Page 1

L&A: Fans react to the series finale of “How I Met Your Mother” (Page 3)

Sports: Haley Scaman is a perfect 10 (Page 4)

Opinion: Which buildings on campus need renovation? (Page 2)

The University of Oklahoma’s independent student voice since 1916

W W W.O U DA I LY.C O M

2 014 S I LV E R C R O W N W I N N E R

W E D N E S D A Y , A P R I L 2 , 2 0 14

ELECTIONS

Norman votes finalized Jungman will continue OU partnership after win Editor’s Note: Greg Jungman is Student Media Director Nick Jungman’s brother. KELLY ROGERS, Campus Reporter TAYLOR BOLTON, Visual Editor

Norman voters approved the proposition to renew the Public Safety Sales Tax, and also voted in Greg Jungman for Ward 4 councilman, representing OU’s city ward. They also voted Jerry Lang for Ward 6 councilman. Unofficial results indicate Ward 2 may have a run-off election between Clint Williams and Aleisha Karajala on June 24 because neither received over 50 percent of the vote, but an official decision won’t be

made until Friday. After polls closed at 7 p.m., 7,458 people had voted in total for the proposition, with 50.9 percent in favor of the renewed half-percent public safety tax, which was originally approved in 2008, according to a sample ballot. Ward 4 The incumbent, Jungman, received 832 votes, or 62.3 percent, beating William Hickman and Rhett Michael Jones for the position. “We worked really hard. We thought we had the votes. We were pretty confident,” Jungman said at his watch party Tuesday night. In office, Jungman plans to continue the city’s partnership with OU on programs, such as the City Center Master Plan, where Norman and OU are splitting the bill to improve Campus Corner and downtown Main Street,

Jungman said. Ward 2 and 6 Williams received 769 votes, or 49.6 percent, and Karajala received 433 votes, or 27.9 percent. Matthew Leal and Gary D. Caissie got a combined 349 votes, or 22.5 percent. Williams ran on a platform to protect Norman’s water supply and resources, such as Lake Thunderbird. Williams also wants to invest in resources for firefighters and policemen, according to his website. Ward 2 was an open seat because Tom Kovach didn’t run for re-election. Lang won Ward 6 with 566 votes, or 52.2 percent, beating out incumbent Jim Griffith. Kelly Rogers, kelly.n.rogers-1@ou.edu Taylor Bolton, taylorbolton@ou.edu

MAN DOWN

Injury at Lindsey and Asp

POTENTIAL STORMS

Severe weather expected to hit this afternoon Students should be familiar with refuge centers well before storms KELLY ROGERS Campus Reporter @KellyRogersOU

A

s storm systems develop, Oklahoma forecasters predict severe weather conditions across the state beginning this afternoon. Although these conditions aren’t necessarily an indicator of a tornadic activity threat, Scott Curl, a National Weather Center Forecast meteorologist, said tornadoes cannot be completely ruled out. “We’ll just have to watch as these storms develop and take on their own characteristics to know for sure,” Curl said. The storms are expected to move toward the eastern part of the state into the evening, Curl said. Large hail and potentially damaging winds are the primary concerns for this storm system, Curl said. Gary McManus, a state climatologist with the Oklahoma Climatological Survey, said today’s storm conditions are fairly normal for this time of year. “The upcoming weather is just a natural spring time occurrence for Oklahoma,” McManus said. “But each new tornado season can change at the drop of a hat.” With Oklahoma’s current drought situation is looking similar a dry spell in 2011, McManus said weather patterns are important to consider when trying to predict the weather. “Continuation of the current drought is expected, and could even worsen though we’re getting storms,” McManus said. The precipitation from isolated storms is not enough to rescue Oklahoma from drought. Following the drought three years ago, Oklahoma saw 50 tornados just within the month of April, McManus said. That doesn’t mean Oklahoma’s drought is indicative of an active tornado season, but it’s still something to consider, McManus said. “It’s important to expect the worse,” McManus said. “That way you will always be prepared.” With the recent update to severe weather safe spots on OU’s campus, McManus said students should look at the maps now, not an hour before the storms hit Norman. “Preparedness is key,” McManus said. “It could save your life.” For more information about OU’s refuge areas, go to the emergency preparedness website. Kelly Rogers, kelly.n.rogers-1@ou.edu

EXCHANGING IDEAS

Scholar dispels long time myth TAYLOR BOLTON/THE DAILY

Emergency responders aid a man who wrecked his motorcycle at the intersection of Lindsey Street and Asp Avenue around 7 p.m. Tuesday.

ALEX NIBLETT

SCHOLARS

OU students recognized for achievements Students receive recognition Three OU students have been named 2014 Goldwater Scholars, bringing up the total number of Goldwater Scholars to 46. Students Sydney Bader, Laura Figueroa and Yuan Rui were given the award for the intent to pursue careers in math, natural sciences or engineering, according to a press release. The three were chosen out of the 1,166 college sophomores and juniors who applied for the 283 scholarships, which will cover the cost of tuition, fees, books and room and board for one or two years, according to the press release. Bader, biochemistry junior, WEATHER

Cloudy in the morning followed by isolated thunderstorms during the afternoon. High 82F. Chance of rain 30%.

Professor and scholar comes to explain the falsity of the religion/science dispute

SYDNEY BADER

LAURA FIGUEROA

YUAN RUI

BIOCHEMISTRY JUNIOR

BIOLOGY JUNIOR

has a 4.0 GPA, and is working with associate chemistry professor Susan Schroeder to investigate the structure and function of viral RNA, according to the press release. Figueroa, biology junior from Colombia, has a 3.96 GPA and has done research with associate biology professor Elizabeth Bergey. Last year, Figueroa researched the state of Oklahoma bumble

bees for her honors thesis, according to the press release. Rue, chemical engineering junior, has a 4.0 GPA, and has been researching since her freshman year with chemical engineering professor Brian Grady to investigate the crystallization of kinetics of an ionized polymer, according to the press release. Another student, Akash

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING JUNIOR

Patel, was awarded the 2014 Carl Albert Award, which is given to an outstanding senior in the College of Arts and Sciences, according to a press release. Patel, political science senior, was presented the award at a ceremony Tuesday. Staff Reports

CONTACT US

INDEX

@OUDaily

Campus......................2 Classifieds................3 Life&Ar ts..................3 Opinion.....................2 Spor ts........................4

theoklahomadaily

OUDaily

Assistant Campus Editor @alex_niblett

A professor from the University of Delaware is visiting OU on Wednesday to tell Sooners there isn’t a contradiction between science and religion. The presentation, “Science and Religion: The Myth of Conflict,” is this year’s True Family Lecture, an annual event sponsored by the OU Catholic Student Association and St. Thomas More University Parish, according to a press release. Stephen Barr, Catholic scholar and physics professor, will discuss how science and religion do not necessarily contradict one another. OU professors Allen Hertzke and Charles Kenney chose Barr to be the event’s speaker because of his interpretation of religion and science. “We thought this would be particularly appealing to the OU community because it crosses the fields of science and religion, and I know a lot of students wonder about whether their religious faith is in conflict with the scientific world they live in or their courses on science,” Hertzke said. The lecture is open to the public and will be held in OU’s Law College’s Dick Bell Court Room. The lecture starts at 7:30 p.m. and is expected to last about an hour, with a question and answer session after the lecture. “I like to emphasize to students how the university is a wonderful place for an exchange of ideas, and I think at one level it’s an opportunity for students to not only learn but to continue that conversation afterwards,” Hertzke said. Alex Niblett, alexandra.g.niblett@ou.edu

VOL. 99, NO. 128 © 2014 OU Publications Board FREE — Additional copies 25¢


2

• Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Campus

Paighten Harkins, campus editor Alex Niblett, assistant editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com • Twitter: @OUDaily

›››› Sooner Sampler: What was your favorite April Fool’s prank today?

“One of my teachers said because since we all did so terribly on the midterm that our final paper was twice its length.” Ady Lunardi, University College Freshman

“Today I was talking about a professor in a not very good way and somebody said, ‘He’s right behind you.’”

“I mean, I’m a big whoopee cushion guy.” Johnathan Crowley, University College Freshman

“I posted a picture on Facebook like I wrecked my car.”

“My sister told me she was pregnant today.”

Hussain AlMarhoon, mechanical engineering sophomore

Kyle Murphy, University College Freshman

OPINION

Rita Akamah, Graduate Student

Kaitlyn Underwood, opinion editor Rachael Montgomery, assistant editor dailyopinion@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/opinion • Twitter: @OUDailyOpinion

editorial

Which building to renovate next? Our View: We are glad Kaufman and Gittinger halls will receive renovations, and we want to know which buildings you’d like to see updated next.

Which buildings do you like on OU’s campus? Are there any buildings you dread having classes in? Fortunately, some of the university’s older buildings will be receiving a facelift after OU’s Board of Regents voted last week to approve $10 million in renovations to Kaufman and Gittinger halls. The impending renovations got us thinking about other buildings on campus in need of attention, and Copeland Hall is at the top of our list. The Daily’s newsroom is located in Copeland Hall, as well as several classes for Gaylord College students. Copeland is the old journalism building and still houses the offices of OU’s Student Media department. Compared to Gaylord Hall, Copeland is a joke. Journalism students go from the modern luxury of Gaylord Hall to the dim lighting, shabby carpets and permanently dusty chalkboards of Copeland Hall. There is no wireless Internet in the Daily’s newsroom, and Copeland Hall, sadly, has

none of the comfy couches and seating areas present in most of the nicer buildings on campus. We certainly wouldn’t mind a few overstuffed leather couches, such as in the lounges of Michael F. Price Hall. After evaluating buildings that could be next in line for renovation after Kaufman and Gittinger, we decided why not Copeland Hall? Even simpler advancements, like new furniture, would be a welcome change for Copeland Hall. But we know Copeland Hall might The Editorial is the majority not be the first building that comes to mind for every OU student. For opinion of The Daily’s example, non-journalism students eight-member probably have no reason to fret editorial board over the state of Copeland Hall. That’s why we want to know which building you want to see renovated next at OU. Maybe you’re a science major and are sick of the bare conditions of George Lynn Cross Hall or wish Burton Hall would receive an update. Or, as most OU students can relate to, maybe you wish the Physical Sciences Center wasn’t such a bizarre labyrinth of crisscrossing hallways and mismatched

decor. No matter your major or which buildings you frequent on campus, we know there is somewhere you’d like to see an improvement. It doesn’t even have to be a lecture hall; maybe you’re sick of your office on the research campus or want an update to your sport’s facilities. Whichever area you’re concerned with on campus, we want to know about it. We understand our fellow students are engaged in a wide variety of activities on campus and have different desires than our own, and that’s great. We want any future university changes to account for the needs of as many students as possible, and the only way to make that happen is by opening a wide dialogue on the state of a range of campus buildings. It doesn’t matter if the changes you wish to see are large or small, we want to hear your concerns. Let us know which OU buildings you’d like to see updated next on Twitter, Instagram, our Facebook page and the comments section of OUDaily.com.

Comment on this at OUDaily.com.

Tony Ragle/The Daily

Tony Ragle/The Daily

While some buildings on campus are stuck in the past, Gaylord is fitted with a much more efficient and modern style both in its classrooms and lounge areas.

There seems to be a disparity in the quality of buildings on Campus. Copeland Hall is home to shoddy furniture, outdated Internet services and dismal decor.


Wednesday, April 2, 2014 •

LIFE&ARTS

3

Tony Beaulieu, life & arts editor Luke Reynolds, assistant editor dailyent@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/life&arts • Twitter: @OUDailyArts

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’all, “How I Met Your Mother� is and Robin’s wedding. over, and I’m really The most heart-wrenchSPORTS EDITOR upset about it. ing thing of all is this was I’ll be honest; I didn’t start planned from the very watching the show until beginning. The writers about three seasons ago. I may think that was best for caught up during the sumTed, but judging from the mer during a huge Netflix reactions on Twitter, many binge. Nonetheless, I fell in disagree. love with Ted and the gang Most fans were upset. and bought into their story. They didn’t know how to Julia Nelson Maybe I get too emotiontake the news. I still can’t julia.nelson33@gmail.com ally attached to TV shows. wrap my brain around it. Actually, I know I do. I cried Others took it surpriswhen Rachel got off the plane on “Friends,� ingly well. They understood that Ted and and I got a little more emotional than I’d like Robin needed to be together and welto admit during the series finale of “Gilmore comed the ending with open arms. I don’t Girls.� think I’ll ever get to that place, but more Here’s where we’re heading into the spoil- power to them. ers. You’ve been warned. One thing everyone can agree on is I heard the theories that the show lasted too long. the mother (who we finalHonestly, I would have ly find out is named Tracy been OK if “How I Met McConnell) ends up dying. Your Mother� had ended Check out the Storify and a photo gallery of other I just wanted to believe it after six seasons. That’s Sooners’ reactions to the wasn’t true. After watching where the show went “How I Met Your Mother� Ted search for nine seasons wrong. It’s where a lot of series finale. for his true love, I wanted shows go wrong — think him to have a happy ending. “Lost,� “The Office� and But here’s my biggest problem with the “Heroes.� show: They spent so much time making us “How I Met Your Mother� had a good accept and actually grow to love Barney and run. It was a little played out in the last Robin’s relationship, only to break it up in a couple of seasons, but overall, it was a fun matter of 30 seconds. They completely wast- sitcom to get into. ed seasons eight and nine. I hope the finale won’t ruin the reDespite the divorce and ending, I enjoyed runs. It might just take a little time for the the finale. I wish that would have been the wounds to heal. premise of season nine, instead of haphazardly throwing in flash backs and future Julia Nelson is a journalism senior. scenes around the 54 hours before Barney

OUDaily.com

Leadership Students Needed Need 2 students to help promote Anti Texting and Driving campaign this Friday. We will provide script. You will be speaking to several hundred high school students. Contact Dr. Coberg at 405-641-2087.

HELP WANTED Special Instructor I: Summer Camp Instrcutor Parks and Recreation Irving Recreation Center & 12th Ave Recreation Center Applicant must be at least 16 years of age and have experience working with children. $7.75 per hour. Work period varies between: 7 am-6pm., Monday through Friday during the summer, May-August (average 25-35 hours per week). Selected applicant must pass physical examination, drug screen and background investigation. Application Deadline: Open Recruitment. A complete job announcement and application is available at www.normanok.gov/hr/hr-job-postings. To request an application, call 405-366-5482, or visit us at 201-C West Gray, Human Resources Dept., City of Norman. EOE NOW HIRING Wanted: Part-time experienced cooks! Gaberino’s Homestyle Italian Restaurant Please apply in person, Mon-Thurs 2-4pm Located at 283 34th Ave SW Temporary Laborer Utilities/Water Treatment Must be at least sixteen (16) years of age. Valid Oklahoma driver’s license and satisfactory motor vehicle record. Ability to perform general maintenance work including cleaning of buildings, mowing, weed eating and painting. Safely operate City equipment, and work outdoors in extreme heat. Selected applicant must pass background investigation, physical examination, and drug screen. $7.25 per hour. Work Period: 7:00am to 4:00pm, Monday - Friday. Application deadline: Open Recruitment. A complete job announcement and application is available on our website at www.normanok.gov/hr/ hr-job-postings or call (405) 366-5482, or visit us at 201-C West Gray, Human Resources Dept., City of Norman. EOE

HELP WANTED

$5,500-$10,000

PAID EGG DONORS. All Races needed. Non-smokers, Ages 18-27, SAT>1100/ACT>24/GPA>3.00 Contact: info@eggdonorcenter.com Line Cooks Needed - Start Immediately Fully private golf club restaurant seeking qualiďŹ ed, experienced, line/ short order cooks. Applicants MUST have evening and weekend availability. Seeking full and part time applicants. Cleveland County food handler license required. Cooks need to be punctual, and eager to learn and excel in the industry. Pay is $8.00 $12.00 determined by skill-set, and experience. Useful skills include, but are not limited to the following; at top grill, char broiler, Sautee station, fry station, baking, vegetable prep, fruit prep, knife usage, portioning, cleaning, etc. Interested applicants can apply by submitting a resume via reply to the online posting. Also, interested applicants may apply in person at (Tuesday - Saturday 3pm - 5pm)

HOUSES UNFURNISHED 2 bd/1 bth, CH/A, walking/biking distance to OU. Fenced backyard. Pets okay. $700 deposit, $800/mo. Call 7pm or later. 3213727.

ROOMMATES WANTED Roommates Wanted - Nice House Near OU Serious male student looking for two roommates to share beautiful house in nice neighborhood, walking distance to OU, Campus Corner and shopping. Perfect for dedicated student looking for quiet lifestyle. Two bedrooms available in this 3 bedroom, 2 bath house with granite counters in kitchen, large living area with gas ďŹ replace, wood blinds in all rooms, washer/dryer in separate laundry room, fenced backyard on corner lot and attached garage. Main living areas furnished. Available June 1 - May 29. No pets. No smoking. Email: jgreen@epiokc.com

1025 E Indian Hills Rd Norman OK 73071 Email cantina@ilovethiscourse.com Seasonal Retail Plant Business Earn extra money for summer! Now hiring for retail plant business, Spring season, April, May, June. Full and Part time positions available. Call Tim at 405-550-6716 for more information. Email debradlowe@gmail.com



 

    

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SUMMER MEDIA JOBS

Vector Control OfďŹ cer Parks & Recreation/Park Maintenance Background in entomology and ďŹ eld biology preferred. Experience in mosquito identiďŹ cation and control work. Valid Oklahoma Driver’s License and satisfactory driving record. Knowledge of how to utilize mosquito collection devices, how to identify mosquitoes and how to use pesticides. Salary $8.40 per hour. Work schedule varies, 40 hours per week. Selected applicant must pass background investigation, physical examination, and drug screen. Application deadline: Open Recruitment. A complete job announcement and application are available at www.normanok.gov/hr/hrjob-postings, or call 366-5482, or visit us at 201-C W. Gray, Human Resources Dept., City of Norman. EOE

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Monday- Very Easy Tuesday-Easy Wednesday- Easy Thursday- Medium Friday - Hard

Instructions: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. That means that no number is repeated in any row, column or box.

G D K W N X O A X H D Q L E B R S K Q P A Z M

HOROSCOPE By Bernice Bede Osol

Copyright 2014, Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 2014

It’s a good year to make lifealtering changes. The ability to apply your skills with energy, drive and perseverance will not go unnoticed. Your eye for detail will put you ahead of the competition. Turn your vision into reality by attacking every situation with enthusiasm. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Do your research before you make any personal changes. Don’t be disappointed if others don’t share your goals. You will find new sources of income by exploring innovative ideas. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Some personal relationships are due for a change. If you are being pressured or feeling guilty, separate yourself from those who don’t have your best interests at heart.

improvements to your financial and business plans if you keep your emotions out of the equation. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Seek advice from trusted friends before signing a contract or agreement. You could face dire consequences if you don’t have the correct information in advance. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Well-meaning friends may try to lead you down a different path. Remember that you are responsible for your future. Trust in your ability, and make your own decisions. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Someone will try to take credit for your ideas. Be careful to keep your plans a secret until you know who is on your side and who is not.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Follow your instincts when dealing with money. Luck and opportunity will enable you to make some lucrative changes. There is money to be made if you invest wisely.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- A relationship with someone is likely to bewilder you. Take time to examine your feelings and to consider the motives involved before making any changes that might alter your future.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Be firm in your beliefs. Those who care for you will be in your corner. Ignore anyone who tries to talk you out of something that you feel is necessary.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Fight depression and make positive improvements both at home and in your workspace in order to relieve stress. Realize that you cannot force others to see things your way, no matter how good your intentions are.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -Keep your business dealings professional. Don’t risk your career by getting romantically involved with a co-worker. The resulting jealousy and resentment of your colleagues could ruin your name and your job prospects. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- It’s time to put your moneymaking ideas to good use. You can make

PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Use your creative abilities to make your projects stand out. Let your personality shine, regardless of what you are working on, and you will reap sweet rewards.

APPLY TODAY STUDENTMEDIA.OU.EDU/JOBS

OU Student Media is a department within The University of Oklahoma’s division of Student Affairs. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. For accommodations on the basis of disability, call (405) 325-2521.

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker April 2, 2014

ACROSS 1 Great Lakes acronym 6 Enormous mythical birds 10 Bend in a sink pipe 14 Join with others in a cause 15 White-hat wearer 16 Surrounding atmosphere 17 Gin-andbrandy cocktails 20 Grosse ___, Mich. 21 John who might be anybody 22 Escape clause 23 Multi-legged swimmers 26 Church residence 28 Enjoy a joke 31 Novel creator 33 TV show interruptions 34 Horse’s wild cousin 35 Big name in flatware 39 Epic achievement? 43 Errors in printing 44 Golf average 45 Dancing specialty 46 Narrow waterway 48 Floats in the harbor 50 Fast dance with many sharp turns

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53 Not observed 55 Hail, to Caesar 56 Existed 58 Squirm 62 Artist’s device 66 “Fifteen Miles on the ___ Canal� 67 Ukrainian capital 68 Perceives a sound 69 .00001 newton 70 You may film on them 71 Intensely interested DOWN 1 Farm door fastener 2 Musical miscellany 3 “Bus� or “sub� starter 4 Cold weather drink 5 Kidnap, slangily 6 Density symbol, in mechanics 7 “StarSpangled Banner� preposition 8 Charging need 9 Nothing special 10 “Chi� lead-in 11 Overly long, as a sentence 12 100-eyed giant 13 Kindergarteners do it 18 Hamster or hound

19 Jalopies 24 Hops drier 25 Bulletin board fastener 27 Rug buyer’s concern 28 Football part 29 Month on the Hebrew calendar 30 Cold War rival of the USA 32 Happy ending? 34 Safest place to love from? 36 Obsessed with 37 Time of reckoning 38 Cobras’ kin 40 Chore 41 Home of the Senators 42 Some cereal grains 47 “G’day!� sayer 48 Big ___ (large cannon)

49 Nobelwinning relief org. for kids 50 Walked nervously 51 Estrogen producer 52 First Soviet premier 54 Barnyard bleater 57 Offers a question 59 Bangkok citizen 60 Mister, in Mannheim 61 Scot’s language, say 63 Churchill signal 64 Holiday in Hanoi 65 They’re slow on mountain rds.

PREVIOUS PUZZLE ANSWER

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Š 2014 Universal Uclick www.upuzzles.com

ON THE MEND By Corey Bowers


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• Wednesday, April 2, 2014

OUDaily.com ››

SPORTS

Go online to see the rest of the feature on Haley Scaman’s remarkable season.

Julia Nelson, sports editor Joe Mussatto, assistant editor dailysports@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/sports • Twitter: @OUDailySports

Perfect

10

JENNIFER RODGERS • GYMNASTICS BEAT REPORTER

Haley Scaman achieves feat no other Sooner gymnast has ever accomplished

W

omen’s gymnastics is a grueling sport, physically and mentally. It’s also a sport that requires charisma and finesse. Some are talented beyond expectation and have the athletic prowess and character to succeed and carry them through. OU is lucky to have one of those gymnasts. Her name is Haley Scaman. Scaman is a sophomore gymnast who has accomplished more in two years than most could ever hope in their collegiate career. She was late to join the gymnastics world, starting her journey five years later than most. “Most people start when they are three. I started when I was eight. It was a little harder for me to catch on when I was younger,” she said. No one would ever know that she started late, especially as her gymnastics career continued. Scaman competed at a level 10 for four years and made nationals each of those years in her home state of Illinois. Scaman was sought after heavily for her college gymnastics career, but there was something about OU that made her want to be a Sooner. “My freshman year was just about learning the ropes for me. College gymnastics is a lot different than club. It is more demanding, and the coaches expect more out of you. So that was a transition I had to make.” As she entered her sopho m o re y e a r a t O U, s h e thought there was no way for her to create Sooner history.

‘‘

I just know that one day she is going to come out roaring like a lion.” K.J. KINDLER, WOMEN’S GYMNASTICS COACH

BLOOD & THUNDER MUSING ON THE ART OF MEDICINE

The literary and artistic journal of the U University of Oklahoma College of Me Medicine is currently seeking healthcare related short stories, poems, and artwor for publication it its 2014 edition. artwork For submission guidelines, please visit www.ouhsc.edu/bloodandthunder

All entries must be received by May 31st,2014

Medieval Fair

She said her mindset was to put up her best performance, not for herself, but for her team. She held the anchor spot on floor exercise all year, as well as performing at anchor on vault for multiple meets. Scaman has also been a consistent scorer for the Sooners on bars. In a meet on Feb. 9, Scaman went out to compete on floor. While it was excellent routine, it was not perfect. It scored her a 9.975. This score catapulted the sophomore to excellence. The following weekend in Fort Worth, at the Metroplex Challenge, she posted a perfect 10 on floor. This marked only the second 10 on floor in Oklahoma history and the first 10 on any event since 2010. After that meet, coach K.J. Kindler made a bold prediction for Scaman’s future and talked about the character she possess to achieve that success. In true form, Kindler never stopped challenging her gymnasts and talked about what she wanted to see out of Scaman. “Haley has a lot of charisma,” Kindler said. “She is pretty cool young lady. I would love for her to have a little bit more attitude, because she is such a humble young lady. I just know that one day she is going to come out roaring like a lion.” And out like a lion, she came. On March 7 at Lloyd Noble Center, the last home meet of the year, Scaman posted another perfect 10 on floor, which marked the first time a Sooner had score multiple perfect 10s on floor in program history. And Scaman was still not done roaring. At the team’s last regular season meet on March 14 in Arkansas, Scaman did the unthinkable: she posted another 10 — this time on vault.

As you enroll...

THINK 15! DID YOU KNOW THAT ENROLLING IN AT LEAST 15 HOURS EACH SEMESTER OR 30 HOURS EACH YEAR HELPS YOU STAY ON TRACK FOR GRADUATION?

April 4, 5 and 6, 2014

Reaves Park, Norman, OK • 10 a.m. – 7 p.m. Free Admission • $5 parking at Lloyd Noble Center medievalfair.org

SO DON’T FORGET... The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution.

Wednesday, April 2, 2014  
Wednesday, April 2, 2014  
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