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T H u R s DaY, auG u s T 3 0 , 2 012

W W W.O U DA I LY.C O M

Sports: Sooner soccer player’s drive takes her from UK to US (Page 7)

2 011 S I LV E R C R O W N W I N N E R

l&A: Fall into new styles (Page 8)

OUDaily.com: Read coverage of local Syrian expert’s discussion of conflict

Fall fashion trends

UniVERSiTy pOlicy

GOVERnMEnT

Sexual misconduct training mandatory

UOSA plans big changes

Sept. 14 deadline for students, staff and faculty to finish online training MikE WOrMLEY Campus Reporter

Students this semester must complete mandatory online sexual misconduct training by Sept. 14 to avoid enrollment holds. The training, required of all students, faculty and staff, is part of the Sexual

Misconduct, Discrimination and Harassment Policy that went into effect in May. The policy defines concepts ranging from sexual coercion to the details of sexual consent and outlines the responsibility of University members to report misconduct, according to OU’s

Equal Opportunity Office website. “The goals of the training are to educate the University community on what activities are considered gender-based harassment,” said Laura Palk, OU Institutional Equity and Title 9 Coordinator. “Most individuals assume that sexual assault is the only topic covered by the Sexual Misconduct Policy. Although it is an important

area covered by the Policy, gender-based harassment can take many forms.” Palk said this training was the direct result of actions put into motion by President David Boren in April 2011 and the influence of a sexual violence fact sheet released on April 4, 2011 through the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights. St u d e n t s a l s o s t a g e d

several on-campus protests encouraging the policy change during spring 2011, according to Daily archives. The report addressed specific problems and suggested solutions relating to sexual impropriety on university campuses that were given light by the Clery Act. The Clery Act requires all higher education institutions see POLICY page 2

ALiSOn HAUSnEr Campus Reporter

Kingsley Burns/tHe daily

A new administration has brought new events and new changes to the UOSA executive branch’s structure. One of the new events put together by UOSA president Joe Sangirardi and UOSA vice president Rainey Sewell was a summer retreat. Applicants for positions in UOSA were put together, and student leaders got to know them before placing them in positions, Sewell said. “The retreat went great, students were more productive and came up with broader ideas since they didn’t know where they would be going. We got to see more personalities beforehand,” Sewell said. U O S A’s e x e c u t i v e b ra n c h a l s o i s w o r king with the Houston Huffman Center and will be training for the 5K coming up on Sept. 15, Sewell said. Interested students can wake up early and go jogging with either Sangirardi or Sewell and work to build up to the 5K running event. Sangirardi’s administration also made big changes to the structu re o f t h e e xe c u t i ve branch last s emester with the Departmental Consolidation and Efficiency Act of 2012. The act targeted specific and redundant offices in the executive branch, cutting them and rolling their responsibilities into other

Junior defensive specialist Mindy Gowen (left) and senior defensive specialist Maria Fernanda stand on the court Tuesday in the Mccasland Field House.

see UOSA page 2

ciTy OF nORMAn

VOllEyBAll

Voters pass bond motion Improved sidewalks, bike paths in works MELOdiE LETTkEMAn Campus Reporter

Suppor t for a bikefriendly Norman gained more ground Tuesday after nearly 62 percent of Norman voters voted in favor of a $42 million bond to improve transportation in the city. Funded by the bond and preexisting federal highway grants, the project will improve or add continuous sidewalks to W Lindsey Street, W Main Street, 24th Avenue SE and Cedar Lane, according to a NewsOK article. The transportation project also will improve road conditions in areas prone to flooding and will widen W Lindsey Street from three lanes to five. In 2 0 1 1 , t h e c i t y o f Norman earned a bronze designation as a bikefriendly community from the League of American Bicyclists, and the league credits the designation t o N o r m a n ’s B i c y c l e Advisory Committee, according to the league’s website. The committee’s projects have spanned across Norman, but Lindsey Street has not been included in BAC plans since 1996. Biking infrastructure, including continuous sidewalks and bike paths and lanes, is a large part of the league’s basis for rankings, meaning the additions could have an affect on Norman’s

Executive branch restructured for greater efficiency

Libero has team’s back on court Players with special position have big task on volleyball court cHriS TYndALL Sports Reporter

The first thing most people notice when they watch a volleyball game is that on each team, there’s one player wearing a differentcolored jersey than the rest of her teammates. Well, this might not be the first thing they notice, but if not, it’s

definitely the second thing they notice. These two lucky players who stand out, not only because of the color of their jerseys, but also because they are some of the smallest players on the courts, are called liberos. So what is a libero (or a defensive specialist, as some might call it because they can’t pronounce the word correctly)? According to about.com, a libero is a “defensive specialist position in indoor volleyball. The position was added to

the game in 1999 along with special rules for play in order to foster more digs and rallies and to make the game more exciting.” Senior libero Maria Fernanda has a more simplified definition. “It’s more concentrated on defense and passing,” Fernanda said. “You’re the one in control in the back row who makes everyone aware of where they have to be when they are receiving or passing the ball.” see LIBERO page 5

OU’s new sexual misconduct policy protects students Opinion: these are the right changes to make ou’s sexual misconduct policy effective, accessible and strong enough to keep students safe. (Page 4)

Actors should choose quality films over money L&A: Brent stenstrom argues that actors should focus their careers on making quality films. (oudaily.com/l&a)

see BOND page 3

STUDEnT inVOlVEMEnT

OU political organizations see rise in membership Young Democrats had 126 students sign up for club SAM HiGGinS

Campus Reporter

Student political organizations on campus are experiencing a rise in membership this year because of mostly to the upcoming U.S. Presidential election in November, said Sam Peyton, president of Young Democrats. These are the highest numbers he’s seen since his

oud-2012-8-30-a-001,002.indd 1

Sam Camp, chairman of the OU College Republicans, WHAT’S NEXT said the group has about 500 college people signed up, with about Republicans 25-30 members showing up regularly to meetings. College republicans P e y t o n s a i d Yo u n g will hold their first Democrats does not have a meeting on thursday, set membership. However, sept. 13 at 7 p.m. in 10 to 75 members typically the Boomer room in show up at regular meetings oklahoma memorial and 545 members are on the union. email list. Source: Sam Camp, OU College One hundred and twenRepublicans chair ty-six students signed up to be part of Young Democrats freshman year in August at the Sooner Orientation 2009, Peyton said. Weekend Involvement Fair

on Sunday, and the organization has registered 60 new voters. Both groups receive funding from the University of Oklahoma Student Association, as well as from private donations. As of now, Young Democrats has received $550. College Republicans still is getting calculating its total. The organization has been using Facebook and Twitter to reach out to their members and encourage recruitment, Peyton said. Leaders of both

organizations said they want to engage students and discuss important issues that affect the country. “I know many people are apathetic toward politics, but for me, public service and informing citizens about various issues is extremely selfgratifying,” Peyton said.

VOL. 98, NO. 12 © 2012 OU Publications Board FREE — Additional copies 25¢

INSIDE TODAY Campus......................2 Clas si f ie ds................6 l i f e & a r t s.................. 8 o p inio n.....................4 spor ts........................5 Visit OUDaily.com for more

SEE MORE ONLINE Visit oudaily.com for the complete story oudaily.com/news

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8/29/12 10:30:34 PM


2

Campus

• Thursday, August 30, 2012

Campus

Lindsey Ruta, campus editor Chase Cook and Jake Morgan, assistant editors dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com • Twitter: @OUDaily

policy: Training required to enroll UOSA: No Continued from page 1

Today around campus A lightsaber-making workshop themed around Star Wars will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the first floor lobby of Oklahoma Memorial Union. An informational session over studying abroad at OU will be held from 4 to 5 p.m. at Old Science Hall. Do you want to see your organization’s campus event here? Visit OUDaily.com/events/submit to add your entry.

Corrections The Oklahoma Daily is committed to serving readers with accurate coverage and welcomes your comments about information that may require correction or clarification. To contact us with corrections, email us at dailynews@ou.edu. In Tuesday’s paper, a news story, “Residents to vote on transportation bond project,” erroneously reported that half of the project’s cost will be paid through property taxes. Half of the projects will be funded by bonds, the other half by federal matching funds. In Wednesday’s edition, a news story, “UPB shares office space after mistake,” incorrectly reported the Union Programming Board is sharing an office with the Hispanic-American Student Organization. The group is called the Hispanic American Student Association. Visit OUDaily.com/corrections for an archive of our corrections

that receive federal financial assistance to annually report crime and safety policies, according to the Sooner Safety and Fire Report. “The President’s goal is to ensure that students, faculty and staff are able to have an educational and working environment free from gender-based discrimination and harassment,” Palk said. “This goal can only be reached with the cooperation of the entire University community.” The reception of the policy changes thus far has been positive, Palk said, but elementary education senior Anissa Angier said the training might be too basic to be taken seriously. “I feel people may blow it off because it is so [common sense],” Angier said. “But, I think at the same time it could be very helpful … Chuc Nguyen/The Daily it’s good that we are making sure that people have defini- Sexual Assault Training posters hanging around campus to inform tive definitions of what this is students that training is mandatory for Spring semester. and what sexual misconduct is.” AT A GLANCE Sexual Misconduct Training As someone who’s involved with the Women’s Outreach Center, multidisciplinary studies sophomore Katiebeth Gardener said the training gives an accurate depiction of what resources the WOC office offers to students. “[The training] was short; it was concise; it got the point across, and it felt like it was [based upon] real life,” Gardener said. University College freshman Matthew Weeks said he wasn’t aware of the mandatory training until recently. “At first, it kind of catches

Who? All students enrolled in the Fall 2012 semester including faculty and staff What? An online quiz including policy information and scenarios.

When? Before September 14, 2012 Why? To inorm members of the University community to changes in policy. Source: www.ou.edu/oupd

Where? sexualmisconduct.ou.edu

“People don’t know to you off guard, but it’s something you know is required,” check online, don’t get online, or just skim through it,” Weeks said. Weeks said he would sug- Weeks said. gest that the University include in-classroom training Mike Wormley Michael.J.Wormley-1@ou.edu to the online material.

Thursday, Aug. 30

complaints for new changes

Continued from page 1 departments. The act met with tough resistance in some sections but ultimately was passed by both Undergraduate Student Congress and Graduate Student Senate. However, a technicality ruled the act invalid. Ev e n t h o u g h Sangirardi’s act didn’t pass, there are no rules against him not filling cabinet positions to fulfill his desire to trim down the size of UOSA’s executive branch. This will be done by creating less specific functions, fewer departments and redistributing responsibilities throughout the organization, Sangirardi said. There currently are 36 students — including all positions — working for the executive branch compared to the 75 working for the branch last year, Sangirardi said. Sewell said the changes happening in the executive branch are being received well by returning members. “ The few returning members seem to like it and don’t see too much of a change. No complaints yet,” said Sewell. Alison Hausner, alihausner@ou.edu

Friday Continued

Intramural Update: Pre Season Flag Football Entries | 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at the Huston Huffman Center front desk, $25 per team TBD. Event will begin September 10.

Boggess Concert Series: Chris Marks, Organ | 8 p.m. in Gothic Hall, Catlett Music Center. Call the Fine Arts Box Office, (405) 325-4101, for more information.

FREE Laser Tag | 7-9 p.m. in the Molly Shi Boren Ballroom, Oklahoma Memorial Union. Come and enjoy FREE 15 vs. 15 laser tag courtesy of the Union Programming Board. Please bring valid OU student ID and wear closed-toe shoes. There’s ALWAYS SOMETHING at the union, www.upb.ou.edu.

Three-year program canceled Government cancels third annual joint military, media training

be even worse. “This is not the only contract — many contracts have Arianna Pickard been canceled beCampus Reporter cause of the sequestration that has startMilitary training organized by ed,” Schmeltzer said. Gaylord College of Journalism and The program began when the Mass Communication that helps Army Captain’s Career Course at Ft. Sill concaptains engage with the media has tacted the journalism college and asked been canceled this year by the U.S. if faculty would be willing to train the government. captains how to talk with the media, Self For the last three years, the Gaylord said. College Institute for Research and The career course already provided Training has contracted with the U.S. media training for the captains at Ft. Sill, government to train Field Artillery but officials of the course decided they Captains from Ft. Sill in Lawton, Okla., wanted the captains to practice working how to communicate with the media, with real journalists, so the course enprofessor Charles Self said. tered into a contract with Gaylord. After Ft. Sill asked Gaylord to expand The training provided an opportuthe contract for the program this year, nity for print and broadcast journalism people in Washington students to practice notified Ft. Sill saying the “Most people don’t interviewing with the training no longer would captains and operating know what the be included. video camera equip“Most people don’t ment to record the inmembers of the know what the memterviews, Schmeltzer bers of the service go service go through.” said. through,” professor John PROFESSOR JOHN SCHMELTZER “It’s just as much a Schmeltzer said. “This loss for our students was kind of a way to let as it is for the army,” the media in and show them what we do Schmeltzer said. “It helps students on and how to answer the questions.” their interviewing skills — most stuSelf and Schmeltzer said they think dents need help with that.” the training was canceled because At the beginning of training sessions, of lack of funding from the federal experienced war correspondent and government. professor Mike Boettcher would offer “My guess is that they are trying to the captains insight on what journalists prepare for the budget cuts that are ex- in the warzone are looking for, Self said. pected in January if Congress can’t apThe captains then would split into prove a federal budget,” Self said. “My groups and Gaylord faculty would teach guess is that they’re afraid to enter into the captains about ethical issues and any contracts until the budget cut is give them suggestions for how to hanapproved.” dle questions from the media, professor Under the Budget Control Act passed Kenneth Fischer said. by Congress last year, the Defense After the faculty teaching, the Gaylord Department could see budget cuts - students would be given interview sceknown as sequestration — amounting narios and break into groups to practice to more than $500 billion in January, ac- questioning the captains. cording to ArmyTimes.com. “Some of them went over the top, “I was really, really disappointed which was fun,” Fischer said. “But some when this budget cut came through,” were the opposite — too timid.” said Robert Pritchard, professor and reThe groups would meet back up aftired Navy captain. “I think it was a huge terward with the professors, who would initiative for the army and one that I watch the recorded interviews and criwish all of the services could do.” tique them, Fischer said. Pritchard said he was in the military Pritchard said he helped critique the during the last force reduction in the interviews and gave the army captains 1990s, which was “dramatic,” and he tips on how to better engage with the said he believes these budget cuts could media to get their messages across.

“You know, communication is such a huge part of command,” Pritchard said. “So to begin to expose those officers to that very important task of leadership is really important, and I think the army was going to end up with better communicators as a result of what we did.” This training also made captains, who had negative views of the media, more open to speaking with the press, Smeltzer and Fischer said. “A lot of them walk in with not real positive attitudes about the media,” Fischer said. “I think we diffuse at least some of that.” Schmeltzer said one army captain began the training openly expressing negative opinions of the media, but by the end of the session he was by far the best person in the class to work with the media and participate in interviews. “We don’t paint a rosy picture about everything, but they walk away understanding that journalists are people who have jobs to do too,” Fischer said. Self said he knows the people at Ft. Sill appreciate Gaylord’s training because they have celebrated it in military publications. “I think [the army] sees this as necessary training, [and] I don’t think they see it as fluff,” Pritchard said. “We’ll just keep our fingers crossed that the budget situation will settle out and well be able to reengage.” “Bottom line is I think we — all the ones who’ve been involved with this — I think we would all say this has been a really good experience for Gaylord Hall, and it’s a shame that it’s stopping now,” Fischer said. Arianna Pickard arianna.j.pickard-1@ou.edu

AT A GLANCE Army Training Training program lasted 3 years 2011-2012: 7 training sessions 2010-2011: 6 training sessions 2009-2010: 6 training sessions Source: John Schmeltzer, Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication professor

Local expert discusses Syria conflict

Kingsley Burns/The Daily

Joshua Landis, Director of the Center for Middle East Studies and Associate Professor of Middle Eastern Studies, speaks during the President’s Associate Dinner Thursday in the Oklahoma Memorial Union. Landis, a Syrian specialist, talked about the current state of affairs and future of Syria. Visit oudaily.com/ news for the complete story.

Bond: Senate working with city on bike plans Continued from page 1 ranking. The emphasis on bikefriendly infrastructure in the project also could lead toward positive momentum for OU’s own bike initiatives. The city, the faculty senate and the staff senates have been working together to improve bike access on campus, said Lezlie Marsh, assistant to the executive vice president. Marsh, who is a member of the staff senate, applied for a bike-friendly distinction on behalf of OU. “I doubt we’ll get it, but it will be a learning experience,” she said. “Hopefully after our projects have started next year, they’ll see we are really trying and we’ll get it.” In April, the Staff and Faculty Senate approved resolutions to make OU a

bicycle-friendly university within five years. The projects improving sidewalks in the Norman community are scheduled for completion by 2017, meeting the senate’s deadline. Marsh said the senate has been consulting with the city to complete plans made to bring OU to bicycle-friendly standards. “We might have to look into the bond before doing work,” Marsh said. “We planned to do projects piece-by-piece, and work will begin this semester.” Marsh said the city’s project should not interfere with OU’s plan, which will affect Lindsey Street. from Jenkins Street. to Elm Street. Melodie Lettkeman melodie.lettkeman@gmail.com

Saturday, Sept. 1 FREE Matinee: “The Cabin in the Woods” | 1 p.m. in Meacham Auditorium, Oklahoma Memorial Union. Presented by the Union Programming Board and Campus Activities Council.

SAVE UP TO

Friday, Aug. 31 FREE Movie: “The Cabin in the Woods” | 6, 9 p.m. and midnight in Meacham Auditorium, Oklahoma Memorial Union. Come and see this thriller before its available on DVD! Presented by the Union Programming Board and Campus Activities Council.

MILITARY

3

Aug. 30- Sep. 2

Intramural Update: Golf Scramble Entries | 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at the Huston Huffman Center front desk, $30/player 4 players per team, tee times TBD. Event will be held on September 7 at Westwood Golf & Country Club.

Museum Lecture: Verbet to Villion | 4-5 p.m. in the Mary Eddy and Fred Jones Jr. Auditorium, Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. Victor Koshkin-Youritzin, David Ross Boyd Professor, OU School of Art and Art History and co-curator for the exhibition, Vernet to Villon: Nineteenth-Century French Master Drawings from the National Gallery of Art will present a highpaced, slide-illustrated lecture on Vernet to Villon. He will discuss the artists, focusing especially on the artistic merits and compositional subtleties of all 30 exhibited drawings.

Thursday, August 30, 2012 •

% OFF

Sunday, S d Sept. S 2 Exhibition Closing: A Century of Magic, The Animation of Walt Disney Studios (Janis and Jay Scaramucci Collection) | Come and enjoy the final day of this magical exhibition at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art.

the Tent! er nd U s em It ot D d Re r fo k oo L NORMAN: Sooner Mall (3447 W. Main St.)

This University in compliance with all applicable federal and state laws and regulations does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, genetic information, age, religion, disability, political beliefs, or status as a veteran in any of its policies, practices or procedures. This includes but is not limited to admissions, employment, financial aid and educational services. For accommodations on the basis of disability, please contact the sponsoring department of any program or event.

oud-2012-8-30-a-001,002.indd 2-3

OKLAHOMA CITY: 10109 N. May (Between Hefner & Britton Rd) TULSA: 6808 S. Memorial Drive sunandski.com facebook.com/SunAndSki.Norman

This notice is published in complance with Oklahoma Corporation Commision guidelines. THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION. www.ou.edu/eoo

8/29/12 10:25:28 PM


2

Campus

• Thursday, August 30, 2012

Campus

Lindsey Ruta, campus editor Chase Cook and Jake Morgan, assistant editors dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com • Twitter: @OUDaily

policy: Training required to enroll UOSA: No Continued from page 1

Today around campus A lightsaber-making workshop themed around Star Wars will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the first floor lobby of Oklahoma Memorial Union. An informational session over studying abroad at OU will be held from 4 to 5 p.m. at Old Science Hall. Do you want to see your organization’s campus event here? Visit OUDaily.com/events/submit to add your entry.

Corrections The Oklahoma Daily is committed to serving readers with accurate coverage and welcomes your comments about information that may require correction or clarification. To contact us with corrections, email us at dailynews@ou.edu. In Tuesday’s paper, a news story, “Residents to vote on transportation bond project,” erroneously reported that half of the project’s cost will be paid through property taxes. Half of the projects will be funded by bonds, the other half by federal matching funds. In Wednesday’s edition, a news story, “UPB shares office space after mistake,” incorrectly reported the Union Programming Board is sharing an office with the Hispanic-American Student Organization. The group is called the Hispanic American Student Association. Visit OUDaily.com/corrections for an archive of our corrections

that receive federal financial assistance to annually report crime and safety policies, according to the Sooner Safety and Fire Report. “The President’s goal is to ensure that students, faculty and staff are able to have an educational and working environment free from gender-based discrimination and harassment,” Palk said. “This goal can only be reached with the cooperation of the entire University community.” The reception of the policy changes thus far has been positive, Palk said, but elementary education senior Anissa Angier said the training might be too basic to be taken seriously. “I feel people may blow it off because it is so [common sense],” Angier said. “But, I think at the same time it could be very helpful … Chuc Nguyen/The Daily it’s good that we are making sure that people have defini- Sexual Assault Training posters hanging around campus to inform tive definitions of what this is students that training is mandatory for Spring semester. and what sexual misconduct is.” AT A GLANCE Sexual Misconduct Training As someone who’s involved with the Women’s Outreach Center, multidisciplinary studies sophomore Katiebeth Gardener said the training gives an accurate depiction of what resources the WOC office offers to students. “[The training] was short; it was concise; it got the point across, and it felt like it was [based upon] real life,” Gardener said. University College freshman Matthew Weeks said he wasn’t aware of the mandatory training until recently. “At first, it kind of catches

Who? All students enrolled in the Fall 2012 semester including faculty and staff What? An online quiz including policy information and scenarios.

When? Before September 14, 2012 Why? To inorm members of the University community to changes in policy. Source: www.ou.edu/oupd

Where? sexualmisconduct.ou.edu

“People don’t know to you off guard, but it’s something you know is required,” check online, don’t get online, or just skim through it,” Weeks said. Weeks said he would sug- Weeks said. gest that the University include in-classroom training Mike Wormley Michael.J.Wormley-1@ou.edu to the online material.

Thursday, Aug. 30

complaints for new changes

Continued from page 1 departments. The act met with tough resistance in some sections but ultimately was passed by both Undergraduate Student Congress and Graduate Student Senate. However, a technicality ruled the act invalid. Ev e n t h o u g h Sangirardi’s act didn’t pass, there are no rules against him not filling cabinet positions to fulfill his desire to trim down the size of UOSA’s executive branch. This will be done by creating less specific functions, fewer departments and redistributing responsibilities throughout the organization, Sangirardi said. There currently are 36 students — including all positions — working for the executive branch compared to the 75 working for the branch last year, Sangirardi said. Sewell said the changes happening in the executive branch are being received well by returning members. “ The few returning members seem to like it and don’t see too much of a change. No complaints yet,” said Sewell. Alison Hausner, alihausner@ou.edu

Friday Continued

Intramural Update: Pre Season Flag Football Entries | 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at the Huston Huffman Center front desk, $25 per team TBD. Event will begin September 10.

Boggess Concert Series: Chris Marks, Organ | 8 p.m. in Gothic Hall, Catlett Music Center. Call the Fine Arts Box Office, (405) 325-4101, for more information.

FREE Laser Tag | 7-9 p.m. in the Molly Shi Boren Ballroom, Oklahoma Memorial Union. Come and enjoy FREE 15 vs. 15 laser tag courtesy of the Union Programming Board. Please bring valid OU student ID and wear closed-toe shoes. There’s ALWAYS SOMETHING at the union, www.upb.ou.edu.

Three-year program canceled Government cancels third annual joint military, media training

be even worse. “This is not the only contract — many contracts have Arianna Pickard been canceled beCampus Reporter cause of the sequestration that has startMilitary training organized by ed,” Schmeltzer said. Gaylord College of Journalism and The program began when the Mass Communication that helps Army Captain’s Career Course at Ft. Sill concaptains engage with the media has tacted the journalism college and asked been canceled this year by the U.S. if faculty would be willing to train the government. captains how to talk with the media, Self For the last three years, the Gaylord said. College Institute for Research and The career course already provided Training has contracted with the U.S. media training for the captains at Ft. Sill, government to train Field Artillery but officials of the course decided they Captains from Ft. Sill in Lawton, Okla., wanted the captains to practice working how to communicate with the media, with real journalists, so the course enprofessor Charles Self said. tered into a contract with Gaylord. After Ft. Sill asked Gaylord to expand The training provided an opportuthe contract for the program this year, nity for print and broadcast journalism people in Washington students to practice notified Ft. Sill saying the “Most people don’t interviewing with the training no longer would captains and operating know what the be included. video camera equip“Most people don’t ment to record the inmembers of the know what the memterviews, Schmeltzer bers of the service go service go through.” said. through,” professor John PROFESSOR JOHN SCHMELTZER “It’s just as much a Schmeltzer said. “This loss for our students was kind of a way to let as it is for the army,” the media in and show them what we do Schmeltzer said. “It helps students on and how to answer the questions.” their interviewing skills — most stuSelf and Schmeltzer said they think dents need help with that.” the training was canceled because At the beginning of training sessions, of lack of funding from the federal experienced war correspondent and government. professor Mike Boettcher would offer “My guess is that they are trying to the captains insight on what journalists prepare for the budget cuts that are ex- in the warzone are looking for, Self said. pected in January if Congress can’t apThe captains then would split into prove a federal budget,” Self said. “My groups and Gaylord faculty would teach guess is that they’re afraid to enter into the captains about ethical issues and any contracts until the budget cut is give them suggestions for how to hanapproved.” dle questions from the media, professor Under the Budget Control Act passed Kenneth Fischer said. by Congress last year, the Defense After the faculty teaching, the Gaylord Department could see budget cuts - students would be given interview sceknown as sequestration — amounting narios and break into groups to practice to more than $500 billion in January, ac- questioning the captains. cording to ArmyTimes.com. “Some of them went over the top, “I was really, really disappointed which was fun,” Fischer said. “But some when this budget cut came through,” were the opposite — too timid.” said Robert Pritchard, professor and reThe groups would meet back up aftired Navy captain. “I think it was a huge terward with the professors, who would initiative for the army and one that I watch the recorded interviews and criwish all of the services could do.” tique them, Fischer said. Pritchard said he was in the military Pritchard said he helped critique the during the last force reduction in the interviews and gave the army captains 1990s, which was “dramatic,” and he tips on how to better engage with the said he believes these budget cuts could media to get their messages across.

“You know, communication is such a huge part of command,” Pritchard said. “So to begin to expose those officers to that very important task of leadership is really important, and I think the army was going to end up with better communicators as a result of what we did.” This training also made captains, who had negative views of the media, more open to speaking with the press, Smeltzer and Fischer said. “A lot of them walk in with not real positive attitudes about the media,” Fischer said. “I think we diffuse at least some of that.” Schmeltzer said one army captain began the training openly expressing negative opinions of the media, but by the end of the session he was by far the best person in the class to work with the media and participate in interviews. “We don’t paint a rosy picture about everything, but they walk away understanding that journalists are people who have jobs to do too,” Fischer said. Self said he knows the people at Ft. Sill appreciate Gaylord’s training because they have celebrated it in military publications. “I think [the army] sees this as necessary training, [and] I don’t think they see it as fluff,” Pritchard said. “We’ll just keep our fingers crossed that the budget situation will settle out and well be able to reengage.” “Bottom line is I think we — all the ones who’ve been involved with this — I think we would all say this has been a really good experience for Gaylord Hall, and it’s a shame that it’s stopping now,” Fischer said. Arianna Pickard arianna.j.pickard-1@ou.edu

AT A GLANCE Army Training Training program lasted 3 years 2011-2012: 7 training sessions 2010-2011: 6 training sessions 2009-2010: 6 training sessions Source: John Schmeltzer, Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication professor

Local expert discusses Syria conflict

Kingsley Burns/The Daily

Joshua Landis, Director of the Center for Middle East Studies and Associate Professor of Middle Eastern Studies, speaks during the President’s Associate Dinner Thursday in the Oklahoma Memorial Union. Landis, a Syrian specialist, talked about the current state of affairs and future of Syria. Visit oudaily.com/ news for the complete story.

Bond: Senate working with city on bike plans Continued from page 1 ranking. The emphasis on bikefriendly infrastructure in the project also could lead toward positive momentum for OU’s own bike initiatives. The city, the faculty senate and the staff senates have been working together to improve bike access on campus, said Lezlie Marsh, assistant to the executive vice president. Marsh, who is a member of the staff senate, applied for a bike-friendly distinction on behalf of OU. “I doubt we’ll get it, but it will be a learning experience,” she said. “Hopefully after our projects have started next year, they’ll see we are really trying and we’ll get it.” In April, the Staff and Faculty Senate approved resolutions to make OU a

bicycle-friendly university within five years. The projects improving sidewalks in the Norman community are scheduled for completion by 2017, meeting the senate’s deadline. Marsh said the senate has been consulting with the city to complete plans made to bring OU to bicycle-friendly standards. “We might have to look into the bond before doing work,” Marsh said. “We planned to do projects piece-by-piece, and work will begin this semester.” Marsh said the city’s project should not interfere with OU’s plan, which will affect Lindsey Street. from Jenkins Street. to Elm Street. Melodie Lettkeman melodie.lettkeman@gmail.com

Saturday, Sept. 1 FREE Matinee: “The Cabin in the Woods” | 1 p.m. in Meacham Auditorium, Oklahoma Memorial Union. Presented by the Union Programming Board and Campus Activities Council.

SAVE UP TO

Friday, Aug. 31 FREE Movie: “The Cabin in the Woods” | 6, 9 p.m. and midnight in Meacham Auditorium, Oklahoma Memorial Union. Come and see this thriller before its available on DVD! Presented by the Union Programming Board and Campus Activities Council.

MILITARY

3

Aug. 30- Sep. 2

Intramural Update: Golf Scramble Entries | 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at the Huston Huffman Center front desk, $30/player 4 players per team, tee times TBD. Event will be held on September 7 at Westwood Golf & Country Club.

Museum Lecture: Verbet to Villion | 4-5 p.m. in the Mary Eddy and Fred Jones Jr. Auditorium, Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. Victor Koshkin-Youritzin, David Ross Boyd Professor, OU School of Art and Art History and co-curator for the exhibition, Vernet to Villon: Nineteenth-Century French Master Drawings from the National Gallery of Art will present a highpaced, slide-illustrated lecture on Vernet to Villon. He will discuss the artists, focusing especially on the artistic merits and compositional subtleties of all 30 exhibited drawings.

Thursday, August 30, 2012 •

% OFF

Sunday, S d Sept. S 2 Exhibition Closing: A Century of Magic, The Animation of Walt Disney Studios (Janis and Jay Scaramucci Collection) | Come and enjoy the final day of this magical exhibition at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art.

the Tent! er nd U s em It ot D d Re r fo k oo L NORMAN: Sooner Mall (3447 W. Main St.)

This University in compliance with all applicable federal and state laws and regulations does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, genetic information, age, religion, disability, political beliefs, or status as a veteran in any of its policies, practices or procedures. This includes but is not limited to admissions, employment, financial aid and educational services. For accommodations on the basis of disability, please contact the sponsoring department of any program or event.

oud-2012-8-30-a-001,002.indd 2-3

OKLAHOMA CITY: 10109 N. May (Between Hefner & Britton Rd) TULSA: 6808 S. Memorial Drive sunandski.com facebook.com/SunAndSki.Norman

This notice is published in complance with Oklahoma Corporation Commision guidelines. THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION. www.ou.edu/eoo

8/29/12 10:25:28 PM


4

OUDaily.com

• Thursday, August 30, 2012

OPINION

Find a link to documents that can help you understand the sexual misconduct policy, as well as a letter detailing additional resources. oudaily.com/opinion

Mary Stanfield, opinion editor Kayley Gillespie, assistant editor dailyopinion@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/opinion • Twitter: @OUDailyOpinion

QUOTABLE: “It was concise; it got the point across, and it felt like it was [based upon] real life,” said multidisciplinary studies sophomore Katiebeth Gardener about the sexual misconduct quiz. (Page 1)

editorial

Sexual misconduct policy right choice for OU Our View: This is the first of a two-part series on

new sexual misconduct policies at OU. Today’s editorial congratulates OU for its new policy. Friday’s editorial will suggest improvements to the mandatory sexual misconduct online training.

sexual activity, but how does one determine consent or the lack thereof? A lack of understanding about consent is a major contributor to occurances of sexual assault and to victims’ uncertainty if what happened to them was an assault. To remedy this, OU’s assault policy now carefully and completely defines consent and clarifies what does not count as consent. For example, silence cannot be taken to be consent, and alcohol and drug use can take away a person’s capacity to give consent. Simply put, “consent is informed, knowing and voluntary” and “consent is active.”

Changes to the university’s sexual assault policy began in April 2011 after a student’s proposal brought attention to the weakness of current policies. During this process, various students spoke about other ways to protect victims and prevent sexual misconduct, and we echoed that cry. We’re happy to say the university listened. The student campaign began just before Step-by-step procedures The Our View an influential letter from the U.S. Education is the majority Department, which reminded universiThough OU has always had a systematic opinion of ties of their responsibilities in dealing with way to address and adjudicate accusations The Daily’s sexual misconduct. Between the local conof sexual misconduct, that process was eight-member opaque to students. Now, the Institutional cerns and that letter, OU had good reason to editorial board strengthen the policy when it did. Equity Office’s webpage has a clear, straightBut although the university was obligated forward explanation of the process. to respond in some way to these calls, administraThis document guides students through how, tors easily could have dragged their feet and done when and with whom they can file a complaint. It the bare minimum to appease both students and the also anticipates and answers questions students are Department of Education. Instead, they responded likely to have during this process and assures stuwith enthusiasm and worked with the right people dents about their confidentiality rights. to create a strong, supportive and accessible policy. Rights of the accuser and the accused The new policy addresses virtually all the prior concerns with a few key additions: Also on the webpage are documents outlining the rights of the alleged victim and the rights of the acSpecific definitions cused. This is an essential part of any sexual misconMost importantly, the new policy lays out specific duct policy because it spells out the ways the system protects both alleged victims and the accused. definitions of the relevant terms. “Sexual misconSuch a document not only assures the community duct” covers sexual violence, sexual coercion and sexual exploitation, among other crimes. The policy about the fairness of proceedings but also increases breaks these categories down into specific behaviors the transparency of the entire process. It’s worth noting that the rights of the alleged vicso there can be no argument over what constitutes tim specifically restrict the use of his or her past sexsexual misconduct. The most important concept involved in defining ual history within proceedings — a pointless trauma often inflicted on victims of sexual assault. these actions is consent. Rape is non-consensual

No statute of limitations Before the student-led campaign, the statute of limitations to report sexual assault complaints was 30 days. Now, under the current policy, the university suggests students make complaints within 365 days, but the Title IX officer has discretion to accept cases after this deadline, with no statute of limitations.

Training Similar to the alcohol training required of freshmen, the university has created an online sexual misconduct quiz to educate students. This training includes essential information about assault and consent. Education like this is part of any strong sexual misconduct policy because it helps students protect themselves from misconduct, discourages assault by educating potential perpetrators and aids students in recognizing when an assault has occurred and knowing how to get help. But none of these changes on their own can protect students or limit sexual misconduct. Students must take it upon themselves to recognize how serious and widespread these issues are. The administration has demonstrated its dedication to making OU a safer place for all students. Now all Sooners will have a chance to show the same resolve. Take the online training seriously. Look over the definition of consent and be sure you know it. Remind your friends about the boundaries of consent and encourage them to stay safe and respectful in their sexual encounters. And if the worst does happen, don’t be afraid to report the incident to the university and help friends do the same. Whether or not you plan to pursue criminal prosecution, let OU help you find closure, feel safe and move on in every way it can.

Comment on this on OUDaily.com

point/counterpoint

Does ‘Stars Earn Stripes’ glorify war? Yes — Show poorly represents

realities of modern warfare

R

eality TV has Both the celebrity parLife & Arts Columnist mostly always ticipants and the show’s been vulgar, but producers have nothing but NBC’s new series “Stars shining praise for the troops Earn Stripes” represents a it features. The show refers new low for the genre. to them as “badasses” and The show, which precaptures them in heroic miered two weeks ago, folposes as if to elevate them to lows a battalion of D-list the status of action heroes. Steven Zoeller celebrities as they attempt Conversely, the soldiers stevenv.zoeller@gmail.com challenges based on acin the show laud sickening tual military operations. praise on the celebrity fightThese include such tasks as jumping into ers. At one point, one of the operatives rea lake from a helicopter and firing live am- fers to participant Todd Palin as “a straightmunition at dummies. up Rambo.” The show operates on the premise that To be clear, I mean no offense to those war, something that should repulse us, is who “support the troops” in the sense of profitable entertainment. simply wishing them the best. I, too, hope This premise by itself is objectionable. for their safe return. Even worse, however, is that the show gloThat being said, “Stars Earn Stripes” rifies war with its sanitized representation takes the concept of support to another of U.S. military operations and its unyield- level. It doesn’t simply ask that we syming military worship. pathize with soldiers, as we should; it asks The military operations in “Stars Earn that we endorse their function as cogs in Stripes” are always exciting and morally the war machine. uncomplicated. Realities like death, injury There is a difference between hoping and emotional trauma never enter the for the troops’ safety and celebrating the picture. The show doesn’t even try to offer violence they must inflict. The show fails to an honest account of what happens on the understand this. battlefield. When we make soldiers into idols, we The show’s defenders might say this shield the military from deserved criticism complaint is irrelevant. After all, its proand obfuscate the issue of whether its obducers never said it was meant to be an jectives are just. The show’s military woraccurate picture of warfare, so what’s the ship effectively validates war by deifying big deal? the institution that wages it. The big deal is that “Stars Earn Stripes” Given its propagandistic nature and will affect how some people view military shallow portrayal of military operations, operations, whether or not they’re familiar it’s not surprising that nine Nobel Peace with the bad bits. By likening soldiers to laureates wrote to NBC two weeks ago, athletes on an obstacle course, it emphaasking the network to remove “Stars Earn sizes the spectacle of war while de-empha- Stripes” from the air. sizing its horror, which should be at the I personally endorse this course of acfront of our minds when we think about it tion. There are many ways to support the — and vote on it. troops without whitewashing their experiThe series also glorifies war in the way ences and exalting armed combat. it regards soldiers, not merely as men and women stuck in a tough situation, but as Steven Zoeller is a journalism junior. epic warriors above mortality.

No — Show represents real

struggles of real Americans

W

ith the war in the exact opposite. Opinion columnist Iraq recently The overwhelming ended and the support given to the conflict in Afghanistan troops allows the viewer trudging on, it is easy for to connect with soldiers American citizens to get in the field. Instead of used to the idea of war. nameless faces, they now It also is easy to not be are human beings. This mindful of the amazing identification has been Mark Brockway sacrifices that servicemen critical in allowing people mark.d.brockway@ou.edu and servicewomen make to at home to encourage an participate in military exerend to the conflict. cises, both at home and abroad. Former soldiers also support this view. Because we as civilians can be so easA quick glance at the show’s Facebook ily forgetful of these sacrifices that milipage shows a myriad of praise from fortary personnel make on a daily basis, it is mer combatants. sometimes necessary to remind ourselves. Zoeller’s column criticizes the contesThat’s exactly what the new NBC show tants for calling the soldiers “badass” and “Stars Earn Stripes” is seeking to do. heroic, likening them to action heroes. The show gives a new spin on a long traBut soldiers are badass and heroic. dition of wartime coverage. Pictures and It is ridiculous to ask us to qualify or television have always played a key role in hold back on our support for those people bringing the realities of war home. overseas who are brave enough to fight for The distaste over the Vietnam War, for us. While they might be, as Zoeller says, instance, was largely fueled by media “cogs in the war machine,” that picture is coverage. the picture of America. Instead of glorifying war, this coverage Make no mistake — it is our government humanized the harsh realities the soldiers and our democratic system that sends our faced. The coverage allowed ordinary young men and women to fight and die Americans to experience a taste of what for us. The responsibility for the lives of was really happening overseas. each soldier does not lie on the shoulders By focusing on the training process, of some politicians in Washington — it lies “Stars Earn Stripes” seeks to achieve a on the shoulders of the American people. similar goal. While part of the motivation We the people are responsible for valiof the show is certainly to entertain, the dating war, not some TV show. training process highlights the difficulties What the show really accomplishes is and rigors of military life. exposing the realities of the American The most important aspect of the show situation. Soldiers are real people fighting is that the military personnel are active a real war. participants. Coming from several areas Let us not use this show as a scapegoat of the armed forces, the support of these for our own guilt over the situation we individuals sends a message that the mili- have put soldiers in. Instead, let us watch tary is being portrayed in a positive light. and identify with the soldiers’ sacrifices Much of the criticism against the show so we may be ever more reluctant to send has come from those claiming that it glori- them off to die. fies war. While the glorification of war certainly is a serious concern, the show accomplishes Mark Brockway is a political science senior. The Oklahoma Daily is a public forum, the University of Oklahoma’s independent student voice and an entirely student-run publication.

Laney Ellisor Jared Rader Lindsey Ruta Kedric Kitchens Carmen Forman Mary Stanfield

Editor in Chief Managing Editor Campus Editor Sports Editor Life & Arts Editor Opinion Editor

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oud-2012-8-30-a-004.indd 1

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Letters should concentrate on issues, not personalities, and must be fewer than 250 words, typed and signed by the author(s). Letters will be edited for accuracy, space and style. Students must list their major and classification. To submit letters, email dailyopinion@ou.edu. Our View is the voice of the Editorial Board, which consists of nine student editors. The board meets at 5 p.m. Sunday to Thursday in 160 Copeland Hall. Board meetings are open to the public.

Guest columns are accepted and printed at the editor’s discretion. Columnists’ and cartoonists’ opinions are their own and not necessarily the views or opinions of The Oklahoma Daily Editorial Board. To advertise in The Oklahoma Daily, contact advertising manager Kearsten Howard by calling 405-325-8964 or emailing dailyads@ou.edu. One free copy of The Daily is available to members of the OU community. Additional copies may be purchased for 25 cents by contacting The Daily business office at 405-325-2522.

8/29/12 9:12:01 PM


Thursday, August 30, 2012 •

SPORTS

5

Kedric Kitchens, sports editor Dillon Phillips, assistant editor dailysports@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/sports • Twitter: @OUDailySports

libero: Going for the dig despite constant threat of cuts and bruises Continued from page 1 When spectators go to games, they always will hear the yells of the libero telling her teammates where the opponents are trying to hit the ball, whether it be a cross-court spike or a light tip over a teammate who moved in too close. “It’s like how the setter controls all of the attackers, telling them where the pass is going or where to spike it,” junior libero Mindy Gowen said. The libero position is not for those who want to escape each game scratchfree or never break a sweat. They are constantly running and diving after balls

“If it costs me a scratch, I’m going to beat that hitter every time.” junior libero Mindy Gowen

to keep their team in the point. “It’s about the mentality, you versus the hitter,” Gowen said. “If it costs me a scratch, I’m going to beat that hitter every time.” Playing libero may have cost Fernanda a few cuts or scratches, but it also helped her become the program’s all-time digs leader, a record to which she has already added to this year, bringing the record to 664 after her 55

digs in last weekend’s Nike Invitational. “You have to get used to it [diving], because that’s what you’re there for,” Fernanda said. “They expect you to get every ball,” she said. Playing the libero position isn’t always as fun as spiking the ball or blocking an opponent’s attempt at a kill, but liberos can a have some fun of their own. Fernanda and G owen both agree that taking the momentum away from an opposing crowd by making a great dig and re-energizing their teammates is a reward all itself. Daily File Photo

Chris Tyndall ctynsports@cox.net

Senior libero Maria Fernanda digs a ball in a game in Norman. Fernanda holds the program record for digs with 664, including 55 in the Nike Invitational last weekend.

These shoes were found 46 yards from the crash caused by a drunk driver. Carissa Deason was thrown 30 yards and not even her father, a doctor, could save her. Friends Don’t Let Friends Drive Drunk.

VOUCHER PROGRAM Photo by Michael Mazzeo

SAFERIDE OU EDU

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THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION.

www.ou.edu/eoo

oud-2012-8-30-a-005.indd 1

8/29/12 9:02:38 PM


6

• Thursday, August 30, 2012

CLASSIFIEDS Announcements

PLACE AN AD Phone: 405-325-2521 E-mail: classifieds@ou.edu

classifieds@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-2521

Fax: 405-325-7517 Campus Address: COH 149A

DEADLINES

SPECIAL SERVICES

Services HELP WANTED

MISC. SERVICES

University Psychic - Palm/Tarot readings & advisor. Specialize in reuniting loved ones! Walkins welcome. Appts preferred. 321-2401, 1915 S Classen, Norman.

Christian Counseling: 204-4615 grace-river.org

Line Ad ..................................................................................3 days prior Place line ad by 9:00 a.m. 3 business days prior to publication.

SPECIAL NOTICES

Display Ad ............................................................................3 days prior Classified Display or Classified Card Ad Place your display, classified display or classified card ads by 5:00 p.m. 3 business days prior to publication.

PAYMENT s r

r

Old couple, ages 83 & 90 tripped and fell in front of 1201 N. Stonewall, OU School of Dentistry in Nov. 2010. We need witnesses to other similar accidents at that location. Call Bernice, 607-8488.

For Sale

TM

FURNITURE

Payment is required at the time the ad is placed. Credit cards, cash, money orders or local checks accepted.

Bed NEW Queen Pillowtop Mattress set $150 Call 405.409.0145

RATES

MISC. FOR SALE

Line Ad

Great GE REFRIGERATOR, like new, white, icemaker, 29� x 64�. $295 cash. 329-3625

There is a 2 line minimum charge; approximately 42 characters per line, including spaces and punctuation. (Cost = Days x # lines x $/line) 10-14 days.........$1.15/line 15-19 days.........$1.00/line 20-29 days........$ .90/line 30+ days ........ $ .85/line

1 day ..................$4.25/line 2 days ................$2.50/line 3-4 days.............$2.00/line 5-9 days.............$1.50/line

C Transportation

Auto Insurance Quotations Anytime

Foreign Students Welcomed JIM HOLMES INSURANCE, 321-4664

Contact an Acct Executive for details at 325-2521. 2 col (3.25 in) x 2 inches Sudoku ..............$760/month Boggle ...............$760/month Horoscope ........$760/month

Recreation Technician (PPT), Parks and Recreation, Senior Citizens Center. Two year college degree in Recreation and Physical Ed, or related field, or any equivalent combination of education and experience which provides the required knowledge, skills and abilities. $13.06 per hr. Work period: hours vary between 8 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday. Must be able to work a minimum of 25-30 hrs. per week. Application deadline: September 7, 2012. A complete job announcement available at www.normanok.gov/hr/hr-job-postings. To request an application, email HR@NormanOK. gov, call 366-5482, or visit us at 201-C W. Gray, Human Resources Dept., City of Norman. EOE Gymnastics Instructors for pre-school girls and boys classes, tumbling, P/T, flex sched. Bart Conner Gymnastics, 4477500. SOONER BLOOMERS Now hiring for Fall Season. FT/PT - Call Tim at 550-6716

AUTO INSURANCE

Classified Display, Classified Card Ad or Game Sponsorship

HELP WANTED Bartending! Up to $300/day. No exp nec. Training available. 800-965-6520, x133

Nanny Needed, Norman family looking for a nanny 3 days per week, flexible hours. Contact debramauter@sbcglobal.net or 2262666.

2 col (3.25 in) x 2.25 inches

HELP WANTED

Note Takers Wanted! Avail. positions in the OU Athletics Department! Junior, Senior, Graduate and Post-graduate applicants only! Hiring for Fall 2012. Call 325-4828 for more info! TUTORS WANTED! Avail. positions in the OU Athletics Department!! Junior, Senior, Graduate and Post-graduate applicants only! ACCT, ANTH, ASTR, COMM, ECON, ENGL, GEOG, GEOL, HES, METR, PSY, SOC, BIOL, MATH! Hiring for Fall 2012. Call 325-0554 for more info! FINANCE/ACCOUNTING INTERN The City of Newcastle is taking applications for part-time pd. finance/accounting intern. Pay $10/hr - $??/hr, depending on college credits. Position will report to City Manager. Candidate must be seeking accounting degree. Intent of permanent position with the City of Newcaslte. City is willing to work with school schedules. Valid driver’s license, drug screen and satisfactory background check required. Applications may be obtained at City Hall, 422 S. Main or online at www.cityofnewcastleok.com. Return complete app to office or mail to City of Newcastle, ATTN: Human Resources, PO Box 179, Newcastle, OK 73065. The City of Newcastle, Okla, is an EOE. STUDENT ASSISTANT needed in Student Media! Assist with phone, copying, filing, other duties. $7.25/hr. TUE-FRI 12-5pm. Apply in person at Student Media Business Office, Copeland Hall Rm. 149A: 325-2521

Full or part-time Clerk and licensed Pharmacy Tech needed. Apply in person, M-F, 9-7 at Noble Pharmacy, 125 S Main. COACH’S RESTAURANT now hiring Cooks, Service Staff and Host/Hostess, daytime and evening shifts available. Apply in person at 102 West Main, MondayFriday, 2-4 pm.

J Housing Rentals HOUSES UNFURNISHED 502 Fleetwood: 4bd/2ba, CH/A, wood floors, all appliances, lawncare incl. $1350/mo, $1000 dep. No pets. CALL 550-7069 BILLS PAID, 1bd & 2bd - 360-3850

ROOMS FURNISHED NEAR OU, privacy, $250, bills paid, neat, clean, parking. WiFi available. Prefer male student. Call 405-410-4407.

$5,500-$10,000

PAID EGG DONORS. All Races needed. Non-smokers, Ages 18-27, SAT>1100/ACT>24/GPA>3.00 Contact: info@eggdonorcenter.com ASSISTANT COOK needed at Alpha Gamma Delta Sorority. Hrs needed 9 AM 4 PM, Mon-Fri. If interested, contact Debi at 365-3660.

Fall Specials

Crossword ........$515/month

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POLICY The Oklahoma Daily is responsible for one day’s incorrect advertising. If your ad appears incorrectly, or if you wish to cancel your ad call 3252521, before the deadline for cancellation in the next issue. Errors not the fault of the advertiser will be adjusted. Refunds will not be issued for late cancellations.

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crisis line

COLLEGE SKI & BOARD WEEK

breckenridge

Vail • Beaver Creek • Keystone • Arapahoe Basin

20 Mountains. 5 Resorts. 1 Price. FROM ONLY

plus t/s

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8 p.m.-4 a.m. every day

except OU holidays and breaks

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1-800-SKI-WILD • 1-800-754-9453

Help Wanted ads in The Oklahoma Daily are not to separate as to gender. Advertisers may not discriminate in employment ads based on race, color, religion or gender unless such qualifying factors are essential to a given position. All ads are subject to acceptance by The Oklahoma Daily. Ad acceptance may be re-evaluated at any time.

Y O U are responsible

for the world you live in...

take care �f �t

HOROSCOPE By Bernice Bede Osol

Copyright 2012, Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 Several new, valuable friendships will be entering your life in the year ahead. These new pals are likely to have a strong but good influence on your life both socially and career-wise. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- A matter that is quite meaningful to you is liely to be resolved to your advantage, yet you might still think you didn’t get enough. Don’t get greedy. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- You’ll think far more highly of yourself if you don’t modify your views just to placate another. Be your own person at all times, and let the chips fall as they may.

www.wildcareoklahoma.org

  

                       

Previous Solution                                                                        

Monday- Very Easy Tuesday-Easy Wednesday- Easy Thursday- Medium Friday - Hard

Instructions: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. That means that no number is repeated in any row, column or box.

oud-2012-8-30-a-006.indd 1

        

SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- When it comes to an issue that could advance your work or career, don’t broadcast your intentions in advance. If you do so, a competitor who steals your ideas could beat you out. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Be on guard if you are in the company of two friends who are having a disagreement, so that you’re not put in the middle. Whichever side you choose will get you in trouble. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Your financial affairs could turn out favorably, provided you are prudent in the management of your funds. Don’t let a good margin get out of hand. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Do not pepper your thoughts with reasons why something can’t be done.

Instead, focus your imagination on positive elements regarding ways to accomplish your purposes. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- If you are able to separate the wheat from the chaff, this can be a productive day for you. Don’t devote more time to the insignificant than to the beneficial and rewarding. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- When involved in a group endeavor, single out one person who is shy and hanging back. You’re the one who can get him or her to join in and enjoy what is going on. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Although things in general are favorable for you, nothing is likely to be handed to you on a silver platter. What you get must be acquired by your own merit. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- By being methodical and practical, the possibilities for fulfilling your aims will be substantially enhanced. Don’t let opportunities of great potential go unfulfilled.

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker August 30, 2012

ACROSS 1 Important name in fairy tales 6 Rose to one’s feet 11 Possesses 14 Boredom 15 Inner circle 16 Sort 17 Outside property managers? 19 Word before “little� or “late� 20 Like cobs and toms 21 Turkish bigshot 23 Helper on a drive 27 By the sea 29 On dry land 30 Containing neither sugar nor spice? 31 Bit of celery 32 Winner’s victim 33 Tiny unit of work 36 Ben Franklin’s flier 37 Russian composer Tchaikovsky 38 Right Guard’s target 39 Paulo or Tiago lead-in 40 Cuban dance 41 ___ donna 42 In the neighborhood 44 Become enraged 45 Orchestra

8/30

leader 47 “War and Peace� author 48 Having wings 49 Nut with caffeine 50 “Neither� companion 51 Skeet targets 58 Trapeze artist’s safeguard 59 Bride’s walkway 60 The best imaginable 61 Remains of a blaze 62 Little Chinese dogs, for short 63 Trite, joke-wise DOWN 1 Toothpaste option 2 Cytoplasm substance 3 Pay-to-stay place 4 Strong coffee, in slang 5 Price incorrectly 6 Heat to just short of boiling 7 Sprinter’s target 8 Emotionfilled poem 9 Hockey legend Bobby 10 Bad thing to sink into 11 Dives for

cover 12 Wailuku welcome 13 “Prosit!� alternative 18 Mobility improver 22 Wild donkey 23 Wine barrels 24 Port city of ancient Rome 25 “Do my eyes deceive me?� 26 Darner’s focus 27 The coast, to a Spaniard 28 Open court hearing, in law 30 Word with “trap� or “prize� 32 State of uncertainty 34 Juliet’s love 35 “Sanford and Son� spin-off 37 Cat or

engine sound 38 Metals in rocks 40 Ceiling on insurance increases 41 Living in the open sea 43 Contractor’s fig. 44 Many recital pieces 45 Exodus miracle food 46 Lotion botanicals 47 Drinks to excess 49 MacLachlan of “Twin Peaks� 52 Untruth 53 Pose a question 54 Former name of Tokyo 55 Not ‘neath 56 Bert Bobbsey’s sister 57 Sneaky and smart

PREVIOUS PUZZLE ANSWER

8/29

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YOU’RE GROUNDED! By Kathy Gotler

CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- You must be able to recognize the difference between a good value judgment and a poor one in order to be successful. Don’t waste time on that which yields sparse rewards. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Although you might be inclined to think otherwise, someone with whom you’re involved will be far more considerate and tolerant than you are. Look at yourself realistically.

8/29/12 7:49:41 PM


sports

Thursday, August 30, 2012 •

Soccer

FOOTBALL

Finding success across the pond

OU defense to face Miners spread attack in El Paso

OU senior defender transitions from England to America

Mike Stoops to debut revamped defense against receiver-heavy offense

Ross Stracke Sports Reporter

In America, soccer takes a back seat to football, basketball and baseball. In England, it’s a way of life. That cultural difference is what drove senior defender Katharine Nutman to achieve her dream of representing England on their international women’s soccer team. By the age of 14, she was living that dream, playing for the English National Team pool. At the age of 15, she was the captain of the U-15 English National Team and was on the U-19 squad just a year later. Nutman said that experience helped her as a senior leader on the OU soccer team. “It helped me grow as a leader and helped me bring some leadership to this team,” Nutman said. “Also, it helped me understand I don’t have to be a leader the whole time. It taught me that sometimes I need to lead and sometimes I need to follow. It’s all about balance.” Aside from developing her leadership skills, international soccer gave Nutman an edge coming into division-one soccer. Sally Nutman, Katharine’s mother, said that English players are better technically, while American players are more advance d physically. “Although English soccer and American soccer are very different in tempo, the skills she learned in the English game have given

7

Dillon Phillips

Assistant Sports Editor

astrud reed/the daily

Senior defender Katharine Nutman (23) makes a play in a game against Vanderbilt on Sunday. The Sooners and Commodores tied 1-1 for OU’s first draw of the season. Nutman has played with the English National Team pool since the age of 14, playing for the U-15 and U-19 teams.

her a great idea about gameplay,” Sally said. “In terms of soccer, the English game is more focused on ball skills, whilst the American game is more athletic and built around the strength of the players.” Katharine agrees that the athleticism in Division I soccer took her by surprise. “I was pretty naive about Katharine how difficult it Nutman would be, but I came over and it has worked out so far,” Katharine said. Coach Matt Potter admits that adjusting to the difference in athleticism probably was a learning process for Katharine, but he said

the intense soccer culture of England has prepared her for the type of gameplay here at OU. “She’s been living, eating and sleeping in an environment that knows about the game,” Potter said. “The culture that she grew up in has prepared her for the environments she’s going to find herself in in college.” Once Katharine finishes her senior season, the question on everyone’s minds is whether or not she will try out for the English National Team that would represent Great Britain in the Olympics. She stays modest, saying she doesn’t know if she’s good enough to make the team. “Well that would be nice,

but I don’t think I’m in contention for [the national team],” Katharine said. “My ultimate goal is to get back and play for a clubcoached team within the English setup.” However, as is typical for a mother, Sally thinks differently. “At (age) 11, she gave a speech at school, declaring her ambition to play for her country,” Sally said. “Somehow we always knew that she would achieve this. We are certain that, once she has graduated, we will see her competing on the English side regularly.” Ross Stracke ross.stracke@ou.edu

When the Oklahoma football team’s defense takes the field at 9:30 p.m. Saturday in El Paso, Texas, it will be the first Mike Stoops-led defense to don the crimson and cream since a 56-25 win against Texas Tech at the end of the 2003 regular season. Sooner fans received a preview of what to expect defensively at the spring game in April, but Saturday night’s game will be the first opportunity to see Stoops’ defense in action against an opposing offense. “I think everyone’s excited,” Stoops said. “Everyone is tired of talking about it, and the players are tired of practice. ” OU’s opponent, UTEP, ranked No. 75 in total offense last season behind the arm of now-senior quarterback Jordan Lamaison. Lamaison threw for 1,718 yards and 12 touchdowns in UTEP coach Mike Price’s single-back offense last season, despite missing three games with a shoulder injury. Sooner fans should expect the Miners to spread the field and test OU’s secondary. “Mike Price has always done a good job of throwing the ball around,” defensive ends coach Bobby Jack Wright said. “They give you a hard time with running people off and on, getting into different personnel groupings and attacking you with different plays out of those groupings.” Stoops said he plans to defend UTEP’s receiver-heavy offense by matching speed with speed. “When they’re three and four wide, we’ll use five and six DBs the majority of the time,” Stoops said. “When they only have two wideouts on the field, we’ll use our standard personnel with three linebackers.” In fact, the Sooners’ latest depth chart lists five starters at defensive back and only two at lineback — junior middle linebacker Tom Wort and junior outside linebacker Corey Nelson. “A lot’s been made about how we’re playing a lot of nickel, but we play a lot of teams that run three and four wideouts, and we certainly have to have as much speed on the field as we can,” Stoops said. As far as the run game is concerned, UTEP offers up a balanced rushing attack to keep the Sooners’ defense guessing. “They’re big up front,” Wright said. “They’ll be good in the run game. They’re simple, but they’re very, very good.” Dillon Phillips, dphillips85@ou.edu

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8/29/12 8:37:29 PM


8

• Thursday, August 30, 2012

LIFE&ARTS Fall into

new styles

OUDaily.com ›› Life & Arts columnist, Brent Stenstrom, writes about why actors should choose to be in quality films, not just ones that earn them money.

Carmen Forman, life & arts editor Westlee Parsons, assistant editor dailyent@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/life&arts • Twitter: @OUDailyArts

Replace your summer favorites with boot cut denim and cardigans. Not only will cardigans keep you warm in the cool fall weather, they will keep you looking stylish around campus. Wear cardigans to add warmth and style to plain V-necks or T-shirts. Dress up a cardigan by wearing a button-up shirt and a tie under it. Accessories Fall is a great time for guys to play around with accessories. Things like hats and scarves are not only practical for keeping warm, but they are sure to help you stand out of the crowd. Even though most people check the time on their phones, watches are a classic must-have accessory for men.

Life & Arts columnist

interesting silhouette this fall. Peplum is a strip of ruffle added to the waist in order to add volume. This is a versatile silhouette that comes in shirts, skirts, dresses or jackets. Peplum shirts or jackets Shannon Borden paired with a straight leg or shannonborden@ou.edu skinny jean is a great way to look casual and cute. To It’s about that time to dress up this look, wear a wake up your cozy sweatpeplum dress or high waist ers and scarves from skirt with a tucked in blouse. Shannon Borden is a hibernation. professional writing Fall is around the corner, sophomore. Chunky Knits and with that comes the One of the most comfortnewest fall fashions. Here able fall trends is the knit are a few trends for the fall Evin Morrison/The daily sweater. that are sure to turn heads Pre-nursing sophomore Kayla This classic ’90s look is on campus. back in full force. Pair over- Blood models fall fashions for women provided by the sized, cozy sweaters with Women Dainty Hooligan Boutique leggings for a daytime look. Menswear and Francesca’s Collections. To dress up a knit sweater, Menswear is one of the Architecture sophmore Keaton wear it over a form-fitting hottest fall fashions for Cizek models fall fashions for dress or skirt. You also could women. It gained popularity men from American Eagle. last year and will be making try tucking it into a flowing, belted skirt. a comeback this autumn. Chunky knits are a fun High necklines with contrasting collars give outfits a fall selection because you can be creative with prints. pop of color. While some may opt for Blazers are great for a ! more polished, professional plain sweaters, others t naked a e r g k can go for wacky patterns. loo look but also can be dressed ake YOU Firm-upTone-up Either way, the oversized m e W down for casual daytime emy Lose weight & inches sweater is sure to grab some ’s Acad looks. Pair menswear with n a n o C attention. thighs & bottom! more feminine pieces like Get a heck of a workout & start seeing results quickly! skirts or statement jewelry Men Conan’s Academy • Jujitsu • Mix Martial Art to give balance to your look. 322 E. Gray Cardigans and denim (405) 366-1204 • Boxing • Anaerobic Kickboxing conansacademy.com Unfortunately, it may be Peplum College Discount time to put away the pastel Bring this ad in, get tuition fee waived ($99 value) Peplum is a new and shorts and bro tank tops.

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8/29/12 7:53:55 PM


Thursday, August 30, 2012