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A P R I L 2 9 - M AY 5 , 2 0 19 | W E E K LY I N P R I N T | O U D A I LY. C O M

OUDAILY

The University of Oklahoma’s independent student voice since 1916

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Attendees and volunteers mill about Norman Music Festival April 25.

BEHIND THE SCENES Norman Music Fest volunteers keep festival scene fun, lively and free for more than 100,000 fans

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hen volunteer applications for Norman Music Fest came out for the 2018 festival, OU Price College of Business junior Alex Fuqua signed up to be a water vendor. But as he entered the festival grounds, his job changed. Fuqua’s supervisor came and grabbed him from his vendor position, and within minutes he found himself instead managing professional musicians during an established music festival. “I had never (managed a stage) before, and (my supervisor’s) like, ‘Here’s your schedule, here’s everything you need to do, have fun, I’ll come back in an hour and see if you’re still swimming,’” Fuqua said. “I did well, and now I’m doing it again this year — it’s been a wonderful time.” Norman Music Fest is original and free to the public, but it differs from other music festivals in another big way. Behind the scenes of lively music, food and fun, Norman Music Fest is a volunteer-run nonprofit entity, reaching over 100,000 music fans with the help of around 150 volunteers, a NMF spokesperson said. Compared to volunteers at festivals like Austin City Limits or Bonnaroo, who receive free access to the festival after their shifts, and even a meal token for each shift worked, volunteers at

ALMA CIENSKI • @ALMACIENSKI Norman Music Fest work for no material incentive other than a T-shirt. However, the good they contribute is enough to make them come back the next year, said volunteer Dakota Sponsler. “ ( Vo l u n t e e r i n g ) h e l p s Norman,” Sponsler said. “It helps local businesses, and it’s just cool to be a part of something that’s free, and this is how they keep it free — volunteers, like us.” Sponsler spent the 2019 festival working on Saturday beside four of his Navy friends at a vendor station in the food court selling water and other beverages as a way to help their Navy committee. While some may register to volunteer for a free T-shirt or access to volunteer rest areas, most people contribute their time and efforts to make sure NMF sticks around, said volunteer coordinator Stephanie Brickman. Brickman also serves as secretary for the 100 percent volunteer-run Norman Music Alliance board of directors. “The vast majority of our volunteers want to be a part of something bigger than themselves and want to ensure the success of NMF for years to come,” Brickman said. The process for registering as a volunteer is quite simple, and even more so for veteran volunteers. Through an online database called iVolunteer,

volunteers must agree to the conditions and choose to help out in either merchandise, hospitality or stage management. People who have volunteered in the past receive an email letting them know that the schedule is available, Brickman said. “We have so many veteran volunteers who check out the musical lineups versus the shifts and plan out the three or four hours to sign up so that they will have the opportunity to enjoy the music,” Brickman said. Brickman said her favorite part of coordinating the volunteers is moving people around a spreadsheet knowing these dedicated volunteers want to present a successful NMF as much as the board members who plan the festival all year long. “Norman is a city of festivals — Medieval Fair, Jazz in June, Groovefest, Christmas Parade and NMF — and those festivals and events that take place annually rely on volunteers to help present them,” Brickman said. “The nonprofit entities that plan and operate the festivals and events run on very small budgets and very little paid staff. They only exist because of dedicated volunteers who embrace the quality of life that festivals and events provide for the community.” Though volunteer Michael Contreras lives in California, he and his family have attended

NMF for the past six years, visiting during the day for the family events and getting a babysitter in the evening for a date night. This was the first year Contreras volunteered after his wife suggested helping out during the festival. Contreras worked at the festival in band registration, which is responsible for checking in band members to provide information about their set, as well as accommodating them with food, water, beer and air conditioning. He was drawn to band registration for the chance to interact and have a conversation with the band members, he said. Though Contreras has attended festivals like Coachella, Bonnaroo and Lollapalooza with big-ticket artists, he said his experience volunteering at the smaller Norman Music Festival was special. “I was asking some of the other volunteers how this is possible and this is all sponsored, with no city money being used,” Contreras said. “Something this big, free to the public, is so cool.” After his first time volunteering, Contreras said he will definitely return to band registration and plans to get his wife and friends involved. Norman Music Fest is composed of over 300 nationally-known and new, local bands alike, so for some groups, it is their first time in front of a big

crowd. For Fuqua, this is the most exciting part of volunteering as a stagehand. “(I volunteer) to encourage these kids to actually come out and play,” Fuqua said. “For a lot of them, this is their first festival, and it’s really cool to just be like, ‘Alright kids, you got the music, here’s the stage, let’s go.’ It’s awesome just to see them do it.” OU College of Arts and Sciences senior Emily Sullivan, a first-year volunteer, said the opportunity for new bands to play for large crowds at a free festival is exciting to see firsthand. “They get to be put out there in front of people who have never heard them before, and the audience gets to experience music that they’ve never heard before,” Sullivan said. “There’s a lot of discovery from both parties.” To those on the fence of either simply attending or volunteering at the festival, Fuqua said go for it, and do both. “Come as just a member of the crowd, do that, and then if you want to be involved, the volunteer office is right next to the stages,” Fuqua said. “Walk in, sign a waiver, get a T-shirt. They need the bodies — they need the help.” Alma Cienski

aacienski@ou.edu

Regents decline to comment on investigation Alumni claim OU fails harassment victims NICK HAZELRIGG

hazelriggn@gmail.com

JORDAN MILLER @jordanrmillerr

After meeting for nearly six hours, the OU Board of Regents released no new information about an ongoing investigation into allegations of sexual

harassment at the highest levels of the university, and declined to respond to accusations that OU policy failed to adequately serve victims. In the April 26 special meeting, which started at 8:30 a.m. and ended at roughly 2:30 p.m., the regents were set to discuss ongoing investigations into allegations of sexual harassment against former OU President David Boren and former OU vice president for University Development Tripp Hall.

The meeting ended with the board’s chair, Leslie RainboltForbes, saying she wouldn’t take any questions from the press. “Privacy is important to our students and employees as a way to come forward safely and without fear of retaliation,” RainboltForbes said. “We’ve complied with the law and we will continue to do so.” The statement from RainboltForbes did not address a statement given earlier in the day by Jess Eddy and Levi Hilliard, the

two OU alumni alleging misconduct by Boren and Hall, in which they both said the university failed to adequately address their needs as victims, and it protected abusers. “With the general counsel’s collaboration and use of private law firms, victims’ claims of abuse have been found ever-unsubstantiated,” Eddy said in the statement. “In my own situation, and countless others’, the general counsel (and) the Title IX officer worked hand-in-glove to

conceal the truth, re-victimize the victims, and protect the reputation of the university.” Eddy and Hilliard called on the regents to review Title IX policy and release the report created by Jones Day regarding its investigation into Boren. “The university can no longer value the careers and reputations of the powerful few over the safety, dignity and lives of students, faculty and see Regents page 3


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• April 29- May 5, 2019

ATRIBUTE TO THE

FACULTY

CONGRATULATIONS FACULTY HONOREES

Abbott

Adams

Barnes

Bass

Beutel

Bolino

Childers

Cricchio

Frantz

Greene

Lake

Lamb

Lightsey

Lobban

McGovern

Nairn

Natale

Patten

Riggs

Safiejko-Mroczka

Salazar

Shaner

Sibbett

Snyder

Song

Wagner

Wang

Ward

Weider

Williams

Yeary

Zgurskaya

ANNIVERSARY RECOGNITION – 50 YEARS: Irvin Wagner, School of Music, Weitzenhoffer Family College of Fine Arts ANNIVERSARY RECOGNITION – 30 YEARS: M. Cenzig Altan, School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, Gallogly College of Engineering, Keith

A. Brewster, Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms, Brian H. Fiedler, School of Meteorology, College of Atmospheric and Geographic Sciences, Scott D. Gronlund, Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, Phillip Gutierrez, Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Arts and Sciences, Scott C. Linn, Division of Finance, Michael F. Price College of Business, Bruce A. Mason, Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Arts and Sciences, Chanda L. Robinson, Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences, David A. Sabatini, School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science, Gallogly College of Engineering, Melissa Stockdale, Department of History, College of Arts and Sciences, Gregory J. Stumpf, Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, Caryn C. Vaughn, Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences, Ming Xue, School of Meteorology, College of Atmospheric and Geographic Sciences

ANNIVERSARY RECOGNITION – 20 YEARS: Julia L. Abramson, Department of Modern Languages, Literatures and Linguistics, College of Arts and Sciences,

Ronald H. Anderson, Division of Management and International Business, Michael F. Price College of Business, John Antonio, School of Computer Science, Gallogly College of Engineering, Loretta E. Bass, Department of Sociology, College of Arts and Sciences, Donald T. Bogan, College of Law, Richard E. Broughton, Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences, Elizabeth Butler, School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science, Gallogly College of Engineering, Hans Butzer, Christopher C. Gibbs College of Architecture, Marjorie P. Callahan, Division of Architecture, Christopher C. Gibbs College of Architecture, Paul G. Christman, School of Musical Theatre, Weitzenhoffer Family College of Fine Arts, Jose J. Colin, Department of Modern Languages, Literatures and Linguistics, College of Arts and Sciences, Mary Shane Connelly Mumford, Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, Andrew D. Cuccia, Steed School of Accounting, Michael F. Price College of Business, Christophe D. Curtis, Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, Robert R. Dohrmann, School of Visual Arts, Weitzenhoffer Family College of Fine Arts, Kathleen E. Duncan, Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology, College of Arts and Sciences, Stephen E. Ellis, Department of Philosophy, College of Arts and Sciences, Evgeni Fedorovich, School of Meteorology, College of Atmospheric and Geographic Sciences, Laura K. Gibbs, OU College of Professional and Continuing Studies, Bradley G. Illston, Oklahoma Climatologic Survey, Kevan L. Jensen, Steed School of Accounting, Michael F. Price College of Business, Amy J. Johnson, Department of Communication, College of Arts and Sciences, Emily D. Johnson, Department of Modern Languages, Literatures and Linguistics, College of Arts and Sciences, Tohren C. Kibbey, School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science, Gallogly College of Engineering, Kevin A. Kloesel, Oklahoma Climatologic Survey, Joshua M. Landis, Department of International and Area Studies, David L. Boren College of International Studies, Jeremy A. Lindberg, School Of Dance, Weitzenhoffer Family College of Fine Arts, Brenda Lloyd-Jones, Department of Human Relations, College of Arts and Sciences, Richard Lupia, ConocoPhillips School of Geology and Geophysics, Mewbourne College of Earth and Energy, David P. Miller, School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, Gallogly College of Engineering, Shankar Mitra, ConocoPhillips School of Geology and Geophysics, Mewbourne College of Earth and Energy, Michael Mumford, Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, Kang Nai, Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, Daniel Ostas, Division of Management and International Business, Michael F. Price College of Business, Dimitrios V. Papavassiliou, School of Chemical, Biological and Materials Engineering, Gallogly College of Engineering, Judith M. Pender, School of Drama, Weitzenhoffer Family College of Fine Arts, Chandra S. Rai, Mewbourne School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering, Mewbourne College of Earth and Energy, Rodger A. Randle, Department of Human Relations, College of Arts and Sciences, Sarah E. Robbins, University Libraries, Teresa M. Shaft, Management Information Systems, Michael F. Price College of Business, Sohail H. Shehada, School of Visual Arts, Weitzenhoffer Family College of Fine Arts, Jay Shorten, University Libraries, Carolin J. Showers, Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, Karl H. Sievers, School of Music, Weitzenhoffer Family College of Fine Arts, Mitchell P. Smith, Department of International and Area Studies, David L. Boren College of International Studies, Carl H. Sondergeld, Mewbourne School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering, Mewbourne College of Earth and Energy, Joseph M. Sullivan, Department of Modern Languages, Literatures and Linguistics, College of Arts and Sciences, Sarah W. Tracy, Honors College, Lawrence J. Weider, Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences, Michael E. Winston, Department of Modern Languages, Literatures and Linguistics, College of Arts and Sciences, Grady C. Wray, Department of Modern Languages, Literatures and Linguistics, College of Arts and Sciences, Linda T. Zagzebski, Department of Philosophy, College of Arts and Sciences, Meijun Zhu, Department of Mathematics, College of Arts and Sciences STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION AWARD OUTSTANDING FACULTY AWARD Rachel Childers, Peggy and Charles Stephenson School of Biomedical Engineering, Gallogly College of Engineering GOOD TEACHING AWARDS Anthony J. Cricchio, Division of Architecture, Christopher C. Gibbs College of Architecture Barbara Safiejko-Mroczka, Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences GENERAL EDUCATION TEACHING AWARD Ann M. Beutel, Department of Sociology, College of Arts and Sciences GATEWAY TO COLLEGE LEARNING OUTSTANDING INSTRUCTOR AWARD Travis Lightsey, University College Major Exploration, University College PROVOST’S COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AWARD FOR SCHOLARSHIP, RESEARCH AND CREATIVE ACTIVITY Robert W. Nairn, School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science, Gallogly College of Engineering

PROVOST’S COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING ENGAGED TEACHING Ron H. Frantz, Jr., Division of Architecture, Christopher C. Gibbs College of Architecture MERRICK FOUNDATION TEACHING AWARD *Myongjin Kim, Department of Economics, College of Arts and Sciences HENRY DANIEL RINSLAND MEMORIAL AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH Curt Matthew Adams, Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, Jeannine Rainbolt College of Education VICE PRESIDENT FOR RESEARCH AWARD FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY SCHOLARSHIP Amy McGovern, School of Computer Science, Gallogly College of Engineering

VICE PRESIDENT FOR RESEARCH AWARD FOR BROADENING THE PARTICIPATION OF TRADITIONALLY UNDERREPRESENTED OR UNDERSERVED POPULATIONS Lori Anderson Snyder, Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences VICE PRESIDENT FOR RESEARCH AWARD FOR SCHOLARLY ENGAGEMENT WITH THE PRIVATE SECTOR Mark B. Yeary, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Gallogly College of Engineering REGENTS’ AWARD FOR SUPERIOR TEACHING John Scott Greene, Department of Geography and Environmental Sustainability, College of Atmospheric and Geographic Sciences Anthony P. Natale, Anne and Henry Zarrow School of Social Work, College of Arts and Sciences Megan Sibbett, Department of Women’s and Gender Studies, College of Arts and Sciences Lawrence J. Weider, Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences REGENTS’ AWARD FOR SUPERIOR PROFESSIONAL AND UNIVERSITY SERVICE AND PUBLIC OUTREACH Wayne D. Riggs, Department of Philosophy, College of Arts and Sciences DAVID L. BOREN PROFESSORSHIP Mark C. Bolino, Division of Management and International Business, Michael F. Price College of Business DAVID ROSS BOYD PROFESSORSHIP Lance L. Lobban, School of Chemical, Biological and Materials Engineering, Gallogly College of Engineering GEORGE LYNN CROSS RESEARCH PROFESSORSHIP Helen I. Zgurskaya, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, College of Arts and Sciences PRESIDENTAL PROFESSORSHIPS Braden K. Abbott, Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Arts and Sciences Brian and Sandra O’Brien Presidential Professorship The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo

Jennifer L. Barnes, Department of Psychology/ Professional Writing Program, College of Arts and Sciences/Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication Robert Glenn Rapp Foundation Presidential Professorship Loretta E. Bass, Department of Sociology, College of Arts and Sciences Edith Kinney Gaylord Presidential Professorship Kirsten T. Edwards Williams, Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, Jeannine Rainbolt College of Education Linda Clarke Anderson Presidential Professorship *Ali Imran, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Gallogly College of Engineering William H. Barkow Presidential Professorship Vickie Eileen Lake, Department of Instructional Leadership and Academic Curriculum, Jeannine Rainbolt College of Education Huddleston Presidential Professorship Marvin L. Lamb, School of Music, Weitzenhoffer Family College of Fine Arts Henry Zarrow Presidential Professorship Michael A. Patten, Oklahoma Biological Survey, College of Arts and Sciences President’s Associates Presidential Professorship Jorge Luis Salazar Cerreño, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Gallogly College of Engineering William H. Barkow Presidential Professorship Megan W. Shaner, College of Law President’s Associates Presidential Professorship *Rachel A. Shelden, Department of History, College of Arts and Sciences President’s Associates Presidential Professorship Li Song, School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, Gallogly College of Engineering Lloyd G. and Joyce Austin Presidential Professorship Le Wang, Department of Economics, College of Arts and Sciences President’s Associates Presidential Professorship Janet A. Ward, Department of History, College of Arts and Sciences Brammer Presidential Professorship *not pictured


April 29-May 5, 2019 •

NEWS

Nick Hazelrigg, news managing editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com • Twitter: @OUDaily

Second Chance saves pets Local animal shelter transforms animals into pets

Emma Keith Editor in Chief Nick Hazelrigg News Managing Editor Kayla Branch Enterprise Editor George Stoia Sports Editor

BAILEY LEWIS

Siandhara Bonnet Culture Editor

@BaileyLewis75

Deb Melser has time and time again seen pets from local city shelters that are completely detached to the point where they have no trust for others and don’t even know how to be a companion. Melser, a kennel technician and vet assistant at the Second Chance Animal Sanctuar y in Norman, spends her days choosing animals from various city pounds and shelters to bring to Second Chance for adoption. She is the first one to meet the dogs or cats and has some of the first positive human interactions with them. Because of this, she gets to see the transformation of the animals brought in go from being anxious and reluctant to happy and loving pets in someone’s home. “We just had one that was adopted, who was completely shut down at the shelter, and didn’t know how to be a dog,” Melser said. “So to see him go from that when we first pulled him from the shelter to this very social, friendly and loving pet for somebody — I mean, that’s the rewarding part right there.” Second Chance works day and night to reduce the number of dogs and cats euthanized in Norman and surrounding cities, and about 700 of the animals they bring in each year are adopted. In the United States, it’s estimated 11 million cats and dogs are killed in shelters every year, and an animal is euthanized every 1.5 seconds, according to Spay Oklahoma. In Oklahoma, cat and dog intake numbers from 2013 in Oklahoma City, Tulsa, Norman, Broken Arrow and Lawton, found 43,500 dogs and cats entered the shelter

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contact us 160 Copeland Hall, 860 Van Vleet Oval Norman, OK 73019-2052

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Axl sits inside Second Chance Animal Sanctuary April 19.

system, according to the Kirkpatrick Foundation’s Oklahoma Animal Study. A little more than half of these animals were either adopted, transferred to a rescue organization or returned to their owners, and more than 20,000 were euthanized, according to the Kirkpatrick Foundation’s Oklahoma Animal Study. Melser said the issue of animals getting euthanized due to overpopulation in animals shelters is a very widespread problem in Oklahoma, and two of the biggest issues contributing to this are pet owners not spaying or neutering their animals, and letting their animals run loose. Almost all of the shelters in Oklahoma are full right now, Mesler said, so some shelters feel they have no choice but to euthanize some of the animals. She said it’s hard for her to know this is going on because the Second Chance only has so much space, and there’s a limit to what

they can do. “I have to tell myself that we cannot save them all, and as hard as I try, we just can’t,” Melser said. “But that also makes me work that much harder on public education about the spay-neuter issue, people not letting their dogs run loose and educating people on leash laws.” Jeff Deisering, the head kennel technician at Second Chance, said they get most of their animals from city and local pounds in Paul’s Valley, Moore and Norman. Melser said dogs and cats can’t be euthanized in shelters for overpopulation in Norman, but the laws governing euthanasia of animals differ for each city in Oklahoma. “Norman has a city ordinance that they can only euthanize if there’s a medical issue or if they’re deemed aggressive by somebody,” Melser said. “Moore tries desperately also not to have to do that. Moore is very good about

reaching out to us, and reaching out to other rescues in the area.” Second Chance provides spaying and neutering, vaccinations, deworming, microchipping and testing for diseases for the animals brought in, according to its Facebook page. However, Melser said whenever she’s choosing the animals from shelters, she has to look for ones that don’t have obvious health issues because they are limited on funding. “Last year there were like five or six dogs that were part of a hoarding case, and we pulled four of them,” Melser said. “But one, I mean his leg was dangling loose, and we don’t have the money to fix things like that, and our vet doesn’t do orthopedic surgery.” Deisering said he has to adapt to each animal that comes in because some have anxiety and others are aggressive. Deisering said they recently had a chihuahua

with severe anxiety and was afraid to be around people, but over time, they were able to calm her nerves and she was finally adopted into a loving home. “It took us two days to get her to walk out of her crate,” Deisering said. “If she was eating and you looked at her, she would go to the back of the cage and stop eating, wait about 20 minutes, and make sure nobody was watching her eat. So we brought her out, put her behind the counter, and she became our office dog, and any dog we put in there she would want to play with and get to know and just have a good old time.” Deisering said they like to have a quick turnover when it comes to animals beings adopted because the ones that stay at the adoption center for a long time are hard to say goodbye to because “they become a part of you, and you get to know them so well.” “When an animal gets adopted, I give it a kiss on the forehead and say, ‘Thanks for letting me get to know you,’” Deisering said. “I’ve had some of the friendships that were only a couple hours long, and as soon as they get moved up, they get adopted the same day. Those are the kinds that we like.” Overall, Melser said while the issue of overpopulation and euthanization in animal shelters is a huge problem, she is hopeful for the change she can make, even if it’s only a little bit at a time. “ Ye s t e r d a y I w e n t t o Paul’s Valley, and I only got one dog, but that was one dog out of the shelter that made space for the next one coming in,” Melser said. Bailey Lewis

The Oklahoma Van Vleet Oval Daily is a public forum, the University of Oklahoma’s independent student voice and an entirely student-run publication. Letters should concentrate on issues, not personalities, and must be fewer than 250 words, typed and signed by the author(s). Letters will be edited for accuracy, space and style. Students must list their major and classification. To submit letters, email dailyopinion@ou.edu. Our View is the voice of the Editorial Board, which consists of student editors. The board meets at 4:30 p.m. Monday to Thursday in Copeland Hall, Room 160. Board meetings are open to the public. Guest columns are accepted and printed at the editor’s discretion. Columnists’ and cartoonists’ opinions are their own and not necessarily the views or opinions of The Oklahoma Daily Editorial Board. To advertise in The Oklahoma Daily, contact the advertising manager by calling 405-325-8964 or emailing dailyads@ ou.edu. One free copy of The Daily is available to members of the OU community. Additional copies may be purchased for 25 cents by contacting The Daily business office at 405325-2522. Corrections: Corrections: The The Daily Daily is is committed committed to to accuracy accuracy in its its publications. publications. If If in you you find find an an error error in in a a story, story, email email dailynews@ dailynews@ ou.edu or visit oudaily. ou.edu or visit oudaily. com/corrections to com/site/corrections submit correction .html toasubmit a form. correction form.

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bailey.n.lewis-1@ou.edu Axl licks technician Deb Melzer inside Second Chance Animal Sanctuary April 19.

REGENTS: Continued from page one

e m p l o y e e s,” H i l l i a r d said. “By lauding the accomplishments of the perpetrators, while in the same moment hindering victims’ efforts to acquire justice and transparency, the Board of Regents and the Title IX office itself, have given license to the perpetrators and a basis to continue and escalate in their predatory behaviors.” S a ra B a n a, E d d y a n d Hilliard’s civil advocate,

3

said the university shared a copy of the Jones Day report with Boren, but Eddy and Hilliard have not yet received the report. “Today is the third private meeting by the regents to discuss these allegations — these meetings are cheap,” Bana said. “We demand action ... They have yet to act to support or protect the victims, and their silence is a form of violence. The time is now for President (James) Gallogly and the Board of Regents to fulfill their responsibility as leaders of this university.” At the end of the meeting, Eddy confronted members

of the regents’ staff over an unclear issue. Bana later said Eddy was upset because he saw an individual working with the regents who had come to Eddy to discuss his situation as a friend, which Bana classified as a conflict of interest. Bana clarified that she didn’t have a full understanding of the details of the situation. “This would be unethical, this would be further evidence of obstruction of justice,” Bana said. Bana and university spokesperson Lauren Brookey later got into a heated confrontation in

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front of the press about the university’s lack of response to Eddy and Hilliard’s statements. Though they did not offer any new information regarding the investigation, the regents did establish three new search committees for the positions of dean of the David L. Boren College of International Studies, dean of the Gallogly College of Engineering and vice provost for instruction and student success. The regents are set to meet again in a regular meeting in early May. Rainbolt-Forbes said the

regents are committed to finding resolution in the investigation. “As I’ve noted before, we cannot comment on any investigations related to personnel or ongoing legal matters,” Rainbolt-Forbes said. “The regents remain committed to a detailed and deliberate process to resolve these matters.”

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VOL. 104, NO. 23

© 2019 OU Publications Board FREE — Additional copies 25¢

Jordan Miller

jordan.r.miller-1@ou.edu


4

NEWS

• April 29- May 5, 2019

Firm not required to report crimes Civil advocate has “no faith� in Boren, Hall investigation JORDAN MILLER @jordanrmillerr

The law firm hired by OU to investigate alleged sexual misconduct by former OU President David Boren and former administrator Tripp Hall is not obligated

to report any crimes it discovers during its investigation to the authorities. Sara Bana, civil advocate for the two OU graduates alleging misconduct, told The Daily April 24 that the investigators hold attorney-client privilege with the university and do not have to report any crimes they find during their investigation to the authorities. She and Jess Eddy, a former OU employee alleging misconduct by Boren

and Hall, were told this in an interview with Jones Day March 26. Bana kept a transcript of her interview and read it in a phone interview with The Daily April 24, and said she asked Jones Day if it had “any legal obligations to report crimes to law enforcement� if they were to come across them during the course of their investigation. “Then (the investigator)

responds, ‘We have a client and we have an attorney-client relationship with a client, so our information and our responsibility is to report to the client,’� Bana said. “And then the client has a legal staff and they can make a judgment as to whether or not they think they’ve got an obligation to do anything with that information that we will report to them.� Previously, the university

and Board of Regents have emphasized that Jones Day was hired in an effort to be unbiased and independent in its investigation; however, Bana previously said they have “no faith� in the firm’s investigation due to its contractual relationship with the university. The Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation took over as the lead agency investigating these allegations March 28. According

to a statement from university spokesperson Lauren Brookey, the OU Police Department requested the involvement of the OSBI “in order to ensure an impartial and unbiased investigation on its campus.� Jordan Miller

jordan.r.miller-1@ou.edu

Students reduce food waste at OU sorority Delta Gamma gives extra food to Food and Shelter JANA ALLEN @jana_allen21

Han Hoang spent four years bringing food from her sorority to the train tracks, feeding Norman’s homeless that gathered there. Hoang had an unspoken agreement with those in charge, coming at the end of dinner and asking for boxes of food. If they didn’t put a lid on it, it wasn’t breaking any rules, Hoang said. Four years later, Hoang has finally found a way to put an end to food waste at her former sorority. Hoang, a human relations fifth-year senior, and three other human relations students have partnered with OU’s Delta Gamma and Norman’s Food and Shelter for their capstone class titled “Service Learning.� Delta Gamma now donates the extra food it has after house meals three to four times a week, with Hoang and her partners transporting from Delta Gamma to Food and Shelter. Before, Delta Gamma was unaware it could donate its extra food to shelters and people in need without being liable if anything happened to someone due to eating the food. “I’ve always found a passion in helping others, but I think this project in particular just kind of opens your eyes to the things that you have and the things that you can give,� Hoang said. “And it’s not even out of my pocket.� Service Learning is a class in which students must split into groups and work on individual projects that serve their community. This project, known as Norman Food Rescue, was started in the fall of 2018 as a project to educate restaurants on the legality of donating extra food, in an attempt to get them to donate to Food and Shelter and Norman’s Salvation Army, said Janna Martin, the professor of the class. When Hoang, along with human relations seniors Makayla Ballard, Elizabeth Jennings and Taylor Evans, took over the project this semester, Hoang said she remembered the wasted food at her sorority and saw that as an easier route than dealing with restaurants.





     

   



“The amount of food that we donate (through Delta Gamma) ... is insane to see, like that would have gone to waste,â€? Hoang said. “But instead we get to take it somewhere else. That’s pretty cool.â€? Katelyn Tenbrink, president of Delta Gamma, said she has wanted to be able to donate food in the past but didn’t realize how easy it would be. She said she’s been excited by this project and by the fact that the sorority doesn’t have to waste so much food. “As a sorority president, we’re constantly trying to find ways ‌ to be more interactive with our community,â€? Tenbrink said. “I just can’t believe we didn’t do this sooner.â€? Food and Shelter serves between 200 to 300 people a day in the dining room alone, said April Heiple, executive director of Food and Shelter. Heiple said Service Learning students have been partnering with Food and Shelter for a few years, and that they’ve gotten more calls from restaurants looking to donate food after catered events due to last semester’s project. However, she said she never would have expected to get food donations from a sorority. “I was surprised to know that sorority houses and fraternity houses had access to that much commercially prepared food and that at the time there was nowhere for it to go and be used other than to be thrown away,â€? Heiple said. “And so that’s the power of students as they get to think creatively and they see things from a different perspective than those of us who have been doing this a long time.â€? Sunny Hill, Food Services manager of Food and Shelter, said she thinks it was a “fabulousâ€? idea. Along with the food donated from Delta Gamma, Hill said they are now also receiving donations from the university through a partnership called Food Recovery Network. This makes it so that Hill has premade food in her kitchen much more often than before, and not only is it saving that food from being wasted but it is also making her job easier. The amount of food they have at Food and Shelter changes at different times of the year, Hill said, but even if there was not a need for donations, she would not turn

                      

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them down. “I never say no to more donations, never ever, ever, because ... if I can’t use it, I’ll find somebody who can,� Hill said. In participating in this project, Jennings said she has realized that it’s not always a huge task in order to make a difference in the community. “We just had to do the little things of going there and transporting the food, the same food that was going to get thrown away,� Jennings said. “And I was happy that I was able to participate in that and be able to see the amount of how much they’re appreciative of what we give them.� Hoang would agree, saying it only takes the gas from her car to transport the food and the time to find people willing to donate it.

“Really this project just o p e n e d my e ye s t o t h e amount of food that could (either) be wasted or the amount of food that we could save and the amount of people that we could help,� Hoang said. Hoang said since Delta Gamma’s donations began, she has been contacted by other sororities and plans to meet with them to talk about setting up donations from them as well. Heiple said if there was ever a time where there were too many donations for Food and Shelter to accept, Norman’s Salvation Army may be interested in a partnership with the sororities. Ultimately, the goal of Norman Food Rescue is to lessen food waste and to end the stigma around donating leftover food. “I think there’s a lot of

uncertainty about donating food,� Martin said. “Like, ‘I don’t know if we can do that. I don’t know if we should do that.’ So breaking that stigma I think is really important.� Hill said with the “astounding� statistics on how much food gets wasted in the United States, food recovery is one of her passions and she’s thankful not only for this group of students, but all who donate to Food and Shelter. “Any time you can recover food from anywhere, it’s a good thing because there’s so many people, it’s really hard to fill those gaps,� Hill said. “I think that Food and Shelter does a really great job and we have tremendous community support.� The other goal for this group is to turn Norman Food Rescue into a self-sustaining project that gets

more than just human relations students involved. Right now, they are working on getting the website completed and will have volunteer forms available for anyone who is interested. The capstone group will prepare a presentation for the next class to look at with recommended next steps to continue the project and grow it further, Martin said. “And then we just keep moving it along,� Martin said. “So it’s kind of like a domino (effect), I guess. Last semester started (the project) and then this one and we just keep moving through.� Jana Allen

jana.r.allen-1@ou.edu

JANA ALLEN/THE DAILY

Katelyn Tenbrink, president of OU’s Delta Gamma sorority, helps pack food up to send to Norman’s Food & Shelter on April 15.

HOROSCOPE By Eugenia Last

Copyright 2015, Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

MONDAY, APRIL 29, 2019 ASTROGRAPH by Eugenia Last Make a focused effort to help people less fortunate than you or to help solve community or environmental problems. Your mode of living should set an example. Choose to do what’s best and right for you. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Don’t make a change based on hearsay. If someone makes you an offer, get it in writing. If you rethink the way you handle money, you’ll discover a way to lower your overhead. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Keep your distance from anyone looking for an argument. Keep an eye out for opportunities that will allow you to use your talents and skills. Romance will improve a relationship. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Don’t take anything or anyone for granted. If you want something done, do it yourself without overspending. Aim for stability and greater security, not for uncertainty and confusion. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Change doesn’t always bring the happiness you are looking for. Before you alter your life personally or professionally, consider the consequences of your actions.

ficult person in your life is to offer incentives. Once you take care of your responsibilities, do something you enjoy. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- You’ll have plenty of options, ideas and support, so don’t hesitate to follow your heart, chase your dreams and fulfill your destiny. An offer shouldn’t cost you emotionally or financially. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Problems will develop if you let someone meddle in your personal affairs. Don’t mix business with pleasure or allow friends or relatives to interfere in your love life. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -Don’t share your thoughts, feelings or plans with anyone. Make adjustments at home that will contribute to your comfort and entertainment. Be honest when dealing with tax, legal and health issues. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Let your experience guide you to make the right choice. Getting together with an old friend or attending a reunion will lead to mixed emotions. Personal improvements and health should be your priority. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- A change of attitude will alter your lifestyle. Not everyone will be happy with the choices you make, but you have to do what’s best for you.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- You’ll be torn between what you want to do and what you should do. Stick to ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Look facts and avoid temptation. Do what inward and make personal growth a priority. A change of scenery, you know is right. company or activity will do you LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- The best good. Walk away from temptation, way to overcome personal problems indulgent behavior and unsafe situations. or handle interactions with a dif-

Universal Crossword Edited by David Steinberg April 29, 2019

ACROSS 1 Essential acid 6 Way up the slope 10 Share a border 14 Gymnast Comaneci 15 Perry Mason creator Gardner 16 Philosopher Descartes 17 How to make the letter K from a kit? 19 ___ of Man 20 Wheel turner 21 Three: Prefix 22 “Et cetera� language 23 How to make the letter V valid? 27 Sheriff’s assistant 30 Instrument played with hands and feet 31 Join forces 32 Tarzan’s transport 34 Soak (up) 37 How men can become the letter N? 41 Medium strength? 42 Sainted Norwegian 43 Goofballs 44 Bizarre 47 Screwed up 48 How to make the letter R rarest?

4/29

51 Musical category 52 Pimple 53 Fairy tale starter 57 “___ girl!� 58 How to form the U.N. with U Thant? 61 Nickelodeon’s “___ 101� 62 “Got it� 63 Scarfs (down) 64 Wraps up 65 Stethoscope wearers, for short 66 Like salad greens DOWN 1 “Puppy Love� singer Paul 2 Tailless cat 3 Beyonce, to the Beyhive 4 Kudos on the green 5 Acorn, in time 6 Four: Prefix 7 Cook with intense heat 8 ’80s sitcom extraterrestrial 9 Zebra with a whistle 10 “7 Rings� singer Grande 11 Dog handler’s dream 12 Totally dark 13 Bat mitzvah attendee 18 ___-bitty

22 Sawmill input 24 Salt Lake City team 25 Apt network for a chemistry show 26 Closed, as curtains 27 “Bro!� 28 Grandson of Adam 29 Located exactly 32 Fancy parking option 33 Retirement vehicle, briefly 35 Present opener? 36 Pain in the neck 38 A famous Amos 39 They flew from Pandora’s box

40 How some boxers go at it 45 Tanning hazards 46 Where to start playing a round 47 Behrs of “2 Broke Girls� 48 Mount, as a horse 49 15th-century Mexican 50 Marriage and burial 51 Long look 54 Saints’ home, familiarly 55 Sleeve feature 56 Craft-selling site 58 Spanish hero El ___ 59 Private entertainment grp.? 60 Leatherworker’s punch

PREVIOUS PREVIOUSPUZZLE PUZZLEANSWER ANSWER

4/28 4/22

Š 2019 Andrews McMeel Universal Š 2019 Andrews McMeel Universal www.upuzzles.com www.upuzzles.com

Enough! by Tom Pepper


April 29-May 5, 2019 •

CULTURE

5

Siandhara Bonnet, culture editor dailyent@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/culture • Twitter: @OUDailyCulture

Artists paint murals around drains Paintings created to raise awareness on water pollutants KATHRYN WARD @kathryn_ward7

The Norman Public Arts Board and the City of Norman celebrated the first completed Artful Inlets project April 17. Artful Inlets is a new collaborative project created by five local artists: Derrick Adams, Jazmin Crawford, Ginna Dowling, Laura Nelson and Rachel Stout. The artists painted murals around storm drains and turned them into art to raise awareness for the effect pollutants have on the local water supply. Norman Mayor Lynne Miller joined Norman Arts Council members on April 17 for a walkthrough of murals painted on the sidewalks of Main Street. These murals are the first of Norman’s Artful Inlets that the city hopes to continue, according to a Facebook post.

E a c h o f t h e f i v e a r tists was selected to paint a mural to educate and raise awareness of pollutants such as oil, grease and trash that go down storm drains and have a devastating impact on local water quality, making it unsafe for drinking, according to the Art Walk’s website. The murals are: “Cumulonim-bliss” by Stout located in front of Moxie Shop, near the intersection of Porter Avenue and Main Street. “Choose Wisely” by Nelson located in front of Main Street Tattoos, near the intersection of Porter Avenue and Main Street. “ Ev e r y D ro p C ou nt s” by Adams located in front of Sea Shanty Adventure Tours, in between Jones a n d Pe t e r s av e nu e s o n Main Street. “ Ru n o f f P o l l u t e s” b y Dowling located in front of Mister Robert, near the intersection of Jones Avenue and Main Street. “Do Somethin!” by Crawford located in front of Benvenuti’s at James Garner Avenue and Main

Street. “I think that the project itself is extremely important,” Dowling said. “(The images in the mural) literally tell the story of how r unoff pollutes ... With these images, I have the rain, the water flowing, the children and the animals.” Dowling said the community needs to start being socially conscious and pay attention to pollutants allowed in the streets because it goes into the community’s water system. “I would like to start a dialogue about our water system here in the city of Norman. I would like to make people stop and think about what is happening,” Dowling said. “The project resonates hope and was a great opportunity to give back.” The Artful Inlets can be found on Main Street between Jenkins and Porter avenues. Kathryn Ward

kathryn.v.ward-1@ou.edu

FIELD PARSONS/THE DAILY

Ginna Dowling’s “Runoff Pollutes” in front of Mister Robert on Main Street on April 19.

Musician to hold class, concert, Q&A at UCO Oklahoman Parker Millsap to discuss music life, perform KATHRYN WARD @kathryn_ward7

R ising ro ck musician Parker Millsap will hold a master class, Q&A and concert on May 1 at the University of Central Oklahoma. Mi l l s a p w i l l v i s i t t h e university as part of the Academy of Contemporary Music at the University o f C e n t r a l O k l a h o m a’s (ACM@UCO) Metro Music Series, which brings musicians to perform on campus year round, according to the event page. Millsap, a Purcell, O k l a h o m a, n a t i v e, i s a rising rock ‘n’ roll artist who made his debut on “Conan” in 2016 and performed with Elton John at the Apple Music Festival in London that same year.

Oklahoma native Parker Millsap will perform at the University of Central Oklahoma on May 1.

Millsap has four full-length releases. His newest album released in 2018 is titled “Other Arrangements.” Millsap started a cover band with classmate Michael Rose, who still

plays bass with him today. He then recruited musicians Daniel Foulks, fiddle, and Andrew Bones, drums, to join his band, according to his website. The master class w ill

consist of Millsap and Scott Booker, ACM@UCO’s executive director, holding a discussion about how Millsap got started and what he was interested in early — giving advice to

audience for a Q&A, Jackson said. “I think anyone who wants any insight into what it’s like to be an artist or musician of any kind, or anyone who wants any insight in what it’s like to work in the music industry should come,” Jackson said. The master class and discussion is from 2-3 p.m. May 1 at ACM@UCO main campus at 25 S. Oklahoma Ave., Oklahoma City. This event is free and o p e n t o t h e p u b l i c . To RSVP register at the event page. After his master class, Mi l l s a p w i l l p e r f o r m a sold-out concert at 7 p.m. VIA PARKERMILLSAP.COM May 1 at ACM@UCO Performance Lab, 329 E. Sheridan Ave., Oklahoma any students or the pub- City. lic, said Jimmy Jackson, ACM@UCO’s administrative assistant. Kathryn Ward Following the discus- kathryn.v.ward-1@ou.edu s i o n , B o o ke r w i l l o p e n the conversation to the

Tibetan monk to talk about culture, practices Expert on Buddhist philosophy to visit Norman, instruct MOLLY KRUSE @MollyKruse98

Norman Cultural Connection will host a fiveday event in May featuring talks from a Buddhist philosophy expert on Tibetan culture, Buddhist practices and art. Geshe Lobsang Tsultrim is part of the Gaden Shartse Monastery in south India and will give five talks to the Norman community May 1-5. Tsultrim’s title, “Geshe,” is the monastic equivalent of a doctoral degree. The five talks he will give are “The Care of Sacred Objects,” “Tibetan Culture a n d B u d d h i s m ,” “ T h e Four Noble Truths,” “The Difference Between Love and Attachment” and “The Many Deities of Mahayana Buddhism,” according to a press release. “ This is the first time f o r G e s h e Ts u l t r i m t o come to Norman, so we’re really looking forward to hosting him,” said Marial Martyn, executive

where colors go and why — gives people a deeper meaning and understanding of a mandala,” Martyn said. Tsultrim grew up in India and attended a monastic university as a Tibetan refugee, but is now a U.S. c i t i ze n a n d t e a c h e s a l l over the country, as well as in Europe and Mexico, Martyn said. Norman Cultural Connection uses outreach such as educational programs and lectures to help people understand and appreciate cultural diversity and social differences, according to its website. The talks will be from May 1-5 at 7:00 p.m. each night at Norman Cultural Connection, 1017 Elm Ave. A $10 donation is suggested, but no one will be turned away if they lack funds, according to the press release. VIA NORMAN CULTURAL CONNECTION PRESS RELEASE Those interested in The Norman Cultural Connection will host Geshe Lobsang Tsultrim, a Tibetan Buddhist monk, May 1-5. scheduling an astrological consultation appointment d i r e c t o r o f N o r m a n differences, and the wis- a c c o rd i n g t o t h e p re s s master artist to show how should contact Martyn at Cultural Connection. dom of world cultures,” ac- release. to construct them. 405-201-9991. N o r m a n C u l t u r a l cording to its website. Martyn said that Norman “I think people are just Connection is an organiIn addition to his talks, Cultural Connection has very interested in mandazation that strives to en- Tsultrim will also instruct hosted several sand man- las in general, and to learn Molly Kruse hance “awareness, under- on how to create mandalas dala painting events over from a master teacher — molly.kruse@ou.edu standing, and appreciation and give private Tibetan the years, but this is the about how to construct the of cultural diversity, social astrological consultations, first time it w ill have a lines and what they mean,


6 • April 29-May 5, 2019

SPORTS

George Stoia, sports editor dailysports@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/sports • Twitter: @OUDailySports

CAITLYN EPES/THE DAILY

Former OU quarterback Kyler Murray was drafted to the Arizona Cardinals in the 2019 NFL Draft.

JORDAN MILLER/THE DAILY

Former OU offensive lineman Bobby Evans was drafted to the Los Angeles Rams during the 2019 NFL Draft.

CAITLYN EPES/THE DAILY

Former OU wide receiver Marquise Brown was drafted to the Baltimore Ravens during the 2019 NFL Draft.

JACKSON STEWART/THE DAILY

Former OU offensive lineman Cody Ford was drafted to the Buffalo Bills during the 2019 NFL Draft.

Where 8 Sooners landed in draft

Murray goes No. 1 to Cardinals, Brown to Ravens, Ford to Bills GEORGE STOIA @georgestoia

Eight former Sooners were selected in the 2019 NFL Draft — the most since 2005 (11). Former Oklahoma quarterback and Heisman T r o p h y w i n n e r Ky l e r Mur ray stole the show, g o i n g N o. 1 o v e r a l l t o t h e A r i z o na Ca rd i na l s. With Murray going No. 1, Oklahoma is now tied with USC and Notre Dame for the most No. 1 picks in the

draft ever at five. But while Murray has gotten most of the attention, seven other Sooners also found homes. Wide receiver Marquise Brown joined Murray in the first round, going to the Baltimore Ravens with the 25th pick. Brown will join Ravens quarterback Lamar Jackson — the 2016 Heisman Trophy winner — as he continues to go from one Heisman-winning quarterback to another. “ M a r q u i s e ’s s t o r y i s well-documented. What are the chances a guy who had to walk to work and fight his way just to get to junior college ends up being the first receiver taken? I’m thrilled for

him and his opportunity,” Oklahoma coach Lincoln Riley said. “He’s going to bring a lot to the Baltimore Ravens. Their fans will love his explosiveness, which we really came to appreciate the last couple of years at Oklahoma.” Brown was followed by offensive lineman Cody Ford, who went No. 38 to the Buffalo Bills. Ford was expected to go in the first round but slid to the early second. The Bills were in desperate need of a powerful offensive lineman and they got it in Ford. “I’m thrilled for Cody. He had to overcome a ton here at OU with the really bad injury against Ohio State in his first year and then

moving positions,” Riley said. “He’s one of the nastiest offensive linemen I’ve ever coached, and I think he was probably the most dominant tackle in the country last year. Seeing him now as a high draft pick is amazing. His best ball is in front of him.” Bobby Evans, Dru Samia, Ben Powers, Austin Seibert and Rodney Anderson were also all drafted over the weekend.

NFL DRAFT 2019 QB Kyler Murray — No. 1, Arizona Cardinals WR Marquise Brown — No. 25, Baltimore Ravens OL Cody Ford — No. 38, Buffalo Bills OL Bobby Evans — No. 97, Los Angeles Rams OL Dru Samia — No. 114, Minnesota Vikings OL Ben Powers — No. 123, Baltimore Ravens K Austin Seibert — No. 170, Cleveland Browns RB Rodney Anderson — No. 211, Cincinnati Bengals

UNDRAFTED FREE AGENTS Amani Bledsoe — Tennessee Titans

George Stoia

Curtis Bolton — Green Bay Packers

georgestoia@ou.edu

Carson Meier — Jacksonville Jaguars Marcelias Sutton — Seattle Seahawks

Murray goes No. 1 in NFL Draft to Cardinals Heisman winner fulfills dream, ready for NFL life GEORGE STOIA @georgestoia

Kyler Murray’s favorite movie is “The Great Gatsby.” Anyone watching the 2019 NFL Draft Thursday night figured that out quickly. Dressed in a wool pink, maroon pinstripe suit, Murray’s extravagant outfit would have made even Leonardo DiCaprio a little jealous. But anyone that follows Murray on social media didn’t need to see his suit to know the former Oklahoma quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner has an obsession with the movie. Murray, who was drafted No. 1 overall by Arizona Thursday, has posted several times on his Instagram story references to the movie, including his bio which reads “Green Light.” His new shoes — the Nike K1’s — even feature the green light stitched into the side. In the book and movie, the green light represents Gatsby’s dreams for the future. Throughout the story, Gatsby is constantly looking at the light, hoping to one day reach his lifelong goal of love and wealth. Murray, like Gatsby, has been dreaming of one day fulfilling his

CAITLYN EPES/THE DAILY

Former OU quarterback Kyler Murray was drafted first overall to the Arizona Cardinals in the 2019 NFL Draft.

lifelong goal of being an NFL quarterback. For Murray, his green light now rests in Glendale, Arizona. “Crazy. It’s a surreal moment, having my family here and my coaches, teammates, friends and family,” Murray said at a press conference in Nashville after he was drafted. “It’s a surreal feeling that I’ve dreamed of my whole life.” Murray’s path to Arizona has been a well-reported one: He went 43-0 as a starter in high school, transferred from Texas A&M to Oklahoma and won the Heisman Trophy in his lone season

with the Sooners. Oh, and he was drafted No. 9 overall in the 2018 MLB Draft by the Oakland Athletics. Since falling to Alabama 45-34 in the Orange Bowl of the College Football Playoff, Murray has been the center of discussion in the college football world. His decision — football or baseball — was widely debated. Once he chose football, his size — 5-foot-10, 207 pounds — became the new topic of choice. “I’m just s o proud of Kyler and the way he’s handled this entire process,” Oklahoma coach Lincoln Riley said. “He’s gone through

something that no one has ever gone through with the amount of scrutiny in different sports, the hype that he’s had since he was such a young kid. To see him get to this moment as the No. 1 pick, that’s been his dream. To see him live this part of it out is awesome.” Through it all, Murray remained unfazed, much like he did during the 2018 season. “I can’t control what people say about me,” Murray said April 25. “For me, all I do is work hard and let my game prove itself.” Murray enters an interesting situation in Arizona.

The Cardinals are all-in on the dual threat quarterback, trading away Josh Rosen who was their first round pick last year. Murray joins new Arizona Cardinals coach and former Texas Tech coach Kliff Kingsbury, who recruited Murray out of high school. “God works in mysterious ways, and me choosing to play football and Coach Kingsbury getting the job with Arizona, us having that relationship for years now, it’s crazy to think that now he is coaching me,” Murray said. Together, Murray and Kingsbury will be the faces of a franchise hoping to turn

around its recent offensive woes. “I’m not going to lie to you, I was reluctant,” Cardinals general manager Steve Keim said Thursday after the draft. “I did not want to watch the tape, I did not want to fall in love with the player. I watched more and more, saw the things he can do. As I continued to get to know the person, as we did all our homework, our due diligence, the more and more I became convinced this was the right guy for us.” Keim was the one to call Murray on Thursday, being the first to let him know he was going to be the No. 1 pick in the draft. “You ready to roll?” Keim said. “We need you to ignite this offense.” Keim then handed the phone to Kingsbury. “It’s time, man,” Kingsburry said. “The talk is over. Now they’ve got to deal with you.” Murray’s journey to being an NFL quarterback, chasing his green light, has been everything he dreamt it would be. But he’s not done yet. “I want to be the best to ever play this game,” Murray said. “I know it’s going to take a lot of hard work and dedication, and I’m ready to do that.” George Stoia

georgestoia@ou.edu


SPORTS

April 29-May 5, 2019 •

7

SIANDHARA BONNET/THE DAILY

OU will play Houston in the 2019 home opener on Sunday, Sept. 1.

OU shifts football season opener Game against Houston will now be Sunday, Sept. 1 GEORGE STOIA @georgestoia

O k l a h o m a ’s s e a s o n opener versus Houston has been moved to Sunday, Sept. 1, OU officially ann o u n c e d Ap r i l 2 5 . T h e game was originally set to be played Saturday, Aug. 31. “It is equally appealing to me that we get to play the game in the best conditions

for student-athletes and fans,” athletics director Joe Castiglione said in a press release. “By making this move, we ensured that this game would be played in the evening, thus avoiding the heat we’ve dealt with in each of the last two seasons.” There are a few reasons behind the move. First, Oklahoma did not want to play another 11 a.m. game due to the temperatures during August and September. Second, with the NFL not starting for another week, the Sooners will be the only football

game on television. And lastly, with no school or work on Monday because o f L ab o r Day , i t ma ke s plenty of sense. “The fact that the game is occurring on Labor Day weekend made it possible for us to make this change,” Castiglione said. “Otherwise, I think it would have been very difficult to consider a Sunday evening option. We understand the concerns that some may have with a Sunday game, but we hope the later kickoff mitigates some of those. We certainly are sensitive to church and other events

Softball sweeps Iowa State in three games No. 1 Oklahoma extends winning streak to 35 games

the circle to seal Oklahoma’s win. The 2018 All-American pitched all seven innings, only allowed four hits and struck out 10 batters.

VIC REYNOLDS

Friday (Game 2): Oklahoma 9, Iowa State 2 Elam and Alo both continued their strong performance on Friday with a second home run of the day from each of them. The Sooners also got RBIs from seniors Sydney Romero, Fale Aviu and Caleigh Clifton. Ju n i o r Ma r i a h L o p e z started in the circle for the Sooners and had another Up next: Bedlam impressive outing on the After sweeping Iowa season. Lopez pitched four State, the Sooners now have innings, gave up six hits and their sights set on No. 12/13 struck out seven batters. Oklahoma State (33-11, 12-2 Big 12). The two will square Sunday: Oklahoma 14, off on Friday, Saturday and Iowa State 0 Sunday; with Friday and T h e p e r f o r m a n c e o n Sunday being in Stillwater Sunday, April 28 was one of and Saturday’s game being Oklahoma’s best of the sea- in Norman. Friday’s game son so far. Juarez was the star will start at 6 p.m. of the game, as she pitched all five innings and retired every Cyclone she faced to Vic Reynolds toss a perfect game. This victor.reynolds@ou.edu was Juarez’s second perfect

@vicareynolds

No. 1 O k l a h o ma ( 4 5 2, 15-0 Big 12) traveled to Ames, Iowa, over the weekend to take on Iowa State (28-21, 4-11 Big 12) and swept the Cyclones. The series extended the Sooners’ winning streak to 35 games, adding to a program record. The Sooners have swept each Big 12 series in 2019, and haven’t lost since Feb. 22. Friday (Game 1): Oklahoma 8, Iowa State 3 Friday, April 26’s game featured three Sooner home runs, all in the second inning. The shots came from sophomores Jocelyn Alo and Lynnsie Elam and senior Shay Knighten. Along with powerful hitting, junior Giselle Juarez brought strong pitching to

game of the season, with her first coming on March 14 against Loyola Marymount. The Sooner batters matched Juarez’s display by batting in 14 runs, tied for the team’s third highest mark of the season. Clifton, Aviu, senior Raegan Rogers and freshman Audrie LaValley all hit home runs for the Sooners. Along with that, junior Nicole Mendes hit 2 RBIs, and sophomore Lynnsie Elam and freshman Grace Lyons tallied one each.

that are held on Sunday.” Castiglione hopes fan are receptive to the change and hinted at a possible event on the Saturday before the game to make up for the schedule change. “We also recognize that this change impacts travel,” Castiglione said. “We want to encourage the hotels in our area to work closely with our fans to accommodate this change. We are looking into the potential of developing an event on the Saturday preceding the game to serve and entertain fans who may be in the area. We want to make this

a celebration of Oklahoma football.” The Daily was also told the TV networks informed Oklahoma the game would likely be an 11 a.m. kickoff, which both Castiglione and coach Lincoln Riley have shared displeasure with in the past. Oklahoma played five 11 a.m. games in 2018. This has been an ongoing issue as Oklahoma and fans prefer later games for recruiting, tailgating and other game day festivities. And now they’ve got it. “We’re looking forward to this new and unique opportunity,” Riley said in the

press release. “In addition to giving us a coveted night game, the exposure we’ll receive as the only game that day will be extremely beneficial to our program. We’re embracing the date change.” The game will kickoff at 6:30 p.m. CT and will air on ABC. George Stoia

georgestoia@ou.edu


8

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• April 29-May 5, 2019

DAILY SPECIALS Mondays: $10 Build your own Pastas 

Tuesdays: 2 for 1 Parmigiana

      

Thursdays: $10.95 8oz Prime Top Sirloin  Â Â?

Sundays: undays 1/2 Price Pizza Piizz

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A TRIBUTE TO THE

FACULTY

the following University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center CONGRATULATIONS! tofaculty members who were honored April 22 at an awards ceremony.

Beckman

Benbrook

BigFoot

Campbell

Cowley

Darden

Freeman

Grantham

Humphrey

Jeffries

Johnson

Kern

Leasure

Maple

Metcalf

Mukherjee

Phillips

Rajala

Sanghera

Sisson

Teague

Terrell

Woo

Zhao

REGENTS’ AWARDS FOR SUPERIOR RESEARCH AND CREATIVE ACTIVITY Jordan P. Metcalf, M.D. Professor of Medicine, College of Medicine Dharambir K. Sanghera, Ph.D. Professor of Pediatrics, College of Medicine REGENTS’ AWARD FOR SUPERIOR PROFESSIONAL AND UNIVERSITY SERVICE AND PUBLIC OUTREACH Karen Beckman, M.D. Professor of Medicine, College of Medicine REGENTS’ PROFESSORSHIP Benjamin D. Cowley, Jr., M.D. Professor of Medicine, College of Medicine DAVID ROSS BOYD PROFESSORSHIP William F. Kern, III, M.D. Professor of Pathology, College of Medicine GEORGE LYNN CROSS RESEARCH PROFESSORSHIP Paul M. Darden, M.D. Professor of Pediatrics, College of Medicine PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSORSHIPS Doris Mangiaracina Benbrook, Ph.D. Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine Presbyterian Health Foundation Presidential Professorship Dolores Subia BigFoot, Ph.D. Professor of Pediatrics, College of Medicine President’s Associates Presidential Professorship Janis E. Campbell, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Research, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology Hudson College of Public Health President’s Associates Presidential Professorship Willard M. Freeman, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Physiology, College of Medicine President’s Associates Presidential Professorship Vesper Grantham, M.Ed. Professor and Chair of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, College of Allied Health President’s Associates Presidential Professorship Peter N. Johnson, Pharm.D. Associate Professor of Pharmacy Clinical and Administrative Sciences, College of Pharmacy President’s Associates Presidential Professorship

John T. Maple, D.O. Associate Professor of Medicine, College of Medicine President’s Associates Presidential Professorship Priyabrata Mukherjee, Ph.D. Professor of Pathology, College of Medicine Presbyterian Health Foundation Presidential Professorship Margaret L. Phillips, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Occupational and Environmental Health, Hudson College of Public Health President’s Associates Presidential Professorship Raju V.S. Rajala, Ph.D. Professor of Ophthalmology, College of Medicine Edith Kinney Gaylord Presidential Professorship Susan B. Sisson, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Nutritional Sciences and Assistant Dean for Research, College of Allied Health Sam K. Viersen Family Foundation Presidential Professorship T. Kent Teague, Ph.D. Assistant Vice President, OU-Tulsa Professor of Surgery and Associate Dean for Research School of Community Medicine, College of Medicine President’s Associates Presidential Professorship Deirdra Renae’ Terrell, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Hudson College of Public Health President’s Associates Presidential Professorship Sukyung “Sue� Woo, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy Edith Kinney Gaylord Presidential Professorship Yan Daniel Zhao, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Hudson College of Public Health President’s Associates Presidential Professorship PROVOST’S RESEARCH AWARD FOR JUNIOR FACULTY Matlock A. Jeffries, M.D. Assistant Professor of Medicine, College of Medicine PROVOST’S RESEARCH AWARD FOR SENIOR FACULTY Mary Beth Humphrey, M.D., Ph.D. Professor of Medicine, College of Medicine

The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo

DAVID L. BOREN FACULTY GOVERNANCE AWARD Renee Leasure, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Nursing, College of Nursing PATENT AWARDS *Jimmy D. Ballard, Ph.D. Professor and Chair of Microbiology and Immunology College of Medicine *Victoria H. Christiansen, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Research Department of Medicine, College of Medicine *P. Madeline Cunningham, Ph.D. George Lynn Cross Research Professor of Medicine College of Medicine *Hariprasad Gali, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Research Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy *Kenneth W. Jackson, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Research Department of Medicine, College of Medicine *Anne Kasus-Jacobi, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Research Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy *Jian-Xing Ma, M.D. Ph.D. George Lynn Cross Research Professor and Chair of Physiology, College of Medicine *Julie Harris Marino, Ph.D. Instructor in Surgery OU School of Community Medicine, Tulsa *Patrick A. McKee, M.D. George Lynn Cross Research Professor of Medicine, College of Medicine *H. Anne Pereira, Ph.D. Dean of Graduate College, Professor and Associate Dean of Research, College of Pharmacy *C.V. Rao, Ph.D. George Lynn Cross Research Professor of Medicine, College of Medicine T. Kent Teague, Ph.D. Assistant Vice President, OU-Tulsa Professor of Surgery and Associate Dean of Research OU School of Community Medicine,Tulsa *Nilesh R. Vasan, M.D. Associate Professor Otorhinolaryngology, College of Medicine * not pictured

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