Page 1

Opinion: Norman should rename De Barr Avenue (Page 3)

L&A: Experience life at a correctional facility with a nun and her dog (Page 2)

Sports: The Sooners play in the Big 12 tournament (Page 4)

The University of Oklahoma’s independent student voice since 1916

W W W.O U DA I LY.C O M

2 013 PA C E M A K E R F I N A L I S T

T H U R S D A Y , M A R C H 1 3 , 2 0 14

FOUND BODY

Body identified, no OU ties OUPD suspects suicide may have been cause of death for subject found on campus STAFF REPORTS

The body found on campus Wednesday has been identified and has no known affiliation to OU. The OU Police Department is investigating a possible suicide after the body was found near OU’s Mosier Indoor Track Facility on Wednesday. The deceased is a male, and OUPD is working to notify his next of kin, said university spokesman Michael Nash. When The Daily contacted OUPD for more information, Major Bruce Chan directed The Daily to university spokespeople, but Nash said he has no more information at this time. Follow @OUDaily for updates.

OUTREACH

Sexual assault survey made Victims can seek help from other males at SART ALEX NIBLETT,

Assistant Campus Editor @alex_niblett KYLE PHILLIPS/THE NORMAN TRANSCRIPT

An OU police officer tapes off an area of the Everett Training Center as police investigate after finding a body at the facility on Wednesday.

that 6,069 students from across the nation have toured campus this academic year as of Feb. 26. Erin Cox, campus tour guide and Spanish junior, said the family atmosphere keeps attracting people to campus. “We really want to make sure that when high school students and transfer students come tour OU that they feel like they could be part of the Sooner family,” Cox said. Chelsea Mooneyhan, coordinator of campus tours and events in Recruitment Services, said more out-of-state students are touring OU than SEE TOURS PAGE 2

SEE OUTREACH PAGE 2

JESSIE BLACKWELL/THE DAILY

A group of perspective students bare the cold weather during a tour of OU’s campus in February to see what the school has to offer. Public relations junior and tour guide Hannah Van Amburgh, walks backward as she tells her group about the buildings on the South Oval.

30 percent more students toured campus last academic school year ETHAN KOCH

Campus Reporter

OU tour participation increased by about 30 percent from the 2011-2012 academic year to the 2012-2013 academic year, according to requested records. During the 2012-2013 school year, 7,512 students toured campus, up from 5,773 the previous year, according to the records. Those same records show

Campus Editor @PaightenHarkins

Today is the last day to participate in a survey gauging student, faculty and staff ’s awareness of sexual assault resources on campus for men. Conducted by the OU Student G overnment A s s o c i a t i o n ’s Undergraduate Student Congress, the six-question Male Sexual Assault Resource Sur vey asks students if they are aware of the Sexual Assault Response Team, or SART, a 24/7, 365-day advocacy service for students, staff and OU faculty. The survey was emailed to the student body on Wednesday. Currently the Women’s Outreach Center offers services for male, female and GLBT sexual assault victims through SART, which is separate from the other services the center offers, said Kathy Moxley, W o m e n ’s O u t r e a c h Center director. Moxley said the team has male advocates available for men who would like to speak with other males about sexual assault. They also educate the community through online trainings. “…men can be victims of any intimate-partner violence, just like women can, and we’re there for them as well,” Moxley said. Gender Studies senior Anna Pr zebinda said she created the survey to determine the number of students aware of sexual assault resources

CAMPUS TOURS

Take a walk around

PAIGHTEN HARKINS

ACCOUNTABILITY

House Bill increases transparency, makes video available Highway patrol dashboard cameras will now be available for public viewing KATE BERGUM

Campus Reporter @kateclaire_b

Oklahoma’s State Senate and House of Representatives have both passed measures to increase transparency in government by making Oklahoma Highway Patrol dashboard camera video public record. Senate Bill 1513 was unanimously approved Tuesday. The House of Representative bill, House Bill 2676, was passed March 5 by a 67-13 vote. State Rep. Ken Walker, R-Tulsa, who authored the House bill, said the Department of Public Safety, which controls the highway patrol, is the only law enforcement agency exempted from the Open Records Act. Walker, who said a constituent’s call inspired the bill, said it would help create more open openness between the government and the public.

WEATHER Sunny, with a high near 68. South southwest wind 8 to 16 mph.

“Government should be transparent — not why they were not exempt from being open just in talk but in actual deeds,” Walker said. records if the highway patrol was, Senat said. The bill benefits the public and law enforceMembers of the public also expressed concern. ment. While the public will be able to see ex“If you can’t see the video, you’re going to actly what transpires in the video footage, offiwonder what they’re trying to hide,” Senat said. cers will have additional protection if they are Frank LoMonte, director of the Student Press accused of wrongdoing, Walker said. Law Center, said traditionally many law enWalker said the highway patrol supports the forcement agencies have been reluctant to unbill. dergo public scrutiny. Joey Senat, an OSU professor who has a backLaw enforcement agencies typically withKen Walker State Representative ground in Oklahoma freedom of information hold video and other forms of information laws, said the bill reflects a culmination of facbecause they involve a current investigation, tors regarding the Oklahoma Highway Patrol LoMonte said. and open records legislation. However, laws that allow them to do so are meant to only Senat said the highway patrol was exempted by the leg- withhold information that, if shared, could damage a case or islature from releasing video as public record in 2005. The endanger someone, LoMonte said. Department of Public Safety lobbied for the exemption, “The ability of police to withhold records because of Senat said. criminal investigation is way broader than it needs to be,” Last May, the Oklahoma Court of Civil Appeals ruled that LoMonte said. if video from a law enforcement agency showed an arrest, it was public record, Senat said. More online at OUDaily.com Following the ruling, other law enforcement questioned

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VOL. 99, NO. 119 © 2014 OU Publications Board FREE — Additional copies 25¢


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• Thursday, March 13, 2014

CAMPUS

Paighten Harkins, campus editor Alex Niblett, assistant editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com • Twitter: @OUDaily

TOURS: Recruitment Services added more employees to outside venues Continued from page 1 ever before. OU has moved more recruiters outside Oklahoma to states such as Kansas, Colorado, Missouri and California, which has contributed to the increase, Mooneyhan said. “We are always looking for those non-residential students because they bring in a unique perspective to our OU community,” Mooneyhan said. While the number of in-state students decreased this year, non-residential student enrollment reached an all-time high with 8,348 students. Wi t h m o re o u t- o f-s t at e s t u d e nt s, Recruitment Services has created more events for students to preview the campus and ask questions, Mooneyhan said. “We try to tailor the experience to the individual as much as possible so they can get a full picture of what OU looks like and that way they can decide if OU’s the place they are suppose to be and if it’s the right institutional fit,” Mooneyhan said. Despite enrollment dipping this year, OU eclipsed the 30,000-student mark for the sixth year in a row. Most towns in Oklahoma have fewer than 30,000 people, including Claremore, where incoming OU student Jessica Hammer lives. Hammer took a tour of campus and believed what Recruitment Services keeps

saying: OU is a family, she said. Hammer said she wants to get away and meet new people. Cox can relate to Hammer. Coming from Stillwater, Cox wanted to make her own path in a new place with new people. Cox said the tours are a great way for showing high school students like Hammer how big, yet personal OU is. “OU has the opportunities and the facilities of a huge research university but at the same time you still feel a part of a family,” Cox said. A tour guide for two years, Cox tries to make that connection to students with personal stories, because students and families want to hear about those stories instead of facts and information. “At the end of the day, chances are they aren’t going to remember the year the library was built, but they might remember a story you tell them,” Cox said. Another personal touch tour guides provide is postcards. After each tour, tour guides will write a personal postcard to each student, Cox said. With spring break approaching, Recruitment Services will give tours throughout the week. Cox said they will give anywhere from three to seven tours with up to 30 people per shift for the next two weeks because of Oklahoma’s and Texas’ spring break.

GRAPH BY TAYLOR BOLTON/THE DAILY

Ethan Koch, samuel.e.koch-1@ou.edu

OUTREACH: Student wants to bring awareness to understated problem Continued from page 1 available on campus. “Basically, I’m trying to ask the student body if they’re really aware that the Women’s Outreach Center does help them and if they think that we should have a separate center from [women],” Przebinda said. “Basically, how can we start creating space for male victims to speak out, ask for help and actually get it.” In the U.S. alone, about 10 percent of all sexual assault victims are male, according to Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network statistics. Przebinda, humanities department representative in student congress, intends to use the survey results to detract what she described as society’s inaccurate and stereotypical view of the prevalence of sexually assaulted men.

“I want to expand resources on campus for male victims, and in order to create legislation and give congress a good argument, I need evidence that men are saying, ‘I had no idea these resources existed,’” Przebinda said. Przebinda offered a hypothetical campus change, suggesting a name change for the Women’s Outreach Center to the Gender Outreach Center. Moxley said Przebinda hadn’t spoken with her about a name change but supports making sexual assault and advocacy services inclusive and clear to all Sooners, whether male or female. Przebinda plans to present the survey‘s results, as well as her own gathered information regarding the topic, to congress one to two weeks after spring break. “I noticed that a bunch of anti-trafficking and anti-violence is really geared toward women being victims, while

LIFE&ARTS

men are categorized as the perpetrator,” Przebinda said. “Because people have the stereotype that men can’t be victims, we thus have a lack of resources.” The Women’s Outreach Center has a program called Step In, Speak Out, which offers students a one-hour interactive workshop. At the workshop, trained college students share tips and techniques on stepping in to end sexual assault on campus, according to the Student Life website. The Male Sexual Assault Resource survey was publicly posted Monday, and today is the last day for OU students to participate. Alex Niblett, alexandra.g.niblett@ou.edu Paighten Harkins, harkinspd@gmail.com

Tony Beaulieu, life & arts editor Luke Reynolds, assistant editor dailyent@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/life&arts • Twitter: @OUDailyArts

CHARITY

Dogs bring peace to correctional facility through education and character development and work-readiness training,” said Kris Steele, executive director of TEEMand former Oklahoma Speaker of the House. He and his two employees said Oklahoma SARAH PITTS Life & Arts Reporter had the highest rate of female incarceration @s_spitts in the states, which was nearly twice the naSister Pauline Quinn asked me if I had ever tional average. They said the dog-training program helps been here before. It was obvious that I had never been to a prison because I was impa- to change the attitudes of the prisoners, give tiently waiting for the gate in front of me to them a work skill after incarceration and a open while the second gate just past it was chance to give back to the community. Two students from OU’s Nonprofit still closing. She told me the gates never opened at the Leadership Student Association were also at Mabel Bassett to see Sister Pauline speak. same time. Another well-known rule is that you can’t They worked to get the grant that brought have your cellphone. I had to run out to Sister Pauline to Oklahoma. Communications senior Jericha McGill my car and return back through those glacial-speed double-gates. I was there to see the and University College freshman Chay John nun, who clearly saw my naivety, speak about had been with Sister Pauline since she landed in Oklahoma and had an a new program at Mabel entire week planned to spend Bassett Correctional Center with her before they screened in McLoud, Okla. “The Dogs of Lexington” at Sister Pauline is the origOU. inator of the inmate-dog “In the five minutes I met training program, Prison Pet her, when I went to go and Partnership, upon which pick her up, I was like, ‘You’re Lexington Correctional’s my new favorite person in the “Friends for Folks” program world,’” McGill said. is based. Mabel Bassett is The mission of McGill and Chay spoke now the second correctionabout different stories Sister al facility in Oklahoma to our nonprofit is told them during an implement an inmate-dog to, literally, break Pauline informal dinner March 2, training program under the the cycles of including her work to help moniker of Guardian Angel. It was a large room, with incarceration and African refugees in Italy and taking care of a Haitian boy white walls and floors and poverty...” for three months after he vending machines. It regot severe burns during an minded me of my elementary KRIS STEELE, school cafeteria, except all of EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF TEEM earthquake. Some of her past is menthe chairs faced a long table tioned in the movie “Within with podium in the middle. Refreshments were out and people were These Walls,” which is based on her first promingling as Sister Pauline and her dog Pax gram, but Sister Pauline included more detail walked around making sure to say hello to in her speech. She grew up in a dysfunctional family and everyone. Pax was from a program in Florida ran away to avoid abuse but was institutionaland he never left Sister Pauline’s side. Veterinarian Dr. John Otto, who produced ized where she described being tortured and the documentary “The Dogs of Lexington,” dehumanized by authoritative adults, includabout Lexington Correctional’s dog training ing getting raped by a police officer. She eventually ended up on the streets — program, introduced me to some members of The Educational Employment Ministry, or so traumatized that she was unable to even TEEM, a nonprofit organization in Oklahoma speak. Then she found Joni, the German shepCity. “The mission of our nonprofit is to, literally, herd that built her self-esteem and helped break the cycles of incarceration and poverty rescue her from her life on the streets.

Sister Pauline strives to evolve the inmates at Mabel Bassett

‘‘

SARAH PITTS/THE DAILY

Sister Pauline converses with event attendees alongside her dog Pax at Mabel Bassett Correctional Center on March 4. Mabel Bassett Correctional Center is now the second correctional facility in Oklahoma to implement an inmate-dog training program under the moniker of Guardian Angel.

The now 71-year-old nun had a sense of humor throughout her speech, making the reality of her recovery even more prominent. After she spoke, the inmates introduced the first three dogs in the Mabel Bassett program. Dogs Lady, Coco and Hannah still have some training to do, but they all wagged their tails and were enthusiastic despite their abusive pasts. “This program has made me feel human again,” inmate and trainer April Wilkens said as Hannah began to bark. Wilkens worked to quiet her only to have Hannah start giving her slobbery kisses. New program facility plans were revealed, and although there isn’t a date set for

completion, plans include a large star in the courtyard to represent hope. I wanted to know how Sister Pauline made this connection that has been so internationally successful. I was hoping to hear about how her past contributed to wanting to help inmates or something about her own kind of imprisonment inspiring her to reach out to these women. “[We’re] the only people that would do it,” she answered simply. She continued to surprise me the entire day, which was quite humbling, and Pax never left her side. Sarah Pitts, s.elizabethpitts@ou.edu


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Thursday, March 13, 2014 •

OPINION

Kaitlyn Underwood, opinion editor Rachel Montgomery, assistant editor dailyopinion@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/opinion • Twitter: @OUDailyOpinion

EDITORIAL

Forget the $20 bill, focus CLASSIFIEDS on renaming local streets C Transportation

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Our View: We should focus on renaming local landmarks rather than encourage a virtual protest to take Andrew Jackson off the $20 bill.

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AT A GLANCE City of Norman Action Center

Quotations Anytime

Foreign Students Welcomed JIM HOLMES INSURANCE, 321-4664

The Action Center serves as a central point of contact People are not all good all of the time, especially for citizens when they have a challenge that can be not past political figures who wielded great power addressed by municipal government. in times with priorities and beliefs differing from Phone: 405-366-5396 our own. A recent article on the website Slate about Andrew Jackson has caused a Email: Action.Center@NormanOK.gov frenzy on the Internet and inspired posts Source: City of Norman’s website calling for Jackson’s portrait to be taken off the $20 bill. We believe that it is hypmembers of OU and the first dean of ocritical to choose one pothe school of pharmacy. Seems loglitical leader from the past ical enough, right? Wrong. DeBarr to vilify. Instead, it would be was also a member of the Ku Klux more appropriate to encourKlan and was reportedly openly racist. DeBarr age local communities to re-evaluate was dismissed from the university in 1923 for the various historical figures their streets, his ties to the KKK, according to an Oklahoma parks, building and museums are named Gazette article. after. We believe it would be more effective So why is there still a street right by our camand beneficial to let cities around America pus that bears DeBarr’s name? It makes us unbegin a revolution of renaming aspects of comfortable, and we hope it makes you angry their towns to better fit their current values, as well. We encourage all Sooners to contact rather than stripping Jackson the Norman City Council protesting the street’s from our national currency. name and calling for it to be renamed to honor The Our View We are not denying that Ada Lois Sipuel Fisher, an African American is the majority Jackson did terrible things woman who desegregated OU. She took her opinion of The Daily’s while he was the seventh case to the Supreme Court to desegregate OU eight-member president of the U.S. He and allow her to attend the editorial board orchestrated the removuniversity’s law school. DeBarr Avenue forms al of thousands of Native Instead of allowing a street one of the northAmericans from their homelands with the south thoroughfares in Norman to represent Indian Removal Act of 1830, which resulted of Campus Corner. decades of hate and intolThis street is named erance, we should all petiin an estimated 2,000 to 6,000 deaths along after Edwin C. the Trail of Tears. However, he also fought tion to rename DeBarr after DeBarr, one of the to end the Bank of America, eliminated the first four OU faculty Fisher, a women who repnational debt and championed on behalf of members, the first resents justice and the fight dean of the school of for equality. the common man, seeking to reduce income pharmacy and a Ku inequalities. We are in no position to definiWe believe such an effort Klux Klan member. tively evaluate Jackson’s good and evil contrito rename local landmarks BENNETT HALL/THE DAILY butions to the U.S. and neither is the author of would be much more powthe Slate article. erful than some people whining on social media Rather than inspire us to change the faces about the $20 bill. Change doesn’t have to be big on our money, the recent dialogue on Jackson to inspire meaningful results. So let’s all take a has made us reflect on places named after moment to ask our City Council members to rehistorical figures right here in Norman. And name DeBarr Avenue and make Norman even a we realized there is one street in particular we little bit better. would like to see renamed to honor a more appropriate political figure. DeBarr Avenue in Norman, a street right by Campus Corner and Comment on this at OUDaily.com the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, is named for Edwin C. DeBarr, one of the first four faculty

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker March 13, 2014

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Monday- Very Easy Tuesday-Easy Wednesday- Easy Thursday- Medium Friday - Hard

Instructions: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. That means that no number is repeated in any row, column or box.

ACROSS 1 Electronic communication 6 “Brava!� elicitor 10 Flan need 14 Cowboy’s tool 15 Genie’s largesse 16 Undeniable 17 Reaching a turning point 20 Happy as a lark 21 High school health topic 22 Beaver State capital 25 Repertory member 26 Sharpness of voice 30 Egyptian goddess 32 Dead-end street 35 Glacial period 41 Make a beeline to 43 Be absorbed gradually 44 Daggers with slender blades 45 Shake hands for the first time 47 Get checkmated 48 Moroccan seaport 53 Theater necessity 56 Skimmer over frozen lakes 58 A disco move 63 Look perplexed

3/13

66 Energy output units 67 One getting a decoration 68 Official language of India 69 Freelance submission encl. 70 Flubs one 71 Atlas closeup DOWN 1 Hamburgers are at its mouth 2 Fertile soil 3 About a third of Earth’s land mass 4 Does not exist 5 Some balcony sections 6 Beard on grain 7 Drilling platform 8 Connecting strips of land 9 “Hi!� on the high seas 10 Body of moral values 11 Bid welcome to, as guests 12 Fertilizer from bats 13 Passover feast 18 Crete’s highest mountain 19 General, to a Turk 23 Deceiver 24 Jailbreak participant 26 Unoriginal response

27 Union requirement 28 T. Rex and Roxy Music’s genre 29 Taro root 31 Roadside reading 33 Useful Scrabble tile 34 Sunflower supporter 36 Ho ___ Minh City 37 “And others,� briefly 38 Frizzy coif 39 Impossibility for a monotheist 40 Language of Ireland 42 Very small amount 46 Rolle of “Good Times� 48 Starts a seventhinning routine

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49 West African capital 50 Arctic masses 51 Lower in reputation 52 Preschool attendee 54 Indexers generally ignore it 55 Roll that’s served cold 57 Training-room complaint 59 Tibia setting 60 Some wallet bills 61 Put on board, as cargo 62 Cut-andpaste 64 Rink legend Bobby 65 Refusals

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HOROSCOPE By Bernice Bede Osol

Copyright 2014, Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 2014 Refrain from taking unnecessary risks in the coming year. Be methodical and systematic in your efforts. Acting in haste could cause you to miss some important details. If you go slowly, you’ll be able to consider all factors as well as take advantage of opportunities that will lead to success. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -Financial or career gains could be heading your way. Approach your boss for a raise or send out your resume. Discussing opportunities with someone you’ve previously worked with will pay off. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -Consider reconnecting with an old friend and take advantage of any travel deals that turn up. Romance is on the rise. A positive personal change is apparent.

3/12

If you are interested in any of these positions, please access our website to ďŹ nd out the minimum qualiďŹ cations. Selected applicants must pass background investigation, physical exam, and drug screen. A complete job announcement and application are available at www.normanok.gov/hr/hr-job-postings. To request an application, call (405) 366-5482, or visit us at 201-C West Gray, Human Resources Dept., City of Norman. EOE

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -Look after your interests. Some information you receive will be inaccurate. To save costly delays, you should verify every piece of information before moving forward. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Change is in the air. You’d be wise to check out real estate opportunities. Find a property or location you are interested in and make some inquiries. Relocating now could prove beneficial professionally. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Keep your dealings with others to a minimum. Someone will consider your goals to be unrealistic. Don’t waste time trying to persuade others to see things your way.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Put your creativity to good use. Channel your energy into a project that interests you. If you do something that you find stimulating, you will make new friends along the way. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Your plans are gaining momentum. It’s important to keep up the pace if you want to avoid being sidetracked by someone trying to outmaneuver you. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- If you keep an eye out, you will find an attractive deal. Muster up some courage and go after your dreams. You are likely to redeem some surprising benefits, as well as some recognition. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- You will run into several pitfalls if you don’t take measures to ensure your success. Be happy with the results you achieve, however long it takes you to get them. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Let your adventurous side take over. Feel free to try something new, but don’t overestimate your abilities. If you let people with experience lead the way, you will reach your goal. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Some of your relationships may have grown stale or unfulfilling. Take a step forward, and look for new people, places and pastimes to stimulate your mind and get you back in the game. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -It’s time to effect some necessary changes. Whether you have to make an adjustment to your financial, intellectual or physical situation, it’s a good day to take action.

G D K W N X O A X H D Q L E B R S K Q P A Z M


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• Thursday, March 13, 2014

SPORTS

Julia Nelson, sports editor Joe Mussatto, assistant editor dailysports@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/sports • Twitter: @OUDailySports

men’s basketball

Sooners hope to build upon successful season Men’s Basketball Beat Reporter

jacqueline eby/the daily

Sophomore forward Ryan Spangler slam dunks against West Virginia on March 5 at Lloyd Noble Center. The Sooners beat the Mountaineers 72-62. OU hopes to build off a second place conference finish this season with a good showing at the Big 12 tournament.

have a long road ahead of us, and the most important thing right now is winning a conference championship. We’ve all learned from our mistakes earlier in the season, and we’re confident that we can do some great things in the tournament.” The Sooners have yet to win a Big 12 tournament game under Kruger and hope to change that in their upcoming matchup Thursday. The Sooners have swept both Baylor and TCU this season and hope to have the same success again. The Sooners will be depending heavily on Buddy Hi e l d , w h o h a s s c o re d in double figures in 29 of 31 games. The Freeport, Bahamas native has emerged as the Sooners top scorer, averaging 16.8 points per game and one of the leagues best three point shooters, ranking fourth in the Big 12 in threepoint field goal percentage. Hield was excited about

earning second team honors but he understands that there is still work to be done if they want to win a conference title. “It was great to receive the second team honors,” Hield said. “I’m really happy for everyone, especially coach Kruger, but at the end of the day, it’s win or go home. We still have to continue working hard so that we can win a conference title.” Playing in his first season as a Sooner, Ryan Spangler instantly became a key factor for the Sooners. Spangler led the Big 12 in rebounds per game with 9.4 and ranked second in the Big 12 with 10 double-doubles. The Sooners will be depending on his toughness and non-stop hustle on the court as they prepare to make a run in the Big 12 tournament. “We’ve been playing really well in our last five games, but we’re going to have to work

harder if we want to make it to the championship game,” Spangler said. “All of these teams are playing to win and we feel confident that we can win the title, but it’s definitely not going to be easy.”

Oklahoma will compete in its last regular season meet in Arkansas this weekend. After an impressive weekend featuring victories over No. 22 Arizona State, No. 13 Minnesota, TWU and Michigan State, the Sooners will wrap up their season against No. 16 Arkansas. The Razorbacks feature multiple threats on their team, including the No. 2 overall gymnast in the country — Katherine Grable. As the regular season comes to an end and post-season is right around the corner, two Sooners have led the team — sophomore Haley Scaman and senior Taylor Spears. They each had incredible meets this past weekend, and the momentum that created will help the team as they compete against Arkansas. Spears was critical in contributing to Oklahoma’s strong performance this weekend, posting career-high numbers both at Senior Night and on the road at TWU. On Friday night at her last home meet at Lloyd Noble Center, Spears posted her career and meet-best 9.975 on beam, receiving a 10.0 from one judge. Two days later, Spears received another 9.975 (receiving a 10 from one judge as well) on bars, another career-high. Taylor was awarded the Big 12 Gymnast of the Week after her performances, making this her ninth time to receive this award in her career at OU. “I finally realized this is the last go around. It was emotional, but at the same time, I was enjoying every last moment of it. I want to finish strong. I have seen improvements in myself every year,” Spears said. Sophomore Haley Scaman had a record setting meet against Arizona State where she posted her second perfect 10 on the floor this season. Scaman is the first Sooner to earn more than one 10 in the same season and the first to ever score multiple perfect 10’s on floor in Oklahoma history. Not only did Scaman post a 10 on floor she received a 9.975 on Friday for her performance on bars, receiving a 10 from one judge. Jennifer Rogers, jennifer.rogers-1@ou.edu

See more online Visit OUDaily.com for the complete story.

Demetrius Kearney dvkearney1@gmail.com

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OU competes in last regular-season meet Jennifer Rogers

OU can win fist Big 12 tournament game under Kruger The No. 17 Oklahoma m e n ’s b a s k e t b a l l t e a m wrapped up a successful season with a 30-point blowout victory over the TCU Horned Frogs, which ended its season with a 23-8 record and secured it sole possession of second place in the Big 12 with a conference record of 12-6. The 23 regular season wins are tied for fourth most in school history, and the Sooners will hope to add to that total, as they prepare for their Big 12 quarterfinals matchup against No. 7 seed Baylor or No. 10 seed TCU at tonight at the Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo. While the Sooners prepare to play for the Big 12 title, their impressive play on the court throughout the season was recognized, as five Sooners, including head coach Lon Kruger, earned Big 12. Sophomore guard Buddy Hield and senior forward Cameron Clark were named to the All-Big 12 second and third teams, sophomore forward Ryan Spangler earned honorable mention allleague acclaim, while senior forward Tyler Neal was named co-sixth man of the year. Head coach Lon Kruger was also recognized for the outstanding job that he’s done this season, earning AP Big 12 Coach of the Year. Kruger was ecstatic about being named Big 12 Coach of the Year, however, his focus remains on the task at hand and that’s winning a Big 12 title. “These awards are a direct reflection of how well our guys have played this season,” Kruger said. “We’ve come a long way from the beginning of the season, and our guys have worked hard, and its good to see them being recognized for that hard work. However, we still

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