Page 1

The University of Oklahoma’s independent student voice since 1916

T U E S DAY, O C T O B E R 2 3 , 2 012

W W W.O U DA I LY.C O M

Opinion: Does OU discriminate against white applicants in its admissions? (Page 3)

2 011 S I LV E R C R O W N W I N N E R

BIG TIMe SOONeRS

Section: Sooner posts key to success (Page 6)

STUDeNT AFFAIRS

OU accused of discrimination Study looks at law, undergraduate, medical school data LINDSEY RUTA Campus Editor

A research organization devoted to national racial issues, including education, accused the university of discrimination in its admissions process in a study released Monday morning. The Center for Equal Opportunity, a self-described

conservative think tank, released a study claiming the university gave preference to less qualified “underrepresented minorities” in admissions to its undergraduate, medical and law schools. The study looked at admission data from the 2005 to 2006 academic school year and compared the medians of standardized test scores and GPA across races. “We looked at test scores and grades and tried to control for as many variables as

we could,” said Roger Clegg, president of the Center for Equal Opportunity. “From that information, we calculated how heavily race and ethnicity were being used.” The study claims during that academic year “OU Law rejected two American Indians, nine Asian Americans, one African American, eight Hispanics and 105 whites despite higher test scores and grades compared to the median African American admittee.”

Clegg said the center used documents requested from the university to accumulate its data. It did not conduct any interviews or talk to admissions officials for context, he said, but it did look at the admission requirements on the website. “It is unfortunate that the university was not contacted or provided an opportunity to participate in the [Center for Equal Opportunity] study,” said Catherine Bishop, vice president for OU Public Affairs

in an email. Bishop said the study has misunderstood the context of the admissions, and had it reached out to the university, officials could have clarified the admission decisions. “We’re an independent organization and this is an independent study,” Clegg said in response. The university was aware the center was requesting the documents, he said, and the

New local director to take over nonprofit Group to build makeshift homes at Build-a-Thon MELODIE LETTKEMAN Campus Reporter

After 10 years of helping people build new lives for themselves, OU’s Center for Student Advancement director is leaving her post as president of Cleveland County’s Habitat for Humanity chapter. Lisa Portwood soon will step down to give newer board members the exAstRud Reed/tHe dAiLy perience needed to run the organiza- Ryan Puckett, construction science senior, hands off a compressed earth block (CeB) to Norman North Highschool tion. Most members only have been GeMS Club member, Andrea Rodriguez, on Saturday that will be used to build a sustainable Habitat for Humanity and on the board for less than a year, she School of Architecture home. said. “I need to take a couple ‘me’ years,” awareness rather than raisSTUDENT LIFE Portwood said. ing money, but organization AT A GLANCE Portwood leaves the organization around plan to raise an GeT INVOLVeD Week-long event members its 40th build, which is something to be celamount between $2,000 ebrated among chapters of similar sizes, she seeks to spread and $4,000, psychology ou Habitat for Humanity meetings said. Portwood said she’s glad to leave while junior and organization awareness for 9 p.m. Mondays the organization is doing so well. president Brianna versteeg “That’s what people dream of,” Portwood local nonprofit said. dale Hall, Room 103 said. during Build-a-thon, stuou Habitat for The organization’s ability to overcome dent organizations will each Humanity’s annual or register to be a volunteer through difficulties has made it a stronger organizabuild makeshift homes from shack-a-thon event the county chapter’s website tion, and that’s not an easy task considering supplies like cardboard has undergone a name Source: Brianna Versteeg, student organization’s president how many Norman nonprofit organizations change and become part and duct tape and inhabit seek funding, she said. the constructions until 10 of a larger, week-long Habitat for Humanity helps low-income event as the ou’s Habitat p.m., according to a press families find homes by building affordable benefits, she said, one of which is close to release. the organizations for Humanity chapter houses, according to the organization’s her heart: the opportunity for education. attempts to spread more will raise money throughout website. Families who are approved must the day while they build the awareness. make a down payment and monthly morthouses, and students will Melodie Lettkeman the group’s Act! gage payments and help build their own melodie.lettkeman-1@ou.edu be able to donate to their speak! Build! Week house as well as the houses of other apfavorite house during the started Monday and proved families. The organization uses the event. includes Build-a-thon, mortgage payments to fund the developstudents also can make shack-a-thon’s new SEE MORE ONLINE ment of new houses. $10 donations by texting alias, as well as a set of “The families put in their own blood, visit oudaily.com “house” to 52000. other events during the sweat and tears into these homes,” for the complete story week. Portwood said. India Maxwell, Campus the group seeks to oudaily.com/News The opportunity to own a home has many Reporter focus on spreading

ROUNDTABLe

Turkey trying to end Student attacks on civilians Media 30,000 killed by Syrian regime, Akyol said JENNA BIELMAN Campus Reporter A p ro m i n e nt Tu rk i s h journalist spoke to students about the reality of the situation in Syria and the influence of Turkey as a whole Monday afternoon. Mustafa Akyol addressed the ongoing issues in Syria because of its secular dictatorships and how Turkey is trying to help the situation. The symposium, “The War in Syria: Turkey’s Role,” was held in Oklahoma Memorial U n i o n ’s Me a c ha m Auditorium. Akyo, who spoke at OU last year, said he decided

oud-2012-10-23-a-001,002.indd 1

to return this year to speak on a different topic that he said was relevant to current events. He pointed out that most of the dictatorships are not Islamic and said in actuality they suppress the Islamic groups. Akyol said a democracy is what is “painfully” lacking in Syria and it’s difficult for a democracy and a secular dictatorship to coexist. “ Th e p ro b l e m i s t hat 30,000 people have been killed by Syrian regime forces,” Akyol said. “In the past few months, Syrian airplanes were being used to drop barrels of dynamite into neighborhoods to teach them a lesson. There see LECTURE pAGe 2

delays discussion Imagine the Future set back because of surveys LINDSEY RUTA Campus Editor

The release of a campuswide survey has delayed the final roundtable that is part of an ongoing study to determine the future of campus media. The fourth roundtable for the Imagine the Future: Campus Media in a Digital Age has been postponed. The discussion was scheduled for Wednesday but has

been delayed indefinitely, said Brian Ringer, director of Student Media. The delay is credited to the delay in the campus-wide survey, which was released Friday, Oklahoma Daily adviser Judy Gibbs Robinson said. “[The survey] took a lot longer to get out the door,” she said. The survey originally was supposed to be sent out by email Oct. 1. The the final roundtable discussion’s goal is to be able to present students with potential scenarios and allow them to give feedback, Robinson said. Without the input from the surveys, those scenarios could not be developed, she said.

Lindsey Ruta lruta@ou.edu

SEE MORE ONLINE visit oudaily.com for the complete story oudaily.com/news

OU to promote scholarly research OU participating in Open Access Week for first time ARIANNA PICKARD Campus Reporter

see STUDY pAGe 2

HABITAT FOR HUMANITy

GUeST SPeAkeR

OPeN ACCeSS

Amp up your rhythm L&A: owners of local vintage store Anty shanty opened their new music business Ampy shanty in downtown norman a couple of weeks ago.

For the first time ever OU Libraries are participating in Open Access Week this week to promote the free use of information for scholarly research. Open Access Week is an opportunity for the academic and research community to learn about the benefits of having open access to scholarly research and the rights to using that research, according to openaccessweek.org. Universities and research institutes have used this week to give faculty a chance to vote on campus open-access policies, to report on the benefits of open access and to commit new funds to support open-access publication. “Open Access makes the results of scholarly research freely availabile to anyone, anywhere, with an Internet connection,” said Cecelia Brown, director of the OU School of Library and Information Studies. OU Libraries has created a resource guide for faculty members, librarians and research funders to educate them about what they can do to promote open access. There is a display about open access on the main floor of Bizzell Memorial Library, and the library will also hold a webinar about copyright laws from 1:30-3 p.m, according to the OU Libraries website. Although Open Access Week has been held globally every year for the past five years, OU Libraries public relations director Sarah Robbins said OU libraries has never participated in it. B row n s a i d t h e O U School of Library and Information Studies has not done anything for open access week in the see WEEK pAGe 2

Oklahoma would benefit from a third party Opinion: the state’s restrictions on thirdparty participation let main party’s become complacent. (Page 3)

Coming next week THE CHALLENGING TASK OF REPORTING AND PUNISHING

SEX CRIMES A special report from The Daily

A three-part, in-depth series

Addressing sexual assault is complicated because people who commit crimes don’t always go to prison, and the needs of survivors aren’t always met. While ou offers resources for support and justice, it isn’t free of problems. (In next week’s Daily)

VOL. 98, NO. 48 © 2012 OU Publications Board FREE — Additional copies 25¢

INSIDE TODAY campus......................2 clas si f ie ds................4 L i f e & A r t s .................. 5 o p inio n..................... 3 spor ts........................6 visit OUDaily.com for more

Facebook

facebook.com/oudaily

Twitter

twitter.com/oudaily

10/22/12 10:22:27 PM


2

• Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Campus

Lindsey Ruta, campus editor Chase Cook and Jake Morgan, assistant editors dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com • Twitter: @OUDaily

Lecture: Turkey a success in democracy Continued from page 1

Today around campus Free cake will be given out by Union Programming Board from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in Oklahoma Memorial Union’s first floor lobby. A concert by professor Jeongwon Ham’s piano student will hold from noon to 12:30 p.m. in Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art’s Sandy Bell Gallery. Mid Day Music, sponsored by Union Programming Board, will be held from noon to 1 p.m. in Oklahoma Memorial Union’s food court. Dillon Gourd will play the piano. A Career Services workshop titled “Careers with the Central Intelligence Agency” will be held from 1 to 2 p.m and 4 to 5 p.m.. in Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Crimson Room. A CIA representative will discuss career opportunities within the CIA and answer questions for students. A Student Success Series Seminar titled “How to Prepare and Apply to Graduate School” will be held from 3 to 4 p.m. in Lissa and Cy Wagner Hall, Room 245.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24 Reference assistance will be provided by OU Libraries from 10 a.m. to noon in Rawl Engineering Practice Facility’s IT lab and Adams Hall, Room 110. Do you want to see your organization’s campus event here? Visit OUDaily.com/events/submit to add your entry.

Record requests The Oklahoma Daily regularly asks for access to public information from OU officials. Here is a list of the most-recent requests our reporters have submitted to the university. Requested document and purpose

Date requested

The 2003 purchase and sale agreement between University North Park LLC and OU — To see the contents and property involved in this purchase agreement.

Sept. 24

A database or electronic document of registered vehicle of students, staff and faculty with OU Parking Services for spring 2012 — To see how and how many people register with OU’s parking services.

Sept. 24

Contract regarding purchase of 146 Page St. — To see the details of the contract, such as the price of the purchase and OU’s plan for the property.

Sept. 24

Visit OUDaily.com/openrecords for a full list of requests

is a stalemate in Syria, and unless the world does do something the stalemate will go on.” Akyol said Turkey has made attempts to tr y to make peace in Syria to stop the attacks on civilians. After the discussion, Akyol answered a few questions that were submitted by the audience on note cards. Arabic and economics sophomore Daniel Meschter said he came to the symposium because of his interest in the Turkish perspective Akyol would bring. “What brought me out here was the concern for Syria and the situation in

Corrections

In Monday’s story “Dog Day Afternoon,” the Campus Corner Merchant’s Association was called the Campus Corner Association. Visit OUDaily.com/corrections for an archive of our corrections

HOW TO CONTACT Us Newsroom office: 405-325-3666

To report news: dailynews@ou.edu

Advertising office: 405-325-8964

Letters to the editor: dailyopinion@ou.edu

Business office: 405-325-2521

Editor in chief: dailyeditor@ou.edu

JENKINS MEDICAL CLINIC CALL FOR APPOINTMENT OR WALK-IN 755 South Jenkins Ave. (two blocks north of Boyd) Norman, OK Phone: (405) 701-2420 Fax: (405) 701-2447

oud-2012-10-23-a-001,002.indd 2

Syria as a whole as a human rights issue because people are dying due to sectarian conflict is a relic of a more barbarous world,” Meschter said. “And I was really curious as to how the Turkish perspective on this

study: Ballot initiative reason for focus on OU Continued from page 1 center is very public about what they study. Bishop said despite the allegations, race is not a criteria considered in admission to OU. “During the time frame considered in the report, undergraduate admission at OU was based on certain published, objective minimum criteria,” she said. This means applicants were judged solely on quantifiable measures — such as their standardized test scores, GPA and class rank. A student who meets the minimum requirement of all three categories never has been denied acceptance to the university, Bishop said, and furthermore no one has been denied on account of their race. Admission to OU’s professional schools, such as law or medical, also is primarily based on objective criteria, but it does take a more holistic approach — which is required by their accrediting bodies, she said. The holistic approach focuses on personal history, including

problem might play out be- and Interfaith Dialogue cause Turkey is a success- Student Association. ful democracy in the largely Muslim Middle East.” The event was jointly Jenna Bielman jenna.bielman-1@ou.edu sponsored by the Center for Middle East Studies, Institute of Interfaith Dialog

BY THE NUMBERS OU Population Breakdown

volunteerism, personal challenges and work experience, Bishop said. The Center for Equal Opportunity has conducted studies of other universities, Clegg said, but its recent focus on OU is because of the upcoming ballot initiative regarding affirmative action in the state. State Question 759 will give Oklahomans the opportunity to vote on whether to ban affirmative action in state education, employment and contracting. “We’ve always thought that it was particularly important to do studies of universities in states where the citizens are about to vote on a ballot initiative because we think it’s important for the citizens in the state to know to what extent race and ethnicity are being used in admissions by public schools, “ he said. The center has been working on this study since 2008 when the ballot initiative was first discussed, Clegg said. “But of course it turned out that the measure did not actually appear on the ballot until this year and it also turned out

5.9%

Editor’s Note: In 2010, the federal government implemented the new categories of Pacific Islander, Two or More Races and Not Reported. These categories, which had no previous data, makes up the other 16.6 percent.

5%

African American

5.2%

62.4% Caucasian

4.9%

Asian

Hispanic

Source: 2012 Factbook

American Indian

that it took us longer to get the data than we wanted,” he said. “Once we had all the data, it didn’t take too long to do the study, but then the problem was getting the measure on the ballot.” Clegg said the center was not actually involved in getting the initiative on this year’s ballot. The center requested documents from the 2005 to 2006 academic school year because at the time was requesting, it was the most recent data available, Clegg said. Usually it likes to examine more than one year to avoid outliers, he said, but he offered no explanation as to why the center did not request more documents as they became available.

Clegg said the center will not release the documents it received from the university to the public, but he encourages anyone interested to request the documents from the university themselves. Bishop said the university is following the Fisher v. The University of Texas at Austin Supreme Court case closely and will review its admissions process pending the ruling. Lindsey Ruta lruta@ou.edu

OUDaily.com To read the Center for Equality Opportunity’s study, visit us online at oudaily.com/news

Week: Research access benefits staff, students Continued from page 1

The Oklahoma Daily is committed to serving readers with accurate coverage and welcomes your comments about information that may require correction or clarification. To contact us with corrections, email us at dailynews@ou.edu.

evin morrison/the daily

Turkey journalist Mustafa Akyol delivers his lecture title “The War In Syria: Turkey’s Role” on Monday in Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Meacham Auditorium

past either. This year, Rick Luce, the new dean of OU Libraries, pushed OU Libraries to get involved with Open Access Week, Brown said. Luce was selected to serve as dean of OU Libraries in July, according to the OU Libraries’ website. “We have a new dean, so we’re using that as our opportunity to start the conversation [about open access] on campus,” Robbins said. Having free access to scholarly research is important to the university setting because it makes faculty research more accessible to students, Robbins said. Brown said free access to scholarly research will help libraries that have to pay high prices for journal subscriptions. Bringing down the cost will allow for wider

distribution of scholarly research and creative activities, and the availability not only promotes life-long learning, but it also provides direct access for patients and their families to literature relating to medical condition, she said. Open access also would benefit OU faculty and students who depend on scholarly research for their own studies, teaching or research. “Open access has the potential to increase the visibility and impact of OU faculty members’ research and creative works and to increase access to the results of research and scholarly activity from all over the world for OU students, faculty members and researchers,” Brown said.

AT A GLANCE Agencies that support open access National Science Foundation — Beginning Jan. 18, 2011, all researchers who submit proposals to the NSF must include a “Data Management Plan” describing how the proposal will conform to NSF’s policy on the dissemination and sharing of research results. Proposals that do not include a plan will not be able to be submitted. National Institute of Health — In 2007, George W. Bush implemented a public access policy requiring all NIH-funded researchers to submit an electronic version of their final, peer-reviewed manuscripts to the National Library of Medicine’s openly accessible repository, PubMed Central. National Endowment for the Humanities — has an Open-Government Web page they provide information about the agency’s work to make it more transparent and provide a place where the public can participate in the Endowment’s work. Source: agency websites

Arianna Pickard arianna.j.pickard-1@ou.edu

Everybody is talking about...

Indian Bistro

580 Ed Noble Parkway Cross from Barnes & Noble 405-579-5600

Open 7 days a week!

Lunch Buffet 11am - 3pm

So fresh!

Classy

Delicious Yummy

Dinner:

Sun.-Thurs.

5-10pm

Fri.-Sat.

5-11pm

More please.

misalofindia.com

10/22/12 10:22:31 PM


Tuesday, October 23, 2012 •

OPINION

3

Mary Stanfield, opinion editor Kayley Gillespie, assistant editor dailyopinion@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/opinion • Twitter: @OUDailyOpinion

THUMBS UP: For the first time, OU Libraries will celebrate Open Access Week this week to bring attention to academic publishing that makes content available for free. (Page 1)

EDITORIAL

OU admissions fair to applicants of all races Our View: Study showing racial discrimination in

“stereotype threat,” the effects of white privelege and OU admissions is flawed. deep structural inequalities. It’s clear some of these are indeed factors, but Editor’s note: In this editorial, we focus solely on comparisons we’re not in a position to determine which and in between black and white students not to present race as a binary, what proportion. We can say three things for certain: but to analyze the conclusions of this particular study. 1. The gap in test scores and GPAs exists. 2. This gap cannot be blamed on deficiencies in Does OU unfairly favor students from minority individual students. racial and ethnic backgrounds in its admissions 3. This gap is caused by one or more systemic decisions? If you read the report released Monday educational or cultural problems. by the self-described conservative think tank the The U.S. must work to address these systematic Center for Equal Opportunity, you might think so. issues. But until they are resolved, universities like But this study draws misleading conclusions from OU must take this difference into account. And flawed data missing important context. studies like a recent one from the Journal of Blacks The center’s study concludes OU gives preferrential treatment to African Americans — and in Higher Education show when they do, black to a lesser extent Native Americans — in admissions students at the nation’s best medical and law schools decisions. Specifically, the study aims this criticism have nearly perfect graduation rates and similar achievements to their white peers. at the College of Law and the College of Medicine OU is doing a good job of accounting for these primarily, and at undergraduate admissions. differences fairly. The center’s report shows OU’s This conclusion is based on the difference in median standardized median LSAT score for white students in the year The Our View examined was 159, while the median score for black is the majority test scores and GPAs in students students was 153. The gap between these scores is opinion of admitted from different races. The The Daily’s much smaller than that between national averages. data in the report does show the nine-member Both median scores are higher than the national median LSAT scores and GPAs editorial board of black students admitted to the average for LSAT scores, and the black students’ median score is significantly higher (11 points) than medical, legal and undergraduate the national average for black test-takers. programs are lower than those of admitted white When national differences are taken into account, students (assuming the center correctly interpreted the data, which we have not yet been able to verify). OU is actually holding black applicants to a higher standard. It requires black students to score However, there are several flaws: significantly more points above the national average Lacking context: for black test-takers than white applicants must Let’s assume, despite the statistical problems, score above the average for white test-takers. the study’s results are accurate: black students are Some of these flaws come from the fact that the admitted with lower standardized test scores and center failed to give OU a chance to clarify the claims GPAs than whites. made in this study, Vice President for OU Public These numbers are cited with no recognition of Affairs Catherine Bishop said in an email. It’s a the significant racial differences in national scores. shame the center failed to seek context for the data it The average LSAT score for test-takers of any race has so misleadingly represented. for the last seven years is 151 (on a scale Of course, it’s clear why it didn’t. The of 120-180), according to a report from center’s president, Roger Clegg, told MORE ONLINE the Law School Admissions Council. The Daily the center began this study Study’s flaws The report shows white test-takers because of the upcoming Oklahoma nationally score near this score, with an ballot initiative on affirmative action Go to OUDaily.com average of 153. to read additional and waited to release the results until flaws with the study. But black students nationally score now in order to influence voters. much lower, with an average of 142. The Though the center represents this as same holds true for MCAT scores. a serious study, it’s clear the only intent Obviously, this is not because of some natural was to misuse facts and ignore context in order difference in ability. So what causes this gap? to provide support for a pre-determined political The score gap has been blamed on many things: stance. Don’t let this intentionally misleading study problems with the test itself, disproportionate sway your vote on State Question 759. rates of poverty, community secondary education standards, cultural differences, the pressure of Comment on this on OUDaily.com

To cast your vote, log on to COLUMN

Misconceptions about anarchists fuel unjust raids EDITOR’S NOTE: Jason Byas is vice president of the Students for a Stateless Society.

D

Scott Houser is a international business senior.

Jason Byas is a philosophy senior.

The Oklahoma Daily is a public forum, the University of Oklahoma’s independent student voice and an entirely student-run publication.

Laney Ellisor Jared Rader Lindsey Ruta Kedric Kitchens Carmen Forman Mary Stanfield

Editor in Chief Managing Editor Campus Editor Sports Editor Life & Arts Editor Opinion Editor

contact us

160 Copeland Hall, 860 Van Vleet Oval Norman, OK 73019-2052

oud-2012-10-23-a-003.indd 1

OPINION COLUMNIST

consider the policy of auditing the Federal Reserve until the libertarian right made it an issue. Unfortunately, if you are an Oklahoman citizen, you do not get to participate. This is because Oklahoma has the toughest ballot access laws in the country. In order for third-party candidates to gain access to the Oklahoma ballot, they must file a petition with an unreasonable number of signatures. The number is not the same every year but can be anywhere between 50,000 and 70,000. This is 10 times higher than what is required of third-party candidates in the majority of states. In addition, Oklahoma is one of only five states to not have a write-in option on the ballot. Together, these rules make Oklahoma the least friendly state in the union for third-party candidates. Ballot access reform in Oklahoma is absolutely necessary for third parties and their supporters to effectively engage in democracy. For now, the only option for third-party supporters in Oklahoma simply is to abstain from voting. Abstaining from voting can affect elections. Low voter turnout can convey disillusionment with mainstream candidates creating a need for policy readjustment. However, it often is hard to measure how many people are refusing to vote as a means of protest in comparison to those who are not voting simply because they are apathetic or lazy.

Okla. two-party system needs a third

W

Should third-party candidates be allowed to participate in presidential debates?

uring May Day demonstrations, an unknown group in all black Jason Byas descended upon the jason.l.byas-1@ou.edu William Kenzo Nakamura courthouse in Seattle, shattering windows. Months later, the incident is being used to fuel a witch hunt against anarchists in the northwest. Bursting into homes across Seattle, Olympia, Washington, and Portland with battering rams and flash grenades, the FBI has subpoenaed and arrested several activists to stand before a grand jury. Among the items seized in the investigations were black clothing and anarchist literature. Grand juries are different from normal legal proceedings in that they take place in private, with defendants not even allowed to bring their attorney. One of the subpoenaed defendants stated the grand jury was being used as a “tool of political repression.” He and others have therefore decided to protest the hearings by refusing to cooperate, saying “our passion for freedom is stronger than the state’s prisons. Our refusal to cooperate with the grand jury is a reflection of our own desires for a liberated world and our support for others who are working to bring that world into being.” Resisters emphasize they are not condoning the vandalism but condemning the way the investigations are being used. The focus is on protecting those defendants being targeted for political reasons, some of whom claim they weren’t even in Seattle at the time. What is most alarming is what the raids show about how the FBI continues to harass political activists. Anarchists themselves, though, are the least surprised. The situation was “entirely characteristic of the apparatus of State justice. Because it’s a monopoly, it tends towards abuse,” said Grayson English, anthropology freshman and president of OU’s chapter of Students for a Stateless Society. English also made a point to note he did not support actions like those taken at the courthouse. That said, the ordeal shows how far public fear of anarchists goes — and what it can be used to justify. Zac Smith, journalism senior and anarchist student, noted the government’s case “depends on the majority of the public to stay indifferent because the people being targeted are radicals.” That this paranoia can be turned into a weapon is something anarchists have long been aware of, and it has to do with how anarchists are characterized to the public. A lot of people “tend to see anarchists as Joker-like agents of chaos and discord,” said Cody Franklin, political science and philosophy junior and anarchist. Franklin said this characterization is odd, seeing as “historically, state armies have been responsible for the majority of the bloodshed, systematic rape, starvation, oppression, etc., that our species has experienced. Scientists had studied the atom for some time, but it took a government to turn years of research into the most potent weapon to which history has ever had to bear witness.” Perhaps investigators would benefit from reading the books seized from defendants’ homes. Because as English pointed out, “having seen ‘anarchist literature’ myself, it isn’t typically about destruction. It’s about the philosophical arguments against the legitimacy of the State, and for the existence of peaceful alternatives to the State.” One might even say through a particularly dark bit of irony, the FBI inadvertently has proven the very point one of the anarchist defendants made in their joint statement to the public: “If we want real safety, and real justice, we need to begin creating liberatory alternatives to the state’s institutions.” As an anarchist, I can testify that a large part of the problem is a mass misunderstanding of what we actually believe. I agree with English when he stated “I hate the State, but I hate it because it is ineffective at implementing justice, not because I hate justice.” The society anarchists seek “isn’t one of unending violence and chaos,” as English said, but one of “peaceful cooperation and human flourishing.”

COLUMN

OPINION COLUMNIST ithin the last decade, it has become increasingly evident the Republican and Democratic parties may not have the solutions necessary to move our country in a positive direction. Neither party Scott Houser seems willing to seriously scott.a.houser-1@ou.edu consider the pressing issues, such as our staggering national debt, our continued unjustified and expensive military presence around the globe, and the insustainability of federal entitlement programs like Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid. What republican and democratic legislators have been able to agree on is even worse. Under the National Defense Authorization Act, passed by cooperation between the parties, American citizens now can be indefinitely detained. In addition, the TSA has been allowed to run wild under both parties, continually receiving more expensive, invasive and unnecessary equipment at the expense of tax payers — and receiving little to no oversight in return. Fortunately, we live in a democracy. Though the country may function as a two-party system in practice, third parties are always an option. When third parties gain popularity with respect to the dominate two, it creates incentives for the two dominant parties to consider or adopt the policies of the third party. For example, the Republican Party did not

?

» Poll question of the day

Kingsley Burns Joey Stipek Kyle Margerum Kearsten Jono Greco Howland Judy Kearsten Gibbs Howland Robinson Judy Gibbs Robinson

phone:

405-325-3666

Visual Editor Online Editor Night Copy Editor Chief Advertising Copy Manager Chief Advertising FacultyManager Adviser Faculty Adviser

email:

dailynews@ou.edu

Letters should concentrate on issues, not personalities, and must be fewer than 250 words, typed and signed by the author(s). Letters will be edited for accuracy, space and style. Students must list their major and classification. To submit letters, email dailyopinion@ou.edu. Our View is the voice of the Editorial Board, which consists of nine student editors. The board meets at 5 p.m. Sunday to Thursday in 160 Copeland Hall. Board meetings are open to the public.

Guest columns are accepted and printed at the editor’s discretion. Columnists’ and cartoonists’ opinions are their own and not necessarily the views or opinions of The Oklahoma Daily Editorial Board. To advertise advertise ininThe TheOklahoma OklahomaDaily, Daily,contact contact advertising advertising manager managerKearsten KearstenHowland Howard by calling 405-325-8964 405-325-8964 or oremailing emailingdailyads@ou.edu. dailyads@ou.edu. One free copy of The Daily is available to members of the OU community. Additional copies may be purchased for 25 cents by contacting The Daily business office at 405-325-2522.

10/22/12 10:14:39 PM


4

• Tuesday, October 23, 2012

CLASSIFIEDS C Transportation

PLACE AN AD Phone: 405-325-2521 E-mail: classifieds@ou.edu

Fax: 405-325-7517 Campus Address: COH 149A

DEADLINES

AUTO INSURANCE

Place line ad by 9:00 a.m. 3 business days prior to publication.

Auto Insurance Foreign Students Welcomed JIM HOLMES INSURANCE, 321-4664

Place your display, classified display or classified card ads by 5:00 p.m. 3 business days prior to publication.

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES MAID SERVICE Call 928-8585

PAYMENT r

TUTOR TM

Need help with writing, proof reading, or editing? Contact Leigh Anne Donovan at 312-2299.

Payment is required at the time the ad is placed. Credit cards, cash, money orders or local checks accepted.

RATES Line Ad

There is a 2 line minimum charge; approximately 42 characters per line, including spaces and punctuation. (Cost = Days x # lines x $/line) 10-14 days.........$1.15/line 15-19 days.........$1.00/line 20-29 days........$ .90/line 30+ days ........ $ .85/line

1 day ..................$4.25/line 2 days ................$2.50/line 3-4 days.............$2.00/line 5-9 days.............$1.50/line

Classified Display, Classified Card Ad or Game Sponsorship

Contact an Acct Executive for details at 325-2521. 2 col (3.25 in) x 2 inches Sudoku ..............$760/month Boggle ...............$760/month Horoscope ........$760/month

2 col (3.25 in) x 2.25 inches Crossword ........$515/month

POLICY The Oklahoma Daily is responsible for one day’s incorrect advertising. If your ad appears incorrectly, or if you wish to cancel your ad call 3252521, before the deadline for cancellation in the next issue. Errors not the fault of the advertiser will be adjusted. Refunds will not be issued for late cancellations. The Oklahoma Daily will not knowingly accept advertisements that discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, religious preference, national origin or sexual orientation. Violations of this policy should be reported to The Oklahoma Daily Business Office at 325-2521. Help Wanted ads in The Oklahoma Daily are not to separate as to gender. Advertisers may not discriminate in employment ads based on race, color, religion or gender unless such qualifying factors are essential to a given position.

™ & Š 2003 The Jim Henson Company

All ads are subject to acceptance by The Oklahoma Daily. Ad acceptance may be re-evaluated at any time.

W L Q Z P K I P W N G D K W N X O A X H D Q L

E B R S L Q P A Z M N E U H R Y A L W O O T P

S M B C D G J A T Q Z P K I P W N G D K W N X

O A X H D Q L N B R S L Q P A Z M Q Z P K I P

W N G D K W N N O A X H D Q L E B R S L Q P A

Z M Q R P K I O W N G D K W N X O A X H D Q L

HELP WANTED

Gymnastics Instructors for pre-school girls and boys classes, tumbling, P/T, flex sched. Bart Conner Gymnastics, 4477500. Research volunteers needed! Researchers at OU Health Sciences Center need healthy volunteers ages 18 to 30 who have a parent with or without a history of an alcohol or drug problem. Qualified participants will be compensated for their time. Call (405) 456-4303 to learn more about the study and to see if you qualify. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution.

Services

Display Ad ............................................................................3 days prior Classified Display or Classified Card Ad

Being

HELP WANTED

Quotations Anytime

Line Ad ..................................................................................3 days prior

s r

classifieds@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-2521

E B R O L Q P U Z M Q Z P K I P W N G D K W N

Looking for a fast pace and upbeat job?! CAYMAN’S seeks PT giftwrapper/stock room assistant. Flexible Hrs. Apply in person: 2001 W. Main Street. CALL 360-3969.

X O J O B S Q N E B R S L Q P A Z M Q Z P K I

P W N M D K W C X O A X H D J O B S R S L Q P

A Z M M Z P K E P W N G D K W N X O A X H D Q

L E B A U T O M O B I L E S K I P W N G D K W

N X O T X H D E L E B O S L Q P A Z M Q Z P K

I P W E G D K N N X O S X H D Q L E B R S L Q

P A Z S Q Z P T I P W T G D K W N X O A X H D

Find them in the classifieds

By Bernice Bede Osol

Copyright 2012, Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2012 LIVE YOUR DREAMS Pass It On. www.forbetterlife.org

COLLEGE SKI & BOARD WEEK

Every Tuesday

Free Pizza

at 8:30pm

breckenridge

Vail • Beaver Creek • Keystone • Arapahoe Basin

20 Mountains. 5 Resorts. 1 Price.

Worship

at 9pm

FROM ONLY

plus t/s the united methodist ministry at the university of oklahoma

WWW.UBSKI.COM

1-800-SKI-WILD • 1-800-754-9453

428 West Lindsey (Corner of Lindsey and Elm) For more information, visit: okwesley.org

        

  



  

               

Previous Solution                                                                        

Monday- Very Easy Tuesday-Easy Wednesday- Easy Thursday- Medium Friday - Hard

Instructions: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. That means that no number is repeated in any row, column or box.

oud-2012-10-23-a-004.indd 1

        

A number of welcome changes are likely to be in the offing for you in the year ahead. Many of them will occur automatically, but you or someone who has a big influence over your life will orchestrate a lot of the other transformations. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Be mindful of all those little incidental expenditures when socializing with friends who are in better shape financially than you are. Trying to keep up could put you down. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Have faith in those to whom you delegate some important assignments. If you insist upon looking over their shoulders and analyzing their every move, you’ll hurt their performance. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Be a bit skeptical of some insider information regardless of its source, because it could easily be overrated. Don’t take everything that is told to you as the gospel truth. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Treating others in a generous fashion is a commendable attribute, but don’t be stupid about it, either. Just because someone has his or her hand out it doesn’t mean they deserve anything. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -Don’t try to achieve an objective in a piecemeal fashion. In order to be successful, you’ll need to coordinate your efforts so that you don’t trip over your own feet. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -Usually you’re not such a gullible

person that you believe everything you hear, yet today, if you’re not careful, you could be used as a conduit for some damaging misinformation. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Even if you believe you have some excellent financial advice to offer another, keep it to yourself. Should the person misuse what you say and suffer a loss, you’ll be blamed. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Don’t get upset if it becomes impossible to sway a supposedly key person to your view in a controversial matter. You’ll end up counting your blessings in the long run. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Instead of looking for shortcuts, it behooves you to operate along conventional lines. Easy ways out won’t enhance your effectiveness --they’ll only detract from it. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -Expenditures that require a large cash outlay aren’t likely to cause you any kind of problem. Strangely, however, when dealing with the nickel- and-dime stuff, you could get into trouble.

celebrate.

PAID EGG DONORS. All Races needed. Non-smokers, Ages 18-27, SAT>1100/ACT>24/GPA>3.00 Contact: info@eggdonorcenter.com Community After School Program is now taking applications for part-time staff to work in our school-age childcare programs in Norman Public Schools. Hours: M-F 2:30pm - 6:00pm. Closed for all Norman Public School holidays and professional days. Competitive wages starting at $7.25/hour. Higher pay for students with qualifying coursework in education, early childhood, recreation and related fields. Complete application online at www.caspinc.org.

STUDENTPAYOUTS.COM Paid survey takers needed in Norman 100% FREE to join. Click on Surveys.

HOROSCOPE Eats flies. Dates a pig. Hollywood star.

$5,500-$10,000

NUMBER ONE is nothing to This year, more than 163,000 people will die from lung cancer—making it America’s

NUMBER ONE cancer killer.

But new treatments offer hope. Join Lung Cancer Alliance in the fight against this disease. lungcanceralliance.org

Q L E B R S L S P A Z & Q Z P K I P W N G D K

W N X O A X H D Q L E F R S L Q P A Z M Q Z P

K I P W N G D K W N X O A X H D Q L E B R S L

Q P A Z M Q Z P K I P U N G D K W A X O A X H

D Q L E B R S L Q R E N T A L S K P P W N G D

K W N X O A X H D Q L D B R S L Q A A Z M Q Z

P K I P W N G D K W N X O A X H D R L E B R S

L Q P A Z M Q Z P K I P W N G D K T N X O A X

H D Q L E B R S L Q P A Z M Q Z P M I P W N G

D K W N X O A X H D Q L E B R S P E T S Z M Q

Z P K I P W N G D K W N X O A X H N Q L E B R

S B I C Y C L E S P K I P W N G D T W N X O A

X H D Q L E B R S L Q P A Z M Q Z S K I P W N

G D K W N X O A X H D Q L E B R S K Q P A Z M

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker October 23, 2012

ACROSS 1 Shorts supports 5 Striker’s substitute 9 Boot out 14 Diva’s opera delivery 15 Fine-tune 16 Porsche propeller 17 Disagreeably damp 18 Jannings of old films 19 Uninviting, to a vegan 20 Store for future use 23 Diner’s prerogative 24 It divides to multiply 25 Bathtub ring gunk 29 FBI guy 30 Tenth mo. 32 “___ seen worse� 33 Given new life 36 Immodestly brag about 38 Rounded molding 39 Marine mayday 40 Perfect in all ways 41 Eat hastily 43 Tropical fly 44 Rap sheet letters 45 Relaxing resort 46 Byte parts 47 Nitti nemesis 49 Have staying power 51 ___ de 10/23

Cologne 54 Goof off 57 To whom a Muslim prays 60 Bibliographical abbreviation 61 Suitable for cacti, environmentally 62 Sphere of influence 63 Fishing eagle 64 Opposite of none 65 Siamese sobs 66 Shoddy clothing 67 Peter I, for one DOWN 1 Possessed, in the Bible 2 Gulf War soldier 3 Locker room photo, perhaps 4 Japanese rice wine 5 Tank type 6 Adman’s lure 7 Oldwomanish 8 Beats a dead horse 9 Austen novel 10 Kids in pouches 11 Schedule letters 12 Barracks bed 13 Take a shot 21 Muzzle

loaders 22 Texas city south of Dallas 26 Catlike carnivore with a spotted coat 27 Some eye parts 28 Country music’s Haggard 29 Game on a green 31 Chubby Checker, famously 33 Atkinson of “Mr. Bean� 34 Conjure up 35 Gaucho’s cattlecatchers 36 Jailbird 37 Lyrical tributes 39 More upscale 42 Candid

43 Longwinded rants 46 Giving credence to 48 Petty 50 Actress Winger of “Shadowlands� 51 Continental coins 52 Jung’s feminine component 53 Whence milk comes 55 Units of electrical resistance 56 Brewer’s kiln 57 Furnish with firepower 58 Bruce of martial arts films 59 Perry Mason’s profession

PREVIOUS PUZZLE ANSWER

10/22

Š 2012 Universal Uclick www.upuzzles.com

ANIMAL INSTINCTS By Kathy Islund

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Should you run into someone with whom you recently exchanged hot words, tread lightly. You’ll need to treat this encounter delicately, because it is not fully resolved as yet. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- If you insist upon playing favorites, someone is going to get hurt. Applying double standards when dealing with friends could cause you to end up looking bad.

10/22/12 8:37:57 PM


Tuesday, October 23, 2012 •

LIFE&ARTS

5

Carmen Forman, life & arts editor Westlee Parsons, assistant editor dailyent@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/life&arts • Twitter: @OUDailyArts

“I have quite a few ideas as far as what we could do here, such as live shows, open mics and the like. A room is just a room until you do something with it. And I think we can do some pretty cool things in this place.” Corey Gingerich, Ampy shanty owner

Amp up your rhythm Vintage clothing store owners open used music business after the success of Anty Shanty. Nick Williams

T

Life & Arts Reporter

he owners of the vintage clothing store Anty Shanty opened a new store with a different tune a couple of weeks ago. Ampy Shanty is a small, personable, used music-gear store specializing in guitars, amps, effects pedals and drums. “It wasn’t really this big conscious thing that I’ve been dreaming about for years,” Ampy Shanty owner Corey Gingerich said. “It was really more of an idea that cropped up in my mind as I was walking the streets of downtown Norman, and a short time later I was opening up the store for business.” Gingerich, who is a native of Iowa City, Iowa, drew from a well-developed history of experience in the music industry when considering the idea of starting his own music gear store. While an undergraduate at the University of Iowa, Gingerich started his own music label, which, he said, took off with solid success. After graduating, Gingerich moved to Los Angeles with his wife, Julia, to run his blossoming label. However, as it did for others, the 2008 financial crisis brought a bit of a hiccup for the two, he said. “When the economy really tanked is when I had to

Photos by Heather Brown/The Daily

Ampy Shanty, owned by OU graduate student Corey Gingerich opened Oct. 12 on Main Street. Gingerich and his wife also own a vintage clothing store named Anty Shanty just two blocks west of Ampy Shanty.

go out and get a day job,” Corey said. “Julia, who’s a fashion designer, also wanted to open up a store of her own, and L.A. at the time, was just too expensive of a place to do it.” The couple then faced the decision of where to relocate. Along with Norman, the two considered places, such as Minneapolis and Austin, yet it was Corey

Gingerich’s roots that influenced the two to move to Norman. “I’m from Iowa City, a small liberal arts college town which I really love,” Corey Gingerich said as he looked out Ampy Shanty’s At A glance w indows in dow ntow n Ampy Shanty Norman. “I think that had a big role in coming here.” Where: Julia Gingerich, who also 527 E. Main St. is the owner and operator of local clothing store Anty Hours: Shanty (located at 318 E. Noon to 7 p.m. Main St.), which she has Friday through run for the past year and a Wednesday 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. half, believes the move to on Thursdays Norman has been a good one for both her and her Upcoming Event: husband. Halloween Show “The community here at 8 p.m. on has been really great, both Saturday business-wise and personally,” Julia said. “I definitely love the downtown Norman area, and I know the same goes for Corey.” Corey Gingerich, who is finishing his Master of Business Administration at OU, claims to have a myriad of ideas in store for Ampy Shanty and welcomes more from the public. “I have quite a few ideas as far as what we could do here, such as live shows, open mics and the like,” Corey Gingerich said. “A room is just a room until you do something with it. And I think we can do some pretty cool things in this place.” Nick Williams, nicholas.c.williams-1@ou.edu

Being

NUMBER ONE is nothing to celebrate.

SMILE Bright Smiles Family Dentistry New Patients Welcome Accepting Most Insurance Plans

This year, more than

172,000 people will be diagnosed with lung cancer, and more than 163,000 will die — making it America’s

NUMBER ONE cancer killer.

But new treatments offer hope. Join Lung Cancer Alliance in the fight against this disease.

SPECIALS Bright Smiles Family Dentistry Save over 50% Filling or on Cosmetic Crowns/Veneers

simple/surgical extraction

$1200 $595 $235 $99 50% Off Whitening

*For non-insured *On same day visit

*For non-insured $550 $275

50% Off Exam E xam X-Rays on Whitening and a d Cleaning CSave over 50%

Veneeros $550 $275 $169 $ $16 6Cosmetic $49

*For non-insured

*For non-insured

*Expires November 1, 2012

Eli Jarjoura DDS

lungcanceralliance.org

oud-2012-10-23-a-005.indd 1

224 W. Gray Street, Suite 105 Norman, OK 73069 405.235.3535

10/22/12 8:50:11 PM


6

• Tuesday, October 23, 2012

SPORTS

Kedric Kitchens, sports editor Dillon Phillips, assistant editor dailysports@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/sports • Twitter: @OUDailySports

women’s basketball

OU posts ‘big’ part of team’s success Oklahoma will play through its front court players Kedric Kitchens Sports Editor

After running small for a season or two, the OU women’s basketball team is ready to go big again. A year ago, the Sooners were a very one dimensional team. OU relied heavily, if not exclusively, on its guards — senior Whitney Hand and juniors Morgan Hook and Aaryn Ellenberg particularly — to win games. Those three alone averaged 56 percent of the teams’ scoring per game. This was a major departure for a team that is just a few years removed from the days of the Pa r i s t w i n s dominating the paint in Portia Norman. This year, Durrett however, coach Sherri Coale said her team is going to be much better rounded. “I hope that our attack is more balanced,” Coale said. “In terms of the number of people involved in scoring but also the positions on the floor from which we score.” Hand echoed her coach’s sentiments about her postplayer teammates. “The [forwards and centers] have come a really long way,” she said. Coale said her bigs, specifically junior center Nicole Griffin and sophomore forward Kaylon Williams, are going to surprise people. Griffin, a 6-foot-6 product

from Milwaukee, lined up as the starting center for the Sooners last season, averaging 5.7 points per game and 3.9 rebounds per game. Williams, a 6-foot-3 forward from Midwest City, split time as a starter and backup as a freshman, averaging 4.8 points per game and pulling down 5.2 boards per game. Hand, Ellenberg and Hook all agreed the confidence level the guards have in the post is much higher. “The bigs look totally different,” Ellenberg said. Williams said she appreciated the sentiment from her team and said she believed she was ready to step up to those new expectations. “I think I have improved my playing a lot,” Williams said. “I have a newfound confidence, which is the biggest thing I think.” Coale said she noticed that increased confidence on the court. “[Williams] seemed to make that jump that sometimes kids do between freshman and sophomore year where the fog lifts and everything makes a little more sense,” Coale said. “She was, in practice, much more vocal. And when you are much more vocal that’s usually a result of having a clearer understanding of what you are supposed to do.” Griffin echoed many of William’s sentiments in her own improvement. She said she had specific things in mind to work on, she accomplished her goals and she can hang with any center in the Big 12 – outside maybe AllAmerican Brittney Griner at Baylor.

days. It lowers our margin of error.” Hand, who has dealt with season-ending injuries in her career, said the hardest thing about a player going down is the team’s mentality. “When someone goes down, the hardest thing to say, because you almost feel insensitive, is ‘we have to move on without them’ even though they are still very much a part of the team,” Hand said. Coale and Hand both said it will be a group effort to fill the void. “It’s not one person replacing you,” Hand said. “It’s a lot of people doing things differently.” A major factor in maintaining the strength of the frontcourt will be former junior college All-American junior for ward Portia Durrett, who averaged 15.4 points per game and 7.8 rebounds per game at Walters State (Morristown, Tenn.) Community College last season. “Portia (Durrett) helps a ton,” Coale said. With a ver y winnable schedule ahead of them, the Ben Williams/The daily Sooners will need their bigs Junior center Nicole Griffin at Lloyd Noble Center on Monday. Griffin is the centerpiece of a post that if they want to do big things coach Sherri Coale said the Sooners want to play through. this season. Coale agreed with her two players’ personal assessments. “[Williams] and Nicole (Griffin) were arguably our most improved players over the spring and summer,” Coale said. Griffin said she has gotten a lot better at demanding the ball in the paint, which will help her guards get more

open. Hook said she agreed with Griffin with regard to the guard play. She said her increased confidence in the post allows her and the other perimeter players to play freer. All looked well for a resurgent and dominant frontcourt for the Sooners, but then Williams’ ruptured her

Achilles’ tendon Oct. 16, an injury that will end her Kedric Kitchens kitchens_kedric@ou.edu season and keep her on the sideline for six months. Coale said the biggest impact the loss of Williams UP NEXT will have on her team is the Friday Night Tailgate depth. “We’re thinner,” Coale When: 6 p.m. Friday said. “You can’t be in foul trouble, you can’t be casu- Where: Lloyd Noble Center al, you can’t really have bad

column

Despite high ranking, Irish no match for surging Sooners sports columnist

Garrett Holt spacetothetree@gmail.com

Alabama, Ohio State, Oklahoma, USC. All of these schools can be considered “blue bloods,” football programs that consistently have achieved at the highest level on the field. If this column had been written in 1990, Notre Dame also would have been on the list, most likely at the very top. However, this is not 1990, and Notre Dame no longer deserves to consider itself a blue blood, a powerhouse or a national title contender. Notre Dame’s last 20 years have been marked by the first 0-3 start in school history, a minor recruiting scandal, possibly the worst recruiting class in school history and a year with a school-record nine losses. Football analysts have been quick to jump on the bandwagon of this year’s fifth-ranked Fighting Irish because of their 7-0 start. This record is a misleading one, however, as Notre Dame has struggled to dominate opponents in any facet of the game, save defense. The Irish have a pedestrian offense at best. They rank a decidedly-mediocre 77th in points per game with 25.9 points per game. They also are a laughable 100th in passing yards per game, with 194 passing yards per game. Not only do they not dominate stat-wise, but the Irish also have had a hard time dominating in games. Their best win of the

oud-2012-10-23-a-006.indd 1

Nam Y. Huh/The Associated Press

Notre Dame senior linebacker Manti Te’o (5) fights against an offensive lineman in a game against Miami on Oct. 6.

season thus far was over No. 17 Stanford, a two-loss team that is vastly overrated because of its upset win against USC. This win came in overtime at Notre Dame’s home stadium; hardly a statement win. Notre Dame’s secondbest victory is a toss-up between a 20-3 win over Michigan State and a 13-6 win over Michigan. As the scorelines suggest, neither of these wins were particularly awe-inspiring, especially because Michigan is ranked 22nd and Michigan State is unranked. Two of the Irish’s other victories also are wholly underwhelming. A 17-14 win over 4-4 BYU and a 20-17 win over 3-4 Purdue are certainly nothing to write home about. With those five games accounted for, the only times Notre Dame has looked even remotely like a top-5 team has been in routs of Miami and Navy, who both

are having mediocre years. All-in-all, Notre Dame just barely has squeaked by against some bad teams. This is a team that is three or four different plays away from being 4-3 instead of 7-0, not a team that deserves to be in consideration for a national title. OU should have no problem demolishing Notre Dame this weekend. The Sooners have proven they can play with any team in the nation, and the Fighting Irish have proven they can play with any 4-4 team in the nation. This is a matchup that will prove to everyone Notre Dame is vastly overrated. The top-5 will look much more respectable without the farce that is Notre Dame occupying one of its spots. Garret Holt is a journalism sophomore. You can follow him on Twitter at @GarrettHolt_.

10/22/12 10:17:28 PM

Tuesday, October 23, 2012  

Tuesday, October 23, 2012