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F R I DaY, O C T O B E R 19 , 2 012

W W W.O U DA I LY.C O M

Opinion: OUPD shouldn’t crack down on slacklining (Page 4)

2 011 S I LV E R C R O W N W I N N E R

BOOMeR sOONeR

OUDaily.com: An OU student will write and illustrate a comic in 24 hours

L&a: Six students bring mascots to life (Page 6)

NONResIDeNT sTuDeNTs

Texas high school grads boost enrollment Number of nonresident students has increased 54 percent since 1990 EMMA HAMBLEN Campus Reporter

W h i l e t h e nu mb e r o f resident students at OU has remained fairly cons i s t e nt s i n c e 1 9 9 0 , t h e number of nonresident

students enrolled has steadily increased. The number of nonresident, full-time equivalent students at OU increased 54 percent from 1990 to 2011, according to the 2012 OU

Factbook. The number of resident, full-time equivalent students however, increased by only 6 percent. This difference in growth rates is reflective of the number of high school graduates in Oklahoma, said Cheryl Jorgenson, Associate Provost and Director of Institutional Research and Reporting.

From 1999 to 2010, the number of high school graduates in Oklahoma increased five percent, according to the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education website. However, the number of nonresident students at OU is highly reflective of the number of high school graduates in Texas, particularly

from Houston and Dallas, Jorgenson said. “It ’s a line just going straight up,” Jorgenson said. From 2003 to 2010, the number of high school graduates in Texas increased by 16 percent, according to the Texas Education Agency website. In other words, the percentage of high school

graduates in Texas grew over three times as much as in Oklahoma in four years less time. OU’s recruiting efforts within Oklahoma have continued to stay strong, said Andy Roop. Prospective Student Services executive See ENROLLMENT PAGe 3

sTORy LaBeL

sLacKLINING

Injury ends player’s season Recovery expected to take six months KEDRIC KITCHENS Sports Editor

HeATHeR BROWn/THe DAiLy

slacklining has been a popular activity on the south Oval for years. This year, however, Ou police have started notifying students that they must have a permit before slacklining, despite there being no explicit university rule against the activity.

OuPD cracks down on slacklining, citing liability, safety concerns Police say students must seek prior authorization JARRETT LANGFORD Campus Reporter

Students may find it difficult to slackline on campus, due to a recent crack down by university police. Slacklining is a hobby with an emphasis on balance, much like tightrope walking. A flat, flexible piece of webbing is raised about two feet off the ground and secured to two objects, usually trees. Individuals attempt to walk, balance and jump across the band. University College freshmen Max Mu n c h i n s k i a n d Je s s e My e r w e re

slacklining between Cate Center and Adams Center near the beginning of October when a university police officer approached them and told them to stop. The officer told them they were no longer allowed to slackline on OU property due to the liability it creates towards the university, Munchinski said. “We had been slacklining in that spot two or three times a week since the beginning of school,” Munchinski said. He said this was the first time he had been approached and had been told to stop. Both Meyer and Munchinski said that it was the officer’s superior who instructed him to come and ask them to stop. “We asked to sign a waiver but the officer

acTIVIsM

PUBLIC RADIO

Student working to end sex trafficking

KGOU far behind reaching fundraising goal for semester

PAIGHTEN HARKINS Campus Reporter

When she was 12, University College freshman Lucy Mahaffey sat down to watch the bonus features on the DVD of the 2006 film, Amazing Grace. Fifteen minutes later when the clip ended, Mahaffey had resolved to make a difference in the lives of

oud-2012-10-19-a-001,002,003.indd 1

millions of people shackled by human trafficking. She cried, prayed, wrote and thought before she finally came to a conclusion. “I was 12 and I was like, ‘I want to change the world,’” Mahaffey said. Mahaffey said she didn’t imagine herself as a potential See CAUSE PAGe 3

OU’s license-owned radio station will need to raise $30,000 by 7 tonight to meet its biannual membership fundraiser goal for this semester. KGOU’s fundraising goal for this semester is $180,000, and the station has received about

told us we would have to go to an office to do that,” said Meyer. The officer did not specify which office to go to, Meyer said. University police department spokesman, Lt. Bruce Chan, explained that students must first seek authorization to partake in slacklining, given the fact that the activity requires the use of university property and has the potential to produce an injury. Chan said students needed authorization from the university in the future. However, there is no explicit university rule against the activity, he said. “Contacting Student Affairs is a good step to See SLACKLINING PAGe 3

$150,000 so far, KGOU membership director Laura Knoll said. Public radio stations like KGOU primarily rely on donations from the public to fund most of their day-today operation. Public donations constitute 60 percent of KGOU’s funding. Funding from OU and a community service grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting covers the remaining 40 percent, Knoll said. Although the station has yet to reach its goal, Knoll said she is optimistic KGOU will raise the necessary

funds in time. “We know that the programs we provide are a great value to people, and we know that our listeners value them,” Knoll said. Listeners can call 405.325.5468 to donate or pledge money online at KGOU.org, KGOU program manager Jim Johnson said. Paighten Harkins Campus Reporter

The OU women’s basketball team will be without one of its returning players after sophomore forward Kaylon Williams ruptured her Achilles’ tendon, the team announced Thursday. Williams’ suffered the injury during practice Tuesday and underwent a successful surgery KayLON Thursday. WILLIaMs Williams’ recovery is expected to take six months, effectively ending her season. Coach Sherri Coale said that Williams has improved greatly after an already solid freshman campaign and will be greatly missed. “We are devastated for Kay Kay because she had improved tremendously since the end of her freshman season and was going See INJURY PAGe 3

Sooners to take on Cyclones on the road SPORTS: OU volleyball team looks to continue moving up the conference standings against iowa State. (Page 8)

VOL. 98, NO. 46 © 2012 OU Publications Board FREE — Additional copies 25¢

INSIDE TODAY Campus......................2 Clas si f ie ds................5 L i f e & A r t s ..................6 O p inio n.....................4 Spor ts........................8 Visit OUDaily.com for more

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10/18/12 10:53:37 PM


2

• Friday, October 19, 2012

CAMPUS

Lindsey Ruta, campus editor Chase Cook and Jake Morgan, assistant editors dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com • Twitter: @OUDaily

Students chalk South Oval for homecoming

TODAy AROUnD CAMPUS Guess the Score sponsored by Union Programming Board will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the first floor lobby of Oklahoma Memorial Union. Students may guess the score for Saturday’s game for a chance to win a prize. Art à la Carte will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. in Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. The evening will include a screen-printing demonstration by OU Print Club, live music from The Dizzy Pickers, a short film by deadCenTeR and other short films made by OU students. The film “Moonrise Kingdom” will be shown from 8 to 11:30 p.m. in Meacham Auditorium in Oklahoma Memorial Union.

KinGSLey BURnS/THe DAiLy

above: Haley upshaw, university college freshman, smooths the edge of the down arrow on chi Omega’s “Dance Dance Revolution” sidewalk chalking Thursday on the south Oval.

The opera “iphigénie en Tauride” will be performed by University Theatre at 8 p.m. in Reynolds Performing Arts Center.

Left: Meteorology sophomore joseph Patton (right) colors in part of the Hcsa homecoming chalk design.

SATURDAy, OCT. 20 The homecoming parade will take place at 3 p.m. on the corner of Boyd Street and elm Street. A contemporary Iranian film, “The Green Wave” will be shown at 5:30 p.m. at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art as part of this week’s film festival. The opera “iphigénie en Tauride” will be performed by University Theatre at 8 p.m. in Reynolds Performing Arts Center. Do you want to see your organization’s campus event here? Visit OuDaily.com/events/submit to add your entry.

ReCORD ReQUeSTS The Oklahoma Daily regularly asks for access to public information from OU officials. Here is a list of the most-recent requests our reporters have submitted to the university. Requested document and purpose

Date requested

The 2003 purchase and sale agreement between university North Park LLc and Ou — To see the contents and property involved in this purchase agreement.

Sept. 24

a database or electronic document of registered vehicles of students, staff and faculty with Ou Parking services for spring 2012 — To see how and how many people register with OU’s parking services

Sept. 24

contract regarding purchase of 146 Page st. — To see the details of the contract, such as the price of the purchase and OU’s plans for the property

Sept. 24

Visit OuDaily.com/openrecords for a full list of requests

BRIeFs CONFERENCE

Sooners present on impacted perspectives Four OU students will present to a panel at the 2012 national Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing, which will be held nov. 2-4 in Chicago. english senior Kristine Davis, english junior Laurel Cunningham, secondary education senior Maggie Williford and secondary education doctoral student Carrie Miller-DeBoer will present “Synthesizing Lived experience With Writing Center ideology” at the conference, according to an OU press release. The panel will focus on how

their different experiences in different fields of study impact their perspectives as writing center consultants. This is a unique opportunity, especially for the undergraduate writing consultants, because the panelists will be able to present their research to not only undergraduates but also graduate students and professionals from all over the nation, said Moira Ozias, associate director at the OU Writing Center. Six other OU writing consultants were selected to attend the conference, according to the press release.

Emma Hamblen Campus Reporter

SPEAKER

Columnist addresses Turkey’s role in the war in Syria A Turkish columnist, former TeD presenter and the author of “islam Without extremes: A Muslim Case for Liberty” will be speaking on campus at 4 p.m., Monday in Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Meacham Auditorium as part of a series of events he will be participating at in the greater Oklahoma City area. Mustafa Akyol will present a talk entitled “The War in Syria: Turkey’s Role” that will

talk about the conflict in Syria from the perspective of its neighbor to the north. nur Uysal, a graduate teaching assistant at the Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication, said that she expects him to address the growing tensions between the two countries. She referenced an event where an airplane flying from Moscow to Damascus was stopped by Turkish offi cials and found to contain arms. The talk is sponsored by the Center for Middle east Studies, institute of interfaith Dialog and interfaith Dialog Student Association, according to an event flyer. Mike Wormley Campus Reporter

Being

NUMBER ONE is nothing to celebrate.

Up to $20,000 in funding for Study Abroad in Africa, Asia, Central & Eastern Europe, Eurasia, La�n America, and the Middle East

CORReCTiOnS The Oklahoma Daily is committed to serving readers with accurate coverage and welcomes your comments about information that may require correction or clarification. To contact us with corrections, email us at dailynews@ou.edu.

Boren Scholarships provide up to $20,000 for an academic year $10,000 for a semester $8,000 for the summer*

in Thursday’s story “Group looks to expand in fall,” the name of the nonprofit organization Loveworks was misspelled as Love Works. Visit OuDaily.com/corrections for an archive of our corrections

*Summer awards available ONLY to students in Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math

HOW TO COnTACT US Newsroom office: 405-325-3666

To report news: dailynews@ou.edu

Advertising office: 405-325-8964

Letters to the editor: dailyopinion@ou.edu

Business office: 405-325-2521

Editor in chief: dailyeditor@ou.edu

This year, more than

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be diagnosed with lung cancer, and more than

163,000 will die— making it America’s

NUMBER ONE cancer killer.

But new treatments offer hope.

Are you on Twitter?

Join Lung Cancer Alliance in the fight against this disease.

Stay connected with The Oklahoma Daily

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oud-2012-10-19-a-001,002,003.indd 2

Informa�on Sessions

(choose the most convenient �me for you)

The following mee�ngs will be in Room 140, David L. Boren Hall

Monday, October 22: 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, October 23: 12 noon and 3:00 p.m. Wednesday, October 24: 1:30 p.m. Thursday, October 25: 1:30 and 3:00 p.m. (From the central staircase, go down the hall toward the library. Room 140 is opposite a browsing table. )

The following mee�ng will be at the Arabic Flagship Program, College of Interna�onal Studies, Hester Hall, Room 160

Friday, October 26: 12:30 p.m.

The mee�ngs will last around 45 minutes. lungcanceralliance.org

Campus Contact: Dr., Melanie Wright, mwright@ou.edu www.borenawards.org

10/18/12 10:53:42 PM


Campus

Friday, October 19, 2012 •

3

cause: Freshman serves as fact-checker for play about human trafficking Continued from page 1 victim, but her love for her twin sister put the issue in perspective. “I just imagined what would happen if she was in slavery,” she said. “I would do anything I could. I would break down doors.” Mahaffey recently helped to affirm the accuracy of a play written by students at the University of Central Oklahoma. The play, titled “Voiced,” is a series of monologues and vignettes that tell the story of the people in Oklahoma who have been affected by human trafficking. “She’s sort of been our fact-checker. She’s so knowledgeable on the subject and that has totally been utilized,” the play’s author Summer Nolan said. The idea behind the play was to put a face on a subject typically hidden behind hard numbers and statistics, she said. “I hope people will take away [from the play] that this isn’t someone else’s issue,” Nolan said. “It’s happening in the heartland of Oklahoma, in our home.” Human trafficking is the second-largest illegal activity in the world, preceded by drug trafficking and followed

by arms trafficking, Mahaffey said. When Mahaffey attended her first Oklahomans Against Trafficking Humans meeting, she didn’t know trafficking was happening in Oklahoma. This knowledge further fueled her passion to advocate an end to human trafficking, she said. Th e e xt e nt o f hu ma n trafficking in Oklahoma is still unknown, yet several law enforcement agencies across the countr y have cases in almost every county of the state, according to the O klahomans Against Trafficking Humans website. In 2003, the State Department listed Oklahoma as one of the top four states in the nations with the largest number of trafficking survivors receiving federal assistance, according the Oklahomans Against Trafficking Humans website. Mahaffey created a club in high school called Helping Oklahomans Prevent Exploitations. The group hosted bake sales, movie nights and two large events called “Break the Chains” to raise awareness and show people that there are ways they can fight against human trafficking, she said. Choosing to buy fair-trade

AT A GLANCE Go and Do What: Voiced: The Real Story of Prostituted Women When: October 19 and 20 at 7:30 p.m. Where: Pegasus Theater UCO Liberal Arts Building Price: Free, but donations are accepted Source: FBI website, Oath website

products, for example, ensures that the product was made without the use of child labor or any other kind of human exploitation, Mahaffey said. “You can do so much [to help],” she said. “That’s kind of a big misconception about this topic.” An estimated 2.5 million people are employed at any given moment as the result of human trafficking, according to the United Nations Global Initiative to Fight Human Trafficking. There aren’t many criteria to be a candidate for human and sex trafficking. A person’s race, age or gender doesn’t matter; anyone can be brought into the

Heather Brown/The Daily

University College freshman Lucy Mahaffey, sits behind the counter at Second Wind coffeehouse where she volunteers to work on Wednesday afternoons. Mahaffey is passionate about ending human trafficking and is involved in OATH (Oklahomans Against Trafficking Humans). Mahaffey helped check the accuracy of a play about human trafficking, showing at the University of Central Oklahoma on Oct. 19th and 20th.

business. Up to 2 million people are trafficked globally each year, and 15,000 to 18,000 of those cases occur in the US every year, according to the FBI website. Human trafficking is predicted to surpass drug trafficking in the sheer amount of activity and money it

p ro d u c e s by n e xt ye a r, Mahaffey said. Yet most people don’t know what’s happening or aren’t aware of the extent of the issue, Mahaffey said. That’s why she has worked so hard to promote awareness of the practice. While Mahaffey said she’s still trying to get her feet on

SLACKLINING: Student enrollment: Recruiting efforts Life unable to authorize partially focused on more Texans Continued from page 1

Continued from page 1

take first [when seeking authorization],” he said. H o w e v e r, K r i s t i n Partridge, the assistant dean of students and Student Life director, said Student Life is unable to provide authorization for the activity. Student Life, a part of Student Affairs, oversees all student organizations for the university and many student activities. “There is not a registered student organization for slacklining, nor is there any policy which specifically addresses it,” Partridge said. “Due to the nature of the activity, and the potential harm it could cause to students and/or trees, it would be up to OUPD’s discretion as to whether students would be allowed to slackline on campus.” Partridge could not give any information as to who could authorize slacklining on campus. Despite the fact that there is apparently no system in place to authorize slacklining even though there is no policy against it, OUPD will

director. However, the number of high school graduates in Oklahoma has not climbed at the same rate as they have nearer the coasts and Texas. The majority of the Prospective Student Services staff recruits within the state, Roop said. While they continue to recruit the best students outside Oklahoma to maintain enrollment, it is not at the expense of instate efforts. “ We f e e l ve r y g o o d about where we are with

AT A GLANCE Slacklining Slacklining: the sport of walking a small, flat nylon rope between two points. It is practiced in the backyard, on college campuses and city parks, sometimes even 3,000 feet above the ground. Source: Slackline.com

continue to crack down on the hobby. “Police are concerned about safety and ensuring that nothing gets damaged on campus. [OUPD is] not going to authorize it,” Chan said.

Jarrett Langford jarrett.langford-1@ou.edu

There are no limits to caring.®

1-800-899-0089

www.VolunteersofAmerica.org

WE IMPROVE THE LIVES OF AN ENTIRE COMMUNITY.

choice now more than ever,” OU President David Boren said. “While our number of resident students at OU has remained basically constant, the rapid improvement of our university is something that is nationally recognized.” Boren said that national recognition has made OU more attractive to out-ofstate students.

Emma Hamblen

emmahamblen@ou.edu

AT A GLANCE Resident/Nonresidents Head count percent:

Head count number:

Resident/nonresident:

1990: 80%/20%

1990: 15,378/3,868

2011: 67%/33%

2011: 15,921/7,929

2003: highest headcount of resident students (17,835) but still only 73%

Time equivalent percent:

Full-Time Equivalent Number:

1990: 80%/20% 2011: 66%/%34

WE DON’T JUST IMPROVE THE LIVES OF THE LESS FORTUNATE.

Oklahoma residents,” Roop said. The university wants the best students within the state to have an opportunity to go to OU if they want to, Roop said. They have expanded their staff and the majority of that staff is devoted to recruiting in state, he said. Despite their in-state recruitment efforts, Roop said they are having to reach outside of Oklahoma to recruit in order to meet the university’s enrollment standards. “As our student and academic programs continue to gain national exposure, prospective students from around the country consider OU for their collegiate

1990: 12,303/3,158

2003: highest number of full-time equivalent resident students (15,010) but still only 73%

2011: 13,129/6,816

Source: 2012 OU Factbook

the ground as a freshman, she said she hopes to resume her fight against human trafficking as soon as things settle down. Paighten Harkins paighten.harkins@ou.edu

injury: Team has to adjust Continued from page 1 to be a significant contributor,” Coale said. Coale also said that, although clearly devastating, there are some positives of when the injury occurred and there are still ways Williams will contribute. “If there is a silver lining, it is that this happened the second day of practice and our team will have ample time to adjust to the loss and progress before our regular season begins, Coale said. “I know Kay Kay will turn her attention to attacking her rehab and continue being an invaluable teammate.” The Midwest City native split time as a starter and backup as a freshman last season, averaging 4.8 points and 5.2 rebounds per game. The Sooners open their season without Williams in an exhibition game against Oklahoma Christian on Nov. 1 at Lloyd Noble Center. Kedric Kitchens kitchens_kedric@ou.edu

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4

• Friday, October 19, 2012

OPINION

Mary Stanfield, opinion editor Kayley Gillespie, assistant editor dailyopinion@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/opinion • Twitter: @OUDailyOpinion

EDITORIAL

Leave slackliners alone

Our View: Slacklining is no more dangerous than any other activity students participate in on campus without special permission.

anyone to get proper permission to slackline. But they shouldn’t even need it in the first place. Do students need permission to bicycle on campus? That is at least as likely — if not much more If you’ve seen people around campus balancing so — to result in injuries if cyclists aren’t careful. on ropes rigged between trees, you’ve seen someWhat about jogging, skateboarding or playing one participating in slacklining: an Frisbee on campus? You can surely activity enjoyed by some students for imagine scenarios in which these AT A GLANCE exercise, meditation and recreation. activities could result in injuries Slacklining But it turns out slacklining may not be as well. But the university doesn’t welcome on campus. worry itself with the possible liabilSlacklining is the practice of balancing Officers from the OU Police ity of injured joggers or require stuon a length of webbing Department have told some students dents to apply for Frisbee permits. strung between two they cannot slackline on campus In the end, stringing a rope beanchors. But the line is without permission. University ponot taut as in tightrope. tween two trees and walking across lice department spokesman Lt. Bruce it (at the height of a few feet and Get involved: Chan said slacklining is a liability to over grass) is just about as dangerSlacklineExpress.com the university, because it’s a potenous for students and the trees as tially dangerous activity undertaken using a hammock. If you walk by the on campus. So, students will need west side of Bizzell Memorial Library on a sunny official issues to slackline. day, you’ll likely see a few students enjoying that The Our View But the OUPD can’t give them particular trouble without worry. is the majority that permission. Chan said OU OUPD is wasting its time shutting down opinion of The Daily’s Student Affairs handles such per- innocuous recreational activity. There are plenty nine-member mission. Student Life — part of of actually dangerous activities for OU’s police editorial board Student Affairs — disagrees: They force to worry about. University officials should deal with the events and advertis- work with OUPD to develop a simple, explicit ing of student groups and are not in the business policy of welcoming slackliners just like any other of telling individual students what kinds of recre- student who makes use of the campus to relax. ation they can enjoy on campus. Since there is no student group devoted to slacklining, Student Life Comment on this on OUDaily.com cannot help. This confusion will make it impossible for

EDITORIAL

OUDaily.com needs your comments If you’ve tried to comment on OUDaily.com this semester, you may have noticed a problem. If you were a first-time commenter, you likely were unable to register for a username. When The Daily moved servers this summer, an error occurred in the code of the website, causing most registrations to fail. Once we discovered this error, we immediately acted to correct it. So good news: Comments are up and running, making this a great time to join the conversation. Do you have questions or opinions about a

story? Disagree with a columnist (or a fellow reader) and want to set them straight? See something a reporter or a columnist missed? Then let us know. It takes less than three minutes to create a username, and then you can comment on any of the content being added to OUDaily.com throughout the day. Your contribution could start a community conversation about an important issue, provide additional context for a story or even help further educate your fellow Sooners about the things you care about. So don’t just listen to what we and other Sooners have to say — talk back.

COLUMN

Claims of U.S. Shariah law are ludicrous

M

y buddy Don the anti-Islam camp. And in that camp, this is all the OPINION COLUMNIST got a DUI and president’s fault. went to jail two On behalf of my buddy Don, I’d just like to say Nakoula years ago. Since his release, had better be in jail. Don endangered other drivers he has had to pee in a cup because he was an alcoholic. He didn’t maliciously trick every week, blow into a people out of their hard-earned money. machine to start his car and He got help and quit drinking and still ended back in been back to jail more than jail several times for petty reasons. Nakoula got out of jail once for extremely petty and went right back to doing what he does best — lying to Trent Cason probation violations. people and pretending to be someone he’s not for his own cason.trent@yahoo.com One time he spent the financial gain. weekend in jail because Pamela Geller, professional blogger and idiot he drank too much water with his breakfast, “diluting” his extraordinaire, sees this as being an issue of free speech. urine sample. It should be noted that Don doesn’t do drugs Geller wrote, “He is being jailed for blasphemy. This is and never did. It had nothing to do with his arrest. Obama [Shariah] enforcement in America.” Another time he had to go back to jail because he spoke I think that Pamela, despite her obvious learning to the police as a witness to an unrelated incident and disability, is capable of understanding the concept of didn’t immediately call his probation “terms of probation.” Nakoula broke his “As a constant officer. Each time his probation was terms of probation, and then got no special extended. treatment. He went back to jail. blasphemer, I can His situation has made me mad at As a constant blasphemer, I can personally attest to personally attest to the fact that Shariah law the “punish-for-profit” legal system, the senseless probation guidelines and the the fact that Shariah is not currently being implemented in the incompetent people who work at the US — nor is biblical law. law is not currently urinalysis lab. But at no point has Don, If they were, I would be a crispy skeleton myself or anyone else thought to blame the being implemented strapped to a charred post or decomposing president of the U.S. for this situation. under a huge pile of stones. Richard in the US — nor is Nakoula Basseley Nakoula was arrested Dawkins would be a vapor cloud by now. biblical law.” and imprisoned for committing bank fraud And Reddit’s servers would have been using an assumed identity. He went to reduced to dust by a drone strike. prison for 21 months and then was barred from using any In the end, people who have rushed to Nakoula’s aid kind of alias. have only proven their own dishonesty and willingness to Since his release, he made the most infamous YouTube manipulate the truth for their own gain. I have no problem video ever produced, lied to the cast of that video about the with YouTube videos that insult people’s religious beliefs, video’s message and content and gave extremists the fuel nor does the U.S. government. to conduct a world-wide anti-American riot that has left You know how I know that? Because I’m on YouTube countless people dead. He did all of this using an assumed right now watching “The Innocence of Muslims.” identity, which is a violation of his probation. Now he’s back in jail, and he’s a “political prisoner,” Trent Cason is a literature and cultural studies senior. according to numerous bloggers and spokespeople in

?

» Poll question of the day Should students be allowed to slackline on campus without official permission? To cast your vote, log on to COLUMN

Diversity, cultural education needs to be revamped

L

ocal news OPINION COLUMNIST headlines encouraging or celebrating diversity within Oklahoma are pretty rare — especially in a state that’s not only more than 75 percent white but which also has Kayley Gillespie less than 5 percent of the kayley.m.gillespie-1@ou.edu population classified as foreign born, according to 2011 census data. Logically, when I read that the Norman library will host bilingual story times, the social justice advocate in me did a double take. Bilingual readings and the dispersion of cultures targeted toward a young audience is exactly what Oklahoma needs in order to encourage the next generation to work with — not against — individuals who don’t look like their reflections. Reading further, I found these bilingual story times were events in just four installments during the first week of October to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month. Just a surface cultural education. We should not teach the Norman youth that the Hispanic culture, or any culture, is a novelty to be celebrated right before National Breast Cancer Awareness Month and right after National Immunization Awareness Month. How we interact with others depends on our culture — a bank of situations, social norms and mores which prescribe “normal” and “acceptable” behavior. By socializing with only like individuals and creating a culture that purges diversity and variation, we are prescribing the same stand-still, stagnant social progression on which this country was founded. OU’s history proves it is evident we embrace diversity in Norman, with the historical ruling of Sipuel v. Board of Regents of OU that set a precedent for many universities around the nation in regard to minorities and higher education. Ada Lois Sipuel Fisher, an African-American woman who graduated from Langston University with honors, applied to OU’s College of Law in 1946. Though Fisher was admitted, an Oklahoma law made it a misdemeanor to instruct or attend classes of mixed races, and violations resulted in fines. Fisher filed a lawsuit, which made it to the Supreme Court and was ruled in her favor. Instead of confronting diversity, the Oklahoma Legislature instituted — in five days — a “new” law school for her to attend exclusively, named Langston University School of Law. After Fisher announced her intentions to again appeal to the Supreme Court, the attorney general declined the legal fight, and Fisher was admitted to the OU College of Law three years after she initially applied. Her battle encouraged eight other African-American students to apply to graduate programs on campus. Fisher challenged the narrow social and cultural norms during a time when Norman was a white-washed community abiding by Jim Crow laws. It is unethical for us not to challenge the same norms Fisher did years ago. We should seek progression and inclusion by fostering learning about other cultures on a regular basis — not just during one week where a culture is fetishized and used as a way to bring people into the Norman public library. History precedes us and beckons Norman and OU students especially to enliven education. No one should be denied or deprived of education — especially a cultural education. Such great historical precedents defy the stagnant and unfortunate 1950s social norms that still exist today. We cannot afford to teach a culture to children four times a year and expect a future that is economically and socially viable 365 days out of the year. Business and industry thrive with varying perspectives and backgrounds; the same ideas from the same cultural samplings do not provide innovation. Let’s encourage diversity and encourage productivity by creating a welcoming and educational environment for all. We must hold events like bilingual story times year-round, inducting children into a culturally-diverse world before they learn to discriminate and see Hispanic culture as a mere component of a calendar year full of “awareness.” Kayley Gillespie is a literature and cultural studies senior.

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W L Q Z P K I P W N G D K W N X O A X H D Q L

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Z M Q R P K I O W N G D K W N X O A X H D Q L

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A Z M M Z P K E P W N G D K W N X O A X H D Q

L E B A U T O M O B I L E S K I P W N G D K W

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P A Z S Q Z P T I P W T G D K W N X O A X H D

Find them in the classifieds HOROSCOPE By Bernice Bede Osol

Copyright 2012, Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2012 Eats flies. Dates a pig. Hollywood star.

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Previous Solution                                                                        

        

Monday- Very Easy Tuesday-Easy Wednesday- Easy Thursday- Medium Friday - Hard

Instructions: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. That means that no number is repeated in any row, column or box.

oud-2012-10-19-a-005.indd 1

5

The year ahead could turn out to be an extremely favorable period in which you’ll experience many new and exciting developments. It would be a great time to set lofty objectives and pursue them vigorously. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Today could launch an extremely significant cycle for you, especially where your finances and material needs are concerned. If you handle things right, surpluses will abound. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Those whom you always feel compelled to please may do a role reversal and perform something nice for you. This change in your relationship will allow you to hold the strings. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- There is a time for sowing and a time for reaping. You’re now in a period in which you will be paid back in large measure by those to whom you’ve given so much. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Some exciting new developments could be in the offing where your social life is concerned. Both a few old and new friends will play big roles in your happiness. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- It would be a good thing to start elevating your sights in terms of your more ambitious objectives. Once you get on a roll, many remarkable achievements are possible. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Something is stirring that could

produce an advantageous effect upon your future hopes and desires. Prepare yourself for all your tomorrows and look forward to what they’ll offer. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Now is the time to make that move, maneuver or adjustment you’ve been contemplating where your work is concerned. Everything is looking good for making such a change. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- If a significant and necessary decision is staring you in the face, it’s the day to take action. Depend on your good judgment and common sense to make the right choice. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- A smart friend who is concerned about your welfare is likely to offer you some unusual advice. Even if it sounds strange, think it through until you understand its essence. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- This is an excellent day to spend some time sorting out things that have been trying and confusing. Once you work things out, you can reorganize your life for maximum efficiency.

Q L E B R S L S P A Z & Q Z P K I P W N G D K

W N X O A X H D Q L E F R S L Q P A Z M Q Z P

K I P W N G D K W N X O A X H D Q L E B R S L

Q P A Z M Q Z P K I P U N G D K W A X O A X H

D Q L E B R S L Q R E N T A L S K P P W N G D

K W N X O A X H D Q L D B R S L Q A A Z M Q Z

P K I P W N G D K W N X O A X H D R L E B R S

H D Q L E B R S L Q P A Z M Q Z P M I P W N G

L Q P A Z M Q Z P K I P W N G D K T N X O A X

D K W N X O A X H D Q L E B R S P E T S Z M Q

S B I C Y C L E S P K I P W N G D T W N X O A

Z P K I P W N G D K W N X O A X H N Q L E B R

X H D Q L E B R S L Q P A Z M Q Z S K I P W N

G D K W N X O A X H D Q L E B R S K Q P A Z M

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker October 19, 2012 ACROSS 1 Boss on “The Dukes of Hazzard� 5 Prima donna problems 9 Newborn puppy 14 Nabisco cookie 15 Card game played against the dealer 16 Classic TV’s “The ___ Limits� 17 Where a football is snapped 20 ___ pork (Chinese dish) 21 Purse part, often 22 Samara dropper 23 Where to get a WWW address 25 It can be deadly or mortal 26 Letters on tires 29 “... as ___ on TV� 31 Feeling of fury 33 Singlemasted boats 35 Double-reed instrumentalist 38 Big girder 39 American purchase? 41 Javelin or harpoon 43 Goes back to square one 44 Shanty

10/19

46 Completed a marathon 47 ___ A Sketch 51 Asian ox 52 Yuletide worker 54 Hallucinogenic drug 56 Clark or Rogers 57 Marching band drum 59 Part of a pump 61 Base to build on 65 Lessen 66 Kite eater in “Peanuts� 67 Louisiana vegetable 68 Apple beverage 69 Groundbreaking person? 70 Joe Flacco option DOWN 1 Conan Doyle’s detective 2 Baltimore ballplayer 3 Human ___ Project 4 “What ___ up must come down� 5 Unrestrained expression of emotion 6 Car “go� liquid 7 Mythical monsters 8 Does a pre-laundry chore 9 Feminine, say 10 Quasimodo feature 11 LAX landing

approximation 12 Tripod feature 13 Prefix for “eminent� 18 “___ believe in yesterday ...� (Beatles lyric) 19 “The Sea, the Sea� author Murdoch 24 Overly inquisitive one 26 Verse writer 27 Relaxing getaway spot 28 Patriot’s end? 30 Whiff king Ryan 32 “Poly� attachment 34 Far from slim 36 Drink mixer 37 Like some currents 39 Apex 40 Take under advisement

41 ___ & the Family Stone 42 Casserole spheroid 45 Count in Lemony Snicket’s books 48 Three-horse team 49 Plays with crayons 50 African carnivores 53 Cappuccino topper 55 Fingerprint’s cousin 57 Something to build on 58 Widely used currency 60 “Enough already!� 61 Cul-de-___ 62 Kimono completer 63 Irish boy 64 Michelle Obama ___ Robinson

PREVIOUS PUZZLE ANSWER

10/18

Š 2012 Universal Uclick www.upuzzles.com

GEOMETRY 101 By Hank Bowman

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- There is no need to allow self-doubts to intimidate you, because you have the answers needed to produce the end results you desire. Figure out what you want and then do it. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Chance could play a big role in bringing about success. You’re apt to say the right thing at the right time to the right person.

10/18/12 8:03:41 PM


6

• Friday, October 19, 2012

LIFE&ARTS

OUDaily.com ›› An OU student will plan, write and illustrate a comic book as a part of 24-Hour Comics Day this weekend and is encouraging others to do so as well.

Carmen Forman, life & arts editor Westlee Parsons, assistant editor dailyent@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/life&arts • Twitter: @OUDailyArts

R E M O BO SOONER

HOMECOMING

OU’s mascots bring magic to Sooner Nation Team is made up of six students SHANNON BORDEN Life & Arts Reporter

B o o m e r a n d S o o n e r, OU’s mascots, rally fans at sporting events, but who are the students who bring life to these beloved characters? The OU Mascot team is made up of six students. Being on the mascot team takes a good attitude, high energy and true passion, members of the team said. Tonya Kiper, a human relations senior is a co-captain of the team. Before she became an OU mascot, Kiper said she tried out for her high school cheerleading team and didn’t make it. She was contacted to try out for a mascot position and was told to prepare a skit. When she went to perform for the coaches, she said she was the only one who had prepared a skit and was chosen as the mascot. “I kind of fell into it, but I absolutely loved it,” Kiper said. When she was a freshman at OU, Kiper said she met with the spirit coordinator in hopes of becoming an OU mascot but was told she wouldn’t make it on the team. Kiper said she saw a poster for tryouts her junior year, decided to go for it and made the team. “I don’t know why they let me on the team, to be honest, but I’m glad they did,” Kiper said. Kiper said she loves interacting with young fans. “They get to see the things they see on TV or in a picture, and you’re getting to create that magic for them,” Kiper said.

oud-2012-10-19-a-006 copy_KB.indd 1

OU mascot and psychology sophomore Blake McAllister, was a mascot in high school. Coming from a small town, he said he thought about what it would be like to come from a Kansas town of 2,000 people, go to OU and become an NC AA mascot. When he found out he made the team, McAllister said he was ecstatic. Boomer and Sooner always seem to be having fun, so the hard work these students put in may often go unnoticed, McAllister said. “It’s not for everyone,” McAllister said. “The suit is much hotter than the temperature outside, and you have to use improvisation all the time with the crowd.” Being in a suit, the students on the mascot team do not receive much recognition, Kiper said. “I’ve seen so many people come through and they start with a good attitude,” Kiper said. “Then they realize how much work they are putting in and they are getting no recognition and they are biting their tongue from saying anything.” Kip er and McAllister said another difficult part of being a mascot is that it is time-consuming. The team practices once a week, with more practices while preparing for national competitions, Kiper said. In addition to practices, the mascots make appearances on campus prior to game days and also make community service appearances. Both Kiper and McAllister have found being on the OU Mascot team to be a rewarding experience. “I found that I could be my excited, crazy, silly self all the time,” Kiper said “It was not

BEN WILLIAMS/THE DAILY

only acceptable, but encour- Boomer crowd surfs during the OU-Kansas State game Sept. 22. The OU Mascot team is made up of aged to be extra crazy.” six students who practice about once a week, with increased practices before national competitions. McAllister said he can be a completely different being while in costume. “It is important to come to the realization that being a mascot involves being unselfish,” Kiper said. “This actually isn’t about you, it’s about making other people happy.”

Shannon Borden, shannonborden@ou.edu

10/18/12 10:10:07 PM


Friday, October 19, 2012 •

Sports

Kedric Kitchens, sports editor Dillon Phillips, assistant editor dailysports@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/sports • Twitter: @OUDailySports

Women’s golf

Sooners soar to top of board Six OU golfers finish in top 20 in local tournament Nick Brown

Sports Reporter

Despite windy conditions at the Jimmie Austin OU Golf Club, the OU women’s golf team stunned the field of 18 teams to win the Susie Maxwell Berning Classic with a score of 859 (-5). “Unbelievable...that is about all I can say,” coach Veronique Drouin-Luttrell said. “The girls played really solid, especially today. The conditions were even tougher today with the wind switching halfway through the round, but the girls were just really prepared.” The coach gave her team advice before the day started and said she was pleased with their performance. “I told them this morning that it was going to play a little different than it has the past couple of days,” DrouinLuttrell said. “They just did unbelievably. It was a lot of fun to watch them.” The Sooners fielded seven golfers in this week’s tournament. Five golfers competed for the team and two entered the tournament as individuals. Six of the seven competitors finished in the top 20, a 54-hole record for OU. Ju n i o r C h i r a p a t Ja o Javanil, last year’s individual national champion, continued to show why she was the best golfer in the nation last year by shooting a 209 (-7) to win the tournament for the Sooners. After a two-day finish tied at second with a score of 141 (-3), Jao-Javanil shot a

Ricardo Patino/the daily

Junior Anne-Catherine Tanguay takes her second shot on the 11th hole during the Susie Maxwell Berning Classisc at Jimmie Austin OU Golf Course on Wednesday. Tanguay finished the tournament -4, shooting 70, 75, 67, placing her at 4th place on the individual leaders board. The Sooners won the tournament by almost 30 strokes, shooting -5 while second place, Notre Dame shot +24.

four under par 68 in the third day of competition to finish in first place. Junior Anne-Catherine Tanguay went into the third day of competition in sixth place after a 70 (-2) on day one and a 75 (+3) on day two. Tanguay shot a 67 (-5) on day three to take sole possession of fourth place with a threeround score of 212 (-4). Junior Emily Collins finished sixth after being two shots out of the lead to start the day. Collins’ strong first and second round performances — a combined total

7

of 141 (-3) — were negated after she triple bogeyed the par-four ninth hole and bogeyed on holes 13, 17 and 18 to end her round at 76 (+4), giving her a three round total of 217 (+1). Finishing in a tie for 18th, senior Taylor Schmidt shot a 225 (+9), giving the Sooners a fourth top 20 in team competition. Junior Kaitlyn Rohrback finished tied for 30th at 227 (+11), shooting a 74 (+2) day one, 81 (+9) day two and 72 (E) on day three. Competing as individuals

for the Sooners, senior Jacki Marshall, tied for 13th — 224 (+8) — and sophomore Jade Staggs, tied for 18th — 225 (+9) — gave the Sooners their fifth and sixth top 20 finishes. The No. 13 Sooners placed ahead of Notre Dame (+24) and Denver (+34) as well as conference foe Texas Tech (+35). The team now looks ahead to the Alamo Invitational from Oct. 28 to 30 in San Antonio. Nick Brown nickbrown@ou.edu

AT A GLANCE OU this week The Sooners won the Susie Maxwell Berning Classic this week with a final score of five under par, beating second-place Notre Dame by nearly 30. OU placed six of their seven golfers in the top-20, including winner junior Chirapat Jao-Javanil.

Men’s Basketball

Sooners to play intrasquad game Saturday The OU men’s basketball team will host a scrimmage Saturday afternoon at McCasland Field House prior to OU’s Homecoming parade and the OU-Kansas football game. The intrasquad scrimmage will begin at 2 p.m. and is part of the Field House Series, which continues Nov. 7 with an exhibition against Central Oklahoma and Dec. 31 in a nonconference game against Texas A&MCorpus Christi. The scrimmage will consist of four 10-minute quarters. Admission is free and Steven the first pledger 500 fans will receive a free T-shirt. The Sooners return all five of its’ starters, including senior guard Steven Pledger, who led the conference in scoring last season with 16.9 points per game. The Sooners were picked to finish seventh in the Big 12 in the preseason poll. All men’s basketball practices this season are open to the public and can be streamed online at SoonerSports.tv. The Sooners officially begin the 2012-13 season against Louisiana-Monroe at 2 p.m. on Nov. 11 at Lloyd Noble Center.

Nick Brown, Sports Reporter

Staff Reports

OPEN TODAY

in Adams Residence Hall on OU campus @ 10AM Be one of the first 100 customers and spin for a Raising Cane’s prize!

Come join us in celebrating Raising Cane’s Grand Opening! Help Support PUSH America! Just mention PUSH when ordering between 4-9PM and Raising Cane’s will donate a percentage of their net sales! Like us at facebook.com/RaisingCanesNorman www.raisingcanesok.com 405.325.0367 Adams Residence Hall, Bottom Floor

oud-2012-10-19-a-007.indd 1

10/18/12 10:24:50 PM


8

Sports

• Friday, October 19, 2012

Volleyball

OU set to chase No. 22 Cyclones Sooners are third in Big 12 behind Texas and Kansas with a 5-2 record Chris Tyndall Sports Reporter

The OU volleyball team continues its weeklong road trip this weekend when the Sooners take on No. 22 Iowa State at 6:30 p.m. Saturday in Ames. After winning two of their last three road games, the Sooners are now 3-4 on the road and 2-1 in Big 12 play. T h e Sooners (16-6, 5-2) are now in s ole possession of third place in the Big 12 despite being Maria the only team Fernanda i n t h e t o p five of the Big 12 not to be ranked. If not for a loss last week at home against thenNo. 21 Kansas, the Sooners would be in second place in the Big 12 and only one loss behind Texas. OU is 2-4 against ranked opponents on the season with wins coming against then-No. 19 Kentucky and then-No. 11 Kansas while dropping matches against then-No. 1 Nebraska, No. 9 Te x a s, No. 2 1 Ka n s a s State and No. 24 Colorado State. The team will look to right the ship with its next matches coming against Iowa St. and welcome the Longhorns next Sunday. The Sooners have notched seven of their last eight wins by sweeping their opponents, with four of the five being Big 12 opponents. They have 11 sweeps on the season, just four shy of the program record of 15 sweeps, which has been

BY THE NUMBERS OU this season

12.7

Number of kills the Sooners have made per game.

2.87

Blocks per game for the Sooners, second in the Big 12.

3

Number of people in front of senior Maria Fernanda on the Big 12 all-time digs list Source: Big12Sports.com

accomplished three times (1987, 1993, 2006). On Wednesday senior libero Maria Fernanda had 13 digs to move her into the fourth position on the Big 12 career digs list with 2,019 career digs. She is third in the conference with 4.76 dig/set, has 371 digs this season and has averaged 549 digs in her four-year career. Ju n i o r m i d d l e blocker Sallie McLaurin leads the S o o n e r offense with 2 . 8 2 , 3 . 7 0 Sallie points and a Mclaurin .385 hitting percentage per match. She is the conference leader in hitting percentage and blocks (1.58). Earlier in the season, McLaurin was tied for the most blocks in the nation, but over the past two weeks her average has declined to where she is now ranked seventh in the

heather brown/the daily

Sophomore outside hitter Tara Dunn (12) spikes the ball in a game against West Virginia on Sept. 29 at McCasland Field House. The Sooners won the match three sets to one.

nation according to the latest NCAA rankings. The Cyclones (10-7, 4-3) return home after losing in five sets to Texas in Austin, tying them with Kansas State for third in the conference. They committed 28 attacking errors, which helped the Longhorns pull

away in the deciding set. Sophomore outside hitter Victoria Hurtt is leading the Cyclones since their loss at K-State on Oct. 3rd. The Sooners lead the series against Iowa State, 43-26, and hold a 17-15 record all-time in Ames. Last year Iowa State swept

the series when they took UP NEXT each match in four sets. OU at Iowa State Oklahoma has managed to claim just three of the last When: 6:30 p.m. 10 meetings, most recently Where: Hilton Colliseum, Nov. 13, 2010 in Norman. Ames

Chris Tyndall ctynsports@cox.net

Follow: Live updates from @Tyndall_Chris

You Are Invited! Class of 2013

Ring Ceremony Professor of Philosophy

Tom Boyd

As He Retires After More Than 40 Years of Service Teaching OU Students Honorary Ring Recipient and Homecoming Parade Marshal

4 p.m.

TODAY

Class of 1950 Plaza and Oklahoma Memorial Union Courtyard

In case of rain, the ceremony will be moved to Beaird Lounge. For additional information or for accommodations on the basis of disability, please call (405) 325-3784. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo

- THE PRIDE OF OKLAHOMA oud-2012-10-19-a-008.indd 1

10/18/12 10:21:34 PM


Friday, October 19, 2012