to force people to obtain acceptable ID, Williams said. “By Oklahoma allowing the [voter registration card] — something that’s issued free to every voter — it’s just a way to prevent any kind of lawsuit against us,” he said. Students who have lost their registration card can call the Cleveland County Election Board and request a new one be mailed to them, Williams said. It typically only takes a week for voters to get their new card, he said. The only information voters need to have on hand when requesting a new card is the name they’re registered under and their date of birth, he said. There is also another alternative ID out-of-state students can use. Williams said voters can get a temporary voter ID issued from the Cleveland County Election Board. The cards are given out for free at the elections board office and it only takes five to 10 minutes to get a temporary ID made, he said. “You can pick one up on your way to the poles if you wanted to; and that would be the same as a voter ID card,” he said. Williams said he

graPhiC Created by eVin MOrrisOn/the daily

BY THE NUMBERS oklahoma Voter Fraud Since 2000

1 0

case of alleged fraud convictions Source: votingrights.news21. com

recommends voters get a new voter registration card over a temporary ID because it helps ensure that they are registered to vote and makes sure voters are aware of which precinct they vote in. U O S A’s O U Vo t e s campaign has been hosting voter registration tables on campus and will continue to do so until the registration deadline, said President Joe Sangirardi. After students fill out their registration cards, UOSA representatives drop the cards off downtown at the state election board office to be processed, he said. Informative pamphlets are

ill: Ellis finds teaching as a way to escape Continued from page 1 unsupportive environment.” After coming to OU, Ellis did not let her disease keep her from doing big things. “Despite all of her illness… she has devised a new course, Intimacy for the Stage, and directed a show that was invited to a six-state regional festival in February of 2012,” Matthew said. “She also wrote and directed a show … that performed to all sold out houses.” Ellis credits her love of teaching to her disease. “I think being sick all my adult life has influenced my teaching a great deal,” she said. “I love teaching and directing… it is an escape from doctors for me. For the hour or two I am teaching, I forget all of my sickness issues and immerse myself in the experience of being with my students. It makes me feel young and healthy.”

Her husband said she uses her experiences to better her teaching. “Her teaching style is a … mix of nurturing and c h a l l e n g i n g ,” h e s a i d . “Through her own struggles, she [teaches] actors to love life and appreciate all they have.” Matthew said Ellis’ philosophy is “teach acting by teaching actors to be better people.” “It works because understanding a character is about losing biases for that character and appreciating who they are,” Matthew said. “An actor must first do this for themselves.” E l l i s i s w o rk i n g w i t h University of Iowa doctors to have either a livingdonor kidney transplant or a cadaver-donated kidney and liver transplant, Matthew said. He hopes to be a donor match for her if they choose a living-donor procedure. “The theory is that either

available at the registration table to explain the different types of IDs students can use at the polls. Sangirardi said they also have information on how students registered in another state can vote by mail-in ,ballot but they do not offer information for the specific IDs out-of-state students registered in Oklahoma need to make sure they have in order to vote. Wi l l i a m s s a i d h e ha s not heard from any OU organizations regarding education initiatives for the ID requirement, but he said he would be happy to work with any interested groups. Student organizations

aren’t the only ones trying to get the word out on the ID requirement. Prior to the state’s voter ID law, which passed in the 2010 election, Oklahoma voters were not required to show any form of ID to cast a ballot. Although the law affects all voters, the change could prevent the 33 percent of outof-state OU students from voting, so county officials are increasing public relations efforts to ensure everyone is aware of the requirements as the November elections near, Williams said. Lindsey Ruta lruta@ou.edu

AT A GLANCE Notable iD law Controversy state courts strike down Wisconsin voter id law as unconstitutional: July 17 Federal court strikes down texas id law as a violation of section 5 of the Voting rights act: aug. 30

Pennsylvania supreme Court threw a strict id law down to a lower court: sept. 18 Federal court hears closing arguments over south Carolina’s photo id law: sept. 24

of these transplants can get her back on her feet and teaching again,” Matthew said. Ellis is emotionally ready to return to the classroom. “Taking care of my health had to come first, but I miss teaching more than anything,” Ellis said. “It was never a job to me. I know that when I finally do get back to work, I will appreciate it even more than before. I know firsthand, no matter what terrible things happen, PhOtO PrOVided things can always be worse.” Peggy Dow helmrich School of Melodie Lettkeman mlettkeman@ou.edu

Drama teacher tonia Ellis has been battling a disease that causes the immune system to attack itself.

BY THE NUMBERS Atypical hUS the cost of the world’s most expensive drug, soliris:

$14K

one dose

$500K

a year

40% 300

affected are children

about the number of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome in the u.s. Source: The Foundation for Children with Atypical HUS

visit oUDaily.com/corrections for an archive of our corrections

oBESity

hOW tO COntaCt us Newsroom office: 405-325-3666

To report news: dailynews@ou.edu

Advertising office: 405-325-8964

Letters to the editor: dailyopinion@ou.edu

Business office: 405-325-2521

Editor in chief: dailyeditor@ou.edu

Are you on Twitter? stay connected with the Oklahoma daily

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oud-2012-09-25-a-001,002,003.indd 2

OU to open clinic for childhood obesity 17 percent of children are obese JENNA BIELMAN Campus Reporter

T h e O U C h i l d r e n ’s Physicians have opened a new clinic at the Health Sciences Center campus to study the adverse effects of childhood obesity. The clinic will serve children between the ages of 2 and 18 who have a body mass index greater than those in the 99th percentile and children with indicies greater than those in the

95th percentile with another related disease or condition, according to a press release. The clinic will provide a health team that attempts to identify medical causes and lifestyle risk factors of weight gain and chronic diseases. “It’s no secret that our country is facing an epidemic of obesity, especially in children,” said Paul Sund, a spokesman for OU Physicians. “And Oklahoma in particular has very high numbers, especially in the population of children. We felt like there was a great need in the community

for resources that we can provide.” About 17 percent of children aged 2 to 19 are considered obese, according to a 2010 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report. A body mass index of 30 or greater constitutes obesity, and the index is based upon calculations that involve a person’s height and weight. The clinic was opened at the end of August, but the announcement of its opening was withheld because physicians wanted to get a hand on things before

making it public, Sund said. The clinic is located in the OU Children’s Physicians Building Specialty Clinic at 1200 Children’s Ave. on the OU Health Sciences Center campus in Oklahoma City. In order to make an appointment with the clinic, families must be referred by their primary care physician, according to the press release. Potential patients must have made efforts in the last three months to control or decrease weight. Jenna Bielman jenna.a.bielman-1@ou.edu

9/24/12 10:40:16 PM


Campus

Tuesday, September 25, 2012 •

3

Shots: 80 percent of OU students made flu shot appointments last year Continued from page 1 infections over the past few years have occurred in January and February. “We’ve had flu seasons [ begin] in October and November, but generally, flu season in Oklahoma is January through early spring,” Pool said. Each year, thousands of people die from influenza, and even more require hospitalization, according to the CDC’s website. The CDC recommends that everyone over the age of six months receive a flu immunization, especially younger children, older adults, pregnant

AT A GLANCE Goddard Health Center Most common reasons for patient appointments: Colds and flu Annual physicals Women’s exams

women and people with certain health conditions, like asthma and diabetes. Flu symptoms include fever, sore throat, muscle aches, cough, headache and runny or stuffy nose, according to the CDC. The vaccine is a cocktail of killed virus particles that rally immune system defenses by tricking the body into producing antibodies against the actual virus, according to the CDC. The vaccine protects against the three most common strains of the virus—H1N1, H3N2 and B/ Wisconsin/1/2012. Additional ways to prevent catching the flu include

Immunization administration General injuries Call 405-325-4441 to schedule an appointment at Goddard Health Center

Source: Maggie Pool, assistant director for clinical services at Goddard Health Center

practicing good health habits like covering your cough and washing your hands often to stop the spread of germs, according to the CDC. Arianna Pickard arianna.j.pickard-1@ou.edu

BY THE NUMBERS Goddard Health Center

3-5K

Average number of flu shots given during a flu season Patient appointments during the last year:

73K total

80%

of total students

Source: Maggie Pool, assistant director for clinical services at Goddard Health Center

Family: Members help nonprofits Continued from page 1

AT A GLANCE Activists-inResidence Kickoff

here,” Irvine said. “So this will be really fun.” The center will host a series of events throughout the When: 7 p.m. Today year as part of the program. Various family members Where: Oklahoma will speak at each event, Memorial Union’ Irvine said. The events will Associates Room include presentations on their humanitarian work Info: 405-325-5787 — including w ork w ith Source: Selmon Family Supplemental nonprofits both in the U.S. Information provided by the Center for and abroad, with particular Social Justice emphasis on their work at an orphanage in Liberia called nonprofit organization called “Rainbow Town,” she said. T h e f a m i l y c re at e d a the Shine Foundation in 2005

to help support the Rainbow Town orphans, according to the release. The Rainbow Town orphans are children that were gravely affected by Liberia’s civil war. Dewey and Kathryn S elmon, parents of the Selmon family, have been active in the Norman community and globally for many years — both graduated from the Gaylord School of Journalism and Ma s s C o m m u n i c a t i o n , according to the release. Brooke Hankinson Brooke.k.hankinson-1@ou.edu

kingsley burns/the daily

A thousand people and even more need to go to the hospital each year because of the flu. The Center For Disease Control and Prevention suggests everyone older than six months old should get a flu shot.

environment

The university made about 90 percent of its purchases as EPA awards OU electricity wind energy, and next year as one of four the plan is to purchase 100 percent as wind energy, green groups facilities management director Brian Ellis said. OU OU is one of four is able to do this thanks organizations nationwide to a 2008 agreement to receive an award between the university and recognizing the Oklahoma Gas and Electric instuition’s green energy to create a wind farm, Ellis purchases. said. OU buys energy from OU was awarded the the wind farm as part of the Green Power Partner deal. of the Year award from “It allows us to be a the U.S. Environmental better steward of the Protection Agency. environment and eliminate The award recognizes the emissions by using entities that “distinguish” wind power versus using themselves in the green electricity from other power market, according sources that contribute to the EPA’s website. to emissions in the

atmosphere,” Ellis said. OU gathers electricity two different ways: It either produces the energy itself through the use of natural gas or it purchases the electricity, Ellis said. The EPA lauded the university’s signing of the 2008 agreement as reasoning behind OU receiving the award, according to the EPA’s website. OU is in the top five colleges and universities of annual green power usage, according to the EPA’s Top 20 college and university list. OU uses green power in 56 percent of its total electricity use. Chase Cook, Assistant Campus Editor

I have learned with sadness that Ambassador Christopher Stevens, along with three other people who worked at the embassy, lost their lives during the attack on the US consulate in Benghazi. I severely protest the attack which targeted the Ambassador, who represented the United States in Libya with respect to his duty, and who was at the same time a guest in that country, and at this time I also condemn all terrorism, no matter who is responsible. I would like to remind those participating in violent protests in Cairo and Yemen that enduring positive change can only be realized through peaceful approaches, open to dialogue. Violence that targets innocent people is a betrayal of the spirit of Islam, which they claim to defend. What is required from Muslims is to respond in peaceful and quiet terms, in way befitting the dignity of their religion. I offer my condolences to the relatives of those who lost their lives, to the American people, and particularly to Mrs. Hillary Clinton. As I pray that the injured recover soon, I share their feelings in heartfelt sincerity.

Fethullah Gülen Muslim Scholar & Education Activist This ad is paid for by the Institute of Interfaith Dialog. www.interfaithdialog.org

oud-2012-09-25-a-001,002,003.indd 3

9/24/12 10:40:17 PM


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Reader comment on OUDaily.com ››

• Tuesday, September 25, 2012

“It used to hurt when OU lost. Now it seems Stoops, and especially the media is trying to condition the OU fan base to accept losing as being OK. It’s not. There’s no excuse for losing that game Saturday night.” (lovethemsooners, RE: ‘COLUMN: Fans need to keep calm over Sooners’ loss at home’)

OPINION

Mary Stanfield, opinion editor Kayley Gillespie, assistant editor dailyopinion@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/opinion • Twitter: @OUDailyOpinion

THUMBS UP: For the first time, OU’s Center for Social Justice has chosen a whole family to be activists-in-residence and share their experiences in Liberia. (Page 1)

EDITORIAL

Biblical verses, bad science have no place in U.S. law Our View: Judge’s decision to deny name changes

malleable social meanings. There is nothing to transgender women abuses science and ignores scientifically rigid about gender or names. the separation of church and state. With just a cursory understanding of the modern sociological and anthropological understanding An Oklahoma County judge now has denied of gender (or even a quick Wikipedia search on a name change request to a second transgender “intersex”), it becomes obvious that Graves’ woman, marking the beginning of a unsettling trend. supposed interest in science is surface-level at best. The decision in this case not only was based on an More realistically, it is entirely disingenuous. inaccurate (and damaging) understanding of gender The ruling cites one expert: a physician who also is issues, it also sets a frightening legal precedent. a politician with a bias evident in his voting record. District Judge Bill Graves’ ruling declares that Proper scientific study is peer-reviewed, repeated changing one’s name based on a sex change and confirmed. And it takes into account the entire (successful or planned) would be fraudulent, field of information. Graves uses undeniable facts because a sex change cannot change the actual about DNA, but he cites these facts in a vacuum, sex of an individual, just the external attributes. He ignoring the relevant psychological, sociological and based this ruling on the affidavit of physician and anthropological evidence. Without context and solid Rep. Mike Ritze, R-Broken Arrow, who said reasoning, he draws ridiculous conclusions because sex changes don’t change the DNA from solid facts. The Our View of the patient, they don’t actually change the Not only does this ruling do nothing to is the majority patient’s “sex or gender.” support the real power of science and the opinion of By including his findings about DNA in desperate need for more accurate data The Daily’s the opinion, Graves is appealing to science (or data at all) in our legal proceedings, it nine-member to legitimize his ruling. Normally, this would editorial board actually obscures these points further by be a laudable and all-too-rare development. passing this reasoning off as valid. But despite using scientific vocabulary, Worse, this appeal to science immediately Graves fails to understand the reality of sex, gender precedes an appeal to a biblical quote from Genesis. and transgender identities. Moreover, his inclusion In his legal opinion, Graves found it appropriate to of a Biblical quote as grounds for his legal decision use the Bible as a source and argue God intended belies all pretense of concern for science and reason. men to stay men and women to stay women. Not only is this ruling a clear abuse of judicial What, exactly, does one individual’s interpretation power — people should be able to change their of one religion’s teachings about God’s intention name to “Batman” or “Apostrophe” if they are so have to do with the legal decisions of this nation? inclined — it also displays a severe ignorance. The U.S. honors the concept of separation of Sex and gender are not the same thing. Biology church and state for good reason. How can judges, may have much to say about sex (and much to politicians or officials hope to represent a population say about the fluidity of sex categories and sex with diverse religious beliefs if their decisions give characteristics, which Graves ignores). But it has precedence to just one of those sets of beliefs? little to say about gender, which refers to a socially The First Amendment of the Constitution forbids constructed concept that prescribes certain the establishment of a state religion; basing legal appearances, behaviors, attitudes, personalities, etc. decisions for all citizens on the holy book of one of to members of sex categories taken to be fixed. the nation’s many religions certainly constitutes the These important concepts cannot be conflated or elevation of that religion by the state. oversimplified. It’s true that a sex change operation Simply put, no religious document or teaching is cannot change the sex of an individual on the an appropriate basis for a legal decision. chromosomal level. But do you routinely question Certain pundits are fond of railing against “activist the nature of others’ chromosomes? The real power judges.” How many will call out this judge who went of the sex change operation is in the ways it affects far outside the scope of this case and set a dangerous the physical presentation of a patient, and thus the precedent to assert his personal opinions about social aspects of both gender and sex. a social issue? You can do so for them by going to The identity of a person is not fixed by their DNA. OUDaily.com and signing the petition calling for It is fixed by societal and cultural rules, norms and Graves to either recant his ruling or resign. institutions. Gender is one of those institutions — so is naming. Both change over time and have Comment on this on OUDaily.com

COLUMN

Ask the right questions about Arab riots

S

ince the eruption of OPINION COLUMNIST violence following the trailer release of “The Innocence of Muslims,” riots have spread across the Arab world, most recently to Afghanistan and Indonesia. Four Americans were killed in the Libya riot, with 10 Janna Gentry protestors dead overall. janna.f.gentry-1@ou.edu Truly, the trailer is disgusting and disrespectful by anyone’s standards, but the reactions among some Muslim populations highlight the different roles religion plays in Western and Muslim society. Initially, I marveled at the ridiculousness of people becoming so violently upset over one man’s opinion of a religion. If someone in the Arab world wanted to make an offensive movie depicting Jesus in a heretical manner, I would be offended, but the amount of energy I would have expended would have been limited to what I could do from my couch and laptop. In a country where we have a television show that regularly skewers all religious figures (“South Park”) and a Broadway play that mocks an entire religion (“The Book of Mormon”), I am accustomed to religious criticism. But, according to Hallie Arias, an international and area studies senior, countries where free speech is not a protected right would interpret a movie like “The Innocence of Muslims” to reflect the “official attitude” of the U.S., because the U.S. allowed its production. Understanding this sheds more light on the seemingly

absurd actions of the rioters. Perhaps the reaction reflected a difference in religious fervor between American Christians and Middle Eastern Muslims. It is easy to assume religion plays more of an important role in the everyday lives of Middle Eastern Muslims, but Joshua Landis, the director of OU’s Center for Middle Eastern Studies, gave a different perspective. Landis said the riots are more complex than simply demonstrations of overzealous Muslims defending the honor of one of their most highly esteemed religious figures. He said in contrast to America, where we have gone to great lengths to separate religion from politics, the Arab world does not have such a defined distinction. In addition to the mixing of religion and politics, Islam has taken on new importance in many post-Arab Spring countries — countries in the Middle East and north Africa that have endured demonstrations of political unrest beginning in 2010 and 2011 — many of which were previously ruled by secular dictators. Landis said strong religious groups were influential in the success of many of these revolutions and, as a result, they have more power and importance now than they had under the secular regimes. Though anti-American sentiment most likely had something to do with the riots, it is comforting to know what seemed like an outpouring of hatred toward one man’s opinion of Islam is actually what Landis described as each post-Arab Spring country trying to figure out their new relationship to a very old religion. Janna Gentry is an English senior.

?

» Poll question of the day Should transgender citizens be able to change their names to reflect their gender? To cast your vote, log on to COLUMN

All citizens should have right to choose their own names

O

klahoma OPINION COLUMNIST County judge Bill Graves has refused to approve the name changes of two transgender women. The denied requests were made by Christie Jason Byas Ann Harvey and Angela jason.l.byas-1@ou.edu Renee Ingram, who still hold the legal names James Dean Ingram and Steven Charles Harvey due to their respective rulings. Graves’ arguments fail to show good reason for his decision on either ruling. In fact, a closer examination of the cases leads us to wonder why they should have been at the discretion of the court at all. Graves’ decisions were made on the basis that name changes could not be made for fraudulent purposes under state law. Graves cited three specific reasons for denying Harvey’s request: She might trick someone into marrying her who was unaware that she was transgender, police officers searching for a male using DNA evidence would overlook her and sex changes might be used to circumvent state laws against same-sex marriage. There are a number of problems with Graves’ reasoning. Neither of the women seem intent on “tricking” anyone into marrying them — Ingram is currently dating a man very aware of her being transgender, and the same is true of the woman to whom Harvey has been married for several years. Why the police would not have access to the fact that either Harvey or Ingram are transgender when conducting an investigation in the event that they committed a crime doesn’t seem entirely clear. Nor is it clear why someone would pretend to be transgender rather than just moving to a state that allowed same-sex marriage if that was what they ultimately wanted. However, even if we accept Graves’ arguments — which I certainly am not prepared to do — they seem rather irrelevant to the actual ruling. What Graves was supposed to decide was not whether Harvey and Ingram legally should be considered women, but only whether they could legally hold the same names they use in their daily lives. If, for example, Ingram had decided to change her name to “Chuck” rather than “Angela,” would Graves have allowed it? Barring a male’s name change to Angela relies on assumptions about the gender normativity of names. On that note, what if she had chosen a gender-blind name such as “Alex,” “Pat” or “Shelby?” If this seems like murky territory, that’s because gender and our notions about what constitutes gender are fluid social concepts. For Graves to deny people he designates as men the ability to change their names to more feminine ones relies on essentialist assumptions about sex and gender that most sociologists and anthropologists emphatically reject. While Graves did consult a doctor, Rep. Mike Ritze, R-Broken Arrow, about whether or not the DNA of a person who has undergone a sex-change operation changes, he takes for granted that a person’s DNA is the final arbiter on their sex or gender. This completely ignores the social aspects of both sex and gender. Furthermore, he equates sex and gender in a way that reveals himself to be unqualified to speak authoritatively (let alone with literal legal authority) on either subject. Why should Ingram and Harvey’s names be subject to subjective approval, not just by Judge Graves, but by any judge? Ingram and Harvey should have to answer only to themselves in regards to their own names, and any legal system that fails to recognize that should be called sharply into question. Jason Byas is a philosophy senior.

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9/24/12 8:31:59 PM


Tuesday, September 25, 2012 •

OUDaily.com ››

SPORTS

5

Kedric Kitchens, sports editor Dillon Phillips, assistant editor dailysports@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/sports • Twitter: @OUDailySports

Check out five things we learned from Monday’s football press conference after the Sooners’ first loss of the season

men’s golf

Sooner freshman has eye on pro career Golfer came to OU after hearing good things about coach

AT A GLANCE So far as a Sooner

Nick Brown

Titsworth hit a +8 224 at The Gopher Invitational Sept. 9-10 in Wayzata, Minn. It was the first tournament of Titsworth’s career. He was the top finisher for the Sooners, finishing 15th overall.

Sports Reporter

Freshman golfer Beau Titsworth comes to OU from Cleveland with hopes of one day making the PGA Tour. Titsworth began golfing at the age of 3 when his grandparents, who live on a golf course in Phoenix, gave him his first set of clubs. It was there where he had one of his earliest golf experiences that he still remembers. “It’s a funny story, but I guess I ended up just making a really long putt, and they paraded me around,” Titsworth said. During holidays, Titsworth and his family would travel to Phoenix , and he would continue to Ryan work on his Hybl game at the course. Eventually, his dad got him together with coaches to refine his game. When asked about his decision of golf rather than a contact sport, he said he prefers golf because he is more of a thinker and finds that he can control it himself. “If I mess up it’s my fault, or if I do something good it’s my fault,” he said. A graduate of St. Ignatius High School in Cleveland, Titsworth spent his

“I heard a lot of really good things about [coach Ryan Hybl], nobody had anything bad to say. I like this school a lot, too.” Beau Titsworth, Freshman golfer

Heather Brown/The Daily

Freshman golfer Beau Titsworth stands on the Jimmy Austin Golf Course. Titsworth, an 18-year-old Cleveland native, chose to come to OU because of the great things he had heard about his coach, Ryan Hybl. Titsworth has placed in the top 20 in both of the tournaments he has competed in thus far as a Sooner.

senior year doing what he does best : Winning golf tournaments. In f i v e m aj o r g o l f i n g events, he won three and placed second in the other two, as well as securing a share of the title in the D-1 State Championship in Ohio, a tournament played

at the Scarlet Course at Ohio State. Titsworth said he chose to come to OU because of the great things he heard about coach Ryan Hybl. “I heard a lot of really good things about him, nobody had anything bad to say,” Titsworth said. “I like

this school a lot, too.” Titsworth said he has had some difficulty getting adjusted to OU due to the drastic transition from high school in Ohio to the college life. After taking a summer off, Titsworth said he finds himself more competitive

after working with Hybl and the rest of the OU squad since he has arrived on campus. He said he spends a great amount of time working on his short game, a piece of his game that he said he felt wasn’t as strong as it should be for the level of

competition he’s working toward. Titsworth led OU in his first tournament as a Sooner with a 224 (+8) in The Gopher Invitational held Sept. 9 and 10 in Wayzata, Minn., and followed that with a 217 (+4) at this weekend’s Mason Rudolph Championship in Franklin, Tenn. Titsworth and the Sooners next tee off October 5-7 at the Bricktown Collegiate Championship in Macon, Ga. Nick Brown nickbrown@ou.edu

Column

OU needs to play to own level, not opponents’ I

n the wake of Kansas sports columnist State’s 24-19 upset victory against the OU football team, many fans have been left wondering what happened. What happened Saturday night is the same problem that has plagued OU for Garrett Holt the past three seasons: spacetothetree@gmail.com Complacency reared its ugly head and knocked OU off of its high horse. Two years ago, OU started the season 6-0 and was ranked as high as third in the country before being upset by No. 18 Missouri in Columbia. Last year, the Sooners also started the season 6-0 and were ranked No. 3 before being upset at home by unranked Texas Tech. This year was yet another chance to possibly play for a national championship, but that chance is most likely gone after losing to Kansas State. In all three of these seasons, OU has had the talent to be absolutely dominant. OU simply needs to start playing up to its talent level instead of playing to the level of its opponents. Many people place the blame on different scapegoats within the team, such as senior quareterback Landry Jones, coach Bob Stoops and even departed offensive and defensive coordinators, Kevin Wilson and Brent Venables. The reality of the situation is that there is a problem with the entire team’s structure. One player doesn’t cause a team to lose to a massive underdog. One coach doesn’t turn a potential blowout into a loss. The root of these losses is located somewhere within

JENKINS MEDICAL CLINIC CALL FOR APPOINTMENT OR WALK-IN

WHAT’S NEXT OU vs. Texas Tech The Sooners will have a bye week before heading to Lubbock to take on the Texas Tech Red Raiders. Tech beat the Sooners, 41-38, last season,

snapping OU’s 39-game home win streak. The Sooners haven’t beaten the Red Raiders in Lubbock since 2003, when they won 56-25.

the team as a whole. It seems as if the Sooners’ attitude is along the lines of, “We’re OU, so we’ll just roll to a 30-point win,” or, “It’s a home game, so we can just worry about next week.” This cannot continue if the Sooners are to get back to the highest echelon of the college football world. The team collectively needs to treat every game as if it is the national championship. If Oklahoma doesn’t treat each game like it is something of the utmost importance, it is just asking to be upset. Fortunately, this loss was early in the season, and there is still plenty of time for the Sooners to come back and Ben Williams/The Daily possibly win the Big 12 or go to a BCS bowl. Senior wide receiver Justin Brown (right) gets tackled during the However, unless something changes in the team’s culture and OU stops overlooking teams just because it is OU-Kansas State game Saturday in Norman. The Sooners suffered their first loss of the season, losing to the Wildcats, 24-19. better on paper, it’s not going to happen. Complacency is killer, and it’s something the Sooners should keep in mind.

University Theatre

Garrett Holt is a journalism sophomore. You can follow him on Twitter at @GarrettHolt_.

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9/24/12 9:34:10 PM


6

• Tuesday, September 25, 2012

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oud-2012-09-25-a-006.indd 1

        

A number of factors that are presently hidden from you will emerge and come into play in the year ahead. They will have a big role in helping you advance your interests, especially those that are of a material rather than an esthetic nature. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- If you make it obvious to your associate that the good things you want for yourself you want for him or her as well, you’ll be more successful in your dealings. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- A positive event will give you a new perspective on a situation that you have thus far viewed negatively. You’ll now be able to see opportunities where you previously only saw opposition. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -You’ve been doing things the same old way, and it hasn’t been working. Your present conundrums call for fresh, innovative thinking; don’t be afraid to shake things up. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Advice from a friend, albeit it well intentioned, will not be on par with your own thinking when it comes to matters that pertain to your reputation or material success. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- An elusive and hard-to- access person whom you’ve been trying to contact regarding an important matter is likely to be available. Try again to open up a valuable line of communication. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Things that you come up with on your own

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Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker September 25, 2012

ACROSS 1 Hoover, for one 4 Hardly refined or genteel 9 Essential points 14 State whose cap. is Boise 15 Kidneyrelated 16 “In an ___ world ...� 17 Bottom line 18 Thing you don’t want to twist 19 Like a pretty lass 20 React badly to boredom 23 Iron setting 24 “That’s all ___ wrote!� 25 It may be concealed cosmetically 28 Bailiwick 32 New York’s ___ Island 34 Withdrawal site, for short 37 Assumed name 39 Dark suit bane 40 What many office buildings don’t include 44 Kinks song 45 Same-old, same-old 46 Con’s vote 47 Numb, as a foot 50 Come after 52 Put in 9/25

stitches 53 Cul-de-___ 55 Small anchor 59 Blow one’s top 64 Ragged mountain ridge 66 Speak pompously 67 Practical joke 68 Lip-curling look 69 Pottery furnaces 70 Put to work 71 Conceals with the hand 72 Extraordinary brilliance 73 Degree of success? DOWN 1 Spinal column features (Var.) 2 Kind of supervision 3 Actress Van Doren 4 Seafood salad ingredient, perhaps 5 Flat fee 6 Pharaoh’s symbol 7 Half-off event 8 Bunches 9 Gravy morsel 10 Heathen’s figurine 11 Tickle or tingle, e.g. 12 Beach bum’s hue

13 Crafty 21 Cause damage to 22 Relaxed sounds? 26 Salami selection 27 Journal item 29 Beverage for the inn crowd? 30 In ___ of (replacing) 31 Parson’s place 33 Nothing alternative 34 Book of maps 35 “All ___ in favor ...� 36 It turns the grindstone 38 Type of gun 41 Filmdom’s “Norma ___� 42 Possesses 43 Most subject to chance

48 Banana oil and others 49 Butter portion 51 Sinuous shocker 54 Fail under pressure, in slang 56 Uncover, as information 57 Grind together, as teeth 58 Encouraged (with “on�) 60 Agenda unit 61 Music’s Clapton or Carmen 62 Curtain ___ (post-show appearance) 63 Volcano in Sicily 64 Cleo’s killer 65 Molecule found in cells

PREVIOUS PUZZLE ANSWER

9/24

Š 2012 Universal Uclick www.upuzzles.com

UNDER CONSTRUCTION By Tim Burr

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- You could be exceptionally lucky in partnership arrangements for both social and commercial purposes. This will be especially true when your ally is someone of the opposite gender. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Tried, true and traditional tactics are the ones that will bring you the kind of results you’ll want in your financial affairs. Any departure from these proven procedures will be less effective.

9/24/12 7:41:20 PM


Tuesday, September 25 , 2012 •

OUDaily.com ››

LIFE&ARTS

7

Carmen Forman, life & arts editor Westlee Parsons, assistant editor dailyent@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/life&arts • Twitter: @OUDailyArts

“The Mindy Project� and “New Girl� start new seasons tonight on FOX.

Boomerfest Band

Dare WE sAY, PioNeers

photo provided

Hip-hop group, Dare We Say, Pioneers will perform Thursday at Campus Activities Council’s Boomerfest as one of the five bands chosen to play.

Student hip-hop group will perform at CAC’sBoomerfest Molly Evans

Life & Arts Reporter

Two dark green water skis mounted on the wall support a stack of old magazines, a tarnished trumpet and a vinyl of Dr. Dre’s 20-year-old solo debut, “Chronic.� A tambourine rests on a black, Technics piano, which is cornered by a lengthy alignment of acoustic and electric guitars. The sedentary series of old amplifiers, nestled record player and even more guitars comes to life as Dare We Say, Pioneers — a three-part collaboration of a double bass, a drum set and a fastpaced narrative — plays their favorite track to date, “Homies 4.�

The hip-hop trio set a regular Wednesday night rehearsal several weeks ago, but they realized their quest — to resurrect the genre from its current state of selfglorification into an honest art form for all of Norman’s deprived souls — in the heat of mid-June. “I asked Sam really politely if he wouldn’t mind possibly being my Questlove,� said Paul Zimmerman, history of science senior. Wordsmith and emcee, Zimmerman joined forces with self-taught drummer and guitarist Sam Regan and OU Civic Orchestra member and double bassist Patrick R i c h a rd s o n . T h e t h re e spontaneously formed a sound and several self-titled subgenres that they call: “deep-space, pyramidal, mar itime and no-coast hip-hop,� according to the

group. “They’re all justifiable,� said Richardson, a letters sophomore. “We wrote a bunch of songs, and then we did a retrospective, and we came up with something hyperbolic that comes out of each of the songs.� “Paul said, ‘We’re like originators of pure-middle hip-hop,’� said Regan, a University College freshman. “’And I said, ‘Dare we say, pioneers?’� Even with a historian’s knowledge of hip-hop’s forefathers, the recurring rock epiphany of Led Zeppelin’s “When the Levy Breaks� and a five-year instrumental proficiency in classical and jazz, Dare We Say, Pioneers would not have survived the summer without a little serendipity and a network of generous friends, Zimmerman said.

FLU SHOTS AVAILABLE Tuesday Sept. 25 ♌ Wednesday, Sept. 26 Thursday Sept. 27

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GO AND DO Boomerfest When: 8 p.m. Thursday Where: Oklahoma Memorial Unionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Meacham Auditorium

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every time we want to play a show, everything just kind of happens,â&#x20AC;? Zimmerman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And, every time we want to practice, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always a place.â&#x20AC;? T h e g r o u p â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s w e e k l y rehearsal currently resides in the living room of friend and occasional co-writer Jordan Hayes. Venues the group has played at include the amphitheater at Andrews Park, St. Anneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, a house north of Campus Corner,

and Ground Zero Crossfit on Main Street. The Ground Zero gig came one rainy summer day when the band was supposed to play an outdoor show, Regan said. Zimmerman posted on Facebook half-heartedly asking for a backup venue, and a friend responded with a connection to the gym. Now, the group has a key to the gym, Zimmerman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s super weird how much this band is surviving and really thriving and doing really well off the raw generosity of awesome friends,â&#x20AC;? Zimmerman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of the coolest things about it.â&#x20AC;? The group has benefited from word of mouth, Richardson said. The group also has benefited from playing

within varied genres and to new audiences because there isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t an established hip-hop group in Norman, Zimmerman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153; We a l w ay s h e a d l i n e a show, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re always playing with bands that have a lot more friends than we do,â&#x20AC;? Zimmerman said. Without a strong hiphop scene in Norman, the members of Dare We Say, P i o n e e r s have c re at i ve f l e x i b i l i t y i n t h e g e n re through songwriting, Zimmerman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hip-hop is pretty dangerous,â&#x20AC;? Zimmerman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once you start doing it, you just got to do it all the time. We hope people get hooked, too.â&#x20AC;? Molly Evans, mollyevans@ou.edu

presents...

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3

Basketball tourney @ the Huff Sept. 29, 1-5 p.m. benefitting

(405) 325-4611

For accommodations on the basis of disability, please call (405) 325-4611. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution.

$30 per 3 player team $40 per 4 player team

$2 to cheer on your favorite team registration is open until 12:30 Sept. 29 4 players per team maximum co-ed teams welcome Sign up in the Student Media business office Copeland Hall, room 149A or email bringer@ou.edu to reserve your spot and pay at the door. Student Media is a department within OUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s division of Student Affairs. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution.

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9/24/12 7:42:05 PM


8

Life&Arts

• Tuesday, September 25, 2012

literature

student [m]edia

imagine

future

the

World Literature Today celebrates author’s culture

CAMPUS MEDIA IN A DIGITAL AGE

{3 p.m. Sept. 25} Governors Room Oklahoma Memorial Union

first roundtable discussion General topic: How Do You Know What’s Going On at OU? photo provided

Author Rohinton Mistry is set to receive the Neustadt Prize for Literature at OU’s annual Neustadt Festival.

Mistry will receive Neustadt Prize for literature

GO AND DO Neustadt Festival Opening Reception at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Norman Depot, 200 S. Jones Ave

Westlee Parsons Life & Arts Reporter

Ever y fall, OU hosts the Neustadt Festival of International Literature and Culture to celebrate an author for his or her literary excellence. Today marks the beginning of the three-day festival to honor the culture and works of this year’s recipient of the Neustadt Int e r nat i o na l P r i ze f o r Literature, Indian-Canadian novelist Rohinton Mistry, according to the World Literature Today magazine’s website. The website states the prize was established by the Nuestadt family of Ardmore, Okla., and Dallas. OU has been giving the Neustadt award for more than 42 years, said Robert Con Davis-Undiano Ph. D., World Literature Today e xe c u t i v e d i re c t o r a n d Neustadt professor. The award is sponsored by World Literature Today and is seen as one of the greatest honors an author could receive, Davis-Undiano said. “The Neustadt Festival is one of the most prestigious literary prizes in the world,” he said. “They say it’s second only to the Nobel Prize for Literature.” Twenty-eight authors who have won the Nobel Prize in Literature also have been part of the Nuestadt Prize, according to the World Literature Today website. Pablo Neruda was a Neustadt Prize candidate in 1970 and won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1971. Toni Morrison and Seamus He a n e y a l s o h av e w o n the Nobel Prize and been nominated for the Neustadt Prize.

Culture Quest: Escape to India at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Molly Shi Boren Ballroom Documentary Film Screening at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Catlett Music Center’s Pitman Hall Roundtable Discussion at 10 a.m. Thursday, Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Meacham Auditorium Scenes from “A Fine Balance” at Second Roundtable Discussion 11:30 a.m. Thursday, Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Meacham Auditorium Price: Free and open to public Info: 405-325-4531

The festival not always has been a big part of the Neustadt Prize and OU. “Over the last seven years, we wanted to make this prize most significant and exciting for students,” Davis-Undiano said. The festival covers Indian culture with music, theater and other arts. Because Mistry was born in India, the festival was created around I n d i a n c u l t u re, D av i s Undiano said.

AT A GLANCE Rohinton Mistry novels, other written works and awards “One Sunday” (1983) won The Canadian Hart House Contest, Annual Contributors’ Award from “Canadian Fiction Magazine” and a Canada Council Grant

“Such a Long Journey” (1991) “A Fine Balance” (1996) “Family Matters” (2002) “The Scream” (2008)

“Auspicious Occasion” (1984) won The Canadian Hart House Contest

Source: Neustadt Festival website

Westlee Parsons, Westlee.A.Parsons@ou.edu

“Tales From Firozsha Baag” (1987)

Every Tuesday

SPIRITS

Free Pizza

at 8:30pm

Worship the united methodist ministry at the university of oklahoma

428 West Lindsey (Corner of Lindsey and Elm) For more information, visit: okwesley.org

Get Game Day Ready! . Fine Wine & Spirits

Joe’s Place.

Lindsey

1330 East Alameda 405.364.9262

www.joesplacewine.com

oud-2012-09-25-a-008.indd 1

SPECIALTIES

Alameda 12th E Ave

at 9pm

“This is our most ambitious festival yet,” he said. In the last seven years, the Neustadt International Prize for Literature has grown from a conference to a festival, said Merleyn Bell, art director of World Literature Today. “[The festival] has become a much bigger endeavor,” Bell said. The festival is set up to involve the entire city of Norman by including the Norman Public Library and Norman Public Schools, she said. The process of becoming the winner of the Neustadt International Prize for Literature is rigorous. A jury of 10 people who possibly could win the prize chooses the winner, Davis-Undiano said. The jurors nominate an author and then vote multiple times, he said. “It’s like choosing the Pope — it’s that serious,” Davis-Undiano said. “We ask the juror who nominated the author is invited back with the author. The juror will attend the events like the banquet on Friday night where the award will be officially given.” The juror who nominated Mistr y, Samrat Upadhyay, will speak at one of the roundtable discussions Thursday, Bell said. The prize is a $50,000 check with a silver feather mounted on Oklahoma wood and certificate, Davis-Undiano said. The banquet is the only event on the schedule that is invitation only — the rest of the events are free and open to the public, he said. The whole point of the festival is to bring the greatest writers to OU to interact with students, Davis-Undiano said. At the banquet Friday night, a prize for children’s literature, named in honor of Nancy Barcelo, Susan Neustadt Schwartz and Kathy Neustadt, will be announced for the festival next fall, Davis-Undiano said. This prize alternates with the Neustadt International Prize for Literature every other year, according to the World Literature Today website.

WINE

.

BEER

{Oct. 1} Online student survey

OU students will receive a survey through OU mass email, asking them to share information about their own campus media use and what they would like to see in the future.

{2 p.m. Oct. 3} Boomer Room Oklahoma Memorial Union

second roundtable discussion General topic: Print vs. Digital Delivery

{7 p.m. Oct. 15} Boomer Room Oklahoma Memorial Union

third roundtable discussion General topic: The role of social media

{6 p.m. Oct. 24} Associates Room Oklahoma Memorial Union

wrap-up of roundtable discussions

{3:30 p.m. Nov. 12} Room 102 Jacobsen Hall

presentation to OU Faculty Senate

{1:30 p.m. Nov. 21} Scholars Room Oklahoma Memorial Union presentation to OU Staff Senate

Additional events time and place TBA

for details: imaginedfuture.wordpress.com Student Media is a department within OU’s division of Student Affairs. The University of Oklahoma is an EOE. For accommodations on the basis of a disability, please call 325-2521.

9/24/12 7:52:04 PM


Tuesday, September 25, 2012