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The University of Oklahoma’s independent student voice since 1916

T H U R S DAY, O C T O B E R 18 , 2 012

W W W.O U DA I LY.C O M

Sports: Sixth-ranked senior tennis player aiming high (Page 5)

2 011 S I LV E R C R O W N W I N N E R

QUeeN OF hArT’s

OUDaily.com: Kevin Greenspon to play free show at Gray Owl Coffee

L&A: Costumes for rent (Page 8)

sTUDeNT JOBs

campus employment up from last year Students represent 29 percent of current employees ARIANNA PICKARD Campus Reporter

After a slight decrease in on-campus employment, student employment rose during the last academic year.

During the 2011-12 academic year, 3,425 students were employed by the university, which is about 11.1 percent of total students enrolled at the university, according to the OU Institutional Research and Reporting Factbook for Fall 2012. This means 180 more students have part-time jobs through the university than

the years before, according to the Factbook. On-campus employment hit a five-year high during the 2009 to 2010 school year when 11.9 percent of students had jobs through the university. That number dropped sharply to 10.7 percent the next year. The university is not sure why there was a spike in

student employment followed by such a sharp decrease, said Cheryl Jorgenson, the associate provost and director of Institutional Research. Of all current campus employees, 29 percent of them are students, according to the Factbook. Almost 80 of the student employees were employed

NONprOFIT OrgANIZATION

in off-campus work-study student jobs for community service nonprofit agencies, according to Financial Aid Services. 119 students were hired through OU’s job location program to work off campus at non-work study jobs, Diana Biggerstaff, assistant director of OU employment and compensation services,

said in an email. The job location program is a federally funded program that connects students with local businesses that understand their needs for flexible work schedules. “OU has a wide variety of jobs for students with different class levels, interests and see JOBS page 2

speech

Group looks to expand in fall

Boren speaks about OU budget “State of the University” address urged citizens to consider education funding JOEY STIPEK Online Editor

kingsley buRns/the daily

Advertising senior, Alexa Mihalick (right), arm wrestles a student during snack time at the Love Works after school program sept. 19. The program provides free after-school care and learning activities for at-risk middle school students.

At risk children are main focus for group LINDSEY BODMAN Campus Reporter

A local nonprofit organization is expanding its work this fall after enrollment quintupled from its first year. Love Works Outreach is a nonprofit organization after school initiative for middle school students in the Norman Public School district as well as the Dimensions Academy School in Norman, said Daniel Smith, lead volunteer at Love Works. The organization provides after school care for students that are considered to be at risk for their age and

at risk regarding academic standing, according to the group’s website. Group members work with students before, during and after school, Smith said. In its first year in Norman last year, the organization worked with 27 middle school students, Smith said. This year, the enrollment in the program has jumped to 140 middle school students, he said. The spike led to the organization’s opening of a second location in Norman earlier this semester. Love Works’ focus is to pay attention to students and the impacts of personal life and personal growth in leadership, academic excellence or social life, said Bri Ramos, OU alumna and Love Works after school

coordinator. More than 120 people actively volunteer with Love Works, according to Smith. Most of these volunteers are OU students, Ramos said. However, with the growing community, they are always in need of more volunteers, she said. “There is so much interest, and the struggles are staying caught up and meeting all of the needs of the students,” Ramos said. The coordinators said Love Works not only has impacted the lives of the students, but their lives as well. Smith recently graduated with a master’s degree in chemical see GROUP page 2

OU President David Boren urged Oklahoma citizens to be concerned about continuing to shrink state appropriations to higher education during an hour-long discussion on Wednesday. “It’s what is critical for the future of our state that we need to wake up the public,” Boren said. “We need a Paul Revere’s ride around the state of Oklahoma to wake up the people to what is going on.” In a chart provided by the university, for the fiscal year 2013 budget OU receives 17.5 percent of its funding through state appropriations, 29 percent in tuitions and fees, 16.9 percent in grants and contracts, 27.5 percent in auxiliary funds, 8.7 percent in other Educational & General budget, 0.5 percent in one-time funding and “the rest of the costs are passed on to students and parents.” The discussion, which took place in Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Beaird Lounge, was Boren’s annual “State of the University” address to the Staff Senate. “At what point do we really still think we have a public university, and at what point, with regards to funding, does it become a private university supported by tuition fees and

cOMMUNITY serVIce

OU, United Way of Norman join forces to raise money to provide aid for communities, programs in need Partnership has raised over $62,000 during its 2012 Campus Campaign BROOKE HANKINSON Campus Reporter

OU United Way — a partnership between OU and United Way of Norman to help raise money to support 41 programs across Norman — has raised $62,248.23 to date for the organization’s 2012 Campus Campaign, less than half of its $215,000 goal, according to Laurie Bass, United Way of Norman director of information services. OU United Way identifies the most pressing needs of communities and supports programs that address those needs, said Kristin Collins, United Way of Nor man president. “We still have a ton of work to do because we are not

oud-2012-10-18-a-001,002.indd 1

even at 50 percent of our goal so far,” Collins said. The campaign started Sept. 13 and will end Nov. 9, she said. The current amount of money raised consists of donations from OU faculty, staff, retirees, students and events held on campus to raise money, said Brian Ringer, OU United Way Campus Campaign co-chair and director of Student Media. Two such events, the United Way OU Office Olympics and Student Media/United Way of Norman three-on-three Basketball, recently raised a total of $1,280, Ringer said. The campaign team visited four programs — Love Works

Outreach, Bridges, Full Circle, and Food & Shelter, Inc. — of the 41 total programs, Collins said. Love Works Outreach is an after-school program for middle school students that includes tutoring and team and character building, Ringer said. The program, which acts as a leadership building block for students, also includes summer leadership camps to nurture students’ athletic, musical and artistic abilities, Ringer said. Geared toward high school students who are living on their own, Bridges is a program that provides access to housing and the services to help such students graduate high school, according to the United Way of Norman website. Full Circle provides

AT A GLANCE campus campaign $2,890

ou Foundation $11,492

ou retirees $47,866

ou employees total: $62,248 Source: Brian Ringer, OU United Way Campaign Co-Chair and Director of Student Media

activities, meals and health monitoring for senior citizens in order to prevent nursing home placement, according to the website. Food & Shelter, Inc., as the name implies, gives the homeless or struggling

access to hot meals, laundry facilities and showers, Ringer said. The campaign also wants to educate the OU community about these programs around Norman and convince 20 to 25 percent of all OU employees to participate in the campaign, Collins said. OU United Way’s last fundraising event, the Chili Cook Off, will be held Nov. 9. OU United Way accepts cash, check or credit card donations online. Brooke Hankinson Brooke.k.hankinson-1@ou.edu

gifts?” Boren asked. Boren praised faculty and staff for “doing more with less” in the midst of the current economic crisis. “We have been challenged more in terms of our financial support than ever before,” he said. Boren said during the last year, the university has had to absorb $100 million in cuts or uncompensated cost increases. This includes $20 million in uncompensated health insurance costs and rising utility costs over which Boren said the university had no control. This is because the Oklahoma legislature cutting higher education funding by 20 percent over the last three years. In a chart provided by the university, OU in 1985 received 38.6 percent of its funding through state appropriation, he said. In 2012, OU received 11.3 percent of its funding through state appropriations. Boren said citizens have to think about the future of Oklahoma and opportunities for young people. “Teachers are being laid off. Courses aren’t being offered,” Boren said. “And here we have been weathering see SPEECH page 2

Sooners look to beat West Virginia in Morgantown SPORTS: after twoconsecutive conference wins, the soccer team looks to continue its streak against mountaineers. (Page 5)

Pres. candidates’ views on smaller economic issues matter too Opinion: tax and spending reforms are not the only candidate platforms that affect the economy. (Page 4)

VOL. 98, NO. 45 © 2012 OU Publications Board FREE — Additional copies 25¢

INSIDE TODAY campus......................2 clas si f ie ds................6 l i f e & a r t s ..................7 o p inio n.....................4 spor ts........................5 Visit OUDaily.com for more

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• Thursday, October 18, 2012

Campus

Lindsey Ruta, campus editor Chase Cook and Jake Morgan, assistant editors dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com • Twitter: @OUDaily

group: Hard work impacts volunteers, students AT A GLANCE Love Works Hours 4 to 6:30 p.m. Monday through Friday (405)397-9576 Locations: East Campus: Lindsey Street and 12th Avenue North Campus: Journey Church Tecumseh Road and I-35

Today around campus A book sale will be held from 10 a.m .to 4 p.m. on the south side of the Neustadt Wing of Bizzell Memorial Library. Thousands of books ranging from best sellers to foreign language books will be offered. Free ice cream floats will be given out by Union Programming Board from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the first floor lobby of Oklahoma Memorial Union. Mid Day Music by Union Programming Board will be held from noon to 1 p.m. in the food court of Oklahoma Memorial Union. Davis Dorrough will play the piano.Do you want to see your organization’s campus event here? Visit OUDaily.com/events/submit to add your entry.

Record requests The Oklahoma Daily regularly asks for access to public information from OU officials. Here is a list of the most-recent requests our reporters have submitted to the university. Requested document and purpose

Date requested

The 2003 purchase and sale agreement between University North Park LLC and OU — To see the contents and property involved in this purchase agreement.

Sept. 24

A database or electronic document of registered vehicles of students, staff and faculty with OU Parking Services for spring 2012 — To see how and how many people register with OU’s parking services.

Sept. 24

Contract regarding purchase of 146 Page St. — To see the details of the contract, such as the price of the purchase and OU’s plans for the property.

Sept. 24

Visit OUDaily.com/openrecords for a full list of requests

The Oklahoma Daily is committed to serving readers with accurate coverage and welcomes your comments about information that may require correction or clarification. To contact us with corrections, email us at dailynews@ou.edu. Tuesday’s story “Awareness group adds training sessions” erroneously identified Kasey Catlett as the spokeswoman. He is in fact the spokesman. It also erroneously stated there are 500 current Allies. There are actually 800. A Wednesday page one photo cutline incorrectly spelled the opera “Iphigénie en Tauride.” Visit OUDaily.com/corrections for an archive of our corrections

NUMBER ONE is nothing to celebrate.

Continued from page 1

Smith said. He is going to continue working with Love engineering, but does not Works because of his “pasplan on pursuing that career. sion to work with the father“Love Works has had a less and to speak into the profound impact on my life,”

through this, but you know we can’t keep weathering through this with very modest changes to tuitions and fees compared to $100 million in cuts.” This year the university has recouped 10 million of that through tuition and fees increases, he said. Boren said the university has thought of multiple ways to cut its budget including removing office telephones as an example as a way to save money. “We can’t cut more without cutting into the muscle and bone,” Boren said. “We’ve cut the fat.” State funding to OU is still $90 million a year below what the university received four years ago, he said. If university funding were to return to the level it was four years ago, Boren said OU would see an added appropriation of $13 million. Boren said he sees it as a reasonable request that state

Continued from page 1 skill sets,” Biggerstaff said. Job categories include clerical and secretarial; skilled crafts and trades and technical and paraprofessional service maintenance workers, Biggerstaff said. “There really is no lack of applicants for student jobs, unless the job requires very specialized skills,” Biggerstaff said. However, student job opportunities with food services, university libraries, athletics and information

University Theatre

Weitzenhoffer School of Musical Theatre

Avenue 8 p.m. Nov. 2-4, 8, 9 3 p.m. Nov. 4 and 11

Rupel J. Jones Theatre Fine Arts Box Office

(405) 325-4101 #OUFineAr ts

The University of Oklahoma is an equal oppor tunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo

oud-2012-10-18-a-001,002.indd 2

Lindsey Bodman lindsey.bodman-1@ou.edu

joey stipek/the daily

At the “State of the University” address to the Staff Senate on Wednesday, OU President David Boren spoke about shrinking state appropriations for higher education. The speech focused on how citizens

leaders return funding to where it was four years ago. “We could do some things we’d like to do with modest enhancement of compensation,” he said. “Keeping tuition and fees low and showing the kind of appreciation that this staff deserves, our

faculty deserves and every- what’s right in our state and one associated with the uni- it’s a cause for investing in versity deserves.” our future.” Boren said he believes increasing state appropriations Joey Stipek is a worthy cause because it is joey.stipek@gmail.com an investment for the state. “It’s not a selfish cause,” Boren said. “It’s a cause for

technology tend to generate a lot of applicants, Biggerstaff said. “There is a competitive job market at OU, including student jobs,” Biggerstaff said. “Students should apply aggressively for all positions they have an interest in and qualify for.” To be eligible for employment at OU, students must be currently enrolled, meet the minimum qualifications for each job, be available for the required hours of work and have a good work ethic, Biggerstaff said.

OU has opportunities for each year students are in school, with only a limited number of jobs specific to upperclassmen, Biggerstaff said. All student jobs are by definition part-time jobs – less than 40 hours per week on average, said Cheryl Jorgenson, director of institutional research at OU. However, most student jobs require 20 hours a week or less, Biggerstaff said. To apply for a job with OU, students can go to jobs. ou.edu for campus jobs,

including work-study and paid community service jobs. Students who are looking for off campus part time jobs can access the job location program. Arianna Pickard arianna.j.pickard-1@ou.edu

University of Oklahoma Libraries

BOOK SALE

Rated R

cancer killer.

lungcanceralliance.org

my life.”

Continued from page 1

NUMBER ONE

Join Lung Cancer Alliance in the fight against this disease.

lives and work with young people.” Working with the organization has allowed Ramos to reach her full potential, she

speech: OU thinking of new ways to cut

This year, more than 163,000 people will die from lung cancer—making it America’s

But new treatments offer hope.

said.

Braden Wallace (right), health and exercise science junior, high fives students as they arrive at the “I feel like I was called to Love Works after-school program Sept. 19 at the Journey Church Love Works campus on Tecumseh impact the next generation Road. The program is funded through a network of local partnerships, and aims to improve the aca- and it’s the given purpose of demic success and leadership potential of at-risk middle school students in Norman.

jobs: Students must be enrolled to work at OU

Corrections

Being

Source: loveworksoutreach.com kingsley burns/the daily

Wednesday- Thursday October 17-18 10:00 am to 4:00 pm South Side Bizzell Memorial Library 401 West Brooks For more information and prices scan the QR code, visit http://libraries.ou.edu , or call (405) 325-2141

10/17/12 10:41:11 PM


NEWS

Thursday, October 18, 2012 •

3

sTUDeNT heALTh

Taking multivitamins lessens risk of cancer MARILYNN MARCHIONE, AP Chief Medical Writer

America’s favorite dietary supplements, multivitamins, modestly lowered the risk for cancer in healthy male doctors who took them for more than a decade, the first large study to test these pills has found. The result is a surprise because many studies of individual vitamins have found they don’t help prevent chronic diseases and some even seemed to raise the risk of cancer. In the new study, multivitamins cut the chance of developing cancer by 8 percent. That is less effective than a good diet, exercise and not smoking, each of which can lower cancer risk by 20 percent to 30 percent, cancer experts say. Multivitamins also may have different results in women, younger men or people less healthy than those in this study. “It’s a very mild effect and personally I’m not sure it’s significant enough to recommend to anyone” although it is promising, said Dr. Ernest Hawk, vice president of cancer prevention at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and formerly of the National Cancer Institute. “At least this doesn’t suggest a harm” as some previous studies on single vitamins have, he said. Hawk reviewed the study for the American Association for Cancer Research, which is meeting in Anaheim, Calif., where the study was to be presented on Wednesday. It also was published online in the Journal of the American Medical Association. About one-third of U.S. adults and as many as half of those over 50 take multivitamins. They are marketed as a kind of insurance policy against bad eating. Yet no government agency

ap photo/bRigham and Women’s hospital

This Oct. 11, 2012 photo provided by the Brigham and Women’s hospital shows a monthly calendar vitamin pack used in a long-term study on multivitamins. America’s favorite dietary supplements, multivitamins, modestly lowered the risk of developing cancer in healthy male doctors who took them daily for more than a decade, the first large study to test these pills has found. The study was published online in the Journal of the American Medical Association on Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2012.

recommends their routine use “regardless of the quality of a person’s diet,” says a fact sheet from the federal Office of Dietary Supplements. Some fads, such as the antioxidant craze over vitamins A and E and beta-carotene, backfired when studies found more health risk with those supplements, not less. Many of those were single vitamins in larger doses than the “100 percent of daily value” amounts that multivitamins typically contain. Science on vitamins has been skimpy. Most studies have been observational — they look at groups of people who do and do not use vitamins, a method that can’t give firm conclusions. Dr. J. Michael Gaziano,

of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and VA Boston, led a stronger test. Nearly 15,000 male doctors who were 50 or older and free of cancer when the study started were given monthly packets of Centrum Silver or fake multivitamins without knowing which type they received. After about 11 years, there were 2,669 new cancers, and some people had cancer more than once. For every 1,000 men per year in the study, there were 17 cancers among multivitamin users and more than 18 among those taking the placebo pills. That worked out to an 8 percent lower risk of developing cancer in the vitamin group. Multivitamins made no

difference in the risk of developing prostate cancer, which accounted for half of all cases. They lowered the risk of other cancers collectively by about 12 percent. There also was a trend toward fewer cancer deaths among multivitamin users, but the difference was so small it could have occurred by chance alone. Side effects were fairly similar except for more rashes among vitamin users. The National Institutes of Health paid for most of the study. Pfizer Inc. supplied the pills and other companies supplied the packaging. The main reason to take a multivitamin is to correct or prevent a deficiency, “but there may be a modest

NEWS FROM AROUND THE NATION 1. BISMARCK, N.D. (AP)

Man sells 20-year old McJordan sauce for $9,995 a man who used to own mcdonald’s restaurants in north dakota is about to be $10,000 richer after selling a 20-year-old container of mcjordan barbecue sauce to a buyer in chicago. the sauce was used on mcjordan burgers, named for basketball icon michael jordan. the promotional item was sold in limited markets for a short time in the 1990s, when jordan led the chicago bulls to six nba championships. mort bank, of bismarck, saved the gallon jug of sauce after selling his mcdonald’s restaurants in bismarck-mandan and minot in 1996. “it was in my basement, and i would look at it occasionally,” he told the bismarck tribune. “i thought it would be worth something someday.” bank advertised the sauce on ebay, saying: “a once in a lifetime chance to own the rarest of rare michael jordan and

mcdonald’s collectible!” it sold for $9,995 monday night to a buyer from chicago whom bank has not identified. bank told the chicago tribune that the buyer was not jordan himself. jordan opened a steakhouse in chicago last year. “i’m sure he’s a bulls or michael jordan fan, and hopefully he’s not going to put it on his ribs or his burger,” bank told kXmb-tV of the buyer. “but it’s up to him; he can do whatever he wants with it.” bank said he has at least three storage units full of mcdonald’s memorabilia and other collector’s items that he has been selling on ebay for three years. he has sold items to buyers as far away as china, japan, brazil and europe, though never for as much money as the sauce garnered. “i’m pretty ecstatic,” he told the bismarck tribune. “you never know what is going to be a hot item.”

JENKINS MEDICAL CLINIC CALL FOR APPOINTMENT OR WALK-IN 755 South Jenkins Ave. (two blocks north of Boyd) Norman, OK Phone: (405) 701-2420 Fax: (405) 701-2447

oud-2012-10-18-a-001,002.indd 3

benefit in reducing the risk of cancer in older men,” Gaziano said. Cancer experts said the results need to be confirmed by another study before recommending multivitamins to the public. These participants were healthier — only 4 percent smoked, for example. For people who do want to take multivitamins, doctors suggest: —Be aware that they are dietary supplements, which do not get the strict testing required of prescription medicines. —Ask your doctor before taking any. Vitamin K can interfere with common heart medicines and blood thinners, and vitamins C and E

can lower the effectiveness of some types of chemotherapy. For people having surgery, some vitamins affect bleeding and response to anesthesia. —Current and former smokers should avoid multivitamins with lots of betacarotene or vitamin A; two studies have tied them to increased risk of lung cancer.

Marilyn Marchione, AP Chief Medical Writer

1 2

3

2. SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP)

Ex-U.S. Sen. George McGovern “nearing the end” in hospice care — the family of ex-u.s. sen. george mcgovern says the 90-year-old is “no longer responsive” in hospice care. mcgovern’s family issued a statement Wednesday afternoon through avera mckennan hospital. his daughter, ann mcgovern, earlier told the associated press that her father is “nearing the end”

3. OKLAHOMA CITY (AP)

and appears restful and peaceful. she says it’s a blessing that she and other family members are able to be with him. mcgovern was the democratic presidential candidate who lost to president Richard nixon in 1972 in a historic landslide. he was a member of the u.s. house from 1957 to 1961 and a u.s. senator from 1963 to 1981 and led his party’s liberal wing during that time. in recent years, he turned his focus to world hunger.

Wynnewood Refining co., owned by cVR energy inc. of land, texas. Second man died sugar cVR officials have said Tuesday after oil the explosion occurred as the boiler was being refinery boiler restarted following schedexplosion uled maintenance and — a second man who was upkeep, which resumed the injured in an explosion at an following day. cVR issued a statement oklahoma oil refinery has saying an investigation into died. the blast continues, and a university of oklahoma ceo jack lipinski expressed medical center spokes“heartfelt sympathies” to all man says Russell mann of affected by the blast. davis died tuesday at the a u.s. department of oklahoma city hospital. labor spokeswoman also mann was injured, said an investigation is and billy smith of pauls ongoing and declined further Valley was killed sept. 28 comment. when a boiler exploded at

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Reader comment on OUDaily.com ››

• Thursday, October 18, 2012

“If you believe that it should be legal, if you believe your reasoning to be sound, you should have no trouble facing photographs of abortion and then explaining your rationale to why that’s okay.” (LinnyO, RE: ‘LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Justice For All displays inspires shame, not genuine dialogue’)

OPINION

Mary Stanfield, opinion editor Kayley Gillespie, assistant editor dailyopinion@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/opinion • Twitter: @OUDailyOpinion

THUMBS DOWN: In Wednesday’s State of the University, President David Boren said the state legislature is likely to further cut funding to higher education next year. (Page 1)

editorial

So what about the other economic issues? Our View: Taxes and spending cuts are not the

be able to deny citizens policies on the basis of pre-existing conditions, charge exorbitant fees for medical services or cap the amount of coverage available to a person in the course of a year or Polls have shown the economy is the highest in the course of his or her lifetime, among other This is part two of a two-part series on the candidates’ priority of voters. The candidates’ most specific restrictions. views. Wednesday’s editorial examined the plans have focused on taxes and spending. But many economic Romney has vowed to repeal this law as quickly as candidate’s tax and spending plans. other factors affect the economy and the recovery possible, allowing states to waive its requirements From now until Nov. 6, The Daily will editorialize about a — factors that have received significantly less focus in the meantime, though he has said he would keep different aspect of the elections each Wednesday. These from either candidate. some unspecified measures of the law. editorials will cover presidential, federal, state and local The Republican candidate also has expressed elections, as well as ballot questions and voting issues. Wages: support for a “regulatory cap of zero dollars on all In 2008, President Barack Obama campaigned on candidate would “repeal Dodd-Frank and replace federal agencies,” meaning federal agencies would with streamlined, modern regulatory framework.” a promise to increase the federal minimum wage not be able to pass any new regulations that have A more efficient regulatory system sounds nice, from $5.15 an hour to $7.25 an hour. He planned to associated costs. This would indeed keep additional but Romney so far has offered few specifics on how raise it to $9.50 an hour by 2011 and then raise it to costs from being passed down to the consumer — compensate for inflation periodically. He has failed this will be accomplished. No president should Romney’s stated inspiration for the cap — but it to take action on this promise since taking office and work to repeal a law before developing a workable also would tie the hands of agencies responsible for replacement with some chance of passing Congress. ensuring the educational quality, consumer safety has not yet mentioned it in his 2012 campaign. Republican candidate Mitt Romney originally and environmental health of this nation. favored raising the minimum wage as well and also Outsourcing/foreign markets: As Romney’s website puts it, this would restrict Romney has emphasized the need to go after favored adjusting it yearly for inflation. But Romney new regulations “no matter what the social benefits.” China for currency manipulation, unfair trade changed his mind after an outcry from supporters practices and the violation of existing economic The grades concerned about job losses and now has come out agreements. Obama largely agrees with this stance against raising the minimum wage at this time. Based on the candidates’ tax and spending plans but has drawn criticism for not doing enough to The president supported and and their views on these other economic issues, we protect America’s interests. signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair have assigned each a letter grade for how well their The Our View Obama’s website says he will eliminate tax breaks position fulfill the goal of economic recovery. Pay Act, which gave women is the majority for companies that outsource and create incentives more freedom to sue over pay Obama: Bopinion of for businesses to bring jobs back to America. discrimination. Romney never has Though the president has weathered a difficult The Daily’s His opponent has declared he would not come out in support of equal pay economic recession and done much to help soften nine-member support such an elimination of tax breaks. Romney the impact on citizens, he could stand to be more editorial board and refuses to release his views on also would eliminate taxes on profits American related legislation. aggressive in his tax and spending reforms. And he businesses earn on foreign soil. This could has failed to give proper focus to some important Wall Street regulation: encourage business growth, as Romney claims, but issues connected to the economy. Obama signed the Dodd-Frank bill, an answer to it is just as likely to encourage businesses to favor Romney: I the financial crisis designed to limit the risk in future foreign markets and move jobs overseas. We would give him a solid C for tax and spending recessions. This legislation provides for oversight on plans that would achieve the desired result, but Other regulation: risks to the financial institutions most essential to do so at too high a cost to consumers. However, The largest new set of regulations Obama has the economy, consolidates regulatory organizations, considering the lack of specifics in his other stances added fall under the unmbrella of health care creates a non-bankruptcy mechanism for the takerelated to the economy, we have to give him an reform. The Affordable Care Act forces insurance over of “too-big-to-fail” institutions and limits incomplete until he does his homework. companies to provide more fair coverage to all consumer financial fees, among other regulations. Americans. Insurance companies no longer will Romney’s campaign website promises the Comment on this on OUDaily.com only important issues related to the economy and influencing the recovery.

column

Homecoming must change to stay relevant to students EDITOR’S NOTE: Scott Houser is a member of Pi Kappa Phi. He writes as a private student and does not represent the fraternity.

opinion columnist

has become a chore to the average greek member. Greek houses work hard to win many homecoming events — not because they enjoy it, but because they feel obligated. Pledges and newer members often are charged with construction of the float and its components, and fined if they do not participate. The same is true for pep rally dances. If greek organizations need to levy fines to make their members participate, then the reward must outweigh the costs, right? Well, that’s the problem. The only real reward is a trophy and some recognition. Without enjoyment for the activities themselves, participation is rather meaningless. CAC is partly to blame. Aside from a change in the theme, to the average greek member, homecoming really is about the same every year. While consistency helps in the ease of planning such events, variety is the spice of life. Organizers should focus on planning new and interesting events the greek community can get excited about. Another problem with CAC homcoming is the extensive rules regarding the competitions, which make competing uninteresting. I’ve seen pep rally dancers disqualified for

J

oy is in the journey, not the destination. It’s the reason we read books and watch movies instead of Scott Houser just Googling the ending. It’s scott.a.houser-1@ou.edu the reason average people play sports or games without being paid to compete. It’s the reason we do anything where the reward doesn’t outweigh the labor necessary to achieve it, with the exception of Campus Activities Council homecoming. For the greek community, homecoming is an interesting dichotomy. We should be looking forward to working with other fraternities and sororities and engaging in friendly competition. Many still do. Lately, however, it seems participating in homecoming

well-performed but otherwise illegal cheer stunts, and I’ve seen South Oval boards and banners “dumbed down” because the desired artistic mediums were not allowed. The other half of the blame rests on us, the greek community. If we aren’t getting anything out of homecoming, why do we feel obligated to participate? Winning homecoming doesn’t make you the best house, and if you don’t think your house is already the best house, you should reevaluate your reasons for joining. First, CAC needs to take action to make homecoming exciting. Not just for those who hold high positions in the organization but for all students involved. Devise new and big ideas. Don’t be afraid to take risks. Second, remove rules that stifle creativity in competition. Finally, executive members of greek organizations should seriously consider removing coercive measures to enforce participation. Scott Houser is an international business senior.

column

To achieve objectivity, professors must express their views

T

o occupy an opinion columnist objective viewpoint is often seen as noble. Apart from the brute facts of existence, life contains many shades of grey. A key selling point of a secular university, for example, is it provides a Nathan Cranford classroom setting in which nathan.a.cranford-1@ou.edu one opinion does not reign supreme over another. This view is attractive in theory, but it is unattainable in practice. Every individual contains psychological predispositions that will knowingly or unknowingly manifest themselves. Given this fact of the human condition, what methodology should professors adopt when addressing controversial topics within a classroom setting? Experience as an observer convinced me students benefit when professors openly express their views beforehand.

Rather than wearing the illusory mask of objectivity, openly expressing one’s views allows students to recognize which alternative positions may not be given full credit. Of course, context matters. As stated earlier, brute facts do exist about which opinion and individual impressions are irrelevant. For example, some professors openly express their religious or anti-religious beliefs when teaching the theory of evolution. These opinions are superfluous to the subject and can negatively affect the discussion. Many students already are hostile to the theory of evolution and likely will be more prone to reject the theory if the professor expresses an anti-religious view. More relevant courses fall within the humanities, such as ethics. Within these courses, a clear right or wrong answer is not always easily found. The primary purpose of such courses is to challenge a student’s thinking, and the opinion of the professor can serve this purpose. Some may argue if professors are to express their opinion, this should be reserved until the end of the semester. This is partially based on the claim that a professor’s primary duty is

to teach the course material as neutrally as possible in order to give fair credit to all positions. Also, students may not have enough intellectual respect for the professor or knowledge of the subject to value his or her opinion beforehand. However, students should value the opinion of their professor for the reasons just highlighted. Without knowing the opinion beforehand, students are under the false impression the professor is merely “stating the facts.” Others may argue if professors express their opinion beforehand, they have highjacked the course to their own personal interest. But experience has shown me most professors are capable of presenting the strongest possible arguments of an alternative position. Adding on their own personal convictions in no way changes this fact. Thus goes the catch-22. Objectivity is found in the classroom by the open expression, rather than suppression, of an individual’s views. Nathan Cranford is a philosophy senior.

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10/17/12 9:36:52 PM


Thursday, October 18, 2012 •

SPORTS

5

Kedric Kitchens, sports editor Dillon Phillips, assistant editor dailysports@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/sports • Twitter: @OUDailySports

MEN’S TENNIS

Sixth-ranked tennis player aims high OU’s top singles player looks to live up to 2011 season

AT A GLANCE Paval in 2011 Paval was an AllAmerican in doubles with sophomore Dane Webb and the Big 12 Player of the Year last season.

Garrett Holt Sports Reporter

Men’s senior tennis player Costin Paval is going to have to learn to play with a giant target on his back. The Sooners’ No. 1 singles player is ranked sixth in the nation by the Intercollegiate Tennis Association to start the season. “It puts a little pressure on you, but when you are in the heat of the moment, you don’t think of those things,” Paval said. “ You’re just thinking of how to execute right, whatever you have to do.” This mentality has served the Bucharest, Romania native well during his career at OU as he already has been one of the greatest tennis players in program history, amassing such honors as being named a 2012 AllAmerican as well as the 2010 Big 12 Freshman of the Year. However, none of these accolades would have been achieved without the tutelage of Oklahoma head coach John Roddick and his coaching staff. “He’s come a long way,” Roddick said. “He has a lot

Source: SoonerSports.com

heather brown/the daily

Senior tennis player Costin Paval is the sixth-ranked singles player in the nation and part of the first-ranked doubles team along with his partner, sophomore Dane Webb.

more variety to his game; his serve has gotten a lot better. There are just some nuances of the game that Dane h av e r e a l l y webb improved, especially over the past year and a half.” Paval agrees that much

of his success has been because of the coaching staff teaching him to properly execute on the court. “I have developed as a lot better player being here in the U.S.” Paval said. “Coach Roddick and [assistant coach] Bo Hodge are doing a tremendous job. I think from a development standpoint, [the coaching is] the best that we can get.”

Not only has Paval developed into a top-tier singles player, he also is one of the most dominant doubles players in the nation. He and his partner, sophomore Dane Webb, are the No. 1 doubles team in the country going into the season. “When you have a guy who can play No. 1 singles and No. 1 doubles for you, it

moves everyone else down a spot,” Roddick said. “It definitely helps everyone’s confidence because they know that every match they play is a winnable match. [Paval] is going to play the best player on the opposite team, and he’s very capable of winning against anyone we play.” While Paval’s accolades are certainly impressive, he is focused firmly on the

upcoming season. “You can’t just think of last season and try to replicate it,” Paval said. “It never works that way. It’s completely different.” The Sooners will lean heavily on Paval to anchor the top part of their team. In order to experience the same level of success they had in 2011, they may need Paval to come up with his best season as a college player. Perhaps junior Guillermo Alcorta Olarra put it best when describing what Paval means to the team. “It’s always good to know that the players who are playing one, two and three have a good ranking and are going to win matches,” Olarra said. Garrett Holt spacetothetree@gmail.com

SOCCER

Sooners look to top Mountaineers on road Oklahoma has won back-to-back conference games Ross Stracke Sports Reporter

After earning two big wins over the weekend, the Oklahoma soccer team looks to continue its momentum against No. 23 West Virginia and its two star forwards. West Virginia’s junior for ward Frances Silva and sophomore forward Kate Schwindel have been nothing short of spectacular this season. Silva is currently third in goals in the Big 12 with 10, and Schwindel has a commanding lead in assists with seven and has added eight goals of her own. OU coach Matt Potter knows whom these two girls are, and like every other week, Potter said the plan to stopping them is simple: defend. “West Virginia has great presence and great ability in its attacking front, for sure,” Potter said. “What we did this weekend was kind of the blueprint going

forward; we have to defend very well.” Defending well has been something the Sooners have done in just about every game this season. In 13 of their 17 games, they have allowed one goal or fewer. Defense has not been the issue. Offense has. Recently though, Oklahoma has been addressing the issue of the lack of offense. In the Sooners’ last four ga m e s, t h e y s c o re d s i x goals, where in the previous eight games before that, they only mustered a paltry eight goals. The change in the offense is anchored behind senior for ward Renae Cuellar. Cuellar is second in the Big 12 Conference in scoring with 11 goals and has emerged as a primary offensive threat in the conference. However, the problem is she is the Sooners’ only scoring threat. Only six other Oklahoma players have a goal this season, and the next in line behind Cuellar for team scoring title is sophomore

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forward Kelly Price with two goals, both of which coming in the same game. If Oklahoma wins this game in Morgantown, it definitely will be an upset, just not necessarily in the opinion of Potter and his Sooner squad. “Number one, I’m sure this would be an upset in the eyes of everyone else,” Potter said. “But I’m not so sure it would be an upset to our own girls, after the version of ourselves we showed this past weekend.” The Sooners and Mountaineers square off at 6 tonight at Dick Dlesk Soccer Stadium in Morgantown. Ross Stracke ross.stracke@ou.edu

Ben Williams/the daily

Junior forward Amy Petrikin (21) slides for the ball during OU’s match against Texas on Sept. 29 at John Crain Field. The Sooners fell to the Longhorns, 1-0.

The Joe C. and Carole Kerr McClendon Honors College invites applica�ons for the Undergraduate Research Opportuni�es Program for the Fall 2012 semester. This is a compe��ve program open to ALL undergraduate students at the University of Oklahoma main campus and the Health Sciences Center. Winners receive research grants of up to $1000 to be used for faculty-sponsored research projects. The deadline for submission is Wednesday, November 7, 2012. Applica�ons and details are available on the Honors College website: h�p://www.ou.edu/honors/SP12app.pdf

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Look for some exciting times to be in the offing in the year ahead. However, don’t expect this to be the case if you try to mix business and friendship. Keep these two areas of your life separate, if you can. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- If your credibility with others could be fragile at present, it wouldn’t be wise to tell any fish stories. You need to have the trophies to back up your tales. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- You are the type of person who seldom counts his or her chickens before they’re hatched. However, for some reason, you might bank heavily on something more wishful than real. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -Watch out for someone with ulterior motives who could try to manipulate you with flattery. If someone says that you’re one of the greatest people alive, enjoy, but be on guard. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -Someone for whom you’ve gone out of your way several times might not be in a mood to reciprocate when needed. Chalk it up to experience. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- If a social gathering that you’re invited to is likely to include several people you dislike, don’t punish yourself by not going and missing out on the fun; be prepared to turn the other cheek. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Instead of taking bows for something you’ve yet to accomplish, tell it like it is. It could cause you

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embarrassment down the line if the work in question should go unfinished. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -Usually, you like to play things spontaneously, and you do quite well, but unless you plan every step of the way today, you’re likely to trip over your own feet. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Before getting yourself involved in a joint endeavor, think carefully about the costs and responsibilities that you’d be taking on. If things are not equally distributed, it won’t work out. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Don’t underestimate your adversaries, especially if you’re involved in negotiating a critical matter. That edge you think you have may only exist in your head. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- The truth will out itself and put you in a very embarrassing position if you fudge the facts and pretend that you’ve done something that you promised to do but have yet to complete. Tell it like it is.

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Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker October 18, 2012

ACROSS 1 Mop decks 5 Words of clarification 10 Spirited party 14 Hack’s vehicle 15 Formal edict 16 Common cookie 17 Seed coating 18 Fountain treats 19 Pear-shaped instrument of old 20 Grab a stool and have a drink 23 “___ Navidad!� 24 Ph.D. preceders 25 “Little Women� novelist 28 White House “no� 30 Place for a pie 31 Malicious feeling 33 Kind of horse or monkey 36 Woolgatherer’s state 40 Slangy “yes� 41 Fermented honey drinks 42 Like the ocean 43 Help a weightlifter 44 Decorates 46 5-1/2 point type 10/18

49 Not dormant 51 Handle a big burden 57 Complain 58 Dote on 59 Basin partner 60 “Beetle Bailey� bulldog 61 Plains grazers 62 Word from a Doris Day song 63 Old Russian despot 64 Dance components 65 Namedropping sort DOWN 1 Brief try 2 Suffix with “soft� or “glass� 3 Leaf-tobranch angle 4 Where to find ones 5 Uproar 6 African ruminant 7 Chopin work 8 Words represented by a colon, in mathematics 9 License prerequisite, often 10 Spanish dance with quick turns 11 One of the Netherlands Antilles

12 Bristlelike 13 Farmers, at times 21 “The best is ___ to come!� 22 Park Place enhancer 25 Blanched 26 Stead 27 Thunder sound 28 Is a contender 29 Series shortener 31 On the double, in the O.R. 32 Dr.’s wall hanging 33 Litigious type 34 Adam and Eve’s home 35 Once-sacred coilers 37 Force along 38 Classical opening?

39 Like radon 43 A drunk may lie in one 44 Capital of Greece 45 Game cube 46 Fancy tie 47 Either of two Indian mountain ranges 48 Blood carrier from the heart 49 Came about 50 Barbershop band 52 Little touches, as of paint 53 Ready for publication 54 Apt name for a guy in debt? 55 Prefix with “dynamic� 56 Dull-colored

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FROM THE WAIST UP By Kelly Islund

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- If you are tempted to cater to your whims in order to achieve instant gratification, chances are you might engage yourself in something extremely extravagant and financially unwise. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Be careful not to do anything that could jeopardize a relationship with some key allies. Your projects and prospects need the goodwill and support of these people.

10/17/12 7:45:07 PM


Thursday, October 18, 2012 •

OUDaily.com ››

LIFE&ARTS cinema

Los Angeles-based musician Kevin Greenspon will perform at 8 tonight at Gray Owl Coffee

7

Carmen Forman, life & arts editor Westlee Parsons, assistant editor dailyent@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/life&arts • Twitter: @OUDailyArts

Austin Film Festival Students to trek south for film fest Molly Evans

Life & Arts Reporter

Sixteen members of OU’s Student Film Production Club will drive 400 miles to the 19th Austin Film Festival on Friday to view film screenings, attend writing workshops and network with professionals. With $125 Lone Star badges, the students will have access to actor and director panels, post-screening parties and nearly 200 film showings, according to the festival website. Although the event includes eight days of screenings and four days of conference activities, the club is visiting for three days. This will be the fourth trip for OU film students but only the third time as an organization and the first without UOSA funding, film and media studies professor Katrina Boyd said. Third-year festival-goer Jason Anthony sees the event as an opportunity to network with old and new connections, which he has done in bars and theaters throughout Austin and the event headquarters, the Driskill Hotel.

“I feel like some people would have the idea that [Austin Film Festival] is pretentious or something like that. It was very approachable.” Katrina Boyd, film and media studies professor “It’s really encouraging for me as an amateur filmmaker that you don’t need to be in Hollywood to be making movies and to be a filmmaker,” said Anthony, a film and media studies senior and club treasurer. That independent support encouraged film and media studies juniors Todd and Alex Greenlee to submit a few shorts to the festival. The Greenlee brothers are attending for the second time, but this year, they submitted several pieces to film festivals, beginning with Austin and extending to those to be held in 2013, Alex Greenlee said. Their films include a documentary about a man involved in the Watergate recordings and a violent feature about a hit man, Alex Greenlee said. Their films were not selected for the festival, but they have learned the hitand-miss nature of the industry.

“In filmmaking, whether you are accepted or not, every opportunity is a way to grow and get better,” Alex Greenlee said. “Also, if you are not sending your films anywhere, who are you making films for besides yourself?” Four years ago, a small group of students loosely organized a trip to Austin and returned to campus with rave reviews, Boyd said. The club has coordinated with greater detail each year with planning, usually starting in the summer, she said. This year, funds from up to $25 membership dues and earnings from a student-produced music video for a private party covered the cost of the hotel, Boyd said. Students learning a second language cross oceans to immerse themselves in a particular culture, but those

studying film only need to cross the state border to Austin, Boyd said. “Being exposed to film and learning about it academically can be helpful, but, obviously, people get into films from a lot of different angles,” Boyd said. Alex Greenlee said attending festivals is something every filmmaker should do to meet people with similar interests and receive unmatched exposure. Although the festival supports indie productions, this year’s wellknown, anticipated films also will be screened, including “Silver Linings Playbook” with Bradley Cooper, “Hyde Park on Hudson” with Bill Murray and documentary “Francophrenia” from James Franco. T h e f e s t i v a l ’s l o c a t i o n a n d atmosphere make it accessible and student-friendly, Boyd said. “I feel like some people would have the idea that [Austin Film Festival] is pretentious or something like that,” Boyd said. “It was very approachable.”

Molly Evans, mollyevans@ou.edu

AT A GLANCE Five films you shouldn’t miss at this year’s Austin Film Festival “Silver Linings Playbook” Director: David O. Russell

“Francophrenia” Directors: James Franco and Ian Olds

After leaving a mental insitution, Pat Solintano tries to move on and makes a connection with an unexpected woman.

A documentary of James Franco various guestacting clips on the daytime drama “General Hospital.

7 p.m. Saturday Paramount Theatre

7 p.m. Saturday Paramount Theatre

“The Sessions” Director: Ben Lewin

“Shadow Dancer” Director: James Marsh

“Hyde Park on Hudson” Directed: Roger Michell

A man in an iron lung finds a sex surrogate to help him lose his virginity with the help of his therapist and priest.

Set in the 1990s, A member of the IRA becomes an informant for MI5to protect her son.

A story about FDR’s love affair with his distant cousin, Margaret Stuckley, when the King and Queen of England visit.

9:45 p.m. Thursday Paramount Theatre

9:45 p.m. Friday Paramount Theatre

12:30 p.m. Saturday Alamo Drafthouse Cinema at the Ritz

d photos provide

You Are Invited! Class of 2013

Ring Ceremony Professor of Philosophy

Tom Boyd

As He Retires After More Than 40 Years of Service Teaching OU Students Honorary Ring Recipient and Homecoming Parade Marshal

4 p.m.

Friday, Oct. 19

Class of 1950 Plaza and Oklahoma Memorial Union Courtyard

In case of rain, the ceremony will be moved to Beaird Lounge. For additional information or for accommodations on the basis of disability, please call (405) 325-3784. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo

- THE PRIDE OF OKLAHOMA oud-2012-10-18-a-007.indd 1

10/17/12 8:43:55 PM


Life&Arts

Thursday, October 18, 2012 •

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local business

Norman costume shop open for Halloween Queen of Hart’s rents year round Courtney Aldridge Life & Arts Reporter

W i t h Ha l l o w e e n j u s t around the corner, students looking to find the perfect costumes have a new place to look. Queen of Hart’s Costumes is open and offering a large selection of clothing just in time for the spooky holiday season. Queen of Hart’s Costumes has been serving the theatrical community for some time now but opened in mid-August, offering one-of-a-kind costumes at reasonable prices, according to shop owner Kristen Ocker. Ocker is the head costumer at Norman’s Sooner Theatre. When the opportunity came for her to buy inventory from Vintage Vibe, a former vintage shop in Norman, she grabbed the opportunity. What began as a chance to buy costumes for future productions at the theater quickly became a business opportunity for Ocker. “I knew Norman would support it,” she said. “I just jumped.” While there are other costume shops in the area to choose from, the quality of the garments sets Queen of Hart’s Costumes apart from other establishments, Ocker said. “We provide theatricalquality costumes,” Ocker said. “They’re made of sturdier fabrics than you would find at Halloween stores.” Quality isn’t the only thing that sets Queen of Hart’s Costumes apart from other shops. The shop offers costumes for rent instead of for purchase, which makes dressing up much more affordable for customers. “We offer real, vintage

Sarah Callihan/the Daily

AT A GLANCE Queen of Hart’s Costumes Where: 924 24th Ave. Phone: 405-573-1800 Hours: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

clothing as opposed to buying cheap, nylon costumes,” employee Emily Ferren said. Around Halloween, people will spend a lot of money on a costum, but then they don’t want to wear it again the next year, Ocker said. “We try to keep prices reasonable because we don’t want people to choose not to rent because it’s too expensive,” she said. We have ’80s prom dresses and Renaissance costumes for $25 for three-day rentals, Ferren said. It’s great for students because they aren’t spending too much money for a one-time-use, she said. Although costumes are for rent only, Queen of Hart’s Costumes has products for

purchase. It offers accessories ,such as glasses, wigs and Above: Queen of Hart’s Costumes, a new costume shop that recently opened on 24th Avenue, rents makeup that fit characters costumes all year and provides costumes for Sooner Theatre. someone wants to portray. Below: Costumes can be rented for $25 for three days at Queen of Hart’s Costumes. “ We s e l l a c c e s s o r i e s ,such as neon makeup and vampire fangs to go along with whatever costume you pick out,” Ferren said. Queen of Hart’s Costumes also is authorized to be an official Ben Nye retailer. Ben Nye products provide personal makeup palettes and kits to be used in costuming, Ferren said. While this brand of makeup can be used for any costumed occasion, Ben Nye makeup also is used in stage productions, so having this inventory will be an asset for students and community actors needing stage makeup, Ocker said. “I’ve always liked making costumes,” Ocker said. “With the college and theater so close, I knew it would be successful.” Courtney Aldridge courtney.e.aldridge-1@ou.edu

Oct. 18-21

Thursday, Oct. 18

Outside the Frame | 4 p.m. at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. Christina Burke, Curator of Native American and Non-Western Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art, will discuss the Bialac Collection, which includes nearly 600 three-dimensional works of art created by Native artists throughout the 20th-century. This lecture is free and open to all ages.

Comedy Fight Night Audition | 7-10 p.m. in the Massad Room (fourth floor), Oklahoma Memorial Union. Have some funny friends? Tell them to come audition for comedy fight night with a couple of minutes of their best material. Auditions are come and go and no sign up necessary.

Flag Football Bracket Placement Meeting | 7:30 p.m.in room 130, Huston Huffman Fitness Center. All flag football teams with a 3-2 record or better and qualify for the playoffs MUST attend this meeting.

University Theatre presents Iphigénie en Tauride | 8 p.m. in the Reynolds Performing Arts Center. For more information and tickets, call the Fine Arts Center (405) 325-4101.

Ruggles Series Concert: Jacobson House Pow Wow Singers | 8-10 p.m. in the Sharp Concert Hall. For more information and tickets, call the Fine Arts Center (405) 325-4101.

Friday, Oct. 19

Moonrise Kingdom Event | 8 p.m. Beaird Lounge, Oklahoma Memorial Union. What’s better than a chocolate fountain and the chance to win a coonskin cap?! Nothing. Make any form of Wes Anderson inspired art or dress up in your favorite Wes Anderson themed character for the chance to win a copy of Moonrise Kingdom and other prizes! Also eat FREE food and enjoy “Moonrise Kingdom” at 9PM! FREE Movie: “Moonrise Kingdom” | 6,9, and midnight in the Meacham Auditorium. After enjoying all of the fun festivities in Beaird Lounge, come see the movie behind the magic. Presented by the Union Programming Board and Campus Activities Council. Art “a la Carte” | 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. The Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art will offer live music by The Dizzy Pickers and short films by the deadCENTER Film Festival as well as student filmmakers. Visitors will also be able to attend a printmaking demonstration by the OU Print Club. Admission is free and open to all ages.

Saturday, Oct. 20

OU Men’s Basketball Scrimmage | 2 p.m. at the McCasland Field House. 500 FREE t-shirts. FREE admission with a valid OU I.D. Visit soonersports.com for more information.

Homecoming Parade | 3 p.m. on Boyd Street by Campus Corner. For a full schedule of Homecoming events, go to http://www. ou.edu/uosa/CAC.html.

Sooner Football Homecoming: OU vs. Kansas | 6 p.m. at the Oklahoma Memorial Stadium. Visit soonersports.com for ticket information.

University Theatre presents Iphigénie en Tauride | 8 p.m. in the Reynolds Performing Arts Center. For more information and tickets, call the Fine Arts Center (405) 325-4101.

Sunday, Oct. 21

University Theatre presents Iphigénie en Tauride | 8 p.m. at the Reynolds Performing Arts Center. For more information and tickets, call the Fine Arts Center (405) 325-4101.

Shift Gears Activity Bucket List | You can check-in and win! Use the foursquare #SHIFTGEARS Activity Bucket List to Facebook, tweet, and check in on Foursquare and you could win some cool prizes! Go to http://bit.ly/SHIFTGEARSlist for your bucket list and more information! Today is the last day to check in.

Homecoming Pep Rally | 7:30 p.m. at the McCasland Field House. Doors open at 7 p.m. For a full schedule of Homecoming events, go to http://www.ou.edu/uosa/CAC.html. University Theatre presents Iphigénie en Tauride | 8 p.m. in the Reynolds Performing Arts Center. For more information and tickets, call the Fine Arts Center (405) 325-4101. This University in compliance with all applicable federal and state laws and regulations does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, genetic information, age, religion, disability, political beliefs, or status as a veteran in any of its policies, practices or procedures. This includes but is not limited to admissions, employment, financial aid and educational services. For accommodations on the basis of disability, please contact the sponsoring department of any program or event.

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10/17/12 8:45:09 PM


Thursday, October 18, 2012  

Thursday, October 18, 2012

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