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RESEARCH

Sooners focus on alternative fuels Center for Biomass Refining finds ways to convert organic materials into fuel BENNETT HALL Campus Reporter

The OU Center for Biomass Refining is making headway in the global effort to turn everyday organic materials like switchgrass and straw into tomorrow’s fuel sources. Five years ago, the university applied for and received a $20 million grant, in conjunction with Oklahoma State

University and the Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation. The grant allows OU researchers from chemical engineering and other fields to conduct research about alternative energy technologies like biomass conversion, said Kelvin Droegemeier, OU’s vice president of research. With the endowment, OU had the funds to hire three new full-time researchers and substantially increase the center’s research output, he added. “Our focus is on taking what’s called lignocellulosic biomass and turning it into fuel,” said Lance Lobban, director of the School of Chemical, Biological and Materials

Engineering and one of the center’s lead researchers. With this technology harnessed, near-carbon neutral fuel sources like grasses, straw and even corn stalks that would otherwise biodegrade into the soil would be used alongside, and would possibly surpass fossil fuels as the primary source of power for machinery and cars. The researchers hope to make this currently expensive experimental task an ordinary practice, Lobban said. According to Lobban, the researchers will use thermal SEE REFINE PAGE 2

HEALTHY SOONERS

POLITICAL ISSUES

Community shows energy at 5k Fun Run Close to 1,000 runners, walkers participate in Healthy Sooners run SIMENG DAI

Campus Reporter

AARON MAGNESS/ THE DAILY

Top: State Senator Rick Brinkley, Republican from the 34th District of Oklahoma, speaks at the Oklahoma Creativity Focus Political Forum, Friday Afternoon in the Scholars Room, of the Oklahoma Memorial Union. Left: State Representative Scott Martin, Republican from the 46th District of Oklahoma, speaks at the Oklahoma Creativity Focus Political Forum, Friday Afternoon in Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Scholars Room.

Bipartisanship encouraged at forum Political forum focuses on bipartisanship in US KAITLYN UNDERWOOD Campus Reporter

When it comes to politics, it’s most important to be educated about both sides of an issue, speakers said Friday at a political forum on campus. Partisanship isn’t as tense in Oklahoma City as it appears to be on Capitol Hill, said Okla. State Rep. Scott Martin and Rep. Emily Virgin at the Oklahoma Creativity Festival focus panel on politics. “Knowing both sides of the issue is one of the most important things you can do,” Virgin said. Panel speakers, which included current OU students as well as state politicians, espoused the importance of reaching across the aisle to compromise. Compromise doesn’t mean that each side gets everything it wants, but there are things more important than winning and losing, such as improving education for future generations, said OU law student David Postic at the event.

“I want students to walk out of here with the confidence that their opinions matter.” BRETTE THROCKMORTON, CAC CHAIR OF THE OKLAHOMA CREATIVITY FESTIVAL AND ECONOMICS SENIOR

Speakers focused on the importance of education and remaining passionate in the political realm. “Find something that matters to you and really pursue that, really care about that. That’s where politics starts,” Postic said. The panel was organized by OU’s Campus Activities Council and took place in the Scholar’s Room of the Oklahoma Memorial Union on Friday. Following the speakers’ discourse, there was a town hall-style discussion with audience members. Attendance was capped at 50 students because limited funds allowed for only 50 lunches to be provided, said Brette Throckmorton, CAC chair of the Oklahoma Creativity Festival and economics senior. Students in the audience, such as

Sports: Volleyball plays well in Nike Invitational but room for improvement remains after loss to Miami (Page 3)

political science freshman Jody King, were excited to take part in the event. “I have decided to devote my life to service work,” King said. “I’m really interested in politics and bipartisanship. The Oklahoma Creativity Festival is designed to give students outlets for expression and to show off individual talents, Throckmorton said. This is the first year the creativity festival has included politics in its event schedule, Throckmorton said. “We wanted to look at a more general definition of what creativity is,” Throckmorton said. The forum focused on bipartisanship and compromise and was designed to inspire students’ creative problem-solving skills for politics, Throckmorton said. “I want students to walk out of here with the confidence that their opinions matter,” she said. CAC members plan to hold events centered on politics at future creativity festivals, Throckmorton said. Kaitlyn Underwood kaitlyn.underwood5@gmail.com

Nearly 1,000 runners participated in the Healthy Sooners annual 5k Fun Run Saturday morning. About 83 volunteers and 952 students and members of the community gathered near Wagner Hall at 8 a.m. to participate in the run, said Amy Davenport, director of OU Fitness and Recreation. Davenport said this was the best Healthy Sooners Fun Run to date. “The energy of the walkers and “Some people runners was radiant,” Davenport who were said. Many families ran together, pushing a and some parents pushed strollstroller ran ers while running. “Some people who were push- faster than me.” ing a stroller ran faster than me,” ANDER SANDERSON, said Ander Sanderson, anatomy sophomore and an exchange ANATOMY SOPHOMORE student from the U.K. Most people wore the gray Fun Run T-shirts, but some participants dressed in costumes for the event. “I was impressed by a guy dressing up as a hot dog,” said Halay Allen, a first-year OU law student. It was the third time to participate in the Fun Run for Zhaojing Chen, health and exercise science graduate student. SEE FUN RUN PAGE 2

HONORS EXPERIENCE

Program pairs students, projects Engineering program provides honors students with research opportunities JORDAN LARSEN Campus Reporter

Honors students have a week to apply for an engineering research program next semester. Sept. 30 is the deadline to apply for OU’s Honors Engineering Research Experience, which connects honors students with engineering research projects and professors, said Javen Weston, Honors Engineering Liaison. Created through a partnership between the Honors College and the College of Engineering, the program fulfills the Honors Research requirement of the Honors Curriculum and is worth three credits, Weston said. SEE RESEARCH PAGE 2

Opinion: Beware of the consequences if you share controversial or offensive posts on social sites. (Page 3)

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9/22/13 10:22 PM


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• Monday, September 23, 2013

Campus

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Arianna Pickard, campus editor Paighten Harkins and Molly Evans, assistant editors dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com • Twitter: @OUDaily

Ou’s fall holiday has been designated for Oct. 11.

refine: Biomass Refining finds new solutions Continued from page 1

Today around campus An art exhibition from the Zhang Sisters will be open in the Lightwell Gallery in the School of Art & Art History from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday until Oct. 8. A letter-writing event will be held at 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the first floor lobby of the Oklahoma Memorial Union. The letters will be sent to children in the hospital.

Tuesday, Sept. 24 A free concert by Jeffery Weaver on piano will be held from noon to 1 p.m. for Mid Day Music in Oklahoma Memorial Union’s food court. A workshop on time management will take place at 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. at Lissa and Cy Wagner Hall, Room 245. The workshop is a part of the Student Success Series. A bingo night will take place at 6 p.m. in Beaird Lounge of the Oklahoma Memorial Union.

Wednesday, Sept. 25 A free concert performance by Conor McBryde on piano will be held from noon to 1 p.m. for Mid Day Music in Oklahoma Memorial Union’s food court. A free workshop on studying for the sciences will take place at 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. at Dale Hall, Room 211. Marielle Hoefnagels and Doug Gaffin will lead the lecture. A lecture from Richard A. Clarke will be held at 6 p.m. at the Sam Noble Museum of Natural History. The lecture is a part of the “9/11 and the War on Terror” Presidential Dream Course. RSVP to Karina Legradi at klegradi@ou.edu by Sept. 24. A general meeting for the Union Programming board will take place at 9 p.m. in the Oklahoma Memorial Union, Associates Room. Any student can attend.

Thursday, Sept. 26 A concert during Mid Day Music will take place at noon to 1 p.m. in the Oklahoma Memorial Union food court. Ivan Duvet will be playing the piano. A lecture from Adriana Beltran will take place at noon at the OU IT Store event space, 329 W. Boyd St. Beltran, a senior associate for Citizen Security, will be speaking about Latin America.

conversion and catalytic processing methods to heat these raw materials into liquids at high temperatures and collect the consequent bio-oil to process into diesel and gasoline. Biodiesel, one of the current technologies, is potentially a cleaner and more sustainable power for heavy machinery than petroleum diesel, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. However, it is much more expensive to produce, has lower fuel economy and is less compatible with healthy engine functioning. “Right now, biofuels can’t compete with petroleum-based gasoline,” Lobban said. “We’re trying to change that.” The path to making alternative fuels economically viable options is a difficult one, Lobban said. The Center for Biomass Refining must source its own biomass materials to transport to the campus lab and convert to biofuel through arduous thermal conversion and catalytic processing, Lobban said. Although the current biofuel production chain seems unable to compare with the already established corn ethanol fuel sector, Lobban said, it is clear that cornbased biofuels are inferior. “Corn-based ethanol is a good fuel, but it doesn’t have as much power as, say, gasoline. If you use corn ethanol, you’re getting about 70 percent of the miles you would with regular gasoline,” he said.

Photo Illustration by Micah Wormley

On top of that, diverting U.S. corn to ethanol production drives up the price of U.S. grown meat because corn is a high-demand, go-to food source for livestock farmers, Lobban said. Another obstacle the center is working to overcome is how to repurpose the massive oil refinery infrastructure in the U.S. that is set up to process crude petroleum, specifically, Lobban said. The less the refineries need to be altered, the better, Lobban said. The research team believes the importance of fostering the demand for biofuels in the U.S. and other global markets is to call for people to move beyond being just environmentally

A production from the OU School of Dance will take place at 8 p.m. in the Rupel J. Jones Theatre. The dancers will perform various ballet routines as a part of the Oklahoma Festival Ballet. Do you want to see your organization’s campus event here? Visit OUDaily.com/events/submit to add your entry.

Javen WEston, Honors Engineering Liason

OU’s entrepreneurship program rises in rankings by Princeton Review OU’s entrepreneurship program has been ranked No. 2 among U.S. public universities by the Princeton Review. The entrepreneurship program at OU’s Michael F. Price College of Business gained three spots, moving from No. 5 to No. 2 in the annual rankings released last week, according to a press release. Jim Wheeler, executive director of OU’s entrepreneurship program, credits the success to an emphasis on experiential learning. “We bring entrepreneurs into the classroom to offer insight on specific industry trends and opportunities,” Wheeler said. Students in the program also travel to Facebook’s headquarters in Silicon Valley, SolarWinds, Inc. in Austin and other high-tech pharmaceutical companies in China and Europe, Wheeler said. Based on surveys sent to school administrators at more than 2,000 institutions from April to June 2013, the Princeton Review rankings recognize 25 undergraduate and 25 graduate programs for their excellence in entrepreneurship education, according to the release. Price College’s undergraduate program also moved up the rankings from No. 10 to the No. 6 spot in just one year, according to the release. This ranking accounts for both private and public universities throughout the country. The top entrepreneurship program rankings can be viewed at www.princetonreview.com/entrepreneur.

ª Biofuel – a fuel, like wood or ethanol, composed of or produced from biological raw materials. • Carbon neutral – making no net release of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, especially through offsetting emissions by planting trees. • Ethanol – a colorless volatile flammable liquid (C2H5OH) that is the intoxicating agent in liquors and also used as a solvent and in fuel.

sensitive and to consider political implications behind petroleum, Lobban said. “Those of us who are old enough to remember the 1970s oil embargoes remember the shock of fossil fuel production,” he said.

The Center for Biomass Refining has begun seeking partnerships with other universities and organizations in the region to continue the momentum of its biofuels research after the five-year grant expires later this year, Droegemeier said.

Research: Application Fun run: Annual 5k deadline approaches draws 952 students, Continued from page 1 community members “[The program] is all about maximizing the research potential of the university and helping students get real, first-hand experience working on cutting-edge research in the engineering fields.”

Business

AT A GLANCE Glossary

Continued from page 1

Of last year’s 54 applicants, 32 were selected to participate in the program, Weston said. Applications are submitted online, with interviews following. Finalists will be notified and partnered with a professor with whom they will participate in active research for the spring semester. “[The program] is all about maximizing the research potential of the university and helping students get real, firsthand experience working on cutting-edge research in the engineering fields,” said Weston. Students can apply for the Honors Engineering Research Experience online at ou.edu/coe/ Jordan Larsen jordan.c.larsen-1@ou.edu

AT A GLANCE Honors Engineering Research Experience Sample projects for Spring 2014: Project: 3D Finite Element Model of Chinchilla Ear to Stimulate Middle Disease and Function Disorder Professor: Rong Gan, aerospace and mechanical engineering Project: Activity, Power Usage and Happiness Professor: Samuel Cheng, electrical and computer engineering

“It’s cool to see so many people passionate with running, even kids run with their family,” Chen said. When some small kids crossed the finish line, people applauded. “It was so fun to see people gathering outside and “Just watching running together,” said Uche people running Ukuku, a second-year counseling psychology Ph.D. made me excited student. that I forgot to Soyeon Lee, meteorology leave.” junior and an exchange student from South Korea, said Soyeon Lee, she’d planned to leave after Meterology junior walking, but she stayed and cheered for the runners. “Just watching people running made me so excited that I forgot to leave,” Lee said. Members of Healthy Sooners also collected hundreds of cans for the Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma from the runners participating in the event. Simeng Dai Simeng.Dai-1@ou.edu

Project: Kinetics and Reaction Mechanisms in the Upgrading of Biofuels

UNIVERSITY THEATRE & SCHOOL OF DANCE

Oklahoma Festival Ballet

Professor: Daniel Resasco, chemical, bio and materials engineering Project: The Evolution of Nurturing Promotes the Evolution of Learning in Robots Professor: Dean Hougen, computer science For a complete list of projects, visit ou.edu/coe/

Molly Evans Assistant Campus Editor

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9/22/13 10:23 PM


Monday, September 23, 2013 •

SPORTS

Julia Nelson, sports editor Joe Mussatto, assistant editor dailysports@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/sports • Twitter: @OUDailySports

VOLLEYBALL

OU wins two in tourney Volleyball tested in Nike Invitational DEMETRIUS KEARNEY Volleyball Beat Reporter

The Sooners wrapped up the third and final match of the Nike Invitational with a 3-1 win over the LIU Brooklyn Blackbirds. The Sooners played host to their first home tournament of the season. While it wasn’t perfect, they managed to recover from their first home loss of the season in game two to end the tournament with an overall record of 2-1. Oklahoma kicked off the t o u r na m e nt w i t h a 3 - 0 sweep of the NebraskaO ma ha Mu s t a n g s, w h o faced the Sooners for the first time in program history. Oklahoma collected its eleventh win in its match a g a i n s t t h e Mu s t a n g s , making it the fastest team to obtain 11 wins in program history. However, the win was far from perfect. Mistakes and errors plagued the Sooners, keeping the Mustangs alive in the match. Those same errors would contribute to OU’s downfall in game two of the tournament. A very solid Miami Hurricane team forced the Sooners to match their intensity and fast tempo as they continuously attacked the Sooners offensively. Oklahoma failed to find their rhythm, both offensively and defensively, against the Hurricanes, who took full advantage of the mistakes and opportunities that the Sooners left

3

CHRIS JAMES/THE DAILY

OU sophomore middle blocker Kierra Holst sends the ball over Nebraska-Omaha’s sophomore middle blocker Diane Banderas and sophomore setter Bailey Baxter on Thursday in the 2013 Nike Invitational volleyball tournament held in McCasland Field House.

“We have to stop digging ourselves in a hole. We are giving up valuable points when we make careless mistakes.” SANTIAGO RESTREPO, VOLLEYBALL COACH

for them. The Hurricanes would go on to sweep OU in straight sets, resulting in their second loss of the season and first loss at home. The Sooners would redeem themselves in the third and final match of the tournament against the LIU Brooklyn Blackbirds who, like NebraskaOmaha, would be facing Oklahoma for the first time in program history. The Sooners took the court, determined to make up for the loss to Miami. OU

started off slowly but eventually found their rhythm and gained momentum throughout the duration of the match. However, the Blackbirds were not just going to accept defeat. They came alive in the second set, obtaining a win in the third set to force a fourth. The Sooners, however, regained focus and put together an excellent fourth set to win the match 3-1. Head coach Santiago Restrepo was pleased with his team’s performance but

still felt his team had improvements to make. Faster starts and consistent play throughout the match will be a must if they wish to remain successful when conference play begins. “The bottom line is that we have to start better,”Restrepo said. “We have to stop digging ourselves in a hole. We are giving up valuable points when we make careless mistakes. We have to start figuring out the team, instead of making them figure us out. If we do that, I feel like we can eventually put everything together.” Senior middle blocker and team captain Sallie McLaurin, who struggled throughout this tournament, finally found her rhythm against the Blackbirds. She recorded only 13 kills through the first two matches, but was back on her A-game, recording 14 kills against the Blackbirds. “As a team we played really well,”McLaurin said. “ We d e f i n i t e l y l e a r n e d from the match against Miami. I played better, and the team played better as a whole. Our chemistry was there and it definitely made a difference.” The Sooners are 12-2, but they are far from satisfied with their performance in this tournament. “There are a lot of things that we can fix, but I hate losing,” Restrepo said. “So if I had to grade our performance, I would say it’s between C and B.” Demetrius Kearney dvkearney1@gmail.com

OPINION

SOCCER

Sooner soccer loses late leads OU unable to close out on road, loses to BYU by one point, ties Utah RYAN GERBOSI

Soccer Beat Reporter

OU coach Matt Potter said earlier this season that OU needed to play the best to be the best. The Sooners finished their nonconference schedule this weekend and are not yet the best, but some tough matches against solid programs are teaching OU what it takes. OU was unable to emerge on top, collapsing against BYU 3-2 Thursday night before relinquishing another late lead and tying Utah 1-1 Sunday afternoon. In Provo, the Sooners started off hot against the No. 11 Cougars, scoring two goals in the first half and applying pressure through the first 45 minutes. Freshman Caren Nelson opened the scoring with her second goal of the year in the ninth minute. Daisy Cardona later scored to put OU on top 2-0 at the half. The lead held for most of the second half, but OU’s offensive pressure significantly dropped. The Sooners did not have a shot in the entire half and, instead, gave BYU a chance to come back. After a goal in the 83rd minute by Ella Johnson for the Cougars, BYU continued their pressure. Only a minute later, another run by BYU led to a foul in the box by OU defender Kathryn Watson, who was given a red card. Following the penalty kick to tie it, the Sooners could not extend the game to overtime with only ten players on the pitch. Jaiden Thornock was able to score off a rebound and give BYU the win in the 87th minute. The potential upset would have been OU’s first true road win of the season, as well as their first win against a ranked opponent, but the Sooners couldn’t close and walked away empty-handed. When the Sooners came out Sunday against Utah, the defense returned to the strong play that carried the team through 83 minutes against BYU. Both teams struggled to find offense in the first half and went to the break with no score.

AT A GLANCE SEE MORE ONLINE Scan this QR code with you phone to go straight to the rest of the story at oudaily.com

Alex Niblett, opinion editor dailyopinion@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/opinion • Twitter: @OUDailyOpinion

EDITORIAL

Controversial tweet reminds all to post carefully Our view: Sharing offensive posts online can lead

etc. — it’s important you be careful with what you choose to post. Regardless of the fact that the First Amendment states, “Congress shall make no law … abridging the freedom of speech,” you still need to be Be careful not to lose your job or put your profesmindful of the content you post. This applies to any sional career at risk by sharing insensitive, sensepictures you post or repost, as well as any personal less social media postings. Even though your First opinions you publicly express. Amendment rights are protected, you must also Many companies and businesses keep an eye on amend to the rules of the establishment you work at. your social profiles and postings, and while it may A journalism professor at the University of Kansas not seem fair, they technically have the right to fire was indefinitely suspended on administrayou if your statements abridge their statutes. tive leave because of a particularly offensive Here are a few tips on what to do to potenThe Our View tweet he posted. Following the shooting in is the majority tially avoid any misconceptions or conflicts opinion of the Washington, D.C., naval yard Sept. 16, with your personal postings: The Daily’s Professor David Guth decided to practice nine-member his First Amendment right, posting a tweet 1. Before posting anything, make sure it’s editorial board that said, “#NavyYardShooting The blood is rational. Yes, you are entitled to your own on the hands of the #NRA. Next time, let it be opinions, and no one is sitting here wanting YOUR sons and daughters. Shame on you. May God to take that away from you. But if your post generdamn you.” ates social discomfort or threatens peoples’ lives in The controversial tweet quickly started an inany way, it’s socially unacceptable and may result in tense national conversation enveloping two points: consequences. This also goes for libel — you can get whether or not he should have been fired because of in trouble with the law if you negatively post somehis tweet and what is or isn’t an appropriate thing to thing that can damage someone’s reputation, so be post, in general, on social media sites. careful. While we were shocked when we read the strongly-opinionated tweet, there is a more important 2. Create two separate accounts — a professional point to make here than to express our personal one and a social or personal one. It’s hardly ever a thoughts regarding whether the tweet was or wasn’t good idea to mix business with pleasure. The things appropriate. you post may not only reflect your own ideologies Any time you post your thoughts on a social but also the company you work for, so having only media site — whether it is Facebook, Twitter, a blog, one Facebook or Twitter account may get you in to job termination and other consequences, so be mindful when posting on social media.

trouble. When you create your personal Twitter or Facebook account, change the setting to private and choose who has access to your posts. 3. Another suggestion is making an anonymous account. If your goal really is to reach any and everyone online with your thoughts and opinions, posting them anonymously or under an alternate username is a great way to openly share your views without being personally scrutinized or penalized at your work place. 4. Taking one step above the concern of companies peering at your posts, consider avoiding specific words if you don’t want to entice the government to spy on you. The Department of Homeland Security released a list of keywords and phrases last year that it uses to monitor social media for possible indications of threats to the U.S. Posting thoughts and opinions online can be risky, so just be practical and respectful. You don’t want to go through the hassle Duth is going through. He isn’t the first person to have lost a job as a consequence of a social media post, and he won’t be the last. So the next time you consider posting your disappointment with someone, jab a company or institute or create posts using offensive words, refrain from clicking “post” and think of the consequences it might create first.

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9/22/13 9:08 PM


• Monday, September 23, 2013

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Research volunteers needed! Researchers at OU Health Sciences Center need healthy volunteers ages 18 to 30 who have a parent with or without a history of an alcohol or drug problem. Qualified participants will be compensated for their time. Call (405) 456-4303 to learn more about the study and to see if you qualify. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution.

STUDENTPAYOUTS.COM Paid survey takers needed in Norman 100% FREE to join. Click on Surveys.

Classified Display, Classified Card Ad or Game Sponsorship

Q L E B R S L S P A Z & Q Z P K I P W N G D K

W N X O A X H D Q L E F R S L Q P A Z M Q Z P

K I P W N G D K W N X O A X H D Q L E B R S L

Q P A Z M Q Z P K I P U N G D K W A X O A X H

D Q L E B R S L Q R E N T A L S K P P W N G D

HOROSCOPE

TAKE A SMALL STEP TO GET HEALTHY www.smallstep.gov

By Bernice Bede Osol

Copyright 2012, Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2013

NOTE TO PUB: DO NOT PRINT INFO BELOW, FOR ID ONLY. NO ALTERING OF AD COUNCIL PSAs. Healthy Lifestyles and Disease Prevention- Newspaper - (4 1/4 x 3 1/2) B&W - HLDYR1-N-12037-N “Fetch this Paper� 85 line screen digital files at Schawk: (212) 689-8585 Ref#: 211169

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Keep life simple and avoid over-the-top expenses or responsibilities that will hinder the ability to take care of your needs. Don’t be reluctant to do what’s best for you.

my friend’s got mental illness

SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Do whatever it takes to improve your living space. Any projects that can enhance the way you look and feel will help you project a better image. Choose good will over anger.

To a friend with mental illness, your caring and understanding greatly increases their chance of recovery. Visit whatadifference.samhsa.gov for more information. Mental Illness – What a difference a friend makes.





     

   



                      

Previous Solution         

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

Monday- Very Easy Tuesday-Easy Wednesday- Easy Thursday- Medium Friday - Hard

Instructions: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. That means that no number is repeated in any row, column or box.

oud-2013-09-23-a-004.indd 1

Everything you’ve experienced will contribute to how far you go in the year ahead. Focus on making money at your work and through investments. Don’t give in to bullying when it comes to something extravagant.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- A day trip that offers adventure or new experiences could prove advantageous. Let your free spirit take over, and be on the lookout for opportunity. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Don’t be shy, and make sure you loudly express your reasons for the decisions you make. Have confidence and show your leadership ability in a work situation, and you’ll gain the right followers. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Too much self-criticism can be debilitating. Look at your positive qualities and work at perfecting the things you enjoy most and do best. If you direct your focus correctly, success will follow. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -You’ve got what it takes to make a difference. Use your skills and offer

APTS. FURNISHED

HELP WANTED

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J Housing Rentals

Services

people help and suggestions, and you will make an impression that will lead to greater prosperity and stability. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Don’t allow personal problems to stand between you and your goals. Step outside your situation and establish what you need to do to excel. You need to plan your moves carefully to solidify your position. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Be aware of what’s going on around you before you take any irrevocable steps. Sticking to rules and regulations will protect you from dubious encounters. Educate yourself and investigate matters before you make a pledge. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Play around with ideas and options that could improve your living space. Joining new groups will lead to valuable networking opportunities. An open, receptive attitude will lead to good fortune. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Do your own thing. Don’t expect everyone to agree with you or help you. Letting go could be the smartest move you’ll make.

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Leader

I

(PPT)

If you are interested in one of these positions, please call our job line or access our website to find out the minimum qualifications. Selected applicants must pass background investigation, physical exam, and drug screen. A complete job announcement and application are available on our website at www.normanok.gov/hr/hr-job-postings or call 405-366-5482, or visit us at 201-C West Gray, Human Resources Dept., City of Norman

$5,500-$10,000

PAID EGG DONORS. All Races needed. Non-smokers, Ages 18-27, SAT>1100/ACT>24/GPA>3.00 Contact: info@eggdonorcenter.com Gymnastics Instructors for pre-school girls and boys classes, tumbling, P/T, flex sched. Bart Conner Gymnastics, 4477500. SEASONAL RETAIL GARDEN CENTER SOONER BLOOMERS IS NOW HIRING FOR FALL SEASON, FULL & PART TIME POSITIONS OPEN SEPT 20 - OCT 31. CALL TIM AT 405-550-6716 FOR INTERVIEW. Email debradlowe@gmail.com

ROOMS FURNISHED Furnished room, util., cable, wifi paid, share kitchen & bath, quiet, parking. M student preferred. $225/mo. 410-4407

COLLEGE SKI & BOARD WEEK

breckenridge

Vail • Beaver Creek • Keystone • Arapahoe Basin

20 Mountains. 5 Resorts. 1 Price. FROM ONLY

plus t/s

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1-800-SKI-WILD • 1-800-754-9453

CAYMAN’S seeks PT giftwrapper/stock room assistant. Flexible Hrs. Apply in person: 2001 W. Main St. CALL 360-3969.

K W N X O A X H D Q L D B R S L Q A A Z M Q Z

P K I P W N G D K W N X O A X H D R L E B R S

L Q P A Z M Q Z P K I P W N G D K T N X O A X

H D Q L E B R S L Q P A Z M Q Z P M I P W N G

D K W N X O A X H D Q L E B R S P E T S Z M Q

Z P K I P W N G D K W N X O A X H N Q L E B R

S B I C Y C L E S P K I P W N G D T W N X O A

X H D Q L E B R S L Q P A Z M Q Z S K I P W N

G D K W N X O A X H D Q L E B R S K Q P A Z M

This is the watch Stephen Hollingshead, Jr. was wearing when he encountered a drunk driver. Time of death 6:55pm.

Friends Don’t Let Friends Drive Drunk.

Photo by Michael Mazzeo

4

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker September 23, 2013

ACROSS 1 Baseball catchers 6 Reunion member 10 Discovery monitor 14 “___ From Hawaii,� 1973 Elvis album 15 Anger 16 “Bye� words? 17 Italian coins, formerly 18 TV dinner, e.g. 19 Change the style of 20 About to land 22 Washington, D.C. attraction 23 Audio part? 24 Bicuspid coating 26 Cattle classes 30 Building contractor’s job 32 Volcano’s discharge 33 It may be found near a drain 35 Buoy one’s spirits 39 Makes a declaration 41 Director Howard 42 Liz of “30 Rock� 43 Pullman sleeper 44 Aid illegalities 46 Tucked in for the night 47 Blue ___

9/23

Mountains 49 Over 51 Alternative to a Mercedes or BMW 54 Hot Springs, for one 55 Jack-in-thepulpit plant 56 Time not long past 63 Certain golf shot 64 A famous one is golden 65 Prosequi lead-in 66 Crinkly cabbage 67 Like an exam sans pencils 68 “If I Only Had a Brain� composer Harold 69 “Keep it� notation 70 Large carrying bag 71 “... to say the ___� DOWN 1 Able to go into men’s rooms 2 Russian skater Kulik 3 Unit of pressure 4 “How’s ___?� 5 Like windows and geishas 6 Combat covering 7 Instead of 8 Mongolia’s capital, ___ Bator

9 Performed a pinochle maneuver 10 “All in the Family� producer 11 Crosswise to a ship’s keel 12 Edge along 13 Circular coral reef island 21 Hide-andseek spot 25 “Away in a Manger,� for one 26 Have a big mouth 27 All-night dance party 28 Continuously 29 Hearing aid 30 Sun-baked brick 31 .00001 newton 34 Bring unwillingly 36 Dais kin 37 Low digits 38 Pigskin

receivers 40 Actor LaBeouf 45 Record, old-style 48 Timber problem 50 Nicholson film ___� Knowledge� 51 Kid’s ball game 52 Buddhist in Nirvana 53 Duplicity 54 Stone marker 57 Dollar overseas 58 Bed frame segment 59 Arthurian era, e.g. 60 She performed with Duke and Dizzy 61 Alternatives to lagers 62 Monthly bill, for many

PREVIOUS PUZZLE PUZZLE ANSWER PREVIOUS ANSWER

9/22 9/20

Š Uclick Š 2013 2013 Universal Universal Uclick www.upuzzles.com www.upuzzles.com

DID YOU HEAR THAT? By Mary Jersey

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Offer suggestions to people seeking help, but don’t take on responsibilities that don’t belong to you. Emotionally charged situations will turn into a battle if you aren’t diplomatic. A change will do you good. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Focus on participation today, be it in your community or in your career. Becoming more involved in a cause or group will lead to new friends and lasting relationships.

9/22/13 7:05 PM


Monday, September 23, 2013 •

LIFE&ARTS

5

Megan Deaton, life & arts editor Tony Beaulieu, assistant editor dailyent@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/life&arts • Twitter: @OUDailyArts

Welcome to Comedy Week. The Daily is dedicating five days of Life &

COMEDY WEEK

Arts pages to highlighting comedy here on the OU campus through satirical columns and features on local comedy happenings.

I’m not a clown, I’m a person I

magine, as you’re walking to the grocery store, you accidently slip on a banana peel. But instead of anyone helping you up, or asking if you’re okay, they point and laugh. As you clumsily attempt to get up and save your dignity — you fall again on the same banana peel. Imagine having to get to work by piling into a tiny car with 29 other people. And at lunch, instead of eating the pie in the fridge, someone throws it into your face. This is what I have to deal with every day. Laugh it up, have a good time. That clown doesn’t have any feelings, does he? In your reverie of amusement, I bet you never even stopped to think, “Hey, maybe this clown is also a human being.” And maybe, just maybe, the outrageous hair, the red button nose and the colorful skin patterns are symptoms. It’s called Chaplinesia. I am one of 1.5 million sufferers around the world. The disease is hereditary, some evolutionary biologists have even argued that it’s not a disease at all, but a minority ethnic group that developed in some obscure region in Eastern Europe. Yes, my condition also makes me prone to fits of pie-ing people in the face,

ASSISTANT L&A EDITOR

Tony Beaulieu anthonybeaulieu78@gmail.com @tonybe787

IN DEPTH Fear of Clowns Coulrophobia: a term meaning “fear of clowns” dating from the 1980s. Coulrophobia is a common fear, often referenced in pop culture.

shooting water out of the flower in my lapel and tripping over everything in sight. Other symptoms associated with Chaplinesia are extreme physical clumsiness, mental aloofness and no control whatsoever over the pitch of one’s voice. The circus is usually the only place a person like me can get an honest day’s work. Like most clowns, I get paid in peanuts — sometimes literally — and thus have to resort to extreme measures when commuting to work. Still laughing? Didn’t

AARON MAGNESS/THE DAILY

Clowns have to go to work like regular people too.

think so. I won’t get near bananas or pies anymore. I can’t bend over and smell a flower without the intense fear that it will spray me in the face. The point I’m trying to make is that the life of a clown is a hard life. And

MUST STAY WEEKEND CONCERT

when you laugh and point at me, well, it doesn’t make my horrible existence any better. A lot of minority groups have come a long way in the last one hundred years, but what strides have been made in clown rights? It is not okay to treat us

clowns as second-class citizens. We demand representation, we demand dignity and most of all, we demand respect. I have a dream, friends, a dream that one day little clown children will play on the same playground as all the other children. And

when those clown children slip and bonk their heads on the monkey bars, the other children will not laugh, but help. Tony Beaulieu is a film and media studies senior.

WE WANT YOU! TRADITIONS SPIRITS is currently accepting applications for BARTENDERS, BEVERAGE SERVERS and BARBACKS at RIVERWIND CASINO

CHRISTOPHER JAMES/THE DAILY

Amy Heidemann of Karmin brings an OU student onstage for a duet to Karmin’s cover of “Look at Me Now.” Karmin headlined the concert with opener Bryce Vine as part of the Campus Activities Council Must Stay Weekend.

SEE MORE ONLINE Visit OUDaily.com for the complete story oudaily.com/news/ae

www.themaneman.net HIGHLIGHT OR COLOR WITH HAIRCUT Walk-Ins Welcome Open 7 Days a Week 9am - 9pm weekdays 1215 W. Lindsey 364-1325

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Are you on Twitter? Stay connected with The Oklahoma Daily

@OUDaily @OUDailyArts @OUDailySports @OUDailyOpinion

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COOKS, SERVERS, HOSTS, DISHWASHERS and BARTENDERS at CHIPS ‘N ALES FRONT DESK, BELLMAN and HOUSEKEEPERS at RIVERWIND HOTEL Our employees are our most valuable assets. We strive to recognize our employess with top pay, recognition programs, sales contests, appreciation rewards, anniversary and birthday gifts and more. Please apply in person or online at www.traditionsspirits.com 2813 SE 44th St Norman, OK 73072 Questions? Please call 405.392.4550

9/22/13 6:58 PM


6

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9/22/13 7:06 PM


Monday, September 23, 2013