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SmoKING

Q&A

e-cigarettes blown away from campus

OU says ‘Hello World’ to talks

Students forced to adjust after executive order bans e-cigarettes on state property PAIGHTEN HARKINS Campus Editor @PaightenHarkins

Emily Lai, women’s and gender studies senior, liked the fact that she could use her e-cigarette anywhere. She still loves her e-cigarette, but now she has to amend that statement to say she used to be able to use her e-cigarette anywhere. Because of Gov. Mary Fallin’s executive order banning the use of e-cigarettes on state property, as of Jan. 1, Lai and anyone else at OU will have to go off campus to get their fix. Fallin signed the executive order on Dec. 23, citing the potential for harmful long-term health effects caused by the e-cigarettes. While long-term consequences of using e-cigarettes are not yet known, Fallin said in the order that the vapor produced by the e-cigarettes can release chemicals that might negatively affect bystanders. As well, some e-ciga“Smoking was a rettes resemble cigarettes, way for me to help and since the passage of Executive Order 2012-01, relieve my stress which banned use of tobacco products on state property, and anxiety.” Fallin fears the use of e-cigaEMILY LAI, rettes on state property could WOMEN’S AND GENDER confuse employees and visiSTUDIES SENIOR tors, according to the executive order. At OU, the e-cigarette ban will be enforced just as the cigarette ban is enforced, university spokesman Michael Nash said. “The University of Oklahoma will, of course, comply with Governor Fallin’s proclamation,” he said in an email. For Lai, who has been using an e-cigarette since she was a senior in high school to stop smoking traditional cigarettes, the ban inconveniences her when she’s on campus and needs to take a break from classes or studying. Before the ban, Lai said she smoked e-cigarettes on campus all the time. “I know how hard it is for students when it comes to studying and keeping grades up. I too felt that pressure,” she said. “Smoking was a way for me to help relieve my stress and anxiety.” When Lai first heard of the ban, she was surprised and angry, and she didn’t understand why e-cigarettes posed any JaCQUeliNe eBy/The Daily threat to public health or safety, unlike cigarettes. In her experience with using e-cigarettes on campus, Emily Lai, women’s and gender studies senior, smokes her vapor cigarette on Saturday afternoon on

Campus Corner. Gov. Mary Fallin recently passed a law banning all electronic and vapor cigarettes on SEE e-CiGS PAGE 6 state property.

Speakers to foster dialogue, change PAIGHTEN HARKINS Campus Editor @PaightenHarkins

The third annual TEDxOU event will have 11 speakers on stage giving talks on anything from video games to music, following the theme “Hello World.” TEDxOU is an event that brings together professionals and students to give talks that will help start a dialogue about issues and ultimately create positive change and build connections among people who may not have previously had them, TEDxOU curator Adam Croom said. The event will be held Jan. 24 from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in Oklahoma M e m o r i a l U n i o n ’s Meacham Auditorium. T h i s y e a r ’s t h e m e , “Hello World,” was chosen because it’s typically the phrase programmers will output to display in the programs they’ve created to make sure everything is working correctly, Croom said. But the theme can mean different things, Croom said, and this SEE Q&a PAGE 6

wINTeR welcome weeK

TecHNoloGY

Tech expo leads new style of learning Wintry fun awaits Info from sessions show benefits of technology in class ALEX NIBLETT

Assistant Campus Editor @Alex_Niblett

OU Faculty and guests were encouraged to push boundaries and incorporate technological components into their traditional classroom settings at the third annual Academic Technology Expo on Friday. The day-long event was held in the Physical Sciences Center and had various public sessions and a keynote speech. The expo had information for attendees that showed the benefits of integrating technical support, such as phone and video elements in instructors’ teaching methods. One session, presented by University College adviser George Bogaski, covered

aleX NiBleTT/The Daily

Students and professors attend the third annual academic technology expo Friday afternoon in the Physical Science Center. Keynote speaker Jeff Selingo, Arizona State University professor, spoke to attendees as they followed along with their devices.

the benefits of a phone app called GroupMe. “Students will express anonymity or being lost, or small fish in a big sea, and I think [GroupMe] really helped

out,” Bogaski said. “I kept trying to think, how can I make it more intimate … how can I connect?” Bogaski said the group-messaging app has

Opinion: Marijuana should be legalized in Oklahoma for both medical and recreational use. (Page 3)

had a huge positive effect on how the class and faculty bond. “Whether we’re educators, advisers …we know there’s a small social component,” Bogaski said. “The greater degree the student connects with the institution, the department of the class and the instructor, it just naturally encourages success.” Other sessions at the expo included online software training, online textbook content and using videos for teaching, among other topics. Breaking up the day of events, keynote speaker and Arizona State University professor Jeff Selingo spoke about the current state of higher education and where it’s headed. Instead of hosting the keynote speaker in person, this year, the expo demonstrated

returning students Campus Activities Council’s weeks of work allow warm welcome back to OU ALEX NIBLETT

Assistant Campus Editor @Alex_Niblett

Months of planning went into this year’s Winter Welcome Week, which aims to ease students into the spring semester with free food, activities and giveaways. Winter Welcome Week takes place at the beginning of every spring semester, but planning began during the first week of September, said Drew Baney, Campus Activities Council’s Winter Welcome Week chairman. The groups met once a week until Thanksgiving break to plan the week, Baney said. This week’s theme will be “It’s Snow Time,” according to the website. Baney said a committee of 20 people divided into three groups — sponsorship, publicity and programming — and did the work to make Winter Welcome Week possible. “Each of our teams have worked very hard this last semester, leading up to this week, in making the best possible events for the students of OU,” said Matt Rogers, vice chairman of sponsorship. Leading a team of four other students, the sponsorship

SEE eXPO PAGE 2

L&A: The school of Art and Art History celebrates 100 years of art with student and alumni exhibitions. (Page 5)

SEE WelCOme PAGE 2

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Campus

OUDaily.com ›› Sooner Schedule Are you looking for the Sooner Schedule? Find it on our newly-designed website — it’s the calendar widget on the right side of the front page.

Paighten Harkins, campus editor Alex Niblett, assistant editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com • Twitter: @OUDaily

expo: One session shows how to include videos in classrooms Continued from page 1

Nikki Self/Oklahoma Daily

Civil engineering junior Kendrick Piercy, left, and political science junior Drew Baney, right, shows students the secrets to solving a Rubix cube and tying a bowtie during the 2013 Winter Welcome Week.

welcome: To host snow ball fight, ice skating Continued from page 1 group got 27 sponsors, 10 sponsors more than last year, Rogers said. All monetary and food donations totaled over $20,000 in sponsorship, providing enough funds for the events. This includes the more expensive events, such as the ice rink Friday in Oklahoma Memorial Union’s courtyard and the snowball fight Tuesday on the Walker-Adams mall, Rogers said.

An ice rink has never been done at OU, and Rogers and Baney said it was one of the largest feats when planning the week. “At first, it seemed like impossible because of the price of putting it on, but through all the hard work and the cooperation of Artificial Ice Events, OU and our team, we were able to get it done,” Rogers said. This year’s theme will be reflected throughout the week’s events across campus in different winter weather events, like the ice rink or the snowball

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the possibilities of classroom technology by virtually hosting Selingo on one screen while an accompanying screen, used a voice-recognition software to transcribe his words. Nearly every attendee had a tablet, laptop or phone in hand as they listened to Selingo over the speakers. “People have access to thousands of great courses from around the world … and most of them are free and open today,” Selingo said during his speech. “This, to me, is a great time to be a student.” Selingo said educators need to embrace the virtual world while maintaining affordable college costs and preserving the quality of education. During another session, Hong Lin, the associate director in The Center for Teaching Excellence, spoke about incorporating videos in class lecture. In the session, called “Using Videos for Teaching,” Lin said she believes incorporating videos in classrooms is an extension of the classroom and “an extension of student engagement” with the course material. OU adjunct instructor Regina Blair is teaching an online class this semester and said the event was helpful. “I incorporate video for demonstrations and strategies that I would show my students if it were a face-to-face class, that I can’t show them since it’s an online class,” Blair said. “I can utilize some of the things I’ve seen today in the online things that I’m changing.”


Monday, January 13, 2014 •

OPINION

3

Kaitlyn Underwood, opinion editor Rachael Montgomery, assistant editor dailyopinion@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/opinion • Twitter: @OUDailyOpinion

Editorial

Citizens must act to get joint rolling on marijuana legalization in Oklahoma Our View: Oklahoma should legalize marijuana because it would reduce

incarceration and increase tax revenue.

Imagine an Oklahoma where it wasn’t illegal to smoke pot and where possessing less than 1.5 ounces of marijuana and getting busted for a first offense wouldn’t land you in jail for up to a year. Marijuana is a drug with few proven adverse health affects, and we believe the use of marijuana for both medicinal and recreational purposes should be legal in Oklahoma. While it may seem counterintuitive to propose a state as red as Oklahoma legalize a drug, conservatives theoretically should support freedom of action and limited government interference in private affairs. In fact, a recent CNN poll shows that 55 percent of all Americans support the legalization of marijuana, and a whopping 73 percent of participants said alcohol is worse than marijuana. Legalizing pot can be rather lucrative for states, as shown by the recent legalization of pot for recreational use in Colorado. The state’s marijuana dispensaries have reported sales of over $5 million since pot was legalized for retail recreational sales to adults aged 21 and older Jan. 1. Colorado projects earnings of $70 million in tax revenue from the sale of pot this Photo Provided year, which includes state and local sales taxes and excise tax, according to a A pair of hands holds marijuana product despite the strict laws against the drug in the majority of states. Dec. 30 Bloomberg report. With the initial success of the recreational marijuana business in Colorado, should Oklahoma follow suit in Oklahoma would benefit enormously from the added tax revenue pot sales Colorado’s ventures in legalization? would bring. In addition to state revenue, the opening and maintenance of marijuana dispensaries would create long-term employment across the state. The path toward marijuana legalization in Oklahoma may not be that far off. Legalizing marijuana usage would also cut down on unnecessary incarceraDemocratic state Sen. Constance Johnson proposed twin marijuana bills last tion for pot possession, saving the state money by reducing the number year, one calling on the state to develop a system for dispensing medicThe Our View of people in the prison system. inal marijuana and one that would reduce the punishments for possesis the majority sion of marijuana. Oklahoma currently has the fourth highest incarceration rate in the opinion of country and incarcerates more women than any other state, according Senate bill 914 suggests a maximum jail stay of 10 days and fine of The Daily’s to the Oklahoma Department of Corrections. eight-member $200 for possession of 1.5 ounce or less of pot, a welcome downgrade “Nearly 80 percent of Oklahoma’s incarcerated women are non-vioeditorial board from the current maximum sentence of one year in jail and a $1000 fine. lent offenders, their presence in Oklahoma Correctional Facilities largeJohnson has yet to receive a hearing for a consideration of either of ly attributable to drug abuse, the distribution of controlled substances, the bills. prostitution and property crimes,” according to research conducted by OU soWe encourage you to write or email your state senator urging them to approve ciology professor Susan Sharp. Johnson’s bills. Talk to your friends and classmates, and encourage open discusIt is only logical that legalizing marijuana would cut down on the number of sion about the pros and cons of marijuana legalization. women put behind bars in Oklahoma every year. If enough Oklahomans make their voices heard and support efforts like the Allowing Oklahomans to use pot legally would not mean the state would imaforementioned bills, Oklahoma can begin the path to the common-sense legalmediately devolve into chaos. Oklahoma should model Colorado’s guidelines, ization of a more or less harmless drug. such as instituting measures to limit the amount of pot sold per transaction and Comment on this at OUDaily.com requiring state agencies to dissuade drugged driving.

Column

Marijuana is here to stay despite fed’s expensive attempts half is imported, leading to chronic diseases. No one unprecedented violence has ever died from a cannain Latin America. The gov- bis overdose. ernment reluctantly admits Cannabis producers that law enforcement con- in Colorado remain in a fiscates only 10 percent of state of legal limbo. Since the crop despite the masit is still banned under the sive investControlled ment in its Substance prohibition. Act, most The defibusinesses nition of a cannot susSchedule 1 tain a bank substance account, in the meaning Controlled Congress doesn’t that the esSubstance timated $3 have to endorse Act — a billion of its consumption substance legal comthat has no so much as admit merce will medical apbe done altotal prohibition is most entireplication, is highly adly in cash. impossible.” dictive and Producers has no agreed method for still remain uncertain on Photo Provided safe consumption — would how they are to file income Different strains of marijuana product are separated in large jars for recreational purchase in Colorado dis- provide cause for concern. taxes. Consumers of legal pensaries. With the initial success of the recreational marijuana business in Colorado, should Oklahoma While many groups, cannabis are uncertain if follow suit in Colorado’s ventures in legalization? including the National their actions are legal and Institute on Drug Abuse, if they could be prosecuted to liberalize marijuana polmarijuana, becoming the Opinion COlumnist attest that marijuana can for following the law. icy, Congress should move first state to decriminalize become addictive over long Congress must endeavto harmonize federal and recreational marijuana. periods of time, it is agreed or to harmonize state and state laws, ensuring that The Justice Department that addiction is rare. federal laws. Congress legal producers and concautiously agreed to look It is widely disputed should decriminalize recresumers aren’t left in legal the other way so that whether or not cannabis ational cannabis consumpColorado is vigilant in pre- limbo. tion. That doesn’t mean In 1970, Congress passed has any medical appliventing minors, criminal cation. The American Congress should emphatenterprises, traffickers and the Controlled Substance John Black Medical Association’s ically endorse consumpAct, defining cannabis as people not in Colorado johnblack@ou.edu official position is that tion. It should enact strict a Schedule 1 controlled from using the sanctioned Congress should look into punishments for transportsubstance. Today the U.S. cannabis. n a 2012 Colorado it. ing cannabis from a state in spends $20 billion annuColorado is the first in referendum, voters Doctors prescribe canwhich it is legal to a state in ally policing, prosecuting what is surely to become amended the state nabis to treat nausea from which it is not. and incarcerating maria national phenomenon. constitution to permit cancer therapy, spasms The government should juana consumers. Of the With 40 years of a failed the lawful consumption from multiple sclerosis continue the prohibition drug war and states moving estimated 22 ton supply, and sale of recreational and to deal with pain from on the import and export of

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I

The Oklahoma Daily is a public forum, the University of Oklahoma’s independent student voice and an entirely student-run publication.

Kyle Margerum Blayklee Buchanan Paighten Harkins Arianna Pickard Kaitlyn Underwood Tony Beaulieu

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Letters should concentrate on issues, not personalities, and must be fewer than 250 words, typed and signed by the author(s). Letters will be edited for accuracy, space and style. Students must list their major and classification. To submit letters, email dailyopinion@ou.edu. Our View is the voice of the Editorial Board, which consists of nine student editors. The board meets at 5 p.m. Sunday to Thursday in 160 Copeland Hall. Board meetings are open to the public.

marijuana and appropriate more resources in preventing it. It should create a bureaucracy to strictly monitor the cannabis supply, maintain records of who produces it and who purchases it. It can fund this by a sizable excise tax on sales. This is a tempered and rational approach. If the government’s prohibition on marijuana was already a failure, sales in corner stores across the country will only make it worse. Congress doesn’t have to endorse its consumption so much as admit total prohibition is impossible. By monitoring sales, the government will know precisely how much marijuana is grown, harvested and sold. Unlike on the black market, stores can check conumers’ ID to keep it out of the hands of minors. And states that disapprove of marijuana can continue to fight to keep it out of their borders. Just like the prohibition of alcohol, the prohibition of marijuana has been a stunning failure. It is our legal tradition to permit any action so long as it causes no harm. For better or worse, cannabis is here to stay. John Black is a University College freshman.

Guest columns are accepted and printed at the editor’s discretion. Columnists’ and cartoonists’ opinions are their own and not necessarily the views or opinions of The Oklahoma Daily Editorial Board. To advertise in The Oklahoma Daily, contact advertising manager Kearsten Howland by calling 405-325-8964 or emailing dailyads@ou.edu. One free copy of The Daily is available to members of the OU community. Additional copies may be purchased for 25 cents by contacting The Daily business office at 405-325-2522.


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• Monday, January 13, 2014

LIFE&ARTS

Tony Beaulieu, life & arts editor Luke Reynolds, assistant editor dailyent@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/life&arts • Twitter: @OUDailyArts

YEAR IN REVIEW COLUMN

Things to take away from... LUKE REYNOLDS, KEATON BELL

Assistant Life & Arts Editor, Life & Arts Columnist

With 2013 over and a new year in full swing, 2014 is already shaping up to be another great year for anyone who cares about pop culture. But, before we allow ourselves to forget Paula Deen, Amanda Bynes or accept our last dealings with Walter White, we have to pay tribute to the illustrious culture of ’13. 2013 will go down in the books as a record year for music. From Lorde to Little Mix, we saw stars rise in the most unlikely places. But even with a crop of new talent, we continued to be shocked and awed by artists we thought we knew (oh Miley...) and didn’t really want to (just stop talking, Kanye).

Music

Hello Miley: We don’t know why you do what you do, but you just keep on doing your thing. Her little stunt with Robin Thicke at the VMA’s furthered her title of “notorious.” Yet we all know behind the girl with her tongue sticking out is a sensitive girl who was hurt after a breakup with Liam Hemsworth. And we can’t really blame her for that. “Wrecking Ball” isn’t the worst song in the world and for those of you who didn’t get to watch her on New Year’s Eve with Ryan Seacrest, you may care to know that she seems to be quite stable despite some of her contrary actions. Good Lorde! (I’ve been waiting for that this entire article.) The 17-year-old Kiwi singer-songwriter came out of the woodwork in 2013 to blow us all away with her catchy songs. Royals will forever be stuck in our head but we will not complain for we are forever grateful for her presence. Jay-Z and Justin Timberlake: Good work boys. We sincerely appreciate what you did with the Gatsby soundtrack and Holy Grail deserves recognition. JT, thank you for coming back. 20/20 is great and I put on my suit and tie to the beat of a different drum now. The two make come together and good things happen. We’re not going to complain if we see more of them.

TV and music

Amanda Bynes: Goes on a Twitter rampage and threw a bong out her window. Like a true boss. Paul Walker: The king of the Fast and Furious series passed away in a car crash. Ironic, yes. Sad, definitely. A good actor with a nice smile. We will miss him. Paula Deen: Yikes. Just yikes. I mean really? I can’t even use butter as much after her egregious comments. (Trust me, butter=Paula and

2013 Paula=butter.) We don’t even feel bad, Paula, learn not to be a racist and then we will begin using your delicious recipes again. Luke and Keaton are University College freshmen


Life&Arts

Monday, January 13, 2014 •

5

Column

photo illustration by Tony ragle/the daily

Students begin to readjust to academic life after the break.

New year, same old problems Life & arts columnist

I

t’s here. It’s finally here. Spring 2014. The Return of the Sooner. The Desolation of the Sophomore. And I need to stop geeking out about “The Hobbit” (not really because it was awesome). Let’s just take a deep Sama Khawaja breath and calm down. It’s sama.n.khawaja-1@ou.edu not going to be so bad. It’s the start of the New Year! New year, fresh start. It’ll be a pain writing 2014 instead of 2013 but I can deal with it. Bring it on, 2013 — I mean, 2014! Darn it… The drive to Norman is going to be a pain. And the radio stations brutal. I swear, if they play “What Does the Fox Say” one more time, I’m going to show them “What Does the Ticked Off Sooner Say.” Well, at least I don’t have to deal with cleaning out my

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potatoes are vegetables and vegetables are healthful after all. Yeah, that makes sense. Good thing I was responsible enough to keep my ID card safe — where’s my ID card? I could’ve sworn I left it in my drawers. Where is it?? OH MY GOD, I’VE LOST MY ID CARD! NOOO-oh, it’s under my wallet. I’m good. It’ll be a pain writing 2014 instead of 2013 Speaking of responsibility, I should make a resolution to study for finals this time. No more procrastination. I’m but I can deal with it. Bring it on, 2013 — I going to start studying more seriously. At least a month before. When are finals again? mean 2014! Darn it ...” Why am I getting so worked up? It’s OU! The home of the Sooners. My home. Sure every semester has its ups and downs but that’s part of the OU experience. It helps dorm room. Thank you, finals, for finishing early so I could leave and have my roommate clean it up instead, ha you grow as a person and I’ve certainly grown into a betha! OK, I’m not that cruel. I tossed out that week old pizza ter person. You know what? I can’t wait to go back. OU, I’ve missed that was lying around ... I think. you. Man, I’ve gained so much weight over the winter. I Except the bike lane. Rude bikers… mean, my tummy has a tummy. That’s it. From now on, it’s the gym, salads and French fries. French fries Sama Khawaja is a University College freshman. are healthy, right? Well, they’re made out of potatoes,

Art

100th annual student art exhibit begins at museum Student, alumni artists to showcase work for centennial Kelsey Bennett

Life and Arts Reporter

The University Of Oklahoma School Of Art and Art History will celebrate the 100th Annual Student Art Exhibition this week, which gives students a unique opportunity to display their work. In c e l eb rat i o n o f t h e 100th anniversary of the student exhibition, which will run from Tuesday to Feb. 16 at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, an exhibit featuring works from OU alumni w ill also be showcased, and will run from Monday to Feb. 16 at the Lightwell Gallery in the School of Art and Art History. “The School of Art and Art History is excited to showcase work by many of our talented students and also offer guests a chance to take a look back at the history of our school,” said Todd Stewart, Co-Interim Director of the School of Art and Art History. “This centennial landmark will not only serve as a celebration

GO AND DO

100th Annual Student Exhibition opening reception When: Jan. 17, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Where: Fred Jones Jr. Museaum of Art Price: Free

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The students who have work chosen for this exhibitition have a one-of-a-kind opportunity...” Jessica Upson public relations and event coordinator, ou school of art and art history

of our history but also offer a glimpse into our future,” Stewart said. Opening receptions for both exhibitions will be held Friday. The reception for the alumni exhibit will begin at 6 p.m. in the Lightwell Gallery, and the reception for the student exhibit will begin at 7 p.m. at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, with awards presented at 8 p.m., said Jessica Upson, Public Relations and Event Coordinator of the School of Art and Art History. “The students who have work chosen for this exhibition have the one-of-a-kind opportunity to have their work displayed in a museum, which is a valuable addition to their resumes,” Upson said. “Within this 100th annual exhibition is another small exhibition titled ‘XXVC’,” visual communications senior Nathan Lunsford said. “This is to commemorate the past 25 years of the visual communication program,” Lunsford said. Lunsford and two other students constructed the entire exhibit themselves to showcase the work of past and

present visual communication students. Lunsford said his position has granted him invaluable experience, “It’s been interesting because many of our projects are fictional, but this began as a bid to win the project, and now the three of us have had to learn how to deal with obstacles coming from real scenarios we have encountered so far.” The process of selecting which pieces will be displayed in the 100th Annual Student Exhibition is highly competitive, as only 55 works are chosen from hundreds of student submissions, says Upson. “All students are required to submit an online application and our guest juror, artist and University of Texas at Austin art professor, Michael Ray Charles,” Upson said. “[Charles] filtered through hundreds of submissions to choose the 55 works that will be on display at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. We are honored and very excited to have Michael Ray Charles serve as juror for this exhibition,” said Upson. “All of the artists featured in our alumni exhibition were selected by current faculty member at the School of Art & Art History,” Upson said. Kelsey Bennett kelseygabriellebennett@gmail. com

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• Monday, January 13, 2014

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Q: What exactly do you do for your job? A: I started a company called Goldfire Studios and it’s a game studio. We’re located in downtown Oklahoma JAMES City, and actually, I SIMPSON founded it when I was at OU. So we make online games for the browser.

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Q: How did you get the idea to start that? A: Well, I’ve actually been making games and websites since I was around 13. So I’ve pretty much just continued doing that since then, but I founded GoldFire Studios physically to build massively multiplayer games in the browser.



 

    

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year’s theme also harkens to the idea that the speakers and those listening are positioning themselves to make an impact on a global scale. In the week leading up to the event, The Daily will be running five Q&A’s with different TEDxOU speakers. The first Q&A in the series will feature James Simpson, CEO and founder of GoldFire Studios, an Oklahoma City game development company.

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The Vrazel brothers, Buck, left, and Clint, right, creative directors of OKC Improv and OU alumni, deliver witty commentary between speaker presentations during the 2013 TEDxOU conference.

Q: Why did you want to speak at TEDxOU? A: I know that TED is always just a great event wherever it is. I’ve seen a lot of talks from the previous TEDxOU events and there have been a lot of really great s p ea ke r s a n d I j u s t wanted to be a part of that.

X

Q: What are some of the games you’ve created? A: Some of the ones previously: There’s one called “BC Wars,â€? which is a sort of caveman game. It’s a roleplaying game, and there’s a caveman and you can join tribes with other people and battle dinosaurs and things like that. The newest game we launched that we’re sort of beta testing is called “Casino RPG.â€? We successfully kick-started it just about a year ago and ‌ that’s what a lot of our focus is on right now.

January 24

Q: What’s your talk going to be about? A: So it’s going to be about how games can enact social change, change on a global scale. Basically, the idea is that games are really a different type of entertainment media than movies or books or television, in that they’re for a social aspect. The perception is they’re sort of more anti-social, but really the new wave of games is all about being

truly social and that can be leveraged to connect people in new ways all over the world. Q: What inspired the talk topic? A: Really, it’s what we’re doing here at GoldFire, that’s a big part of our goal. We’re really focused on building communities around games. Q: What do you hope people will take away from your talk after hearing it? A: The goal is really to help change the perception of what games are and what they can be moving forward.

TEDXOU Keep up with TED This is one of five Q&A sessions with TEDxOU talkers. Pick up tomorrow’s Daily or visit OUDaily. com for a Q&A with OU professor Irvin Wagner.

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revised Tobacco Use and Smoking Preparation Use in or on University Property policy, according to a press release. It is unclear if OU was moving in the same direction as OSU, because Nash didn’t answer that specific question when The Daily asked, saying the ban would be officially

discussed in the January Board of Regents meeting. Lai said she’s thankful she only has one class on campus this year because of the ban and expects to use her e-cigarette before and after class in her car.

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -Refuse to let anyone stifle your plans or suppress your opinion. Exercise your right to follow whatever path you choose. Speak up and take action. You can make a difference.

Previous Solution         

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

Monday- Very Easy Tuesday-Easy Wednesday- Easy Thursday- Medium Friday - Hard

Instructions: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. That means that no number is repeated in any row, column or box.

MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2014

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Your industrious nature will pay off. Let your personality lead the way and make an impression on those in higher positions. Your chances for advancement look good, though you should be sure to get all offers in writing.

All ads are subject to acceptance by The Oklahoma Daily. Ad acceptance may be re-evaluated at any time.

        

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Help Wanted ads in The Oklahoma Daily are not to separate as to gender. Advertisers may not discriminate in employment ads based on race, color, religion or gender unless such qualifying factors are essential to a given position.

                                  

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The Oklahoma Daily will not knowingly accept advertisements that discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, religious preference, national origin or sexual orientation. Violations of this policy should be reported to The Oklahoma Daily Business Office at 325-2521.



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people never seemed to mind. “I’m still dreading going back to campus since Fallin passed the bill,� Lai said. Oklahoma State University banned e-cigarettes on campus Dec. 6 as part of their

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PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -Emotions, both yours and those of others, will be difficult to control. Reach out to the people who share your concerns and your interests. Now is not the time to deal with false accusations or manipulation. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Diverse actions will lead you in a new direction. Expand your circle of friends and protect the relationships you have. Your loved ones could use a little extra attention. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -Emphasize what you do and how you do it. Offer your suggestions carefully by being aware of others’ cherished beliefs and preconceptions. Focus on self-improvement instead of trying to change others.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- You should follow common sense, not your emotions. Unpredictability will not get you closer to your goal. Your inclinations for excess and evasion should be reined in via discipline and moderation. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Listen before taking action. You will end up in a no-win situation if you are too quick to judge. Focus on love and showing your loyalty through action. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Make alterations to the way you present who you are and what you can offer. The impression you make will give you the upper hand in any competitive arena you enter. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Be aware of the influence you have, and offer constructive suggestions and hands-on help. Your actions will affect how others treat you. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Don’t expect talks to occur without a hitch. Controversy can be expected, along with uncertainty, disagreements and a debate that will require a wellrounded point of view. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- You need to listen instead of talking. Protect your health and your wealth. If you make a snap decision, you can expect opposition. Focus on selfimprovement, romance and keeping the peace. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- You should make abrupt changes in order to take everyone by surprise and buy time to maneuver your way into a key position. Use your intelligence and make things happen.

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker January 13, 2014

ACROSS 1 Additional thought preceder 5 Guernsey’s grazing areas 9 Having a sharp taste 14 Whopper teller 15 Unwanted aquarium organism 16 ___ apso (dog breed) 17 Pinnacle 18 Cow’s hurdle, in rhyme 19 It may be tucked by a doctor 20 Wisher’s object 23 Mauna ___ (Hawaii’s highest point) 24 Get droopy 25 Potential ring accepter 29 Actress Potts 31 Islamic leader, one way 33 “Who ___ Seen The Wind?� 34 Kansas, e.g. 36 Casual wear 39 Big Dipper, for one 42 Nurture 43 Scots trills 44 Refined petroleum 45 Red cheese 1/13

47 Aromatic compound 51 Qualification 54 Your financial advisor advises it 56 “How ___ you?� 57 Larger than large 60 Even a bit 63 Hit 64 An amount of medicine 65 Mischievous one 66 Ireland, affectionately 67 Writing on the wall 68 Sound from the nest 69 Model cars, e.g. 70 After everybody else DOWN 1 Nome’s home 2 Mossy growth 3 Certain islander 4 A favorite with milk 5 Female monster 6 Stretch out 7 Overly eager 8 Grandchild of Japanese immigrants 9 Site for some rites 10 Grouch 11 Farm butter? 12 Skeptic or cynic follower

13 “Our ___ Will Come� 21 Fly from Africa 22 Deposit on teeth 26 “Birthplace of Aviation� 27 Loft locale 28 Quick or slow attachment 30 Does not exist 32 Peach ___ 35 Like a body in Newton’s first law 37 Water source 38 Vent sound 39 Rope fiber 40 City where “The Scream� was stolen 41 Inspirational celebrity 42 Dandy dresser

46 English county known for sheep 48 Port on Commencement Bay 49 Shakes an Etch A Sketch 50 Show mercy 52 Worth 53 Land in a lake, e.g. 55 Lassos 58 Hodgepodge or mishmash 59 Worshipped carving 60 Garfunkel or Carney 61 AAA specialty 62 Birthday number

PREVIOUS PREVIOUSPUZZLE PUZZLEANSWER ANSWER

1/12 12/13

Š 2014 Universal Uclick www.upuzzles.com Š 2013 Universal Uclick www.upuzzles.com

PLENTY OF SPACE By Kenneth Holt


Monday, January 13, 2014 •

SPORTS

7

Julia Nelson, sports editor Joe Mussatto, assistant editor dailysports@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com/sports • Twitter: @OUDailySports

ROUND UP

What did you miss over winter break? STAFF REPORTS

W

e all heard about the Sooners’ upset over Alabama in the Su ga r B ow l ove r w i nt e r break. But as football season draws to a close, other sports at OU are kicking off. Here’s the top moments you might have missed over winter break.

2.

1

BEATING THE BEST

A LOSS TO TEXAS Oklahoma women’s basketball took on rival Texas Jan. 8 following a heartbreaking overtime loss to Iowa State just three days before. In the first half, everything was falling Oklahoma’s way. Senior guard Aaryn Ellenberg scored 22 points in the first half alone. And to end the half, senior guard Morgan Hook hit a buzzer beater at the end of the first half to give the Sooners a 12-point halftime lead. Texas would pull within one four different times but could not get over the hump. That was, until Texas’ GiGi Mazionyte drilled a three pointer to tie the game with under a minute to play. To overtime the Sooners went yet again. This time, Sherri Coale and her squad hoped for a different outcome. However, they could not hang on and dropped their second straight overtime game, 79-74. Ellenberg scored a career-high 37 points but that was not enough to contain Texas in overtime. With those

3.

The Oklahoma men’s basketball team started a two-game home stand before the beginning of the semester with a loss to No. 18 Kans., but recovered against No. 7 Iowa State. Oklahoma upset the previously unbeaten Cyclones thanks to sophomore forward Ryan Spangler’s dominance on the boards, winning 87-82. Spangler and the Sooners held the Cyclones from any second chances with no players recording an offensive rebound and just one team rebound from a Spangler block out of bounds. The game was tied at half after Iowa State closed out with an 8-0 run, but the Sooners continued their effort on the glass in the second. OU also came to life from downtown in the second, hitting 7-13 from 3-point range. Sophomore guard Buddy Hield was perfect to start the second half, hitting his first four 3-pointers. Just like against Texas, however, Oklahoma allowed Iowa State back in it. The Cyclones led by one with 2:39 to play, but Spangler hit a lay-up and converted the foul shot to give the Sooners a twopoint lead they never relinquished. Spangler’s mark of 15 rebounds is a new career high and allowed OU to outscore Iowa State 22-2 on second-chance points. OU is now 13-3 and is 2-1 in the Big 12. The statement win against Iowa State will not only help in the standings but will also be helpful in OU’s effort to make the NCAA Tournament in March.

4.

GYMNASTICS OPENS SEASON The Sooners gymnastics teams opened their seasons on a high note this past weekend. The women, led by sophomore Haley Scaman and seniors Madison Mooring and Taylor Spears, beat the No. 8 Georgia Gym Dogs 197.700 — 196.500 on Friday night at the Lloyd Noble Center. It was the Sooners’ highest season-opening score in program history. The Sooners overcame a fall on their first floor routine in the final rotation to post a 49.5, including 9.9s from Spears and freshman Chayse Capps and a 9.95 from Scaman in the anchor (final) position. The women’s team will continue their season next Friday at 6:45 at the Lloyd Noble against unranked Iowa State.

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RED RIVER VICTORY Playing in Austin has been a weak-point for the Sooners. Entering this season’s conference opener at rival Texas, the men’s basketball team hadn’t won in Austin since 2005. Both former coach Jeff Capel and superstar alum Blake Griffin came and went without a road win in the Red River Rivalry. Despite entering conference play with a loss in their last game to Louisiana Tech, the Sooners beat Texas in Austin for the first time in nearly a decade. OU held on to beat the Longhorns 88-85 thanks to strong play from young players. OU was behind for most of the second half and trailed by seven with 9:36 to play. Hield was able to finish a comeback with a 3-pointer to tie the game. With the game tied at 78 points in the final two minutes, freshman guard Jordan Woodard scored four straight points to put the Sooners up. OU held on, hitting free throws and playing strong defense to pull off the win.


8

SPORTS

• Monday, January 13, 2014

Column

Sugar Bowl victory lands recruit assistant sports editor during the Army All-

American Bowl in San Antonio. “Welcome to the family,” Knight tweeted to Mixon after hearing the news. “Let’s have a little fun the next couple years.” OU edged out UCLA, Cal Joe Mussatto jmussatto@ou.edu and Wisconsin in the race for the Oakley, Calif., nas Trevor Knight’s tive. But the selling point knee touched the that attracted Mixon to the Superdome turf, southern plains was what the final seconds ticked transpired two nights prior. from the scoreboard, and “I’m not going to lie,” all of Sooner Nation’s woes Mixon told rivals.com. seemed to be forgotten. “Watching that Alabama The Big 12 could comgame sealed the deal.” pete with the SEC, co-ofIn recent years, the fensive coordinator Josh Oklahoma staff has slightHeupel could call an ofly slipped in corralling fense, the Sooners weren’t highly-touted recruits to too small on defense and Norman. However, they Big Game Bob was back. haven’t been able to pitch But the 45-31 Sugar Bowl an exceptional postseason bashing of ‘Bama didn’t victory in some time. prove to be the end of the But the coaches aren’t Sooners’ stay on cloud the only ones hitting the nine. unpredictable recruiting The sugar only got trail. sweeter. Now that Mixon has Not only did OU topple pledged his allegiance to the Tide on that the crimson and New Orleans night, cream, the running but Oklahoma also back has been busy regained its footon social media to ing alongside the beef up the incomnation’s top proing class and do a grams. And severlittle recruiting of al key recruits took his own. note. The back has The clock-meltreached out on Joe Mixon ing knee and heroTwitter to four ic Sugar Bowl perdifferent four-star formance helped Knight prospects the Sooners and the Sooners land covet — offensive lineman what fans hope to be a key Natrell Curtis, receiver component of the future Michiah Quick, defensive backfield. tackle Trey Lealaimatafao Two days after the bowl and he has even tried to win, five-star running back sway a Baylor-committed Joe Mixon announced his receiver, K.D. Cannon. commitment to Oklahoma If Oklahoma has a

A

Chris James/The Daily

Coach Bob Stoops and his team celebrate the Sooners’ 45-31 victory over Alabama in the Sugar Bowl. The signature win calmed the fears of many Sooner fans across the nation and helped seal the deal for recurits including five-star running back Joe Mixon. Fans and players alike are excited for Mixon’s commitment and hope he will add a new element to the Sooner offense.

chance to sign those prospects, Mixon’s reputation may be its most lethal weapon of persuasion. The 6-foot-2, 195 pound back has even professed the Sooners will have a spot in next season’s championship game — a bold statement but one fellow recruits may also buy into. If Mixon turns into the star back he is slated to be,

LARGEST SELECTION EVER

AT A GLANCE Oklahoma recruiting • With Mixon’s commitment on Jan. 4, OU has the 18th recruiting class in the nation.

• Recruits can sign a National Letter of Intent starting on Feb. 5. Source: rivals.com

linebacker Teddy Lehman tweeted. “That’s what happens when you beat the best. You get the best.” Joe Mussatto is a journalism sophomore. Follow him on Twitter @joe_mussatto.

Jan. 2, 2014, will have a spe- the night the Sooners won cial place in Sooner history over Joe Mixon. as the night the Sooners “The Sugar Bowl sealed won against Alabama and the deal,” former OU

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Sports: The Sugar Bowl victory helped the Sooners snag Joe Mixon and got the ball rolling for the 2015 recruiting class. (Page 8) W W W.O U DA I LY.C O M

The University of Oklahoma’s independent student voice since 1916

2 013 PA C E M A K E R F I N A L I S T

M O N D A Y , J A N U A R Y 1 3 , 2 0 14

SmoKING

Q&A

e-cigarettes blown away from campus

OU says ‘Hello World’ to talks

Students forced to adjust after executive order bans e-cigarettes on state property PAIGHTEN HARKINS Campus Editor @PaightenHarkins

Emily Lai, women’s and gender studies senior, liked the fact that she could use her e-cigarette anywhere. She still loves her e-cigarette, but now she has to amend that statement to say she used to be able to use her e-cigarette anywhere. Because of Gov. Mary Fallin’s executive order banning the use of e-cigarettes on state property, as of Jan. 1, Lai and anyone else at OU will have to go off campus to get their fix. Fallin signed the executive order on Dec. 23, citing the potential for harmful long-term health effects caused by the e-cigarettes. While long-term consequences of using e-cigarettes are not yet known, Fallin said in the order that the vapor produced by the e-cigarettes can release chemicals that might negatively affect bystanders. As well, some e-ciga“Smoking was a rettes resemble cigarettes, way for me to help and since the passage of Executive Order 2012-01, relieve my stress which banned use of tobacco products on state property, and anxiety.” Fallin fears the use of e-cigaEMILY LAI, rettes on state property could WOMEN’S AND GENDER confuse employees and visiSTUDIES SENIOR tors, according to the executive order. At OU, the e-cigarette ban will be enforced just as the cigarette ban is enforced, university spokesman Michael Nash said. “The University of Oklahoma will, of course, comply with Governor Fallin’s proclamation,” he said in an email. For Lai, who has been using an e-cigarette since she was a senior in high school to stop smoking traditional cigarettes, the ban inconveniences her when she’s on campus and needs to take a break from classes or studying. Before the ban, Lai said she smoked e-cigarettes on campus all the time. “I know how hard it is for students when it comes to studying and keeping grades up. I too felt that pressure,” she said. “Smoking was a way for me to help relieve my stress and anxiety.” When Lai first heard of the ban, she was surprised and angry, and she didn’t understand why e-cigarettes posed any JaCQUeliNe eBy/The Daily threat to public health or safety, unlike cigarettes. In her experience with using e-cigarettes on campus, Emily Lai, women’s and gender studies senior, smokes her vapor cigarette on Saturday afternoon on

Campus Corner. Gov. Mary Fallin recently passed a law banning all electronic and vapor cigarettes on SEE e-CiGS PAGE 6 state property.

Speakers to foster dialogue, change PAIGHTEN HARKINS Campus Editor @PaightenHarkins

The third annual TEDxOU event will have 11 speakers on stage giving talks on anything from video games to music, following the theme “Hello World.” TEDxOU is an event that brings together professionals and students to give talks that will help start a dialogue about issues and ultimately create positive change and build connections among people who may not have previously had them, TEDxOU curator Adam Croom said. The event will be held Jan. 24 from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in Oklahoma M e m o r i a l U n i o n ’s Meacham Auditorium. T h i s y e a r ’s t h e m e , “Hello World,” was chosen because it’s typically the phrase programmers will output to display in the programs they’ve created to make sure everything is working correctly, Croom said. But the theme can mean different things, Croom said, and this SEE Q&a PAGE 6

wINTeR welcome weeK

TecHNoloGY

Tech expo leads new style of learning Wintry fun awaits Info from sessions show benefits of technology in class ALEX NIBLETT

Assistant Campus Editor @Alex_Niblett

OU Faculty and guests were encouraged to push boundaries and incorporate technological components into their traditional classroom settings at the third annual Academic Technology Expo on Friday. The day-long event was held in the Physical Sciences Center and had various public sessions and a keynote speech. The expo had information for attendees that showed the benefits of integrating technical support, such as phone and video elements in instructors’ teaching methods. One session, presented by University College adviser George Bogaski, covered

aleX NiBleTT/The Daily

Students and professors attend the third annual academic technology expo Friday afternoon in the Physical Science Center. Keynote speaker Jeff Selingo, Arizona State University professor, spoke to attendees as they followed along with their devices.

the benefits of a phone app called GroupMe. “Students will express anonymity or being lost, or small fish in a big sea, and I think [GroupMe] really helped

out,” Bogaski said. “I kept trying to think, how can I make it more intimate … how can I connect?” Bogaski said the group-messaging app has

Opinion: Marijuana should be legalized in Oklahoma for both medical and recreational use. (Page 3)

had a huge positive effect on how the class and faculty bond. “Whether we’re educators, advisers …we know there’s a small social component,” Bogaski said. “The greater degree the student connects with the institution, the department of the class and the instructor, it just naturally encourages success.” Other sessions at the expo included online software training, online textbook content and using videos for teaching, among other topics. Breaking up the day of events, keynote speaker and Arizona State University professor Jeff Selingo spoke about the current state of higher education and where it’s headed. Instead of hosting the keynote speaker in person, this year, the expo demonstrated

returning students Campus Activities Council’s weeks of work allow warm welcome back to OU ALEX NIBLETT

Assistant Campus Editor @Alex_Niblett

Months of planning went into this year’s Winter Welcome Week, which aims to ease students into the spring semester with free food, activities and giveaways. Winter Welcome Week takes place at the beginning of every spring semester, but planning began during the first week of September, said Drew Baney, Campus Activities Council’s Winter Welcome Week chairman. The groups met once a week until Thanksgiving break to plan the week, Baney said. This week’s theme will be “It’s Snow Time,” according to the website. Baney said a committee of 20 people divided into three groups — sponsorship, publicity and programming — and did the work to make Winter Welcome Week possible. “Each of our teams have worked very hard this last semester, leading up to this week, in making the best possible events for the students of OU,” said Matt Rogers, vice chairman of sponsorship. Leading a team of four other students, the sponsorship

SEE eXPO PAGE 2

L&A: The school of Art and Art History celebrates 100 years of art with student and alumni exhibitions. (Page 5)

SEE WelCOme PAGE 2

VOL. 99, NO. 78 © 2013 OU Publications Board FREE — Additional copies 25¢

INSIDE TODAY Campus......................2 Clas si f ie ds................6 L i f e & A r t s ..................4 O p inio n..................... 3 Spor ts........................7 Visit OUDaily.com for more

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• Monday, January 13, 2014

Campus

OUDaily.com ›› Sooner Schedule Are you looking for the Sooner Schedule? Find it on our newly-designed website — it’s the calendar widget on the right side of the front page.

Paighten Harkins, campus editor Alex Niblett, assistant editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666 oudaily.com • Twitter: @OUDaily

expo: One session shows how to include videos in classrooms Continued from page 1

Nikki Self/Oklahoma Daily

Civil engineering junior Kendrick Piercy, left, and political science junior Drew Baney, right, shows students the secrets to solving a Rubix cube and tying a bowtie during the 2013 Winter Welcome Week.

welcome: To host snow ball fight, ice skating Continued from page 1 group got 27 sponsors, 10 sponsors more than last year, Rogers said. All monetary and food donations totaled over $20,000 in sponsorship, providing enough funds for the events. This includes the more expensive events, such as the ice rink Friday in Oklahoma Memorial Union’s courtyard and the snowball fight Tuesday on the Walker-Adams mall, Rogers said.

An ice rink has never been done at OU, and Rogers and Baney said it was one of the largest feats when planning the week. “At first, it seemed like impossible because of the price of putting it on, but through all the hard work and the cooperation of Artificial Ice Events, OU and our team, we were able to get it done,” Rogers said. This year’s theme will be reflected throughout the week’s events across campus in different winter weather events, like the ice rink or the snowball

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fight. Breakfast will be served every morning on a first-come first-serve basis, along with provided lunches as well, according to the schedule. “I really hope that Winter Welcome Week gives students an opportunity to ease back into school after the winter break,” Baney said. “Sometimes this can be a little hard to do after being home for winter break, and these events hopefully start everyone’s semester off great.”

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the possibilities of classroom technology by virtually hosting Selingo on one screen while an accompanying screen, used a voice-recognition software to transcribe his words. Nearly every attendee had a tablet, laptop or phone in hand as they listened to Selingo over the speakers. “People have access to thousands of great courses from around the world … and most of them are free and open today,” Selingo said during his speech. “This, to me, is a great time to be a student.” Selingo said educators need to embrace the virtual world while maintaining affordable college costs and preserving the quality of education. During another session, Hong Lin, the associate director in The Center for Teaching Excellence, spoke about incorporating videos in class lecture. In the session, called “Using Videos for Teaching,” Lin said she believes incorporating videos in classrooms is an extension of the classroom and “an extension of student engagement” with the course material. OU adjunct instructor Regina Blair is teaching an online class this semester and said the event was helpful. “I incorporate video for demonstrations and strategies that I would show my students if it were a face-to-face class, that I can’t show them since it’s an online class,” Blair said. “I can utilize some of the things I’ve seen today in the online things that I’m changing.”


Monday, Jan. 13, 2014  

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