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Sports: It may be a bye week for Oklahoma, but the football team has been hard at work (Page 6) W W W.O U DA I LY.C O M

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HOUSINg aND FOOD

Unused meal points used for H&F costs Leftover funds used to cover Housing and Food’s remaining overhead budget KAITLYN UNDERWOOD Campus reporter

Sooners left $63,456.01 in unused meal points on university meal plans last year, about $20,000 less than what went unclaimed in 2011-2012, according to Housing and Food Services records. Mo n e y f ro m u nu s e d m ea l p o i nt s g o e s towa rd

covering Housing and Food’s overhead costs, said Dave Annis, Housing and Food director. Housing and Food’s sole source of revenue comes from the money students pay for their meal plans, Annis said. Since Housing and Food generates its own revenue, it doesn’t get any money from OU or from the state. In fact, Annis explained that Housing and Food Services pays utilities to the university, including about $6 million in costs last year. Students prepay for their meal plans each semester, and the cost of a freshman meal plan this year is $1,973 per

semester, Annis said. The prepaid meal plans are loaded onto Sooner OneCards, which also serve as student IDs. The meal plans are priced according to how much it costs Housing and Food to run their operations on both the Norman campus and the OU Health Sciences campus, Annis said. “We price the plan to cover all the overheads, and we try to have a little bit leftover so that we can invest and do new projects, like the new university market that’s going to come see FooD pAGe 2

eNtertaININg tHe Oval

Students participate in blitz ball competitions on South Oval

CArA JoHnson/tHe dAiLy

Above: OU’s leadership & Volunteer team cover the south Oval with red stress balls for “red Ball Blitz” thursday morning. the Oval contained 1,018 balls to symbolize the starting date of their Ball Drive (October 18), asking students to donate newsports balls for the schools in Moore.

JACQueLine eBy/tHe dAiLy

weatHer

left: Natalie Wallis, marketing junior, drinks pond water through a specialized filtered straw during the Creativity festival on the south Oval, thursday afternoon.

StUDY aBrOaD

Campus black-out leads to canceled Writing class gears classes, affects one-third of facilities up for travel abroad Power outage caused by safety features in system

Week-long course offered for students who are interested in trip to Puerto Rico

REAGAN MARTIN

MIKE BREKSTOVENSKY

At least one-third of buildings on campus lost power for about 30 minutes during the early afternoon on Thursday, releasing many students from class early. The power outage was caused by a problem with the OG&E system, and as a safety precaution OU’s power was shut down automatically, said Brian Ellis, director of OU’s Facilities Management. Ellis said he didn’t know what caused the problem with OG&E’s system, but he assumed it could’ve been something as simple as a lightning strike. Professors canceled classes because they didn’t want to teach in the dark, and some students got out of a psychology test because of the black-out. “Our professor said ‘no class’ when we walked into the room - and we had a test,” said Mariah Norwood, a Psychology senior.

had power outages in this building before, but never this close to news time.” Drew Farley, a journalism senior and OU Nightly crew chief, said he waited in a pitch black control room

Communicating Culture, a week long study abroad travel writing course, will be holding information sessions next week for students interested in a trip to Puerto Rico in January. At noon on Sept. 24 and 25, and 7:00 p.m. on Sept. “We’ve been doing 26, in Room 3120 of Gaylord this class for a few Hall, students can attend an years now, and information session about student responses Communicating Culture: Travel Writing in Puerto have been very Rico. positive.” Communicating Culture is a week-long course on JOCelyN PeDersON, the origins, motives and GAylOrD COlleGe iNstrUCtOr contexts of travel writing taught by professors Meta G. Carstarphen and Jocelyn Pedersen. The course is worth six credit hours and will be held before regular classes start. “We’ve been doing this class for a few years now, and student responses have been very positive,” said Pedersen. “It’s

see XXXXXX pAGe 2

see CAMPUs pAGe 2

Campus reporter

Campus reporter

heATher Brown/The DAilyn

After a brief power outage on thursday, students walk through the rain down the south Oval back to the dorms and other classes.

The OU Nightly team in Gaylord Hall had to cancel Thursday’s show due to the power outage. “We were in a holding pattern for our systems to come back, and when that didn’t happen by 3:30, we called it off,” said Bob Dickey, OU Nightly news director and instructor. “We’ve

L&A: Never been to the ballet? Our columnist tells you what to expect at the Oklahoma Festival Ballet (Page 5)

Opinion: Sign the pledge to never text and drive — no text is worth a fatality (Page 3)

VOL. 99, NO. 24 © 2013 OU Publications Board free — Additional copies 25¢

iNsiDe tODAy Campus......................2 Clas si f ie ds................4 L i f e & A r t s .................. 5 o p inio n..................... 3 spor ts........................6 Visit oUDaily.com for more

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9/19/13 10:28 PM


2

• Friday, September 20, 2013

Campus

OUDaily.com ›› Read what a panel discussed about how students can engage in social activism at OUDaily.com

Arianna Pickard, campus editor Paighten Harkins and Molly Evans, assistant editors dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com • Twitter: @OUDaily

Food: Point-based system benefits students Continued from page 1

Today around campus A meet up for graduate students and faculty will take place from 10 a.m. to noon in Wagner Hall, Room 280. Refreshments will be provided. A free screening of “Monsters University” will be shown at 6 p.m., 9 p.m. and midnight in Meacham Auditorium in the Oklahoma Memorial Union. A battle of the bands will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. on the East Lawn of the Oklahoma Memorial Union. The concert is a part of CAC’s Oklahoma Creativity BoomerFest. A volleyball game against Miami will be held at 7 p.m. at McCasland Field House. Students get in FREE with I.D. A production from the OU School of Dance will take place at 8 p.m. in the Rupel J. Jones Theatre. The dancers will perform various ballet routines as a part of the Oklahoma Festival Ballet.

Saturday, Sept. 21 An interactive walk-through for human trafficking awareness will take place from 3 to 5 p.m. at Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. Congressman James Lankford will speak at the event as a part of CAC’s Oklahoma Creativity Freedom. A volleyball game against Long Island Univeristy at 7 p.m. at McCasland Field House. Students get in free with I.D. A production from the OU School of Dance will take place at 8 p.m. in the Rupel J. Jones Theatre. The dancers will perform various ballet routines as a part of the Oklahoma Festival Ballet. A free concert from Karmin will be held at 8 p.m. on the East Lawn of the Oklahoma Memorial Union. The Must Stay Weekend Concert will open with Bryce Vine.

Sunday, Sept. 22 A performance from the OU Symphony Orchestra will be held at 3 p.m. in Sharp Concert Hall. Tickets are $9 for adults, $5 for students. A production from the OU School of Dance will take place at 3 p.m. in the Rupel J. Jones Theatre. The dancers will perform various ballet routines as a part of the Oklahoma Festival Ballet.

MONDAY, SEPT. 23 An art exhibition from the Zhang Sisters will be open in the Lightwell Gallery in the School of Art & Art History from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday until Oct. 8.

up in the Union,” Annis said. The meal plans are designed to give students options, such as choosing either more meal exchanges or more meal points according to individual preferences, Annis said. OU is unique to other universities because students are allowed to use their meal plans to pay for others if they so choose, such as swiping a Sooner OneCard multiple times to bring guests to the cafeteria or other university restaurant, he said. “Our challenge is to give students a lot of different ways to use it, so that they feel like they’re getting a great value for their meal plan,” Annis said. Meal points, which can be used like currency to pay for meals or for groceries from the campus convenience store Xcetera, can carry over from the fall to spring semester. Meals, however, never roll over from semester to semester. Meal plans do not carry over due to IRS regulations, Annis said. The IRS directs a board plan as a plan that starts and ends on specific dates, and by sticking to those guidelines, students do not have to pay sales tax on purchases made through meal plans, he said.

Cara Johnson/The Daily

Amanda Blake, freshman University College student, uses an exchange to grab a snack at Crossroads after class.

If meals were allowed to carry over, students would have to pay sales tax on food, something Housing and Food feels would not be in students’ best interest, he said. OU also doesn’t allow students to use S ooner OneCards as credit cards because state law forbids universities from extending credit to students, Annis said. Although the meal points carry over through the year, if a students has points

Creativity festival

Four state politicians to visit OU for discussion on American politics Four state politicians will visit campus Friday to talk about mending the divide in American politics. The event will take place from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., on Sept. 20 in the Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Scholars Room, said Andy Stewart, a creative consultant with the Oklahoma Creativity Festival. Senator Rick Brinkley, as well as several politically active students will give short speeches about their view of the bipartisanship before the discussion, Stewart said. This is the first meeting talking about the troubles of partisanship within politics, Stewart said. Over 50 students have registered for the lunch, Stewart said. Simeng Dai, Campus Reporter

leftover at the end of the year they cannot be refunded. “At the end of the spring semester, if you don’t use them you lose them,” Annis said. However, a student can be reimbursed their Sooner Sense funds at any time. The Sooner OneCard draws from two different sources of funds, the prepaid meal plan and the voluntary addition of money to Sooner Sense. Sooner Sense can be used for things other than university restaurants, such as

laundry, the bookstore and vending machines, Annis said. Students can also use Sooner Sense to purchase food, said Frank Henry, director of food services. Unspent money on meal plans translates into a saving in food costs, Annis said. “Whether you use your card or not, that money doesn’t go anywhere else, it’s all within that food service budget,” he said.

travel: Class prepares students for island trip Continued from page 1 just a really fun time for everyone.” Students will travel across Puerto Rico, learning about the island’s culture and how travel writers convey cultural complexities to their readers. The professors will guide the students in hands-on group writing exercises and cultural interpretations. “We do most of the normal coursework in Norman before the trip, so most of the work we do on the trip is hands-on,” said Pedersen. Communicating Culture is open to students of all majors. For more information, contact Dr. Carstarphen at mcarstarphen@ou.edu, or Jocelyn Pedersen at jpedersen@ ou.edu.

power outage: OU Nightly, test takers affected

A letter-writing event will be held at 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the first floor lobby of the Oklahoma Memorial Union. The letters will be sent to children in the hospital.

Tuesday, SEPT. 24 A free concert by Jeffery Weaver on piano will be held from noon to 1 p.m. for Mid Day Music in Oklahoma Memorial Union’s food court. A workshop on time management will take place at 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. at Lissa and Cy Wagner Hall, Room 245. The workshop is a part of the Student Success Series. Do you want to see your organization’s campus event here? Visit OUDaily.com/events/submit to add your entry. Heather Brown/The Daily

After a brief power outage on Thursday, students walk through the rain down the South Oval back to the dorms and other classes.

Corrections A p. 1 cutline in Thursday’s edition of The Daily with a photo of a student sitting in Headington Hall misspelled the name of the student in the photo. The student’s name is Eric Striker. The Oklahoma Daily is committed to serving readers with accurate coverage and welcomes your comments about information that may require correction or clarification. To contact us with corrections, email us at dailynews@ou.edu. Visit OUDaily.com/corrections for an archive of our corrections

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Continued from page 1 as things slowly booted back up. “But our editorial team’s servers were down, so we could have had a technical show but there was nothing we could do to get the scripts done because they couldn’t access the software,” Farley said. While many buildings lining the South Oval were blacked out during

the power otage, other parts of campus were not affected. “I didn’t even know there was a power outage - I was in Felgar,” said Ashley Stevens, a University college freshman. Some buildings weren’t affected by the power outage because OU takes electrical feeds from multiple sources, Ellis said. “To kind of spread the risk out, I guess,” he said. So when one of the electrical feeds

was shut off, the others remained operational, he said. Ellis said he would estimate that power has gone out about three or four times this year, and the most common cause has been a problem on OG&E’s side. There was one other incidence where it was a problem with OU’s system, but that’s since been repaired. Ellis said OU restored power within about 20 to 30 minutes on Thursday. “It’s a fairly routine process for us as far as getting power restored,” he said.

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HAPPY H U UR

2PM TO 5PM & 1 HOUR BEFORE CLOSE

$1.75 Bud/Bud Light $3.50 select rolls 1/2 off select appetizers Confucius says, “Talk doesn’t cook rice.”

616 Bud Wilkinson Dr. * 364-0255 Worship 10:30 * www.uccfamily.org Dr. James Taylor, Pastor Your church home away from home.

105 12th avenue se east 12th & alameda 405.701.8899 www.oasianfusion.com

9/19/13 10:28 PM


2

• Friday, September 20, 2013

Campus

OUDaily.com ›› Read what a panel discussed about how students can engage in social activism at OUDaily.com

Arianna Pickard, campus editor Paighten Harkins and Molly Evans, assistant editors dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com • Twitter: @OUDaily

Food: Point-based system benefits students Continued from page 1

Today around campus A meet up for graduate students and faculty will take place from 10 a.m. to noon in Wagner Hall, Room 280. Refreshments will be provided. A free screening of “Monsters University” will be shown at 6 p.m., 9 p.m. and midnight in Meacham Auditorium in the Oklahoma Memorial Union. A battle of the bands will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. on the East Lawn of the Oklahoma Memorial Union. The concert is a part of CAC’s Oklahoma Creativity BoomerFest. A volleyball game against Miami will be held at 7 p.m. at McCasland Field House. Students get in FREE with I.D. A production from the OU School of Dance will take place at 8 p.m. in the Rupel J. Jones Theatre. The dancers will perform various ballet routines as a part of the Oklahoma Festival Ballet.

Saturday, Sept. 21 An interactive walk-through for human trafficking awareness will take place from 3 to 5 p.m. at Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. Congressman James Lankford will speak at the event as a part of CAC’s Oklahoma Creativity Freedom. A volleyball game against Long Island Univeristy at 7 p.m. at McCasland Field House. Students get in free with I.D. A production from the OU School of Dance will take place at 8 p.m. in the Rupel J. Jones Theatre. The dancers will perform various ballet routines as a part of the Oklahoma Festival Ballet. A free concert from Karmin will be held at 8 p.m. on the East Lawn of the Oklahoma Memorial Union. The Must Stay Weekend Concert will open with Bryce Vine.

Sunday, Sept. 22 A performance from the OU Symphony Orchestra will be held at 3 p.m. in Sharp Concert Hall. Tickets are $9 for adults, $5 for students. A production from the OU School of Dance will take place at 3 p.m. in the Rupel J. Jones Theatre. The dancers will perform various ballet routines as a part of the Oklahoma Festival Ballet.

MONDAY, SEPT. 23 An art exhibition from the Zhang Sisters will be open in the Lightwell Gallery in the School of Art & Art History from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday until Oct. 8.

up in the Union,” Annis said. The meal plans are designed to give students options, such as choosing either more meal exchanges or more meal points according to individual preferences, Annis said. OU is unique to other universities because students are allowed to use their meal plans to pay for others if they so choose, such as swiping a Sooner OneCard multiple times to bring guests to the cafeteria or other university restaurant, he said. “Our challenge is to give students a lot of different ways to use it, so that they feel like they’re getting a great value for their meal plan,” Annis said. Meal points, which can be used like currency to pay for meals or for groceries from the campus convenience store Xcetera, can carry over from the fall to spring semester. Meals, however, never roll over from semester to semester. Meal plans do not carry over due to IRS regulations, Annis said. The IRS directs a board plan as a plan that starts and ends on specific dates, and by sticking to those guidelines, students do not have to pay sales tax on purchases made through meal plans, he said.

Cara Johnson/The Daily

Amanda Blake, freshman University College student, uses an exchange to grab a snack at Crossroads after class.

If meals were allowed to carry over, students would have to pay sales tax on food, something Housing and Food feels would not be in students’ best interest, he said. OU also doesn’t allow students to use S ooner OneCards as credit cards because state law forbids universities from extending credit to students, Annis said. Although the meal points carry over through the year, if a students has points

Creativity festival

Four state politicians to visit OU for discussion on American politics Four state politicians will visit campus Friday to talk about mending the divide in American politics. The event will take place from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., on Sept. 20 in the Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Scholars Room, said Andy Stewart, a creative consultant with the Oklahoma Creativity Festival. Senator Rick Brinkley, as well as several politically active students will give short speeches about their view of the bipartisanship before the discussion, Stewart said. This is the first meeting talking about the troubles of partisanship within politics, Stewart said. Over 50 students have registered for the lunch, Stewart said. Simeng Dai, Campus Reporter

leftover at the end of the year they cannot be refunded. “At the end of the spring semester, if you don’t use them you lose them,” Annis said. However, a student can be reimbursed their Sooner Sense funds at any time. The Sooner OneCard draws from two different sources of funds, the prepaid meal plan and the voluntary addition of money to Sooner Sense. Sooner Sense can be used for things other than university restaurants, such as

laundry, the bookstore and vending machines, Annis said. Students can also use Sooner Sense to purchase food, said Frank Henry, director of food services. Unspent money on meal plans translates into a saving in food costs, Annis said. “Whether you use your card or not, that money doesn’t go anywhere else, it’s all within that food service budget,” he said.

travel: Class prepares students for island trip Continued from page 1 just a really fun time for everyone.” Students will travel across Puerto Rico, learning about the island’s culture and how travel writers convey cultural complexities to their readers. The professors will guide the students in hands-on group writing exercises and cultural interpretations. “We do most of the normal coursework in Norman before the trip, so most of the work we do on the trip is hands-on,” said Pedersen. Communicating Culture is open to students of all majors. For more information, contact Dr. Carstarphen at mcarstarphen@ou.edu, or Jocelyn Pedersen at jpedersen@ ou.edu.

power outage: OU Nightly, test takers affected

A letter-writing event will be held at 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the first floor lobby of the Oklahoma Memorial Union. The letters will be sent to children in the hospital.

Tuesday, SEPT. 24 A free concert by Jeffery Weaver on piano will be held from noon to 1 p.m. for Mid Day Music in Oklahoma Memorial Union’s food court. A workshop on time management will take place at 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. at Lissa and Cy Wagner Hall, Room 245. The workshop is a part of the Student Success Series. Do you want to see your organization’s campus event here? Visit OUDaily.com/events/submit to add your entry. Heather Brown/The Daily

After a brief power outage on Thursday, students walk through the rain down the South Oval back to the dorms and other classes.

Corrections A p. 1 cutline in Thursday’s edition of The Daily with a photo of a student sitting in Headington Hall misspelled the name of the student in the photo. The student’s name is Eric Striker. The Oklahoma Daily is committed to serving readers with accurate coverage and welcomes your comments about information that may require correction or clarification. To contact us with corrections, email us at dailynews@ou.edu. Visit OUDaily.com/corrections for an archive of our corrections

www.themaneman.net HIGHLIGHT OR COLOR WITH HAIRCUT Walk-Ins Welcome Open 7 Days a Week 9am - 9pm weekdays 1215 W. Lindsey 364-1325 1/4 mile W of Campus

129 N.W. 24th Ave 360-4422 Main & Porter

127 N. Porter 360-4247 W. Main & 24th

oud-2013-09-20-a-001,002.indd 2

$55.99 HAIRCUT

Also Available: Straight razor shaves Brazilian Blow-outs Extentions

THE WORKS

SHAMPOO, HAIRCUT AND BLOWDRY

$12.99 $17.99 NON-REQUESTED STYLIST ONLY

Continued from page 1 as things slowly booted back up. “But our editorial team’s servers were down, so we could have had a technical show but there was nothing we could do to get the scripts done because they couldn’t access the software,” Farley said. While many buildings lining the South Oval were blacked out during

the power otage, other parts of campus were not affected. “I didn’t even know there was a power outage - I was in Felgar,” said Ashley Stevens, a University college freshman. Some buildings weren’t affected by the power outage because OU takes electrical feeds from multiple sources, Ellis said. “To kind of spread the risk out, I guess,” he said. So when one of the electrical feeds

was shut off, the others remained operational, he said. Ellis said he would estimate that power has gone out about three or four times this year, and the most common cause has been a problem on OG&E’s side. There was one other incidence where it was a problem with OU’s system, but that’s since been repaired. Ellis said OU restored power within about 20 to 30 minutes on Thursday. “It’s a fairly routine process for us as far as getting power restored,” he said.

VXVKLVWLUIU\VWHDNVFRFNWDLOVÀQHVDNHDQGZLQH

HAPPY H U UR

2PM TO 5PM & 1 HOUR BEFORE CLOSE

$1.75 Bud/Bud Light $3.50 select rolls 1/2 off select appetizers Confucius says, “Talk doesn’t cook rice.”

616 Bud Wilkinson Dr. * 364-0255 Worship 10:30 * www.uccfamily.org Dr. James Taylor, Pastor Your church home away from home.

105 12th avenue se east 12th & alameda 405.701.8899 www.oasianfusion.com

9/19/13 10:28 PM


Friday, September 20, 2013 •

OPINION

3

Alex Niblett, opinion editor dailyopinion@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/opinion • Twitter: @OUDailyOpinion

editorial

Sooners — don’t text and drive Our View: Texting

and driving is a simple act that risks severe consequences. Refrain from texting and driving to prevent future incidents from occurring.

Every decision we make affects the next moment we take a breath — we constantly have to think before we speak or act. This includes thinking before you text while driving. If you’ve been listening to the radio or watching Youtube videos lately, you’ve probably seen or heard a commercial referring to texting and driving. The commercial, affiliated with the “It can wait” campaign, is narrated by a young man who texted “I love you” when he collided with another vehicle. The incident took three children’s lives and haunts his conscience on a daily basis. “There’s never a day that I wake up and don’t think about it,” he said. This commercial is one of several that have been created throughout the last year by various companies in an effort to convince people that texting and driving isn’t

worth the consequences it threatens reality to present. It sounds obvious that driving and texting at the same time isn’t safe, but for whatever reason, some people don’t understand the severity of distracting themselves while driving. More than 9 people are killed each day in the U.S. and more than 1,060 people are injured in crashes that involve a distracted driver, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In June 2011, more than 196 billion text messages were sent or received in the U.S., a number the CDC claims is nearly 50 percent more than June 2009. It took only two years to almost double the number of text messages exchanged between people in the U.S. Here we are two years later — it’s a fair guess 196 billion has been breached. We haven’t successfully gained any extra time in a day, nor has time slowed down. So when do we have time to text so often? A lot of people decide that while driving, it’s an okay thing to do. But it’s really not. Our nation is on its

pledge at Itcanwait.com. Tulsa also joined the Death takes the wheel national campaign when Mayor Dewey Bartlett kicked off the It Can Wait campaign yesterday at City Hall. It’s not just Oklahoma that’s turning their focus to the cause. Governor Malloy of Conn. Has declared today as “No Text and Drive Day.” The movement is quickly gaining momentum, and if you haven’t given it much attention, it’s one cause you should vow to support. The point is, that two-word text message you’re tempted to send is not worth the loss of provided art someone’s life. NO text, for that matter, is worth join the other 41 soon. their temptation to text way to banning phone someone’s life, includLaws can be set in while driving. usage completely while ing your own. If it is dire Yesterday was national you send a text message, citizens are on the road. stone, but it’s up to each “Drive 4 Pledges” day. Washington was the first one of us to make the pull over and send it. OU and OSU teamed up You may feel silly, but state to pass a texting ban cautious decision of whether or not to text through AT&T and its in 2007, and today 41 that’s no comparison to while behind the wheel. It Can Wait movement states and Washington the feeling of being reThe GHSA stated that (mentioned earlier) to D.C. ban text messagsponsible for the death of beginning in October, all support the Oklahoma ing while driving for all someone’s child, someof the driving laws will be Collegiate It Can Wait drivers, according to one’s sister, someone’s primary enforcement, Challenge, the first of its partner, someone’s loved Governor’s Highway meaning an officer may kind. Both universities Safety Association. one. Be smart and put cite a driver for using were challenged to raise your phone down. Think Oklahoma is one of the a handheld cellphone awareness of the dangers ahead before you reach nine remaining states without any other trafof texting while driving that has not yet banned for your phone while and get students to sign driving next time. texting and driving for all fic offense taking place. the pledge to never text drivers. Hopefully with This is a positive thing while driving again, the growing number of — hopefully it defers Comment on this at supporters, our state will people from caving in to which you can take the OUDaily.com

column

column

Petraeus deserves respect

Accepting inequality provides opportunity

opinion columnist

to connect him to the worsening conditions in that nation today, consider this: In 2008, as Petraeus’ command in Iraq neared its end, he acknowledged the fragility of the gains made there. Without a sustained American effort, he beCorbin Brown lieved, they would not surbrown.corbin.h@ou.edu vive. And the general was correct. avid Petraeus In July 2011, a congresjust can’t catch sionally appointed special a break. Now a visiting professor at the City inspector released a report detailing Iraq’s deterioratUniversity of New York, ing security situation. The Petraeus recently came United Nations described under fire from a mob of July 2013 as being Iraq’s unruly students as he was deadliest month in over five walking to his first class. Following the man like flies years. The violence shows on honey, members of this no sign of stopping. Just this month, an atthrong hurled such epithets tack on a Shiite mosque as, “war criminal,” “disin Baghdad resulted in gusting imperialist” and significant casualties. The “murderer.” coordinated bomb and suiIn this case, the volume cide attack left 33 people and vitriol acted as comdead and over 50 wounded. pensation for substance. A terrorist seen fumbling Petraeus deserves praise with his suicide belt followfrom these students, not ing the first two explosions scorn. was summarily stabbed to Those who were harassing Petraeus on September death by a group of locals. The list of recent terrorist 9 seem unaware that the man was an essential figure attacks in Iraq is a long and in the liberation of the Iraqi bloody one and the abpeople from a brutal tyrant. sence of Petraeus’ forceful leadership does nothing Aside from launching but extend it. numerous reconstruction These CUNY students, projects and public works while certainly less of a programs after Saddam threat than Islamic terrorHussein’s removal from ists, still pose a problem. power, Petraeus oversaw the training of Iraqi security The methods they used to display their distaste forces. Before you attempt

D

to put a halt to what one of the shouting students said would occur before “every class.” Such behavior only soils the reputation of that university. Imagine if an OU professor was verbally excoriated by students on his way to a lecture. Those involved in the disturbance would appear uninhibited by considerations of courtesy or tolerance. The University, David Petraeus whose stated goals include forging a strong for Petraeus are nothing sense of community, short of childish. Like a would in turn appear toddler screaming and cry- ineffectual. ing because their mommy The invectives levwouldn’t buy them the ce- eled at David Petraeus real or the toy they wanted, demonstrate an astonthese students chose the ishingly critical attitude most ineffective and aurally towards education and abrasive routine. freedom of thought. How a group of college Regardless of one’s postudents believed verbal litical beliefs, one must harassment would win acknowledge that the them any supporters or actions of the CUNY garner a reaction from the students involved in naturally stoic Petraeus is this event must be conbeyond me. demned. Should their acThe university is indeed tions go unpunished, the a place where political academic environments pluralism and freedom of of all universities will speech should be upheld become increasingly susbut this does not excuse ceptible to the raucousany student from accosting ness and anti-pluralism and berating a professor in of an emboldened few. public. Do not think for a moment that my opinion on Corbin Brown is a this matter has any ideolog- University College ical basis. I believe that it is freshman. in the best interest of CUNY

W

Opinion Columnist hen discussing ideals and rights, equality can easily exist. But here is the thing: rights and ideals only exist in our minds. We invent them and can imagine them as equal among us. That we imagine rights this Brandon Frye way, strive for equality, these bramfry@gmail.com are good things. That we forget the truth of reality in the effort is bad. Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, you say, Jefferson? A child with cancer holds onto life. A battered wife longs for liberty. The road set for the pursuit of happiness is paved with hard work, failure, and if we try, catching up with the happiness we have been chasing. No road is the same. No road is equal. These idealistic “truths” are not self-evident when applied to the grit of the real world. Fully believing in them can harm as much as they help. Equality proves itself false in many ways; we see it all around us but are blind. Not all of us are blind, but that is the point. Some of us are blind, and that is blatantly not equality. Some of us are short and cannot reach the cereal on top of the refrigerator. Some of us want children but cannot conceive. Biologically, some of us are dealt bad hands. Accepting inequality is not bad. It is empowering. As an example, imagine a student applying for colleges who believes all men—and women— are created equal. What need would this student have for bettering his or her ACT score? None, because this student is blind to the competition involved. And that is the same oversight many of us fall into by ignoring inequality. By accepting inequality, the student works to become better, knowing others out there are better and applying for the same colleges. Equality takes no work and allows for no competition.

The Oklahoma Daily is a public forum, the University of Oklahoma’s independent student voice and an entirely student-run publication.

Kyle Margerum Blayklee Buchanan Taylor Bolton Arianna Pickard Carmen Forman Alex Niblett

contact us

oud-2013-09-20-a-003.indd 1

Editor in Chief Managing Editor Print Editor Campus Editor Special Projects Opinion Editor

Megan Deaton Julia Nelson Heather Brown Kearsten Howland Judy Gibbs Robinson

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Letters should concentrate on issues, not personalities, and must be fewer than 250 words, typed and signed by the author(s). Letters will be edited for accuracy, space and style. Students must list their major and classification. To submit letters, email dailyopinion@ou.edu. Our View is the voice of the Editorial Board, which consists of nine student editors. The board meets at 5 p.m. Sunday to Thursday in 160 Copeland Hall. Board meetings are open to the public.

See more online Visit OUDaily.com for the complete story oudaily.com/opinion

Guest columns are accepted and printed at the editor’s discretion. Columnists’ and cartoonists’ opinions are their own and not necessarily the views or opinions of The Oklahoma Daily Editorial Board. To advertise in The Oklahoma Daily, contact advertising manager Kearsten Howland by calling 405-325-8964 or emailing dailyads@ou.edu. One free copy of The Daily is available to members of the OU community. Additional copies may be purchased for 25 cents by contacting The Daily business office at 405-325-2522.

9/19/13 10:29 PM


4

• Friday, September 20, 2013

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Full & Part-Time Housekeepers Wanted 2 Green Chicks is looking for positive minded and detail oriented individuals to join our growing team of housekeepers! Quality is VERY important to us. We offer competitive salaries and a flexible work schedule. Apply at 2greenchicks.com/employment or CALL 928-8535.

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BRAND NEW Student Housing management company is looking for a group of energetic individuals wanting to join a winning team! These individuals will be responsible for showing the model home and leasing 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 bedroom apartments! Email your resume today, to beejan@park7group.com STUDENTPAYOUTS.COM Paid survey takers needed in Norman 100% FREE to join. Click on Surveys. Traditions Spirits is currently accepting applications for COOKS, SERVERS, HOSTS, DISHWASHERS, and BARTENDERS at Chip ‘N Ales inside Riverwind Casino. We recognize that our employees are our most valuable assets. We strive to recognize out employees with top pay, recognition programs, sales contests, appreciation rewards, anniversary and birthday gifts and more. Please apply in person or online at www.traditionsspirits.com. 2813 SE 44th St Norman, OK. Questions? Please call 405-392-4550. Gymnastics Instructors for pre-school girls and boys classes, tumbling, P/T, flex sched. Bart Conner Gymnastics, 4477500. SEASONAL RETAIL GARDEN CENTER SOONER BLOOMERS IS NOW HIRING FOR FALL SEASON, FULL & PART TIME POSITIONS OPEN SEPT 20 - OCT 31. CALL TIM AT 405-550-6716 FOR INTERVIEW. Email debradlowe@gmail.com

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$5,500-$10,000 PAID EGG DONORS. All Races needed. Non-smokers, Ages 18-27, SAT>1100/ACT>24/GPA>3.00 Contact: info@eggdonorcenter.com

Traditions Spirits is currently accepting applications for FRONT DESK, BELLMAN and HOUSEKEEPERS at Riverwind Hotel. We recognize our employees are our most valuable assets. We strive to recognize our employees with top pay, recognition programs, sales contests, appreciation rewards, anniversary and birthday gifts and more. Please apply in person or online at www.traditionsspirits.com. 2813 SE 44th St Norman, OK. Questions? Please call 405-392-4550. CAYMAN’S seeks PT giftwrapper/stock room assistant. Flexible Hrs. Apply in person: 2001 W. Main St. CALL 360-3969.

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APTS. UNFURNISHED 1 bd, 1 person, efficiency apt. $435: bills paid, no smoking, no pets, 700 C, east Brooks, around back, info on door. 3603850.

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POLICY The Oklahoma Daily is responsible for one day’s incorrect advertising. If your ad appears incorrectly, or if you wish to cancel your ad call 3252521, before the deadline for cancellation in the next issue. Errors not the fault of the advertiser will be adjusted. Refunds will not be issued for late cancellations. The Oklahoma Daily will not knowingly accept advertisements that discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, religious preference, national origin or sexual orientation. Violations of this policy should be reported to The Oklahoma Daily Business Office at 325-2521.

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HOROSCOPE By Bernice Bede Osol

Copyright 2012, Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2013

Eats flies. Dates a pig. Hollywood star.

LIVE YOUR DREAMS Pass It On. www.forbetterlife.org

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Check out what’s being offered and sift through any questionable promises being made before you take a leap of faith. Protect your assets and your family.

Your source for: News | L&A | Sports Opinion | Multimedia Marketplace





 

    

 









 

    

   



Previous Solution

  

 



        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

Monday- Very Easy Tuesday-Easy Wednesday- Easy Thursday- Medium Friday - Hard



Instructions: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. That means that no number is repeated in any row, column or box.

oud-2013-09-20-a-004.indd 1

Don’t be afraid to take vigorous action in the year ahead. Your financial involvements look good, as long as you avoid unpredictable people. Rely on you and you alone when it comes to making progress and personal improvements.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Listen to what others are saying, but don’t act on hearsay. Follow your heart and only share something when you know what you will get in return. Privacy and consistency should be maintained. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- You need to take control of matters pertaining to the home. If you’re firm and fair, your stance will be appreciated in the long run. Quickly shifting conditions could lead to unexpected developments. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Helping others will help you get what you want, but before you decide to go that route, double-check your motives and consider possible consequences. A mistake could affect your reputation. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Put more effort into your personal life and your connections with loved ones. Invite the people most influenced by your decisions to comment and make suggestions before you make a move.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -When confronted with a restrictive situation, jump into action and counter whatever is standing in your way before it’s too late. Partnerships can be formed that will ensure your success. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- It’s a good day to get things accomplished, be they big or small. Interacting with others will help you seal a deal or come to a conclusion that will allow you to make a wise choice. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Pick and choose wisely. Avoid people who tend to exaggerate or are forever asking for something. You have to nurture and take care of your needs, for a change. Make positive personal improvements. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Take a look at your work relationships and look for a way to collaborate equally. Allowing others to contribute will help you avoid resentment. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- You should foster change and refuse to be influenced by what someone else is doing. Branch out into an area that will allow you to use your talents to the utmost.

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker September 20, 2013

ACROSS 1 Wild land in Africa 5 Donor 10 Problematical 14 Nonsupporter 15 Grisham’s “___ to Kill� 16 White-centered snack 17 Cleopatra’s love 18 “___ in a sentence� 19 Dudley Do-Right’s damsel 20 TravoltaSlater film 23 Fraternal fellow 24 Accept from abroad 25 French philosopher Georges 27 Switching device 30 Whitewater transport 33 “___ Madonna� (1968 Beatles hit) 36 Auspicious nights 38 Basic principle 39 Yoko’s maiden name 40 Tolerate 42 Numbercrunching pro 43 “Project Runway� figure 45 Wolfe on the trail 46 Dam across a creek 47 Latino’s white 9/20

American friends 49 Greek weeper 51 Overdo it onstage 53 Adobe dwelling 57 “Acid� 59 Sweet or dill morsel 62 Lustrous gem 64 Natural talent 65 “ ___ la Douce� 66 Expose, as skin 67 Erroneous 68 “Hud� Oscar winner Patricia 69 ___ von Bismarck 70 Word before “fast� and after “home� 71 Needlenosed swimmers DOWN 1 Animated classic of 1942 2 Turn swords into plowshares, e.g. 3 Barbershop band 4 Cookout flavoring 5 Four-player arcade classic 6 “___ Wonderful Life� 7 Twice zwei 8 Some oilmen 9 Captured again

(as a hill) 10 Tract end 11 Like many writers 12 Took a nosedive 13 Egg feature 21 Preposition in poetry 22 Vengeful feeling 26 Hurricane’s center 28 The Bard’s river 29 Middle Eastern country on the Red Sea 31 French soldier’s cap 32 Dressingroom door adornment 33 ___ Linda, Calif. 34 Unknown author (abbr.) 35 Debut auto of 1960 37 Ganges garb

40 Singlemasted sailing vessel 41 Made barrels 44 “A Nightmare on ___ Street� 46 Sobbing 48 Cadavers, slangily 50 Subway alternative 52 Razzledazzle 54 Kentucky college town 55 Odom of the NBA 56 Certain graduate exams 57 Timber wolf 58 Old-fashioned shoe covering 60 Cabbage kin 61 Actress Kudrow 63 Durocher of baseball

PREVIOUS PUZZLE ANSWER

9/19

Š 2013 Universal Uclick www.upuzzles.com

STUCK! By Jerry Berns

CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Explore new interests and develop ideas. Research interesting ways to present and promote what you have to offer. Love is on the rise, and socializing will invite romance. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Be careful what you agree to today. It’s admirable to be accommodating, but not at the expense of missing out on an even greater opportunity that pops up. Ask, and you shall receive.

9/19/13 8:04 PM


Friday, September 20, 2013 •

LIFE&ARTS

OUDaily.com ›› Read about a new OU School of Dance faculty member whose works are being featured in the Oklahoma Festival Ballet.

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Megan Deaton, life & arts editor Tony Beaulieu, assistant editor dailyent@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/life&arts • Twitter: @OUDailyArts

dance

Ballet can seem foreign to those who don’t know it. The Daily’s columnist has his first formal ballet experience at OU’s Oklahoma Festival Ballet, presented by the OU School of Dance.

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motions evoked by a live performance are a rare occurrence for a fan of violent movies, action sports and reporting on Middle East uprisings. Yet sitting in the front row of Rupel J. Jones Theatre watching performers transform from people to characters expressing stories with movement rather than words was such a refreshing experience. You should not be surprised to find me at any of the several upcoming shows. Last night, I was fortunate enough to spend my evening watching the dancers of the Oklahoma Festival Ballet perform their newest show. The performance has everything from contemporary pieces set to the opera “Lakme” to classic pieces set to music by the classical Italian Baroque composer Vivaldi. The barrage of oranges, reds and purples gracefully flowing across the stage of the theatre were nothing short of something out of a fantasy novel. My first time at the ballet was, for the most part, absolutely wonderful. As a fan of theater, I had no doubt that the ballet

life & arts columnist

Luke Reynolds reynolds.luke5@gmail.com

GO AND DO Oklahoma Festival Ballet When: 8 p.m. Sept. 20-21, 3 p.m. Sept. 22, 29 Where: Rupel J. Jones Theatre Price: $14

would be a visual and audible pleasure. Yet, I was unaware the human body could achieve such grace. Perhaps this is because I am slightly clumsy or simply because I’ve grown up playing contact sports. Regardless, the dancers displayed feats of human achievement that I was otherwise unaware of. My favorite part of the

Bennett Hall/The Daily

Performers in this year’s Oklahoma Festival Ballet dance on stage in front of the moon.

ballet was the more classical performances that were more intimate in nature. With just two to four performers and the music of another century, the dancers truly took the audience to another place. My qualms with the show were few. The ballet was just a preview, so there were

column

Students use social media to add humor to cricket infestation life & arts columnist

ideal place to take a girl or boy you’re trying to impress and at $14 per person, it is a modest way to expand your artistic horizons. Just remember: keep your feet off the stage. Luke Reynolds is a University College freshman.

WE WANT YOU!

BARTENDERS, BEVERAGE SERVERS and BARBACKS at RIVERWIND CASINO

briana_hall@ou.edu

S

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PLEASE get your feet off the stage?” Upon which I immediately did so. Let’s just say I learned my lesson. For those of you who are interested in theater, or just need something to do this weekend, I highly recommend taking the time to go to the ballet. The show, at two hours in length, is the

TRADITIONS SPIRITS is currently accepting applications for

Briana Hall ocial media has proven to be more influential than ever in activities and various issues on campus this year, as seen with the recent #FreeOUGreek movement that has taken campus by storm. Some social media endeavors are also grabbing hold of students’ attention, without causing the same amount of harsh controversy #FreeOUGreek is. Despite that fact, there are countless Facebook pages dedicated to all sorts of OU phenomena, and one account in particular is getting a surprising amount of attention. OU Crickets, the administrators of which are unknown, has been registered as a parody account of the absurd amounts of crickets on campus. Instead of registering as a mere page that Facebook users can “like,” one must actually send a friend request to the OU Cricket page, and be accepted, thereby personifying the invading critters. Page administrators have even gone so far as to cite the crickets as being in “a domestic partnership” on Facebook. With around 350 friends, the page’s popularity is growing exponentially. This growth is probably due to the humorous nature of the account. Through personifying the animals and acting as if they were crickets themselves,

understandably a few slipups — although, I think if we were sitting anywhere but the front row they would have been completely unnoticeable. At one point, I got a little too comfortable and propped my feet on the stage during intermission to which I was yelled at by the stage manager, “Can you

Photo provided

The OU Crickets Facebook page acts as the cricket voice on campus.

page administrators have been interacting with students via Facebook, creating rather amusing posts. One student posted on the account “I always try to be nice, but it’s not fun when one of you decides to jump on my plate from out of nowhere.” The crickets, upset, responded, “First you complain about our songs, our presences, and now you complain about us wanting to eat? Jesus.” While the account sticks up for the crickets that are being squashed all throughout campus, it does so in an ironic way, which also allows students to poke fun at the cricket infestation. In turn, the page has done a fine job at making light of the situation, which is otherwise gross and plainly inconvenient. Another post by a student referring to game day reads “Get off the field!” to which the crickets responded, “LET ME HAVE MY FUN.” Some funny statuses of

the account read “I have a hunger that only Cane’s sauce can satisfy,” and “Oh, you’re trying to study for an exam? Let me sing you the song of my people.” And while these posts sarcastically point out all of the worst aspects of the cricket infestation — their large presence by Raising Cane’s and their constant chirping — it does so in a relatable and enjoyable way. The fun and enjoyable aspect of the account has led students to participate in discussion of on-campus events and phenomena an unusual amount. Even if the discussion is about something as inconsequential as the large amounts of crickets on campus this year, it is still refreshing to see students using social media to join together in a communal discourse on campus. Briana Hall is an economics and English writing sophomore.

COOKS, SERVERS, HOSTS, DISHWASHERS and BARTENDERS at CHIPS ‘N ALES FRONT DESK, BELLMAN and HOUSEKEEPERS at RIVERWIND HOTEL Our employees are our most valuable assets. We strive to recognize our employess with top pay, recognition programs, sales contests, appreciation rewards, anniversary and birthday gifts and more. Please apply in person or online at www.traditionsspirits.com 2813 SE 44th St Norman, OK 73072 Questions? Please call 405.392.4550

9/19/13 7:05 PM


6

• Friday, September 20, 2013

SPORTS

Julia Nelson, sports editor Joe Mussatto, assistant editor dailysports@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/sports • Twitter: @OUDailySports

Football

BYE WEEK BLUES Shelly Perkins/The Daily

Evin Morrison/The Daily

Joe Mussatto & Julia Nelson

Assistant Sports Editor & Sports Editor

Notre Dame’s “Victory March” blared from the practice field speakers this week as the 14th ranked Sooners began game preparations early for next week’s trip to South Bend, Ind. Oklahoma is off on Saturday, and coach Bob Stoops’ squad (3-0) used this week as extra time to game plan for the 22nd ranked Fighting Irish (2-1). Playing the opposing team’s fight song at practice has been a tactic Stoops has implemented in the past to prepare his side for harsh environments at away games, and the trip to Notre Dame is OU’s first road game of the season. Not only that, but the Sooners are looking to avenge a 30-13 loss they suffered at the hands of Notre Dame a season ago. And leading the OU offense onto the field will be junior

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his is not an off week for us, this is a work week. We’re not taking it light, we’re going to hit it full headed…Last year just being here and experiencing that, it left a bad taste in my mouth and I didn’t even play. —Redshirt freshman cornerback Zack Sanchez

quarterback Blake Bell, making his first career start away from Norman. Bell threw for 413 yards and four touchdowns last week against Tulsa, and was named Big 12 Offensive Player of the Week. But facing Notre Dame will be a tougher task for Bell and the Oklahoma offense. The Fighting Irish have an, 8-1, stranglehold on the all-time series against the Sooners, and coach Brian Kelly’s squad hasn’t dropped a home game since Oct. 22, 2011. While Oklahoma has an extra week to prepare for last year’s national title runner-up, Notre Dame can’t look ahead to the anticipated matchup as they host undefeated Michigan State on Saturday. Here are thoughts from Oklahoma players and coaches on the bye week and the upcoming contest in South Bend.

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very day that we prepare, every day that we’re out there, we’re practicing for Notre Dame. We’re looking at it like an extra week to prepare for those guys. —Junior defensive end Geneo Grissom

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Chris James/ The Daily

Evin Morrison/ The Daily

his is going to be a very physical football game. It’s a downhill game when you play with Notre Dame.

here’s a ton to coach us up on, but I like the direction we are going and the way it’s progressing. We have a lot of work to do in two weeks. —Head coach Bob Stoops

eah, I have to like [having the bye week this week]. That’s what it is. To be honest with you, it’s one of the major reasons why we moved West Virginia up to get another game in before having to travel to Notre Dame. To have two off weeks and only two games wouldn’t have been very good, but I like how it’s set up now.

—Defensive coordinator Mike Stoops

e’re going to have to hunker down and really be a physical football team in two weeks.

—Head coach Bob Stoops

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—Mike Stoops

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Friday, September 20, 2013