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W E D N E s DaY, N OV E m B E R 2 8 , 2 012

W W W.O U DA I LY.C O M

Sports: Men’s basketball team to take on Oral Roberts. (Page 6)

2 011 S I LV E R C R O W N W I N N E R

wINTeR FASHION

OUDaily.com: UOSA president’s explanation of plans to cut some positions’ pay

L&A: Gets funky, edgy (page 8)

TeCHNOLOGY

Team aims to block concussion effects Group developing plan for high impact technology PAIGHTEN HARKINS

Assistant Campus Editor

As the Friday night lights shone down on the field and the offense lined up to spar defense in an all-American game of football, a member of one of the teams took a hit to the head. Zachary Lystedt of Tahoma, Wash., decided he felt good enough after the hit to go back out on the field and finish the game. Unbeknownst to him, he had sustained a concussion. Sometime later, he took another hit to the head and as a result, fell into a coma for 37 days. It took 9 months for Lystedt to regain his ability to speak and years of grueling physical therapy before he would walk again. That was the story Mubeen Shakir, biochemistry senior, heard shortly

after he began work on the Software Business Accelerator project as a business intern for the Center of the Creation of Economic Wealth, or CCEW. If the person in the story hadn’t gone back into the game he could have been spared from the additional trauma, considering there is a much higher risk of brain damage if someone receives a second blow to the head before the concussion had healed, Shakir said. This semester Shakir is an intern at CCEW working to market a piece of technology that could help prevent these kind of injuries from happening because it would notify those on the sidelines that whatever hit the individual had taken was above the threshold indicative of a concussion. The team consists of four business interns, four software developers and two graphic designers.

“There’s a really huge social problem that we’re trying to solve and we’re using business measures and business applications to try and solve this problem,” he said. This semester, the business interns, as well as a team of developers and designers are working with a Tulsabased company called ICEdot to market its sensors that would be able to detect possible concussions and get the players who may have received them out of the game. Interns are responsible for marketing the sensor. They’ve done research on concussions in general, found what sport in which concussions are most prevalent, indentified a potential marKinGsLey BuRns/ tHe dAiLy ket, given presentations of their findings and will soon pitch their recom- CCew interns (left to right) Tiffany Haendel, visual communicamendations to ICEdot, team leader tions senior, Susan Moring, entrepreneurship & venture manageCaroline Trump said. ment senior, parker Dooly, finance and international business senior, and Mubeen Shakir, biochemistry senior, discuss the consee CCEW pAGe 3 tent of their final presentation at a group meeting Tuesday.

FRED JONES

IMMIGRATION

Students give support for DREAM Act Undocumented immigrants gather to advocate Act’s passing HALEY DAVIS

Campus Reporter

A group of students, friends and family held candles, lighting each other’s one-by-one while standing in the Unity Garden on the South Oval Tuesday night. After a prayer, members of the group began to share their stories of being undocumented immigrants in the U.S. “Tonight we reflect and bring light to an issue t hat i s f a c i ng ou r “Tonight we reflect countr y, our state and bring light to and the University Oklahoma,” said an issue that is of Eleazar Velazquez, facing our country, architecture junior and undocumented our state and immigrant, during the University of the candlelight vigil. “Tonight we shine a Oklahoma.” light of peace.” ELEAZAR VELAZQUEZ, The vigil was orARCHITECTURE JUNIOR ganized by Norman members of Dream Act Oklahoma, an immigration-reform advocacy group that aims to educate people about the DREAM Act. The DREAM Act would create a pathway towards legalization for thousands of young people who were brought to the U.S. as children. Tracey Medina, co-founder of the Norman Dream Act-Oklahoma group, created the group after meeting two students who were affected by their illegal status at the Tomás Rivera see IMMIGRATION pAGe 2

. AstRud Reed / oKLAHomA dAiLy

Students and community members listen as attendees share their dreams for the future in regards to their struggles as “undocumented” persons at Tuesday night’s candlelight vigil in the South Oval. Most are in the country legally, work and pay taxes – they just do not have social security numbers. Yet they are still discriminated against and live in fear of deportation of themselves and their families.

GReeN eNeRGY

ReSeARCH

OU ranked 3rd in green power usage NASA Nearly 100 kilowatt hours used yearly JAKE MORGAN

Campus Reporter

The U.S. Environmental P ro t e c t i o n A g e n c y ha s ranked OU No. 3 in green power usage among universities that participate in a voluntary program that p ro m o t e s g re e n p o w e r leadership. The rankings are based on annual green power usage in kilowatt-hours. OU currently uses 97.2 million kilowatt-hours per year, only falling to the University of Pennsylvania and Carnegie Mellon University, with 200 million and 116 million kilowatt-hours per year respectively. The EPA’s Green Power Partnership program encourages organizations, universities and companies to reduce environmental

oud-2012-11-28-a-001,002.indd 1

scott stARR/ tHe dAiLy

Tom woodfin, OU Architechtural Landscaping Director, describes the data stream generated by the instruments attached to this mast located on the Green Roof at the National weather Center.

impact through green power, according to the program’s website. Organizations that wish to enter a partnership agreement must use a certain percentage of green power based upon total annual electricity within six months of joining the program.

OU is ranked No. 47 out of the nearly 1,400 program participants nationwide, according to the program’s website. OU joined the partnership last year because of the level of wind power purchases the university was making as

part of an agreement with Oklahoma Gas & Energy to make OU completely wind-powered by 2013, said Brian Ellis, director of Facilities Management. OU signed the agreement in September 2008 and began by purchasing wind power from OG&E to cover 10 percent of its total electricity usage, Ellis said. “When we entered in with OG&E, there was a plan to ramp up wind power usage over the next four years,” he said. Wind power currently covers 90 percent of OU’s energy usage, and the university is on track to meet its 100 percent goal by next year, Ellis said. The agreement has allowed OG&E to build its 101-megawatt OU Spirit Wind Farm in Woodward, Okla. Fees included in the

gives OU research grant OU to augment radars with grant JAKE MORGAN

Campus Reporter

An OU team of researchers received a $750,000 grant from NASA for a project to improve existing radar technologies and develop new radar techniques. NASA received 57 proposals, and OU’s three-year grant was among the 17 that were awarded, according to a letter from NASA. The proposal, titled “Advanced Digital Radar Techniques for the Next Generation of Synthetic

Athletics Department donation allows free admission to museum members of the community can now see a million-dollar art collection for free thanks to a donation from the ou Athletics department. the Athletics department’s donation of $60,000 has enabled free admission for the general public to the Fred Jones Jr. museum of Art, according to the press release. ou’s Athletics department is one of six self-sustaining athletics department in the u.s., and it has allocated around $14 million to the university’s academic budget over the past 10 years, according to the press release. “the success of our athletics programs not only has a positive impact on intercollegiate competition, but it also helps support the academic mission of our university,” president david Boren said in the press release. Sarah Smith Campus Reporter

Respect your fellow students’ DREAMs Opinion: next time you talk about immigration, know you’re talking about your fellow sooners, who may have had no choice. (Page 4)

Top albums of 2012 L&A: columnist emily Hopkins picks some of her favorite albums of the year. it’s not too late to give them a listen. (Page 7)

VOL. 98, NO. 69 © 2012 OU publications Board FREE — Additional copies 25¢

INSIDE TODAY campus......................2 clas si f ie ds................5 L i f e & A r t s ..................7 o p inio n.....................4 spor ts........................6 visit OUDaily.com for more

see POWER pAGe 2

see NASA pAGe 3

11/27/12 10:41:46 PM


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• Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Campus

Jared Rader, managing editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com • Twitter: @OUDaily

IMMIGRATION: Vigil attendees call for equality Continued from page 1

BY THE NUMBERS Immigrants in the U.S

11.5M

estimated undocumented immigrants in the U.S. Source: U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security website

75K

Today around campus

estimated undocumented immigrants in Oklahoma

Reference assistance provided by OU Libraries will be available from 10 a.m. to noon in Adams Hall, Room 110 and Rawl Engineering Practice Facility’s IT lab. Bingo, sponsored by Union Programming Board, will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Crossroads Lounge. A Student Success Series seminar titled “Money Management” will be held from 2 to 3 p.m. in Lissa and Cy Wagner Hall, Room 245. OU’s annual holiday lights celebration will take place at 5:30 p.m. at David A. Burr Park, 1501 Asp Ave. The Singing Sooners and the OU Wind Symphony Brass will perform seasonal music.

Thursday, Nov. 29 Reference assistance provided by OU Libraries will be available from 2 to 4 p.m. in Adams Hall, Room 110. A Student Success Series seminar titled “Final Exams­— Test Management” will be held from 4 to 5 p.m. in Lissa and Cy Wagner Hall, Room 245. A lecture titled “Making Modern: Selected Paintings, Drawings and Prints from the James T. Bialac Native American Art Collection” will be presented by W. Jackson Rushing III from 4 to 5 p.m. in Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art’s Mary Eddy and Fred Jones Auditorium. Rushing will examine selected works of art and illustrate the notion of making modern art. Holiday Craft Factory, sponsored by Union Programming Board, will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. in Oklahoma Memorial Union’s food court. A clarinet studio recital will be held from 8 to 10 p.m. in Catlett Music Center’s Pitman Recital Hall. Do you want to see your organization’s campus event here? Visit OUDaily.com/events/submit to add your entry.

Record requests The Oklahoma Daily regularly asks for access to public information from OU officials. Here is a list of the most-recent requests our reporters have submitted to the university. Requested document and purpose

Date requested

OU’s Open Records Log from Oct. 5 to Nov. 27 — To see what type of records people are requesting

Nov. 273

Visit OUDaily.com/openrecords for a full list of requests

Corrections The Oklahoma Daily is committed to serving readers with accurate coverage and welcomes your comments about information that may require correction or clarification. To contact us with corrections, email us at dailynews@ou.edu. A photo cutline in a Tuesday story, “Boren increases financial aid for students studying abroad,” erroneously stated the location of the picture as Buenos Aires, Argentina, and the local villagers as being from Buenos Aires. The picture was taken with a group of Guaraní in Northern Argentina during an “OU in Buenos Aires” trip. isit OUDaily.com/corrections for an archive of our corrections

Source: 2011 Pew Hispanic Center report

Educational Empowerment conference at OU on Nov. 9. “[The students] wanted to bring everything they learned from the Dream Act group that was created in Tulsa here to Norman,” Medina said. “We want allies, as well as DREAMers, to understand why we want the Dream Act to pass,” Medina said when asked about the overall purpose of the candlelight vigil. “We just want students to realize there are students everywhere in their

Astrud Reed / the Daily

Tuesday’s Dream Act Oklahoma ­— Norman candlelight vigil attendees show their support for the group’s message of equality by putting their handprint on the banner in red paint.

classes and all over campus that are undocumented immigrants.” According to the White House website, the U.S. government recently began accepting requests for consideration of deferred action for childhood arrivals,

which means certain indi- a two-year period in the U.S. viduals will be deferred as and may also receive eman act of prosecutorial dis- ployment authorization. cretion instead of immediate removal. This process does not mean these inHaley Davis haley.g.davis-1@ou.edu dividuals will receive permanent citizenship or residence, but they will be given

power: OU to install meter to track energy use Continued from page 1 utility rates paid by OU have helped OG&E recoup the cost for building the wind farm, Ellis said. “It really is a partnership between O G&E and the university to build the wind farm,” Ellis said. “The EPA thinks it could be a prototype to use as a model for the increasing level of green power in the country.” OU currently is in the process of installing a smart meter capability on campus to watch energy use as it’s happening, Ellis said. The system will allow facilities management to see how behavioral-based savings initiatives are impacting energy consumption. “For the first time, we’ll have a good understanding of what’s happening in real time on campus,” Ellis said. The grant that’s funding the installation was awarded to OG&E as part of the stimulus package to help OU as a second-hand beneficiary, Ellis said. Thirty of the total 275 smart meters that comprise the system on campus now have wireless capability, and Facilities Management is fine-tuning the software that will handle the energy usage data. The smart meter system will offer OU new opportunities, such as the chance to

BY THE NUMBERS OU 2012 energy rankings

97.2 hours

56 3

million killowatt-

green power electricity use

OU’s rank among other universities

Source: EPA Green Power Partnership website

compare data usage among the residence halls and see which one can reduce energy consumption the most, Ellis said. Students, faculty and staff also will have access to a public site where they can click on a building on a map to see its energy consumption in real time. UOSA joined forces with Facilities Management to encourage students to adopt eco-friendly habits through the launch of the Crimson and Green Commitment this semester, said Lauren Abston, director of the Department of Interior for UOSA. Students can sign the pledge electronically using their 4x4 to take sustainability as a personal responsibility, and Facilities Management will donate $2 for every signature up to $10,000 to add recycling bins for every trash bin on

campus, Abston said. So far, about 1,000 students have signed the pledge, she said. “Sustainability has been kind of my goal with this department,” Abston said. “We’ve definitely seen a student desire to help with more sustainability measures.” Ab s t o n ’s d e p a r t m e nt plans to implement an initiative to have “zero-waste” football games in which 90 percent of waste generated would either be recycled or composted, Abston said. The department currently is in contact with Ohio State’s sustainability coordinator and is trying to find someone in the athletics department who would give significant support to the program. “However, it would be so expensive, so there’s only

so much we can do,” Abston said. The greatest challenge with energy initiatives is choosing what is financially advantageous to the university, Ellis said. Energy savings of certain initiatives, like installing energy-efficient light bulbs across campus, are difficult to quantify because no two light bulbs save the exact same amount of energy. “That’s why the smart metering project is so important; we see real results,” Ellis said. “A balance has to be struck there. We have to concentrate on the things that will result in savings.” Jake Morgan jakemorgan@ou.edu

UNIVERSITY THEATRE & SCHOOL OF DANCE

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Choreography by George Balanchine © The Balanchine Trust

1000 East Alameda

oud-2012-11-28-a-001,002.indd 2

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The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo

WEDNESDAY ALL DAY

Cinderella

Choreography by Mary Margaret Holt and Steve Brule

8 pm Nov. 30 8 pm Dec. 1, 6-8 3 pm Dec. 2 and 9

Reynolds Performing Arts Center Fine Arts Box Office

(405) 325-4101

11/27/12 10:41:51 PM


Campus

Wednesday, November 28, 2012 •

3

NASA: Research grant ccew: Final presentations to be held on Dec. 4 to fund improvements Continued from page 1 to radar technologies Continued from page 1 Aperture Radar (SAR) and Student Training,” addresses the need for more highly accurate calculations of biomass on the surface of the Earth, said Mark Yeary, principal investigator and author of the proposal. NASA will use the research to further its observations of the Earth, Yeary said. One of the first experiments will be done over Costa Rica to understand measurements of biomass there. Synthetic aperture radar works by taking many lowresolution radar snapshots as you fly over an area and synthesizing them into one highly focused, high-resolution image, Yeary said. Yeary’s team is looking to improve synthetic aperture radar by enabling polarimetry that allows the radar to send out vertical and horizontal waveforms at the same time, Yeary said. This will allow the radar system to determine the geometrically shaped of objects on the Earth more accurately. Yeary’s team will start in the spring by recruiting

In depth Research project - Project Title: Advanced Digital Radar Techniques for the Next Generation of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and Student Training - Grant amount: $750,000 - Research team: Mark Yeary, Victoria Duca-Snowden, Caleb Fulton, Jessica Ruyle and Nathan Goodman

interested and engaging students to help with the project. “We want to try to attrat and retain the best in Oklahoma and prepare them for advanced research down the road,” Yeary said. Jake Morgan jakemorgan@ou.edu

PHOTO PROVIDED

NASA grant will give OU money to upgrade radar technologies, like the kind used on this truck.

oud-2012-11-28-a-001,002.indd 3

While the interns are focused on the business side of the sensor, called HITdot, the designers and developers are working to create an iPad application that connects to the sensor via Bluetooth. “Without the [designers and developers] we wouldn’t actually have an app or anything,” Trump said. T h ro u g h o u t t h e y e a r the interns have to present their findings during two progress review sessions, all working toward the final presentation to be given on Dec. 4. In preparation for the final presentation, the team meets late in the evenings weekly to discuss the workflow for the week and decide who needs to get what done, Trump said. Sometimes the meetings don’t get out until after midnight, Shakir said. “If we have a presentation coming up, we’ll stay there that late for a few nights. Then you still have homework to do on top of that,” he said. Shakir has found that the number of hours he spends working on the project doesn’t really matter though because he cares so much about it, he said. “School is tough, but you make it work. It’s long hours but the fulfillment you get and the enjoyment you get out of it is totally worth it,” Shakir said. Sometimes the meetings last long, though, because the team has a lot of fun, Trump said. The atmosphere lends itself to a good working environment for the group, she said. “Our team gets along really well. We’re really lucky in that aspect,” she said. The group will make its final presentation on Dec. 4 at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History.

Kingsley Burns/The Daily

Above: Jeffrey Rhea (left), petroleum engineering senior, and Chris Larberg, visual communications senior, discuss their group’s final presentation Tuesday at the Center for the Creation of Economic Wealth on the OU Research Campus. Below: CCEW interns Caroline Trump (left), economics senior, and Parker Dooly, finance and international business senior, members of the Software Business Accelerator team, brainstorm during a meeting Tuesday.

GO AND WATCH CCEW Final Presentations When: 6 p.m., Tuesday, Dec. 4 Where: Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History Info: Three CCEW teams will present their semester projects and recommended next steps.

“[Working for CCEW] is a tremendous learning experience, and I have had a great time along the way,” Rhea said.

Paighten Harkins paighten.harkins@ou.ed

BY THE NUMBERS Sports concussions

1.6-3.8M 75 sports-related concussions that occur each year

5-10

percent of athletes will experience a concussion in a sports season

percent chance for concussion for males playing football

50

percent chance of concussion for females playing soccer

Source: Sports Concussion Institute website

11/27/12 10:41:53 PM


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Reader comment on OUDaily.com ››

• Wednesday, November 28, 2012

“The lack of diversity is not due to systematic exclusion by the Greeks, but rather a reflection of OU’s student body make-up and a general lack of minority interest in non-minority greek organizations.” (ThatGuyWithTheFace, RE: ‘COLUMN: Greek community leadership deserves UOSA funding’)

OPINION

Mary Stanfield, opinion editor Kayley Gillespie, assistant editor dailyopinion@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/opinion • Twitter: @OUDailyOpinion

THUMBS UP: The OU Athletics Department donated $60,000 to the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art to enable the museum to offer free admission to the public. (Page 4)

editorial

letter to the editor

Our View: Undocumented

Make the most out of studying abroad

OU, fight for the DREAM

students deserve your compassion. Tuesday on the South Oval, your fellow students stood up and spoke about their undocumented status. Their stories are similar: As young children, their parents immigrated to the U.S. without permission. They have been raised as American citizens since — but are not citizens. Across the nation, young people share the same story. Many remember nothing of the country they were born in. Some didn’t even know about their undocumented status until it came time to apply for a job or college. Most hesitate to reveal their undocumented status. Whatever your feelings on the broader immigration debate, it’s clear that these young people — or DREAMers, as some call them, after the proposed law that would help them become citizens — are not to blame. They were children when their parents made the decision to bring them here. They hardly share culpability for that decision.

Astrud Reed/The Daily

Attendees of Dream Act Oklahoma - Norman’s candlelight vigil on the South Oval on Tuesday night lit candles and shared stories of struggle and discrimination.

And these young people were raised in America. They were educated here, they work here and are steeped in American culture. If that isn’t enough to make you an American, what is? These DREAMers are all around you. They are your fellow students at OU. And they are living in an environment that makes them scared to reveal their undocumented status. It’s clear humane immigration

policies should be the first priority in improving the situation for these students. If the federal government won’t, Oklahoma can join those states that have passed their own DREAM Act. But there is much Sooners can do outside of political activism. If you are undocumented, consider living openly. Sharing your life will help put a face on a largely invisible side of the immigration debate.

If you’re a citizen, there are a few simple steps you can follow to help create a more supportive environment. 1. Calm the rhetoric. When you talk about “those damn illegals” and claim they are nefariously stealing your jobs and bringing down society, you’re talking about DREAMers too. You’re talking about bright, talented young Americans who had no more control over their undocumented status than you did over the color of your baby blanket. So whichever side of the debate you support, cool the anger and the insults and try for a rational conversation on the issues. You can still work to strengthen immigration restrictions while recognizing the humanity of those at the center of the debate.

2. Don’t assume every Hispanic person is Mexican. The narrative about immigration in this country centers around the U.S.-Mexico border. But immigrants, both official and undocumented, come from a variety of countries in Latin America and elsewhere that are commonly lumped together despite having unique (and sometimes opposing) cultures. While some cultural sensitivity here will certainly help Hispanic DREAMers, this also is just general advice for not insulting large sections of your fellow citizens. It is an especially important rule to remember in an international community like OU.

3. Don’t assume any student speaks another language. Are you sensing a theme? Assumptions will get you into trouble. You may be incredibly excited to have a chance to practice your Spanish or another language, but verify the person you’re approaching actually speaks that language. For all you know, that person’s family has been here for generations. And even DREAMers may have left behind their native language.

4. Don’t feel entitled. With the economy in its current state, it’s easy to view other students as the enemy — all competing for the same post-graduation jobs. In this mindset, it may seem unfair to let anyone who is not an official citizen join the competition. But these students did not choose to come here, and how they got here doesn’t change what they’ve accomplished. If they worked hard, got into college and can compete in the job market, they earned those accomplishments. They’re just other students you’ll have to outshine. So remember next time you’re dealing with an immigration issue: It’s not just the stereotype of the dangerous illegal you’ve heard about on the news. These issues affect prosperous young Americans, just like you.

Comment on this on OUDaily.com

Studying abroad is a life-changing experience. William Doll, a curriculum theorist, explained it is imperative to know the other if you want to know yourself. As an educator, I have had the opportunity to study and work in France, Spain, England, Morocco and the USA. While each of these countries has its own charm, culture and customs, knowledge of a country seems incomplete without knowledge of the country’s language. In the academic year 2011-2012, OU welcomed about 300 exchange students from 25 different countries in addition to the 1523 international students enrolled at OU during the spring semester 2012. Moreover, 902 OU students went to study abroad on an exchange program during that academic year. A feature these students have in common when studying abroad is a desire to learn about both language and culture. The most meaningful experiences one can have in a lifetime usually occur when stepping out of one’s comfort zone. When in another country, it is easy to hang out with only others who speak your language or identify with your culture. This is what my former English teacher would refer to as tourism. Thus, when traveling to another country, here are five simple tips you could make good use of in order to benefit from your experience.

Tip # 1: Learning the language is learning the culture. Actively search out opportunities to speak. For example, you can choose to join an association or club. It can be a soccer team, a chess club, a cultural association, a study group, etc. This will exponentially increase social situations where you will be required to speak and listen. The idea here is simple: immerse yourself.

Tip # 2: When in Rome, do as the Romans do. Consider the way of life of locals. Read local newspapers, watch TV, engage in local customs. It just gives you more to talk about in situations described in tip No. 1.

Tip # 3: Make long-lasting connections. Meeting people is good but making long-lasting friends with people speaking the language is even better. With the increasing use of smart phones, it is easy and cheap to keep in touch through text messages and phone calls with people all over the world.

Tip # 4: Fluency impresses but grammar grants respect. Fluency, speaking speed and a perfect native accent are great, but they should not make you forget about grammar. Bring a grammar book with you. The native speakers around you will not always correct your mistakes.

Tip # 5: Listen, Select, Write. When you come across an expression that might be useful, write it down. Write down only what is relevant for your future use of the language. In my case, when I came to the U.S., I wanted to improve my word bank of idiomatic expressions. When I look at my first note pad, I can still see expressions such as “cowboy up” and “fake it until you make it.” Last but not least, do not stress out because you did not meet your own high expectations. Language learners are all different. They all have their own pace and learning strategies. So when in doubt, remember: Fake it ‘til you make it! Noumane Rahouti, Center for English as a Second Language instructor

guest column

Cutting some UOSA positions’ pay best for all students UOSA PResident Monday, I was disappointed to read a misinformed, contradictory o p i n i o n column. Mark Brockway, a Joe Sangirardi Daily columnist, joe@ou.edu argued against a decision I made about whether student fees should pay for the salaries of the Greek Council presidents. I believe students who are not in the greek system should not have to pay for the salaries of those presidents. Brockway argued we should pay the Greek Council presidents because they represent such a large portion of our campus and give so much back to the community. I do not deny either claim. Mark also asked students in the end of his column to contact me if they disagree with me, something even he did not do. If he had

contacted me, he would have been delighted Commuter Student Association no longer to find out the best possible outcome for all exists, which means these paid positions no students, including those in the greek system, longer represent the student body — only portions of it. That’s why I argue, with these was reached during discussions. changes, it should be up to the There was a time when the organizations whether their Greek Councils, the Student presidents are paid. Bar Association, the Housing AT A GLANCE It should not be the Center Student Association Explanation responsibility of all students and the Commuter Student to pay the salaries of students Association presidents were You can read the who do not represent them. part of the UOSA president’s explanation of the Part of the agreement I cabinet. These groups, decision Sangirardi reached with the Greek Council collectively representing the sent to Student and Housing Center Student student body, were responsible Congress, GSS and Association presidents is to cut to the student body president. those affected at the pay for their successors, Over the last two decades, OUDaily.com but in the meantime to help though, these organizations find alternative pay sources. have become more They have agreed to meet autonomous because they have been given advisors. These advisers every other week with the UOSA president to give greater consistency and create better discuss the organizations and how each can accountability than I believe a student body help the others. The students — all students president can provide. Furthermore, the — get the better deal.

The Oklahoma Daily is a public forum, the University of Oklahoma’s independent student voice and an entirely student-run publication.

Laney Ellisor Jared Rader Kedric Kitchens Carmen Forman Mary Stanfield Kingsley Burns

Editor in Chief Managing Editor Sports Editor Life & Arts Editor Opinion Editor Visual Editor

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oud-2012-11-28-a-004.indd 1

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Letters should concentrate on issues, not personalities, and must be fewer than 250 words, typed and signed by the author(s). Letters will be edited for accuracy, space and style. Students must list their major and classification. To submit letters, email dailyopinion@ou.edu. Our View is the voice of the Editorial Board, which consists of nine student editors. The board meets at 5 p.m. Sunday to Thursday in 160 Copeland Hall. Board meetings are open to the public.

As the UOSA president, I am accountable to the students and respond when students voice concerns. I am disappointed, though, when someone does not seek out facts first. Brockway claimed UOSA not funding these salaries would limit student involvement, but shows no evidence or explanation for this. He also claims my decision (also the decision of Student Congress) creates less involvement in decision-making. I am sure if these positions are paid through other means, it will not detour involvement. As always, I respect the concerns of my fellow students and am happy to respond and give context. If you have a problem with my decision, please feel free to contact me, the author of the bill, Student Congress or the leaders affected (all of whom agree with my decision). They’ll welcome your questions and explain how we have all come to consensus for the sake of the students. Joe Sangirardi, UOSA president

Guest columns are accepted and printed at the editor’s discretion. Columnists’ and cartoonists’ opinions are their own and not necessarily the views or opinions of The Oklahoma Daily Editorial Board. To advertise in The Oklahoma Daily, contact advertising manager Kearsten Howland by calling 405-325-8964 or emailing dailyads@ou.edu. One free copy of The Daily is available to members of the OU community. Additional copies may be purchased for 25 cents by contacting The Daily business office at 405-325-2522.

11/27/12 10:32:30 PM


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Auto Insurance Foreign Students Welcomed JIM HOLMES INSURANCE, 321-4664

MISC. FOR SALE

ROAD BIKES: Lots of refurbished bikes from $75-$150. 1604 NW 30 OKC or call 747-7425

TM

AUTO INSURANCE Quotations Anytime

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CSL PLASMA NOW HIRING PT SCREENING & DONOR FLOOR TECHNICIANS Make a Difference Today! Apply Online at www.cslplasma.com CSL Plasma 1327 E. Lindsey Norman, OK 73071 (405)447-9977

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Research volunteers needed! Researchers at OU Health Sciences Center need healthy volunteers ages 18 to 30 who have a parent with or without a history of an alcohol or drug problem. Qualified participants will be compensated for their time. Call (405) 456-4303 to learn more about the study and to see if you qualify. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution.

PAID EGG DONORS. All Races needed. Non-smokers, Ages 18-27, SAT>1100/ACT>24/GPA>3.00 Contact: info@eggdonorcenter.com STUDENTPAYOUTS.COM Paid survey takers needed in Norman 100% FREE to join. Click on Surveys.

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POLICY The Oklahoma Daily is responsible for one day’s incorrect advertising. If your ad appears incorrectly, or if you wish to cancel your ad call 3252521, before the deadline for cancellation in the next issue. Errors not the fault of the advertiser will be adjusted. Refunds will not be issued for late cancellations. The Oklahoma Daily will not knowingly accept advertisements that discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, religious preference, national origin or sexual orientation. Violations of this policy should be reported to The Oklahoma Daily Business Office at 325-2521. Help Wanted ads in The Oklahoma Daily are not to separate as to gender. Advertisers may not discriminate in employment ads based on race, color, religion or gender unless such qualifying factors are essential to a given position.

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E B R S L Q P A Z M N E U H R Y A L W O O T P

S M B C D G J A T Q Z P K I P W N G D K W N X

O A X H D Q L N B R S L Q P A Z M Q Z P K I P

W N G D K W N N O A X H D Q L E B R S L Q P A

Z M Q R P K I O W N G D K W N X O A X H D Q L

E B R O L Q P U Z M Q Z P K I P W N G D K W N

X O J O B S Q N E B R S L Q P A Z M Q Z P K I

P W N M D K W C X O A X H D J O B S R S L Q P

A Z M M Z P K E P W N G D K W N X O A X H D Q

L E B A U T O M O B I L E S K I P W N G D K W

N X O T X H D E L E B O S L Q P A Z M Q Z P K

I P W E G D K N N X O S X H D Q L E B R S L Q

P A Z S Q Z P T I P W T G D K W N X O A X H D

Find them in the classifieds HOROSCOPE By Bernice Bede Osol

Copyright 2012, Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER WEDNESDAY NOVEMBE 28, 2012 Eats flies. Dates a pig. Hollywood star.

LIVE YOUR DREAMS Pass It On. www.forbetterlife.org

WE DON’T JUST PROVIDE FOOD FOR THE HOMELESS.

There are no limits to caring.ÂŽ

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WE PROVIDE JOB TRAINING SO THEY CAN BUY GROCERIES.



 



 



                        

        

Previous Solution                                                               

Monday- Very Easy Tuesday-Easy Wednesday- Easy Thursday- Medium Friday - Hard

Instructions: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. That means that no number is repeated in any row, column or box.

oud-2012-11-28-a-005.indd 1

        

Certain changes over which you’ll have little or no control could usher in some promising material conditions in the year ahead. It will behoove you to flow with events whenever these shifts begin to occur. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- To achieve the best results when negotiating with someone who is using intimidating methods, assume that the other party is merely bluffing. Even if they’re not, the extra confidence will give you the edge. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- It’s important to follow a carefully conceived game plan regarding an important matter. Try your best not to deviate from such a blueprint, because your on-the-spot decisionmaking might not be optimal. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Unfortunately, this might not be one of your more productive days, but not for a lack of industriousness on your part. It is likely to be due to others unloading excess work on you. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- You could end up being greatly disappointed if you fail to keep your hopes and expectations within reasonable bounds. Your optimism simply won’t match your opportunities. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Don’t expect to learn too much if you are intimidated by the subject matter. Get back in character and trust your smarts to figure out what it’s all about.

The Community After School Program is looking to hire staff to lead a physical activity and nutrition program for K-5th grade children for the Spring semester. Applicants must be available to work M-F 2:30-6. Pay starts at $8/hour. No experience required, but majoring in a health field is a plus. Apply now to begin work in January. Please contact Lindsey at 3665970 ext, 208 or lindsey@caspinc.org.

Looking for a fast pace and upbeat job?! CAYMAN’S seeks PT giftwrapper/stock room assistant. Flexible Hrs. Apply in person: 2001 W. Main Street. CALL 360-3969.

HELP WANTED

Payment is required at the time the ad is placed. Credit cards, cash, money orders or local checks accepted.

There is a 2 line minimum charge; approximately 42 characters per line, including spaces and punctuation. (Cost = Days x # lines x $/line)

5

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -Experiencing some opposition and/ or frustration could prevent you from conducting business in your usual manner. Do your best to keep things moving forward. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- On issues where you and your mate hold divergent opinions, it might be difficult for either of you to alter the other’s point of view. Applying pressure will only make matters worse. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- You’re apt to be totally unyielding with anyone who takes you for granted, yet when someone truly needs your help, you’ll be the first to lend a hand. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- If what you want turns out to be the opposite of what everybody else desires, it might be quite difficult for you to go along with them. Nonetheless, you need to take this one for the team.

Q L E B R S L S P A Z & Q Z P K I P W N G D K

W N X O A X H D Q L E F R S L Q P A Z M Q Z P

K I P W N G D K W N X O A X H D Q L E B R S L

Q P A Z M Q Z P K I P U N G D K W A X O A X H

D Q L E B R S L Q R E N T A L S K P P W N G D

K W N X O A X H D Q L D B R S L Q A A Z M Q Z

P K I P W N G D K W N X O A X H D R L E B R S

J Housing Rentals DUPLEXES UNFURNISHED 914 Drake: 1bd/1ba, CH/A, $550/mo, $500 dep. Water, gas, lawn care provided. 550-7069

HOUSES UNFURNISHED House for Rent. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, pet friendly. If interested please call 8029381

H D Q L E B R S L Q P A Z M Q Z P M I P W N G

L Q P A Z M Q Z P K I P W N G D K T N X O A X

D K W N X O A X H D Q L E B R S P E T S Z M Q

Z P K I P W N G D K W N X O A X H N Q L E B R

S B I C Y C L E S P K I P W N G D T W N X O A

X H D Q L E B R S L Q P A Z M Q Z S K I P W N

G D K W N X O A X H D Q L E B R S K Q P A Z M

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker November 28, 2012

ACROSS 1 Titanic’s downfall 5 It eliminates a suspect 10 From the same tree? 14 Say it’s so 15 Ascended, as from the grave 16 Tibetan holy man 17 Cement ingredient 18 Characteristic carriers 19 Cable TV sports award 20 It’ll put you down for the count 23 Follow, as a suggestion 24 Respectful title in India 25 Bumped into 28 Bridal bio word 29 Many millennia 33 Lapse, as a license 35 Concerning this, to lawyers 37 Primal impulse 38 What a cliche is, essentially 43 General vicinity 44 Grad student’s project 45 “The Mick� of baseball 48 Prepares, as a dinner table

49 “Check THAT out!� 52 Pull the plug on 53 Swiss high-rise? 55 Turkish bath 57 Crucial car part 62 Contented cat sound 64 Braid of hair 65 Like some pickings 66 On the ocean 67 Medicinal herb 68 West Wing underling 69 ___-inwaiting (princess’ attendant) 70 Garden border tool 71 Calendar unit DOWN 1 ___ States (group that includes Bulgaria) 2 Demonstrate clearly 3 Device with a mute button 4 ___-Roman wrestling 5 Bearer of the Golden Fleece 6 In ___ of (replacing) 7 “Winning ___ everything!� 8 Traffic toots 9 Take out a policy on 10 Guinness or Waugh

11 Indo-Aryan language 12 Little handful 13 Con’s vote 21 Delivered a low blow? 22 Give the thumbsdown to 26 Cogito, ___ sum 27 College freshman, usually 30 Tramcar lode 31 Customer service call 32 Second-year coeds 34 “___ in Boots� 35 Winter budget item 36 For the taking 38 Unlikely to bite 39 Home to the Zagros Mountains 40 Delivered

formally, as a jury 41 Attendance fig., often 42 Wuss 46 ___-di-dah 47 Pass by, as time 49 Tell bigger whoppers? 50 Big name in flatware 51 Carpenter’s tool 54 Whimpered 56 Measure metal 58 Revealing photo? 59 Competed on “American Idol� 60 Pitchfork prong 61 Twinkler in the sky 62 Chum 63 July 4th honoree

PREVIOUS PUZZLE ANSWER

11/27

Š 2012 Universal Uclick www.upuzzles.com

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- An

important personal objective might not be in accord with the wishes and/ or plans of your colleagues. Instead of being supportive, they could make things harder for you. Try to be diplomatic, but also be firm.

11/28

GIVE IT A REST By Turner Givens

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Many little annoyances, which you would normally overlook, could become overwhelming if you don’t try to get a handle on them. Sweat the small stuff. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Someone who is trying to use intimidating methods to get you to comply with his or her wishes might act like he or she has the upper hand, but it’s just a bluff. Don’t be taken in.

11/27/12 8:17:00 PM


6

• Wednesday, November 28, 2012

SPORTS

Kedric Kitchens, sports editor Dillon Phillips, assistant editor dailysports@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/sports • Twitter: @OUDailySports

men’s basketball

Sooners to battle against Oral Roberts Junior M’Baye named Big 12 Rookie of the Week

PLAYER PROFILE Je’lon Hornbeak

Dillon Phillips

Year: Freshman

Assistant Sports Editor

Coming off a third-place f i n i s h i n t h e O l d Sp i c e Classic last weekend, the OU men’s basketball team takes on Oral Roberts at 7 tonight at the Mabee Center in Tulsa. Thanks to his performance in Orlando, junior forward Amath M’Baye took home Big 12 Rookie of the Week last week. M’Baye averaged 10.7 points and five rebounds and scored a season-high 19 points in the third-place game against West Virginia. “It was great to see Amath not only get that award but do things that allowed him to get the award, mainly, playing much better on Sunday,” coach Lon Kruger said. “I thought he looked like the Amath of old on Sunday. Up to that point, I thought he looked a little bit tentative.” The Golden Eagles are 3-3 and are led by senior guard Warren Niles, who is sure to challenge senior guard Steven Pledger and the Sooners’ trio of young guards: freshmen Isaiah Cousins, Je’lon Hornbeak

Position: Guard Statistics: Averaging 7.2 points and three rebounds per game as a freshman this season

and Buddy Hield. “[Niles] gets up a lot of shots,” Pledger said. “It just tells you (that) you got to buckle down more and pay attention to the plays.” The Cincinnati native leads the team with 20.8 points per game and 58 percent shooting from the floor. L a s t w e e k , Ni l e s w a s named the Southland Conference’s Player of the Week after averaging 19.3 points and 3.8 rebounds in four games, including a season-high 33 points against Loyola Marymount in a 75-66 victory in the first round of the Great Alaska Shootout. But Pledger is embracing the challenge. “You want to play against good scorers as a guard,” Pledger said. “It just brings

Steve Johnson/the associated press

Senior guard Steven Pledger (right) defends UTEP sophomore forward Jalen Ragland (left) in a game Thursday at the Old Spice Classic in Orlando. The Sooners won the game, 68-61, and went 3-1 in the tournament, taking third place.

the best mindset out of you.” Tonight also marks the opportunity for Kruger to pick up career victory No. 499 and move just one win away from the 500-win club. But Kruger downplayed the number’s significance and

shifted the spotlight to his young team — one that’s continuing to improve. “It’s something that just kind of comes around when you do it awhile,” Kruger said. “These guys are making progress, that’s what is most important to us right

now.” When OU and ORU tipoff, the Sooners will be focused solely on picking up the victory. “(We want to) hopefully come out with a win,” senior forward Romero Osby said. “And hopefully [we’ll be]

able to sustain what we did against West Virginia and just build on that and carry it over to another game and see how we get better.” Dillon Phillips dphillips85@ou.edu

Thunder

Oklahoma City turns lopsided win into historic blowout Thunder led Bobcats by 40 points at halftime JEFF LATZKE

The Associated Press

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Russell Westbrook tipped away a pass, got into the open court all by himself and then braced for a big take-off and a signature throwdown dunk. Instead, he meekly flipped the ball into the basket and grinned sheepishly at the Oklahoma City Thunder bench after the miscue. “I really thought he was going to do something a little better than what he did, but I’ll take up for him and say he slipped a little bit,” said Kevin Durant, the three-time NBA scoring champion. “But he made up for it at the end of the half.” Did he ever. Westbrook powered home a right-handed slam to put an exclamation point on one of the most dominant first halves in NBA history, putting Oklahoma City up by 40 Sue Ogrocki/the associated Press on its way to a 114-69 blowThunder guard Russell Westbrook (0) goes up for a layup in a game out of the Charlotte Bobcats against the Charlotte Bobcats on Monday in Oklahoma City. The on Monday night. Thunder destroyed the Bobcats, winning the game, 114-69.

The 64-24 advantage was the fifth-biggest halftime lead in NBA’s shot clock era and the largest since Golden State set the record with an 88-41 edge on Sacramento on Nov. 2, 1991, according to STATS. It ended up as the biggest blowout in Bobcats history. “We struggled to hit shots, we struggled to get good shots, we got beat on the boards. We got beat in all facets of the game,” Charlotte center Brendan Haywood said. Durant scored 18 points and Westbrook had 12 points and 11 assists. The defending Western Conference champions pulled their starters after Durant’s 3-pointer from the right wing made it 79-25 less than five minutes into

the second half. “We came out and took care of business, regardless of who the opponent is,” Westbrook said. “That’s a good team. They came in tonight and had won some big games. “We just took care of business.” Rookie Jeff Taylor scored 10 points to lead Charlotte, which had shown promise with seven early wins — the same number it had last season while going 7-59 and setting an NBA record for futility. “There hasn’t been any kind of damage control to be done on this game,” firstyear coach Mike Dunlap said. “We kind of know that OKC is a test for us, we failed it miserably but there are

other, better days ahead.” The Bobcats opened with their worst offensive quarter of the season, scoring just 12 points while committing seven turnovers on their 20 possessions, and it only got worse. Oklahoma City broke it open with a 22-3 run, scoring the final 10 points of the first quarter and then 12 of the first 15 to start the second. The Thunder shot 60 percent from the field in the first half while limiting Charlotte to 22 percent and forcing 11 turnovers. The Bobcats made only 3 of 20 shots in the second quarter while getting outscored 36-12. Jeff Latzke The Associated Press

Adopt - An - Area Area Ratings For This Week

Phi Delta Theta

Air Force R.O.T.C.

Delta Tau Delta

Alpha Chi Omega

Delta Upsilon

Alpha Gamma Delta

Gamma Phi Beta

Alpha Kappa Alpha

Engineers Without Borders

Pi Beta Phi

Alpha Kappa Delta Phi

Hispanic American Student Association

Pi Kappa Alpha Pi Kappa Phi

International Leadership Class

Kappa Alpha Psi

President’s Community Scholars President’s Leadership Class RUF/NEK Lil Sis

Kappa Alpha Theta

Sigma Alpha Epsilon

Alpha Omicron Pi Alpha Phi

Iota Phi Theta

Alpha Phi Alpha Alpha Phi Omega Alpha Sigma Kappa Alpha Tau Omega Beta Theta Pi Catholic Student Assoc. Chi Omega

Kappa Alpha

Kappa Delta Chi Kappa Kappa Gamma Kappa Kappa Psi Lambda Chi Alpha

Delta Chi

Omega Delta Phi

Delta Delta Delta

Omega Psi Phi

Delta Epsilon Psi

Our Earth

Delta Gamma

Phi Beta Sigma

Delta Phi Omega Delta Sigma Theta

Way To Go!

Phi Gamma Delta Phi Delta Alpha

Phi Kappa Psi Phi Kappa Sigma

Sigma Chi Sigma Gamma Rho Sigma Lambda Beta Sigma Lambda Gamma Sigma Phi Epsilon Zeta Phi Beta Adams Cate Couch Walker

Keep Up the Good Work!

Volunteer � Programs leadandvolunteer.ou.edu Strengthening Our Traditions through Service to State and Society

The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo

oud-2012-11-28-a-006.indd 1

11/27/12 8:48:18 PM


Wednesday, November 28, 2012 •

LIFE&ARTS

7

Carmen Forman, life & arts editor Westlee Parsons, assistant editor dailyent@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/life&arts • Twitter: @OUDailyArts

column

Top albums of 2012 Life & Arts Columnist

Emily Hopkins ehopkins@ou.edu

T

hanksgiving is over, and there are hardly any albums left on the release calendar for 2012 — that means it’s time to tally up the best of the best of the year in music. This year was big for some heavy hitters and a breakout year for once lesserknown artists. Below are six of the top 10 albums this year. The rest can be found at oudaily.com/life&arts.

Beach House — “Bloom” (rel. May 15)

“Bloom” is the perfect title for this amazingly light and whimsical album — ­­it’s like the listener stepped through the looking glass and landed in a swirling garden in Wonderland. It’s all trances, methodical guitars and ghostlike vocals, sounds that juxtapose nicely with recurring themes of heartbreak, confusion and loss. Beach House certainly keeps getting better and better with each subsequent release.

Divine Fits — “A Thing Called Divine Fits” (rel. Aug. 28)

Not quite a supergroup but definitely more than just a new band, Divine Fits features some of the most magnetic indie-rockers of today — Spoon’s Britt Daniels, Dan Boeckner of Wolf Parade and Handsome Furs and Sam Brown of New Bomb Turks. Luckily the band isn’t a one-and-done act like some similar groups. As Daniels put it when discussing the project, starting a band doesn’t mean simply “settling in as a precious recording act” — it means touring, hanging out and living and breathing rock and roll.

The xx — “Coexist” (rel. Sept. 10)

There was nothing quite like the soft reverbs and ghostly sounds of the xx’s 2009 selftitled debut album. On this sophomore effort, the band chose to refine what already was there, at the same time stripping things down even more. The vocals get a boost on “Coexist,” while the instrumentals take a slight but undeniable backseat. “Naked” may have been the word to throw around with the first album — this second album takes that bareness to the extreme, leaving absolutely nothing remaining to hide.

Tame Impala — “Lonerism” (rel. Oct. 9)

Tame Impala’s sophomore album is a genius mix between colorful psychedelia and effortlessly easy pop. With hooks galore and more than enough fuzz and electric guitars to go around, “Lonerism” recalls some of the great rock albums of the ’60s while adding in modern influences to keep it extremely current. Think The Flaming Lips meets “Magical Mystery Tour” with a touch of Animal Collective thrown in.

Sleigh Bells — “Reign Of Terror” (rel. Feb. 14) For the most part, Sleigh Bells “Reign of Terror” is the much more accessible younger sister to 2010’s “Treats.” It’s a bit more serious, with lyrics that actually make a little more sense, but it still has the light fun and insane guitars that made the duo’s debut album such a hit. “Reign of Terror” is an album that I’ve been playing for almost a year, and that I’m still not tired of it.

Jack White — “Blunderbuss” (rel. April 24)

Now that Jack’s gone through three bands, we finally get to hear the solo work of perhaps this generation’s greatest guitarist and rock star (at the very least, he’s definitely the most interesting). Not quite like any of his other efforts, “Blunderbuss” combines White’s characteristic blues influences and distorted guitars with touches of hard rock and soul, creating an incredibly heady and addicting mix.

JENKINS MEDICAL CLINIC

CALL FOR APPOINTMENT OR WALK-IN

Let’s wrap up your holiday party plans!

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(two blocks north of Boyd) Norman, OK Phone: (405) 701-2420 Fax: (405) 701-2447 Paps and STD Tests Available!

oud-2012-11-28-a-007.indd 1

550 24th Avenue NW, Norman 360-3634 www.soonerbowl.com

11/27/12 8:34:41 PM


8

LIFE&ARTS

• Wednesday, November 28, 2012

COLUMN

Winter fashion gets edgy

LIFE & ARTS COLUMNIST

Shannon Borden shannonborden@ou.edu

With winter nearly upon us, it is time to update our wardrobes for the weather change. Scarves and ear warmers are always essential, but there are a few new trends that will be hot this season. EVIN MORRISON/THE DAILY

Shannon Borden is a professional writing sophomore.

Top: Drama sophomore Casey Thibodaux models a jacket and scarf from H&M, a plaid shirt from Urban Outfitters and a white shirt from Express. Bottom: Multidisciniplinary studies junior Kelsie Heitman models a coat from Macy’s, jeans and scarf from J.C. Penny Co. and boots from CATO.

HEATHER BROWN/THE DAILY

Leather

Elbow Patches

Jacket Trends

Leather is the number one trend to look for this season. It is bold and can be worn in so many different ways. The leather jacket is a fashion classic, but it often gives a biker look that not everyone is going for. If you like the leather trend but want to tone it down, buy pieces with leather accents, such as pockets, collars or even full sleeves. Wearing leather pants is not an easy thing to do. If you can pull it off, more power to you. If you can’t, try wearing a leather skirt over tights instead. While more expensive, leather is a good investment because it typically comes back into style every year when the weather gets cooler. Think of buying leather as making an investment in a piece you will wear for years.

For a few years now, elbow patches slowly have been becoming more popular. Previously worn by hipsters, this quirky addition to cardigans, blazers and sweaters has finally blossomed into a full-blown winter trend to watch for this season. Elbow patches give outfits a “classy professor” vibe and can be paired with anything from jeans to skirts to trousers. The best part of this trend is you can make it a do-it-yourself project. You can get creative with the texture, design and shape of your elbow patches. Heart-shaped patches are the most popular alternatives to the classic ovals. Instead of plain nude shades, try a floral or animal print patch added to a solid-colored shirt.

The peacoat is back this season, but expect new variations on last year’s hottest jacket style. This year, rock a peacoat in a bold color or pattern. Geometric patterns are in for the season, and animal prints will be around forever, so mix up your peacoat style, because plain black won’t be as popular this year. Puffy jackets are another jacket option. A common misconception with puffy jackets is that they are strictly casual. With new embellishments and quilted patterns, puffy jackets are becoming dressier. It is a new trend for this season, so be sure to jump on this bandwagon. Warning: Don’t wear puffy vests. We are too old to look like we just walked out of Abercrombie & Fitch.

REGISTER NOW for

LEADER SUMMIT 2013! A leadership conference – on campus!

SATURDAY, JAN. 26th 9:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Join us

for holiday shopping ng to benefit United Way of Norman 11-1, TODAY Student Studen Media, Copeland Hall

> Registration form and $15 due by 5 p.m. Dec. 14th. > Includes t-shirt, light breakfast, lunch, snacks and program. Get inspired. Get involved. Presented by

Masonic Fraternity of Oklahoma More information: leadandvolunteer.ou.edu visit OMU 249-253 or call 405-325-4020

featuring g in independent representatives of:

For accommodations on the basis of a disability, please call 325-2521.

oud-2012-11-28-a-008.indd 1

11/27/12 8:53:17 PM


Wednesday, November 28, 2012