Issuu on Google+

Campus: Is gender-neutral housing still on students’ minds? (Page 2)

J u n e 2 6 -J u ly 2 , 2 013

L&A: Start your vinyl record collection today with these tips. (Page 7)

How does flat-rate tuition affect you?

‘‘ ‘‘ ‘‘ ‘‘

Name: Blake Armstrong

Name: Peggy Sabatini

Name: Changing Chen

Name: Jozette Massiah

Year: senior

Year: senior

Year: graduate student

Year: senior

Major: business administration

Major: advertising

Major: petroleum engineering

Major: public relations

I think it will affect more people negatively. I know a lot more people that take 12 hours and not many that take more than 15 … It could also be motivation for people to study more and enroll in 15 hours.”

I’ve never wanted or needed to take more than 12 to 15 hours … I also work a lot during the year and pay for part of my education, who has time to take advantage [of the new plan]?”

It’s not reasonable. If you’re only in 12 hours why do you need to pay for 15? But It could push people to study and enroll in more hours.”

I like it! I’m enrolled in a lot of hours, so it helps me … But I can see why some wouldn’t like it. It has it’s advantages and disadvantages.”

The flat-rate tuition initiative means fulltime students will pay for 15 credit hours per semester. (Page 4-5)


2

• June 26-July 2, 2013

UP AND COMING Keep an eye out for the following stories on OUDaily.com Grade Hacking update — Two experts weigh in on the implications of changing one’s grade in higher education, detailing what it means for the future of cyber security and academic integrity. This comes in the wake of four students, including one from OU, allegedly hacking into university computer systems and changing grades. Impactful OU Players Series — The sports desk will be continuing its series of five OU players from different sports who made a major impact on their respective teams this past athletic year. O’Connell’s Beer Pong — O’Connell’s Irish Pub & Grille is sending two people to Las Vegas to represent it at a national beer pong tournament after a month-long in-restaurant tournament. Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park — “Ring Round the Moon” opens as part of Oklahoma City’s Shakespeare in the Park. The show begins at 8 p.m. Thursday at the Myriad Botanical Garden’s Waterstage.

CORRECTIONS 160 Copeland Hall, 860 Van Vleet Oval Norman, OK 73019 phone: 405-325-3666 email: dailynews@ou.edu

Blayklee Buchanan Editor in Chief Kyle Margerum Managing Online Editor Paighten Harkins Campus Editor Jono Greco Sports Editor Megan Deaton Life & Arts Editor Ryan Boyce Visual Editor Judy Gibbs Robinson Faculty Adviser

The Oklahoma Daily is committed to serving readers with accurate coverage and welcomes your comments about information that may require correction or clarification. To contact us with corrections, email us at dailynews@ ou.edu. Visit OUDaily.com/ corrections for an archive of our corrections

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GENDER-NEUTRAL HOUSING

Rally may have lost appeal Some worry coed option is temporary JOESPH LYON

Campus Reporter

Editors note: Micah Wormley is a former assistant online editor at The Daily. With the freshman coed housing program deemed a success to be continued this fall, the future of the gender-neutral housing initiative is left in the hands of students who may have lost interest. Last summer, OU announced a freshmen coed housing policy in response to the wildfire of discussion and campaigning for gender-neutral housing that had been ongoing since 2010, according to Daily archives. The coed housing option differs from the gender-neutral option because, while the coed floor houses both males and females, the rooms are still segregated by sex. For instance, in gender-neutral housing cisgender males could room with cisgender females. That isn’t the case for coed housing, which lets students of all sexes live on the same hall but not in the same room. When the pilot program was implemented last year, a total of 58 spaces were made available for freshman students interested in a coed housing arrangement, university spokesman Michael Nash said in an email. “Interest in [the coed] option has continued to steadily grow since the announcement of the program’s expansion,” Nash said. The popularity of the program prompted the administration to increase the

RICARDO PATINO/THE DAILY

Students gathered in the South Oval on March 7, 2012 to march to President David Boren’s office demanding changes in the housing. Students marched to show their support for gender-neutral housing with a proposal for Boren, who did not give an official date upon which the decision would be discussed.

DEFINITION Cisgender The sex that agrees with one’s biological sex. Source: urbandictionary.com

number of available spaces in the freshman coed communities from 58 to 186, he said. The ongoing success of this particular program may raise questions as to whether advances will be made in the way of gender-neutral housing, as it was the issue that prompted the decision for a freshman coed floor. However, Nash didn’t comment on further plans to advance in the direction of gender-neutral housing. “This program, like all student programs, will continue to be evaluated on an ongoing basis,” he said.

Whether these evaluative practices will lead to the university adopting a gender-neutral housing option is a primary concern for professional writing senior Micah Wormley. As a transgender woman, Wo r m l e y sa i d t h e g e n der-neutral option was important to her and is disappointed with the lack of a proper solutions to students’ original concerns with gender-neutral housing. “The administration as I’ve perceived it has been kind of lackluster,” she said. This summer, Wormley is living in the residence halls while taking classes, and she was put on the men’s floor, even though she identifies as a woman. Because of incidents like this, Wormley is concerned with the decline in student interest in the movement for gender-neutral housing since the coed program was implemented.

Recently, students haven’t brought up this matter at Housing Center Student A s s o c i a t i o n ’s G e n e r a l Council, said Stephanie Te r r a z a s P r e s i d e n t o f Housing Center Student Association. Since some students who were adamant about the movement’s success have graduated, members of the movement have not made any major demands or had talks with the administration, she said. Also, she is worried the coed housing program might have just been a temporary solution until interests declined, she said. “It would be a shame if this was just to appease the group until it fell apart,” she said. Joseph Lyon jlyon.ou@gmail.com More online at OUDaily.com


June 26 - July 2, 2013 •

SPORTS BRIEFS

SOFTBALL

Ricketts adds another accolade First Sooner to earn Honda Cup JONO GRECO Sports Editor

Former Oklahoma softball pitcher Keilani Ricketts had been honored with just about every award a female college athlete could receive during her softball career. On Monday, she added another accolade to her already impressive resume: The 2013 Honda Cup, which is awarded to the nation’s top female athlete. “My teammates helped m e s t a y d e t e r m i n e d ,” Ricketts said in a news release. “Winning the Honda Cup has been great to represent my school and my state. I wouldn’t be here without the people of Oklahoma. They have motivated me to be prideful to use softball to represent them well.” Ricketts is the first OU athlete and third softball player to earn the award, according to a news release. The other two softball players are a pair of UCLA Bruins: Natasha Watley in 2003 and Lisa Fernandez in 1993. This is the second straight year a Big 12 athlete has taken

3

ASTRUD REED/THE DAILY

Former OU pitcher Keilani Ricketts was dominant in the circle and at the plate this past season, earning her second straight Player of the Year honor and her first Honda Cup honor, which goes to the nation’s top female college athlete.

“Winning the Honda Cup has been great to represent my school and state.” KEILANI RICKETTS, FORMER OU SOFTBALL PLAYER

home the Honda Cup. Baylor basketball player Brittney Griner earned the award for the 2011-2012 athletic year. During OU’s run toward its second national championship in program history and the first since 2000, Ricketts

put up numbers some believed could only be achieved while playing a video game. She went 35-1 with a 1.23 ERA in the circle while striking out 350 batters in 238 1/3 innings. Also, she recorded six no-hitters, including one against Washington in the Women’s College World Series, to up her career total to seven. Ricketts was a force at the plate, too, hitting .379 with 15 homers and 60 RBIs. “She is a special athlete, and one who is very

9

deserving of the 2013 Honda Cup,” Jean Lenti Ponsetto, Collegiate Women’s Sports Awards chairwoman of the board, said in a news release. Ricketts is preparing with Team USA for the World Cup of Softball, which will take place from July 11 to July 14 at ASA Hall of Fame Stadium in Oklahoma City. The pitcher is one of three Sooners to be selected for the team. Jono Greco, jonogreco13@gmail.com

FOOTBALL

Two charged in connection to Stoops residence burglary Corey McCarty has been charged with burglary in the first degree, possession of stolen property, unlawful use of a credit card grand larceny of an automobile in connection to the burglary of Oklahoma football coach Bob Stoops’ home the morning of June 22, according to a proba- BOB ble cause affidavit. STOOPS No information has been given about the second suspect in custody because of the person’s juvenile status. “McCarty admitted he was the one who swiped the victim’s bank card at the area business in a purchase attempt,” Norman Police Department detective Corey Lambrecht stated in the affidavit. “McCarty was apologetic, stating he meant no harm to the victims’ family and that this incident was not his idea.” The investigation into the burglary at the Stoops residence still is being conducted. Staff Reports

NBA

Kevin Durant to host camp at Huston Huffman Center in August Oklahoma City Thunder star Kevin Durant will host a basketball camp for boys and girls from first through 12th grades at the Huston Huffman Fitness Center on Aug. 8 and Aug. 9. The Academy Sports + Outdoors Kevin Durant ProCamp will take place in threeKEVIN hour sessions each of the two days. Those DURANT who attend will receive a limited edition Kevin Durant Basketball ProCamp T-shirt and an exclusive autographed camp team photo with Durant, according to the camp’s website. People who wish to attend the camp can register at ProCamp’s website. Staff Reports

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4

• June 26-July 2, 2013

June 26-July 2, 2013 •

5

Flat-rate tuition passed by OU regents, state regents to render verdict June 26 Regents also unanimously pass cost increase for students living in university housing

AT A GLANCE Possible exemptions from flat-rate tuition

PAIGHTEN HARKINS, JULIA NELSON Campus Editor, Staff Reporter

The OU Board of Regents passed President David Boren’s proposal for flat-rate tuition, which will go to the Oklahoma State Board of Regents on Wednesday. In approving the motion, the regents also accepted the proposed 2.9 percent tuition and fees increase for out-ofstate students and no increase for resident tuition. If passed by the state regents, OU will become the sixth Big 12 university to move to flat-rate tuition, putting them among the ranks of schools like Baylor University, Iowa State University and University of Texas. The motion for flat-rate tuition was approved unanimously after little discussion. “ It w i l l s av e f a m i l i e s money. It will increase our four-year graduation rate, and it will meet governor and legislative goals to get more college graduates in our state at a faster rate,” Boren said. The new flat-rate tuition is It will save families based on the current rate for 15 credit hours, according to money. It will Daily archives. increase our fourThe goal for flat-rate tuition is to get students to year graduation graduate on time, Boren rate, and it will said. However, there are other meet governor and avenues to assist students legislative goals to who may not be able to get more college take 15 hours in the fall or spring semesters, said Matt graduates in our Hamilton, vice president state at a faster and registrar, in an email. Full-time students in rate” both fall and spring semesPRESIDENT DAVID BOREN ters who take fewer than 30 hours in the fall and spring semesters will acquire credit hours for summer school, Hamilton said. For example, a student who took a total of 27 hours in fall and spring will have three credit hours to be credited in tuition and mandatory fees during the following summer term or summer intersession periods, he said. For students who work 25 hours a week or more is applying for financial aid to offset the cost of working over 25 hours, Hamilton said. The scholarship will require students to be enrolled in at least 15 hours.

‘‘

Those who may be eligible include students who are: • Part-time

BY THE NUMBERS

TWITTER REACTIONS

The new flat-rate tuition plan is based on 15 credit hours per semester, so taking under 15 hours will cause students to lose money.

Students speak their mind

12 hours

$845.25

13 hours

$563.50

14 hours

$281.75

• Oklahoma’s Promise scholarship recipients • Enrolled in certificate programs • Solely taking courses through the College of Continuing Education or Liberal Studies • Enrolled in Health Sciences Center undergraduate healthrelated programs • Visiting JULIA NELSON/THE DAILY

The OU Board of Regents discuss the proposed flat-rate tuition Monday, June 24. The OU Board of Regents passed the motion unanimously, but in order for it to be in effect, the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education must pass the motion. The state regents will meet June 26 and will discuss flat-rate tuition among other items on their agenda.

In addition, there will be an appeals board for students looking to be exempt from flatrate tuition, Boren said. Students will sit on the appeals board, Hamilton said. They will be appointed by student government leaders to serve along with OU staff on this appeals committee. Students who are exempt through this appeal process will receive a reduction in tuition and mandatory fee charges for the unused credit hours, Hamilton said. The OU regents also unanimously approved increases to the coming semester’s Housing and Food Services rates. The cost for living in the residence halls will increase by 4 percent, which amounts to $168 more per semester for students who live in a double occupancy room with a standard meal plan, according to the regent’s agenda. As well, there will be a 3 percent cost increase for students living in Traditions S q u a re E a s t a n d We s t, t h e K ra e t t l i Apartments and the University Village at the Health Sciences Center, according to the

agenda. The increase amounts to a $15 increase per month for a four bedroom, two bathroom apartment at Traditions Square, and $18 to $21 increase per month for those living in an unfurnished or furnished apartment, respectively, at Kraettli, according to the agenda. The increased rate amounts to a $17 increase per month for a studio apartment at the University Village, and a $26 per month increase at a townhouse, according to the agenda. The regents will meet again June 26 to discuss construction costs for the Bizzell Memorial Library renovations and the new modern food services market to be put in Oklahoma Memorial Union, according to Daily archives. Paighten Harkins, Julia Nelson paighten.harkins@ou.edu, julia.nelson33@gmail.com

These exemptions must include verifiable supporting documentation: • With disabilities • With fewer than 15 credit hours needed to graduate • Active military or called up for military service • Studying abroad

However, while students will lose money by taking less than 15 hours, taking more will save money. 16 hours

$281.75

17 hours

$563.50

18 hours

$845.25

• With internships more than 50 miles away • Covered with contractual arrangements with other universities • With health issues or medical hardships • With a death in the immediate family • Suffering a natural disaster Source: OU flat-rate website

*Numbers based on resident tuition and mandatory fees Source: Office of the Bursar website

We tweeted out asking students what they thought about the proposed flat-rate tuition, and this is what some Sooners had to say:


6

• June 26-July 2, 2013

C Transportation

PLACE AN AD Phone: 405-325-2521 E-mail: classifieds@ou.edu

Fax: 405-325-7517 Campus Address: COH 149A

DEADLINES Line Ad ..................................................................................3 days prior Place line ad by 9:00 a.m. 3 business days prior to publication.

Display Ad ............................................................................3 days prior Classified Display or Classified Card Ad Place your display, classified display or classified card ads by 5:00 p.m. 3 business days prior to publication.

POLICY

The Oklahoma Daily will not knowingly accept advertisements that discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, religious preference, national origin or sexual orientation. Violations of this policy should be reported to The Oklahoma Daily Business Office at 325-2521. Help Wanted ads in The Oklahoma Daily are not to separate as to gender. Advertisers may not discriminate in employment ads based on race, color, religion or gender unless such qualifying factors are essential to a given position. All ads are subject to acceptance by The Oklahoma Daily. Ad acceptance may be re-evaluated at any time.



 

 

 

                    

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Utilities PAID, incl. wireless internet, cable, parking, quiet, furnished, share kitchen & bath. Male students preferred. ONLY $220/month. 410-4407

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Students! Walk to OU! 3bd, huge yard, wood oors, incl. internet, cable TV, W/D, hot tub. $1200 - 446-0776 4100 Bentbrook Pl. 4 br/3 ba. 2-car garage. 3,070 sq. ft. Fenced yard. $2,100/ mo. $2,100 deposit. Lease purchase available. Call 476-9133. Call 405.360.3850 for a clean, safe place! No smoking, no pets. Application, with a refundable fee if you rent from us! All places very near campus!

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The Oklahoma Daily is responsible for one day’s incorrect advertising. If your ad appears incorrectly, or if you wish to cancel your ad call 3252521, before the deadline for cancellation in the next issue. Errors not the fault of the advertiser will be adjusted. Refunds will not be issued for late cancellations.



AUTO INSURANCE

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Previous Solution                                                                        

        

Monday- Very Easy Tuesday-Easy Wednesday- Easy Thursday- Medium Friday - Hard

Instructions: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. That means that no number is repeated in any row, column or box.

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker June 26, 2013

ACROSS 1 Ebenezer’s exclamation 4 Greet the sultan 10 What a cowboy calls a lady 14 Controversial mentalist Geller 15 OK to ingest 16 “___ la Douce� (1963 film) 17 Chair support 18 Lady Macbeth, on occasion 20 Country in the Persian Gulf 22 Like some tree trunks 23 Windowframe part 24 Hybrid big cat 27 Wah-wah producer 28 Riddle 32 “If you build it, they will ___.� 33 Drunk 34 Half and half? 35 Part of a cheer 36 Pre-med course 37 Suffix with “lion� or “host� 38 Recite lines 39 Really exist 40 Remnant or survivor 42 Keep the engine running in park 43 To the point

6/26

45 What a greedy person wants 46 “Tails� alternative 47 Something a person may take a spin in? 48 Aquatic mammal 51 Adapt music for the band 54 Term of endearment for Caine 58 Doze momentarily (with “off�) 59 Bed for some shrimp? 60 Archimedes’ shout 61 Omelet need 62 They give people big heads 63 Like tails 64 Caviar, before processing DOWN 1 Future lily 2 Kind of rug 3 Olympic competitor 4 Seed on hamburger buns 5 Improvise lines 6 Banker’s protection 7 Vigoda of “Fish� 8 Yodeling peak 9 Plaintive cry 10 Noble address 11 Slowmoving,

12 13 19 21 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33

commodious crafts ___ Brothers (“Rag Mop� singers) Wells of Motown Changes Payroll datum Costello or Gehrig Crawling creature Kind of room or star Waterypatterned cloth Put in the fridge Cartoon beeper Remus or Sam Apportion (with “out�) Jolly good fellow Italian province or

its capital 36 Thorny bushes (var.) 41 Former Justice Dept. branch 42 Whit or wee bit 44 Grad school papers 45 SNL’s Bill 47 Tough trips 48 Barbarous one 49 Calc preceder, perhaps 50 Filled tortilla 51 “Great� swingers 52 “Faster!� 53 Beat by a point or two 55 “___ give you the shirt off his back!� 56 Sharing possessive 57 Prefix for “packaged�

PREVIOUS ANSWER PREVIOUS PUZZLE PUZZLE ANSWER

6/25

6/19

MOVERS AND SHAKERS

Š 2013 Universal Uclick www.upuzzles.com Š 2013 Universal Uclick www.upuzzles.com

By Tim Burr

HOROSCOPE By Bernice Bede Osol

Copyright 2012, Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 Exciting and rewarding times are in the offing for you in the year ahead. The many lessons you’ve learned will provide the framework you need for numerous successes. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- A gentle reminder should do the trick to get something that you loaned to another returned. The recipient of your kind gesture may have merely forgotten. CANCER (June 21-July 22) --You can make this remarkable day by doing everything in accordance with your highest standards. Don’t compromise just to get things out of the way. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Even though you might do your utmost to conceal your tender inclinations, you won’t be able to help being wonderfully charitable and compassionate toward your friends. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -Someone who holds you in high esteem might work on your behalf without your knowledge to make something easier for you. Be sure to pay it forward. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -Something that appears to be difficult, even mysterious, will be a piece of cake to you. Don’t hesitate to show your stuff. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- A person you’ve recently met is very anxious to get to know you better. You’re aware of this, yet for some strange reason you’ve never encouraged the relationship. Why not?

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- An associate who has been extremely helpful to you in the past can be of considerable assistance you to once again. If you need anything, go to him or her first. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- If you are lucky enough to get involved with someone whose objectives closely parallel yours, both you and this person will have an easier time achieving your goals. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -When something important has to be negotiated, keep in mind that the other party is just as eager to reach an understanding as you are. Don’t blow your cool. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Your associates will sense your strength and resolve. You need to realize that you don’t have to be overly aggressive to get your way. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -Thoughtful things you do for your mate or special someone will not go unnoticed or unappreciated. Try your hardest to go out of your way for others. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- If at all possible, entertain at your place, where friends feel welcome and relaxed. They’ll have a better time there than any fancy place you could take them.


June 26-July 2, 2013 •

7

HOW TO

Start your own vinyl collection LIFE & ARTS COLUMNIST

Mark Brockway mark.d.brockway@ou.edu

S

tarting to collect vinyl records can be an intimidating process. Record stores have hundreds of albums by bands you may or may not have heard of, and you never listen to anything but iTunes tracks and Pandora Radio. However, establishing a good record collection is easy; it just takes a little time and effort. Here is a quick guide to getting started.

When buying a used record, the most important factor is condition. You want to look for records with no scratches or warping. Both could cause the record to skip. Dirty records are fine, but they must be washed before playing. You might look through hundreds of records before buying a handful in good shape.

Buy these records

There are a few albums everyone should own. They sound incredible on vinyl, and you will have the respect of any serious vinyl collector you happen to run into. The first album is “Led Zeppelin 4.” It has the classic rock staple “Stairway to Heaven” among others. The next is “Exile on Main Street” by Get the right gear the Rolling Stones. It is a Half the fun of collectPHOTO PROVIDED great double album with ing and listening to vinyl is Guestroom Records, 125 E. Main St., is an example of a good place to tons of material. You also having a cool vintage stereo start building your vinyl record collection, both new and used. need Pink Floyd’s “Dark system on which to play it. Side of the Moon” and All-in-one record players anything by The Jimi Hendrix Experience. Last but not are nice and convenient, but having speakers, a receiver least is “The White Album” — arguably the best album and stand-alone record player will produce the best sound. With a little luck on Craigslist and at thrift stores and garage by The Beatles and one of the greatest double albums of sales, you can find a complete stereo system for around the all time. Even if you are not a classic rock fan, owning vinyl price of a new all-in-one player. is about connecting with other people through music. Local records stores often carry quality used gear as well. Millions of people have listened to these albums on vinyl Ask if you can plug in and listen to any equipment before records, and you should join in that experience. you purchase it to make sure it is in good working order.

Don’t buy brand new records (yet)

New vinyl records can be $15 to $40 or more. When you are first getting started collecting, you can break the bank on only a few albums. Instead, hit the garage sales and thrift stores to find cheaper records — they usually run $1 to $5. Buying used records will let you try out your system and see if vinyl collecting is for you.

Buy new records

If your stereo sounds good, and you enjoy listening to the used records you bought, head to the local record store and buy the latest albums by your favorite bands. Many new albums are coming out on vinyl, and some companies are re-releasing classics on vinyl. iTunes might be easy, but nothing sounds like a new vinyl

MARK BROCKWAY/THE DAILY

record. If you need any help or advice, please feel free to drop me a quick email. Mark Brockway is a political science senior.


8

• June 26-July 2, 2013

DANCE

Dinner, choreography merge SummerDance to begin this Friday

SHOW TIMES

KELLY ROGERS

When: 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday 3 p.m. Sunday

Life & Arts Reporter

The OU School of Dance will present this year’s annual SummerDance production, “Dinner and Dance” this weekend. Held in the Reynolds Performing Arts Center, the event will include a box dinner that will be one hour and 15 minutes before the show, provided by Legend’s restaurant, according to a press release dated June 12. In addition to a gourmet dinner, guests also will have the opportunity to chat with the choreographers behind the making of this year’s SummerDance event. Audience members can expect to see graceful and captivating dances performed by dancers of the Oklahoma Festival Ballet and Contemporary Dance Oklahoma. Dance-lovers will get a taste of works by choreographers, such as Oklahoma Festival Ballet Director Mary Margaret Holt, Contemporary Dance Oklahoma Director Austin Hartel and OU School of Dance alumnus Brett Young, Redwine said. Holt has been involved with SummerDance productions and Oklahoma Festival Ballet for approximately 25 years, she said. For this year’s program, Holt choreographed two ballets full of history and passion, she said. The first ballet she choreographed is set to the music of German composer Kurt Weill, who fled from

Where: Studio 3002 of the Reynolds Performing Arts Center

PHOTO PROVIDED

Natalie Kischuk and Zeek Wright, both ballet performance majors, perform with Oklahoma Festival Ballet at OU.

“I’ve always loved his music for its emotional content and melodic line.” MARY MARGARET HOLT, OKLAHOMA FESTIVAL BALLET DIRECTOR

TICKETS Dinner, dance, performance and reception: $43 Performance and reception: $20 Student tickets for performance and reception: $15

Germany in the 1930s to move to the U.S. “I’ve always loved his music for its emotional content and melodic line,” Holt said. John Fry, the School of Dance’s staff pianist, will accompany Holt’s second ballet with the music of Astor

Piazzolla, a South American composer whose heritage and background will be reflected through the ballet, Holt said. Passionate ballets and modern dance works will be under the spotlight as both Oklahoma Festival Ballet and Contemporary Dance Oklahoma dance companies celebrate their passion for dance. Kathleen Redwine, dance history professor for the School of Dance, said this year’s production is unique because audience members will be able to experience ballet and modern dances in one show. With new lighting equipment and risers for the audience, the performance space

in the studio provides an intimate space for the audience to connect with the show on a more personal level, Redwine said. “[It] contributes to the total artistic environment of the performance,” Redwine said. Adam Honore, a student designer in the School of Drama, has designed the lighting for the entire production, Holt said. With only three weeks to prepare for the production, the entire production process for the summer is compacted, Holt said. “This is excellent experience for the dancers, as they will often be called upon to work in similar time frames as professionals,” Holt said. After the show, a champagne and dessert reception will be held for audience members to meet and talk to the performers and choreographers of the performances, according to the press release. Reservations can be made by calling the Fine Arts College Ticket Service at (405) 325-4101. The box office is located in the Catlett Music Center, 500 West Boyd St. Kelly Rogers kelly.n.rogers-1@ou.edu

See a performance of “Suessical the Musical” at The Sooner Theatre. The musical is starring summer production camp participants. Tickets can be purchased at the box office or at the door for $10.

Enjoy the cooler summer nights with Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park’s 29th summer season in Oklahoma City. “Ring Round the Moon” opens at 8 p.m. at the Myriad Botanical Garden’s Waterstage. Visit Norman’s OPOLIS for a show headlined by Lord Huron. The concert starts at 8 p.m. Friday. Tickets are $8 and can be purchased in advance or at the door. The show is only open to those 21 and up.

Take a trip to Oklahoma City for a Steamroller Print Festival, hosted by [Artspace] at Untitled. The festival will run from 3 to 10 p.m. and will feature events for both kids and adults. Some things to look forward to include a visit from Big Truck Tacos and T shirt printing for those who bring their own shirts. Catch the last “Dinner and Dance” performance, a SummerDance production from the OU School of Dance. For more details, see our companion story on this page.

Kick off the first day of July with a picnic lunch in Lions Park. Don’t forget to stop next door at the Norman Firehouse Art Center. The gallery’s Faculty Art Show is currently showcasing a variety of artistic styles. The art center will be open 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Hurry over to the South Oval for a free sno cone, courtesy of OU Summer Session. The free sno cones will continue while supplies last every Tuesday at 11 a.m.


6-26-13