Issuu on Google+

Take 5 nmF gets started on the right note (See photos, page 8)

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2 0 1 1 s I LV E R C R O W N W I N N E R

F R I D A Y, A P R I L 2 7, 2 01 2

graDUaTe raTeS

preSS STarT TO Learn

Website connects students, employers

“everyone plays video games to some degree.” BRYAN CARR, PROFESSOR OF A NEW VIDEO GAME COURSE

Site part of initiative trying to increase grads in state KAtHleen eVAnS

Assistant Campus Editor

pHotos By Ben Williams/tHe daily

Doctoral student Bryan Carr plays on his Nintendo 3DS on Tuesday outside Gaylord Hall. Carr’s interest in video games has turned into an intersession class that will explore video games as mass media and the effects gaming has on violence, gender and racial representation, and childhood obesity.

Course looks to pause stereotypes Games can be important to human nature, Carr says nAtAliA SMitH-rOBerSOn Campus Reporter

Students taking a new intersession course will learn how Mario and Link provide players more than entertainment. Graduate student Bryan Carr created the course “Survey of Gaming and Interactive Media”, which breaks down the fundamentals of video games and

their importance to human nature, including the history, impact and culture of video games. People have many stereotypes about gamers, such as games are mainly for children or for boys, but studies show women 25 and older play more video games than boys 13 and younger, Carr said. “Everyone plays video games to some degree,” Carr said. Video games are not just games New video game course professor Bryan Carr uses a see COURSE paGe 2

stlyus to manipulate his Nintendo 3DS touch screen. Carr said games can teach players different skills.

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin’s office is hoping to find jobs for more graduates and unemployed people in the state through its new employment website initiative this spring. Fallin outlined her initiatives to increase the number of degrees and certificates awarded in Oklahoma by 67 percent over the next 12 years in her February State of the State address, accord- marY ing to a press release. FaLLin Along with her Complete College America Initiative, she also launched OKJobsMatch.com to link unemployed students and Oklahomans to employers by posting resumes and listing jobs online, according to a press release. Site development began in summer 2011, and the office reached out then to universities and others, said Shawna McWatersKhalousi, the director of green programs for the Department of Commerce. The program began as part of a grant with educational institutions across the state to identify green jobs, McWaters-Khalousi said. However, the department realized it could expand the project to something more useful. However, the director of career services Bette Scott said her office just learned about it this spring. “This is a fairly new program for us,” she see JOBS paGe 3

greek

After two-year absence, Sigma Nu to return in fall semester Low membership caused fraternity to close in 2010 HillArY MClAin Campus Reporter

AT A GLANCE History of Sigma nu The Delta Epsilon chapter of Sigma Nu relinquished its charter in 2010 after chapter operations issues and disrepair at the fraternity house.

One fraternity will return to OU during the fall 2012 semester after lack of membership caused a two-year Joshua Green, Sigma Nu diabsence. Sigma Nu will officially rector of expansion and rereturn next semester and cruitment, said. The Delta Epsilon chapter resume formal recruitment,

Now the fraternity is returning in fall 2012 after a two-year hiatus. Sigma Nu will resume formal recruitment. Source: Joshua Green, Sigma Nu expansion and recruitment director

of Sigma Nu at OU was having issues in 2010 with chapter operations and disrepair at the fraternity house,

Green said. “Year after year, membership went down to the point where it was difficult to operate as a full chapter with the limited membership they had,” Green said. The chapte r vo te d to voluntarily relinquish the charter, but not without discussion of recolonizing the chapter eventually, Green said. As a re-established fraternity, it may be difficult to

OUr VieW VOL. 97, NO. 147

© 2012 OU Publications Board FREE — Additional copies 25 cents Campus ........................ Classifieds .................. Life & Arts ................... Opinion ...................... Sports .........................

2 6 7 4 5

Locals laugh it up at norman music Fest

OU baseball looks to end two-game losing skid

The first of three comedy hours at this year’s festival gave attendees a break from music on opening night. (Life & arts)

Oklahoma heads to Kansas to take on the Jayhawks in a three-game series starting at 6 tonight. (page 5)

see SIGMA NU paGe 2

requested document and purpose

Child sex slavery and other forms of human trafficking plague the U.S. and the state. You can help. (page 4)

SpOrTS

effort, Coffey said. Some fraternities may come back stronger due to more guidance of the larger organization after dispersing. “The upside is when you reopen you’re a much more organized, much greater presence of the national fraternity,” Coffey said. Members of the national Sigma Nu organization have

The Daily’s open record requests

Oklahomans must fight to end human trafficking

nOW OnLine aT

attract members, but Sigma Nu will use other methods of recruitment, Interfraternity Council President Nicholas Coffey said. “A lot of time what these fraternities will do is recruit the members and outstanding individuals at the university that are not currently Greek,” Coffey said. It can be a challenge when it comes to recruiting, but usually the national organization will help with the

The most recent contract between OU and the Coca-Cola Company — To learn the terms and conditions of the contract, including how much the university spends on Coke products each year. pharmaceutical invoice data from goddard Health Center from august 2011 to present — To learn if the use of certain drugs increases as finals week approaches. ty JoHnson/tHe daily

The Wickersham Brothers — Dan Horn (left) and Jamard Richardon — perform during the preview of “Seussical the Musical” on Thursday night. The brothers plot to steal Horton’s clover while performing “Monkey Around.” The musical, which opens Friday. (OUDaily.com)

most recent contract between OU and apple inc. — To better understand Apple’s relationship with OU’s journalism college after it was named to the Apple Distinguished Educators program.

date requested

Thursday

Tuesday

Friday

Visit OUDaily.com/openrecords for a complete list of The Daily’s requests


2

Campus

• Friday, April 27, 2012

Tomorrow ››

Campus

Laney Ellisor, campus editor Kathleen Evans, assistant campus editor Chris Miller, assistant campus editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

The American Indian Student Association will host a powwow from 1 to 10 p.m. at Lloyd Noble Center. Visit OUDaily.com for event coverage.

Friday, April 27, 2012 •

Speaker

Author discusses overcoming apartheid by love, education

Speech centers on power of humanity Ajinur Setiwaldi Campus Reporter

Today around campus Art After Hours will feature art from the Hispanic Southwest from 6 to 7 p.m. in the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art’s Dee Dee and Jon R. Stuart Classroom. “Seussical The Musical,” presented by OU School of Musical Theatre and University Theatre, will premiere at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Center’s Rupel Jones Theatre.

Saturday, April 28 A performance of original choreography, “Degrees of Rotation,” will be presented by four OU School of Dance graduate students at 3 and 8 p.m. in the Reynolds Performing Arts Center. “Seussical The Musical,” presented by OU School of Musical Theatre and University Theatre, will take place at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Center’s Rupel Jones Theatre.

Sunday, April 29

Photo provided

A rendering of the future Sigma Nu fraternity house shows what the house will look like after it is completed. The house will reside at 1300 College Ave. Construction of the house should be completed by the fall 2013 and spring 2014 academic year.

Sigma nu: New fraternity house to open 2013-14 Continued from page 1 visited OU’s campus twice in April for interest meetings. Members will be recruited through one-on-one conversations and meetings, Green said. “We’re not looking to recruit every person we can,

A concert, Collegium Musicum, will be held at 3 p.m. in Catlett Music Center’s Gothic Hall. Tickets are $5 for OU students, faculty and staff. “Seussical The Musical,” presented by OU School of Musical Theatre and University Theatre, will take place at 3 p.m. in the Fine Arts Center’s Rupel Jones Theatre.

Monday, April 30 “Seussical The Musical,” presented by OU School of Musical Theatre and University Theatre, will take place at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Center’s Rupel Jones Theatre. A lecture, “Student Success Series: Overcoming Procrastination,” about how students can overcome their procrastination just in time for finals will be presented by Logan Lockhart of the graduation office at 1:30 p.m. in Adams Center’s Muldrow Tower, Room 105.

people play on their televisions, but also games people play on their smartphone or computer, Carr said. “This class will put the idea [that] we are all gamers in context,” Carr said. Games also are a social network for many, Carr said. We now are able to play against friends on Xbox LIVE or on Facebook, so it has developed into a new communication medium. Professor Meta Carstarphen said Carr proposed the video game course her, and she thought it was a great idea to help shed some light on the background of video games. “Bryan has had a couple of

Corrections The Oklahoma Daily is committed to serving readers with accurate coverage and welcomes your comments about information that may require correction or clarification. To contact us with corrections, email us at dailynews@ou.edu. Visit OUDaily.com/corrections to see an archive of our corrections

������������������������������������� ��������������������������������

Being

NUMBER ONE is nothing to celebrate.

This year, more than

172,000 people will be diagnosed with lung cancer, and more than 163,000 will die — making it America’s

NUMBER ONE cancer killer.

But new treatments offer hope. Join Lung Cancer Alliance in the fight against this disease.

Assessments

10 & 24 Hour ADSAC “DUI SCHOOL”

State-Certified For Court & Drivers License Reinstatement

10-Hour Class: May 4, 5 & 6

Fri. 5:30pm-8:45pm, Sat./Sun. 9am-12:30pm 24-Hour Classes: Sat./Sun. 2:00-4:00pm OR Tues./Thurs. 6:00-8:00pm

Assessments- call for appointment

Norman, 550 24th Ave. NW, Ste. H lungcanceralliance.org

“And what we’re coming back to do is truly build a premier student organization on campus, not simply a fraternity.” Sigma Nu also has a fouryear leadership-training program within the fraternity, called LEAD. Green said the program teaches networking, finding

a job and managing money after college. Currently, Sigma Nu is in the process of a capital campaign to fund construction of a new house. Green said the house is expected to be available for members to move in during the fall 2013, spring 2014 academic year.

Course: Games are more than fun, Carr says Continued from page 1

The School of Art & Art History’s capstone exhibit will go on display in the Fred Jones Art Center’s Lightwell Gallery.

we’re truly trying to build an organization that’s mutually beneficial to both parties involved,” Green said. Green said several factors make Sigma Nu unique. “The guys that get involved will get to build the fraternity into what they think the ideal organization should be,” Green said.

Call: 447-1114 www.okduischool.com

guest lectures on this subject and found the students to be very interested and responding to the ideas he discussed,” said Carstarphen, graduate director at Gaylord College of Mass Communication and Journalism. Games have developed into much more than just playing for fun, Carr said. Games can teach people how to save, the importance of doing chores, and other types of learning games.

S t u d e n t s w i l l h av e a chance to have fun and learn about a subject that affects them or someone they know, Carstarphen said. The goal of the course is to interact and shape the experience students have whether they play games or not, Carr said. Spots still are available, and the class is open to all majors. The video game course begins May 14 and ends June 8.

AT A GLANCE Course info “Survey of Gaming and Interactive Media” meets 1 to 3:10 p.m. Monday through Friday. It runs from May 14 to June 8. Contact course professor Bryan Carr at bcarr@ou.edu for more info. Source: ozone.ou.edu and course flyer

An internationally known author spoke Thursday about growing up under apartheid and the world’s common humanity during an on-campus lecture. Mark Mathabane, author of the autobiography “Kaffir Boy” and its sequel “Kaffir Boy in America,” delivered the lecture and described how he survived growing up in South Africa’s toughest ghettos through a belief in education and love. Mathabane’s mother is his greatest teacher and the person who first inspired him to believe in the common humanity, he said “I had many teachers in life, but you are the best because you taught me how to survive with my soul intact,” Mathabane said. Mathabane said his mother encouraged his education and allowed him to move from hatred to understanding to love. “She loved me unconditionally,” he said. “She loved dad and my five sisters and brothers unconditionally. She loved white people unconditionally. She loved the universe unconditionally.” Mathabane found meaning in life when he denounced hatred and adopted love as his faith, he said. Our common humanity and love is what makes us great humans, he said. “Earth. It’s not even a planet. It is a heart,” Mathabane said. “In it we live as an extended family.” Mathabane said that he

Kelsey Higley/The Daily

Mark Mathabane (left), author of “Kaffir Boy,” signs a copy of his book for Loretta Bass, sociology professor, Thursday evening in Dale Hall. Bass said she was excited to meet Mathabane because she teaches a sociology class on Africa. Mathabane has published a total of eight books.

believed that the common humanity of man, forgiveness and love are the true powers that make a better world. “It is my hope we will become the disciples of love,” Mathabane said. After his lecture, Mathabane answered questions from event organizer Jidlaph Kamoche and the audience. Mathabane’s most popular lecture topics include the importance of education, our common humanity, teaching tolerance, the importance of promoting human rights and racial justice and preparing students for a global future, according to his website. The OU History Department sponsored the lecture, and African history professor Kamoche said Mathabane’s subject matter

AT A GLANCE Books by Mathabane 1986 — “Kaffir Boy” 1989 — “Kaffir Boy in America” 1992 — “Love in Black and White” 1994 — “African Women: Three Generations” 2000 — “Miriam’s Song” 2011 — “Ubuntu”

makes him a perfect lecturer on the subject of apartheid. “A lot of people don’t understand what the apartheid was about,” Kamoche said. “Most of us who study and teach South African history rely on ‘Kaffir Boy’ material.” Mathabane has spoken at more than 70 colleges and

universities in the U.S., according to his website. Over 80 individuals attended the event at OU. Kamoche said his African studies students were among the audience. Kamoche’s class has been reading Mathabane’s autobiography and its sequel. “I am delighted to have him on our campus for the first time to share his unique and fascinating life story with our students, faculty and the community at large,” Kamoche said. Mathabane was nominated Speaker of the Year by the National Association of Campus Activities and has appeared on talk shows including Oprah, Larr y King, National Public Radio and CNN, according to his website.

Jobs: Officials not yet recommending site Continued from page 1 said. “We are just now in the process of looking at it to determine how it works so that we can then begin to direct students to use it.” Because Scott said her office knows so little about it, she is having assistant directors set up accounts to get an idea of what students would experience on the website. Right now, Career Services links to the website, but officials are not recommending it to students until they learn more about how it works. “I would be able to say it’s something we offer and encourage them to use it, but we can’t track how many do it,” Scott said. “We’re anxious to learn more about it and inform the students, but it will be pretty much be next year’s students.” OU has a similar service that lets students upload resumes for potential employers to look at, according to its website. Currently, more than 5,000 people have uploaded resumes to OKJobsMatch.com, but the site won’t let employers start accessing it until late spring, McWaters-Khalousi said. “We need a strong talent pool of Oklahomans first,” she said. Part of the delay is legislation to allow more data sharing, which is how part of the website operates, McWatersKhalousi said. The website works by asking users questions to determine their skills and matching those with abilities that employers need. Users also can look at specific career paths and see what credentials they may need to qualify for a position. This spring, approximately 32,400 students will graduate from Oklahoma universities and seek more education or employment, particularly in business and nursing, according to a press release from the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. For the website to be more successful, the state is trying to create a more diverse economy offering these students and Oklahomans job opportunities in a variety of fields. The legislature has focused on that by creating the right kind of environment where businesses would want to locate, said Rep. Randy McDaniel, R-Oklahoma City, chair of the Economic Development, Tourism and Financial Services Committee. Examples include trying to improve the workers’ compensation system, one of the main reasons employers don’t want to come to Oklahoma, McDaniel said. The committee also focuses on cleaning up the state budget. “Most employers will realize if state budgets are not financially sound, and it would put them in a situation where tax increases would prevent them from wanting to do business,” McDaniel said. “We don’t want the writing on the wall that a tax increase is inevitable.” However, even these efforts to diversify the Oklahoma economy still revolve around energy because that is the staple of Oklahoma’s economy, political science professor Keith Gaddie said. “If we’re not doing energy, Oklahoma isn’t worth living in,” Gaddie said. “It’s like taking the whiskey and tobacco and coal out of Kentucky.”

PHI BETA KAPPA

the premier honorary society for the liberal arts and sciences is pleased to announce the seniors & juniors elected to membership for 2012

Jeff Abbott Paige Abernathy Chinwe Ajalla Brooke Allen Alexander Anand Christine Ariana Dayana Arteaga Yasmin Baksh Kelsey Barrow Jonathan Bateman Laura Bock Julianne Bonifield Jacquelyn Boyd Amy Brackenbury Meghan Bragers Adam Breipohl Lauren Brentnell Catherine Brothers Brittney Brown Joshua Burks Kelcie Burks Jordan Cannon Caitlin Capps Katherine Carruth Kathleen Chaplin Matthew Chapman Gina Circelli Kristen Cline Savannah Collins Aaron Conrado Abigail Coppedge Nathan Crain Kelly Crane Maura Cremin Sarah Croft Katherine Cunningham Jared Curran Natalie Daab Rachelle David Kimberlee Davies Matthew Day Brett Deatherage Aubrey Delafield Mary Dewers Thanh-Nhan Do John Doerfel Paul Dollahite Lane Donaldson Haley Doran Alisha East Breanna Edwards

Jinwoong Kim Summer Kimbrough Kathryn Kinser Jay Kumar Sandra Kunzweiler Charles Lackey Emily Langhorst Cara Lasley Melissa Laub Hilary Ludwig Dilip Mahale Logan Maingi Joshua Malone Sara Marin Melissa Mathewson Scott Mauldin Sean McCormick Alia McCrite Alexis Graham-Stephenson Heather McDonald Brian Graves Amber McKnight Sarah Graybill Trevor McMichael Amy Grosser Caitlin Miles Brett Gudgel Molly Miller Erica Halley Sarah Miller Erin Hampton Dana Mohammad-Zadeh Rachel Hardcastle Ganga Moorthy Evan Hardesty Aubrey Morris Angelica Harper Ashley Morris Audrey Harris Anthony Morris Sarah Hauptman Mason Morrow Kaitlin Hawkins Allison Mrasek Dana Haymon Ellen Mueller Daniel Helm Margaret Mulcahy Millard Henry Andrew Nguyen Alyssa Hill Kristy Nguyen Vianne Hinsdale Hoang Nguyen Stacey Hitchcock Tuan Nguyen Steven Hudec Amanda Niedzwiecki Hilary Hudson Amy Oden Christine Hursh Nathaniel Odor Alison Huskey Alexander Parker Paige Iven Sarah Parrish Blake Jenkins Laura Patterson Ashley Johnson Chelsea Pierce Blakeley Jones David Pierce Heather Jones Stephen Pittman Peter Jones Emily Powell Bhargav Karamched Caleb Prentice Mohammed Kayyali Lauren Price Jennifer Keller Lyssa Prince Randi Kennedy Alim Ramji Scott Renner

Ashley Edwards Constance Eimer Patrick Ernst Elena Eva Kathleen Evans Adam Fallon Lacy Fannell Kathleen Fenwick Riane Fern Werner Ferrone Michael Fons Elizabeth Forsythe Sarah Franklin Alexandra Glavas Megan Godwin John Goetzinger Andre Goran Kevin Grabski

Richard Rhodes Casey Richardson Shannon Rickley Meghan Riley Jillian Robinson Jose Roman Elizabeth Rucker Jacob Rupert Annelise Russell Austin Scheller Taylor Schmidt Kevin Scoggin Preston Seaberg Lydia Sexton Dhara Sheth Ashley Shovanec Anna Skupin Andrew Slagle Cameron Smithee Ali Somjee Sarah Stough Jamie Sykes Jessie Tanner Lucas Toho Michael Treptor Evan Trinidad Becky Varghese Keely Voytovich Emily Ward Jillian Ward Lauren Weaver Elise Wenzel Shelly Wernette Kaitlin West Katherine Wiarda Tiegan Willoughby Jennifer Wilt Kalli Wolf Hailon Wong Ashleigh Woodall

Phi Beta Kappa was founded in 1776 at the College of William and Mary, and the University of Oklahoma’s chapter, Alpha of Oklahoma, was chartered in 1920. For over two hundred years, election to Phi Beta Kappa has been a recognition of intellectual capacities well employed, especially in the acquiring of an education in the liberal arts and sciences. Phi Beta Kappa — recognizing OU’s excellence. For more information, please contact Sherry Cox at scox@ou.edu or Craig Hayes at rchayes@ou.edu.

Congratulations to the University of Oklahoma Chapter 251 Phi Kappa Phi Members 2012

Paige Abernathy Maria Acevedo Amy Anderson Jessica Anthony Hallie Arias Cindi Atkinson Karis Barnett Heather Bateman Lisa Bierema Rebecca Borden Samuel Briggs Brittney Brown Meredith Brown Robert Bruce Kathleen Burns Anna Butcher Courtney Carroll Allison Childers Sara Ciccolari-Micaldi Kendra Collins Christine Connolly Jodie Cook Natalie Daab Matthew Davis Lisa DeSpain Thai Dinh Nhung Duong Angela Edwards Zachary Eldredge Michelle Farabough Jamie Farmer Amanda Fehlbaum Nubia Fiesel Christopher Foster Summer Frank Shawn Garmon Gwendolyn Gillson LeNece Glossett Karen Goodnight Brent Greyson Shelley Groves

Anna Gurley Edward Hagen Dayna Hamilton Kimberly Haney Drew Hendrix Jennifer Hermann Jason Herron Brett Herzog Cathleen Hewett Stacey Hitchcock Caleb Holt Allison Hopper Shannon Hucker Rachel Jackson Krysten Jenkins Amanda Johnston Jessica Johnston Blakeley Jones Jessica Jones Kelley Jones Cael Josephson Samantha Kahoe Shellie Keast Jerod Keith Ann Kientz Emily Kilpatrick Kathryn King Katharine Kosniewski JoAnne Kosta Alexandra LaFalce Mallory Lambert Christie Latimer Gina Leger Brian Li Kayla Lilley Larissa Lynn Hannah Magruder Verna Martin Mary Mason Michael Masterson Harvey Matlock

3

Amber McConnell Cameron McCoy Alison McMahan Chloe MeChloe Meek Mylo Miller Patrick Miller Jessica Mitzner Nathan Moore Katherine Morrow Jeffrey Moseley Dana Mueller Jordan Naylor Wendy Newton Andrew Nghiem Linh Nguyen Nor Norazman Haley Noteboom Mary O’Neill Lauren Oatman Alexandra Obregon-Tito Lauren Patton Gretchen Peirce Danielle Peters Delphine Piguet Pragya Rampuria Andrew Rathgeber Chris Ray Emily Reed Dylan Reif Scott Renner Hannah Rieger Thomas Romano Amanda Ross Madeline Ross Kira Roth Jennifer Roulet Tyson Roulston David Rouse Tim Saidi Alexandra Sampson Karl Schaettle

Briana Schroeder Tashanda Scruggs Erin Shore Robert Shoup Emily Siegrist Zane Simmons Helga Skaftason Brandon Smith Katie Smith Michael Smith Morgan Smith GeorgeAnn Stoops Wassim Tabet Ishita Tejani Jennifer Terry Caramia Testa Emily Thoes Tanner Tiedeman Katy Tipton Caroline Trump Kyle Vanderburg Kristen Veal Justina Violette Christopher Vu Todd Walker Rebecca Wallman Michael Warren Katherine Wiarda Erin Williams Katie Williams Keitha Wilson Jennifer Wilt William Womble Ashleigh Woodall Robert Woods Jeffrey Yanchick Xiyao Yang Adelle York Jacob Young


2

Campus

• Friday, April 27, 2012

Tomorrow ››

Campus

Laney Ellisor, campus editor Kathleen Evans, assistant campus editor Chris Miller, assistant campus editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

The American Indian Student Association will host a powwow from 1 to 10 p.m. at Lloyd Noble Center. Visit OUDaily.com for event coverage.

Friday, April 27, 2012 •

Speaker

Author discusses overcoming apartheid by love, education

Speech centers on power of humanity Ajinur Setiwaldi Campus Reporter

Today around campus Art After Hours will feature art from the Hispanic Southwest from 6 to 7 p.m. in the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art’s Dee Dee and Jon R. Stuart Classroom. “Seussical The Musical,” presented by OU School of Musical Theatre and University Theatre, will premiere at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Center’s Rupel Jones Theatre.

Saturday, April 28 A performance of original choreography, “Degrees of Rotation,” will be presented by four OU School of Dance graduate students at 3 and 8 p.m. in the Reynolds Performing Arts Center. “Seussical The Musical,” presented by OU School of Musical Theatre and University Theatre, will take place at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Center’s Rupel Jones Theatre.

Sunday, April 29

Photo provided

A rendering of the future Sigma Nu fraternity house shows what the house will look like after it is completed. The house will reside at 1300 College Ave. Construction of the house should be completed by the fall 2013 and spring 2014 academic year.

Sigma nu: New fraternity house to open 2013-14 Continued from page 1 visited OU’s campus twice in April for interest meetings. Members will be recruited through one-on-one conversations and meetings, Green said. “We’re not looking to recruit every person we can,

A concert, Collegium Musicum, will be held at 3 p.m. in Catlett Music Center’s Gothic Hall. Tickets are $5 for OU students, faculty and staff. “Seussical The Musical,” presented by OU School of Musical Theatre and University Theatre, will take place at 3 p.m. in the Fine Arts Center’s Rupel Jones Theatre.

Monday, April 30 “Seussical The Musical,” presented by OU School of Musical Theatre and University Theatre, will take place at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Center’s Rupel Jones Theatre. A lecture, “Student Success Series: Overcoming Procrastination,” about how students can overcome their procrastination just in time for finals will be presented by Logan Lockhart of the graduation office at 1:30 p.m. in Adams Center’s Muldrow Tower, Room 105.

people play on their televisions, but also games people play on their smartphone or computer, Carr said. “This class will put the idea [that] we are all gamers in context,” Carr said. Games also are a social network for many, Carr said. We now are able to play against friends on Xbox LIVE or on Facebook, so it has developed into a new communication medium. Professor Meta Carstarphen said Carr proposed the video game course her, and she thought it was a great idea to help shed some light on the background of video games. “Bryan has had a couple of

Corrections The Oklahoma Daily is committed to serving readers with accurate coverage and welcomes your comments about information that may require correction or clarification. To contact us with corrections, email us at dailynews@ou.edu. Visit OUDaily.com/corrections to see an archive of our corrections

������������������������������������� ��������������������������������

Being

NUMBER ONE is nothing to celebrate.

This year, more than

172,000 people will be diagnosed with lung cancer, and more than 163,000 will die — making it America’s

NUMBER ONE cancer killer.

But new treatments offer hope. Join Lung Cancer Alliance in the fight against this disease.

Assessments

10 & 24 Hour ADSAC “DUI SCHOOL”

State-Certified For Court & Drivers License Reinstatement

10-Hour Class: May 4, 5 & 6

Fri. 5:30pm-8:45pm, Sat./Sun. 9am-12:30pm 24-Hour Classes: Sat./Sun. 2:00-4:00pm OR Tues./Thurs. 6:00-8:00pm

Assessments- call for appointment

Norman, 550 24th Ave. NW, Ste. H lungcanceralliance.org

“And what we’re coming back to do is truly build a premier student organization on campus, not simply a fraternity.” Sigma Nu also has a fouryear leadership-training program within the fraternity, called LEAD. Green said the program teaches networking, finding

a job and managing money after college. Currently, Sigma Nu is in the process of a capital campaign to fund construction of a new house. Green said the house is expected to be available for members to move in during the fall 2013, spring 2014 academic year.

Course: Games are more than fun, Carr says Continued from page 1

The School of Art & Art History’s capstone exhibit will go on display in the Fred Jones Art Center’s Lightwell Gallery.

we’re truly trying to build an organization that’s mutually beneficial to both parties involved,” Green said. Green said several factors make Sigma Nu unique. “The guys that get involved will get to build the fraternity into what they think the ideal organization should be,” Green said.

Call: 447-1114 www.okduischool.com

guest lectures on this subject and found the students to be very interested and responding to the ideas he discussed,” said Carstarphen, graduate director at Gaylord College of Mass Communication and Journalism. Games have developed into much more than just playing for fun, Carr said. Games can teach people how to save, the importance of doing chores, and other types of learning games.

S t u d e n t s w i l l h av e a chance to have fun and learn about a subject that affects them or someone they know, Carstarphen said. The goal of the course is to interact and shape the experience students have whether they play games or not, Carr said. Spots still are available, and the class is open to all majors. The video game course begins May 14 and ends June 8.

AT A GLANCE Course info “Survey of Gaming and Interactive Media” meets 1 to 3:10 p.m. Monday through Friday. It runs from May 14 to June 8. Contact course professor Bryan Carr at bcarr@ou.edu for more info. Source: ozone.ou.edu and course flyer

An internationally known author spoke Thursday about growing up under apartheid and the world’s common humanity during an on-campus lecture. Mark Mathabane, author of the autobiography “Kaffir Boy” and its sequel “Kaffir Boy in America,” delivered the lecture and described how he survived growing up in South Africa’s toughest ghettos through a belief in education and love. Mathabane’s mother is his greatest teacher and the person who first inspired him to believe in the common humanity, he said “I had many teachers in life, but you are the best because you taught me how to survive with my soul intact,” Mathabane said. Mathabane said his mother encouraged his education and allowed him to move from hatred to understanding to love. “She loved me unconditionally,” he said. “She loved dad and my five sisters and brothers unconditionally. She loved white people unconditionally. She loved the universe unconditionally.” Mathabane found meaning in life when he denounced hatred and adopted love as his faith, he said. Our common humanity and love is what makes us great humans, he said. “Earth. It’s not even a planet. It is a heart,” Mathabane said. “In it we live as an extended family.” Mathabane said that he

Kelsey Higley/The Daily

Mark Mathabane (left), author of “Kaffir Boy,” signs a copy of his book for Loretta Bass, sociology professor, Thursday evening in Dale Hall. Bass said she was excited to meet Mathabane because she teaches a sociology class on Africa. Mathabane has published a total of eight books.

believed that the common humanity of man, forgiveness and love are the true powers that make a better world. “It is my hope we will become the disciples of love,” Mathabane said. After his lecture, Mathabane answered questions from event organizer Jidlaph Kamoche and the audience. Mathabane’s most popular lecture topics include the importance of education, our common humanity, teaching tolerance, the importance of promoting human rights and racial justice and preparing students for a global future, according to his website. The OU History Department sponsored the lecture, and African history professor Kamoche said Mathabane’s subject matter

AT A GLANCE Books by Mathabane 1986 — “Kaffir Boy” 1989 — “Kaffir Boy in America” 1992 — “Love in Black and White” 1994 — “African Women: Three Generations” 2000 — “Miriam’s Song” 2011 — “Ubuntu”

makes him a perfect lecturer on the subject of apartheid. “A lot of people don’t understand what the apartheid was about,” Kamoche said. “Most of us who study and teach South African history rely on ‘Kaffir Boy’ material.” Mathabane has spoken at more than 70 colleges and

universities in the U.S., according to his website. Over 80 individuals attended the event at OU. Kamoche said his African studies students were among the audience. Kamoche’s class has been reading Mathabane’s autobiography and its sequel. “I am delighted to have him on our campus for the first time to share his unique and fascinating life story with our students, faculty and the community at large,” Kamoche said. Mathabane was nominated Speaker of the Year by the National Association of Campus Activities and has appeared on talk shows including Oprah, Larr y King, National Public Radio and CNN, according to his website.

Jobs: Officials not yet recommending site Continued from page 1 said. “We are just now in the process of looking at it to determine how it works so that we can then begin to direct students to use it.” Because Scott said her office knows so little about it, she is having assistant directors set up accounts to get an idea of what students would experience on the website. Right now, Career Services links to the website, but officials are not recommending it to students until they learn more about how it works. “I would be able to say it’s something we offer and encourage them to use it, but we can’t track how many do it,” Scott said. “We’re anxious to learn more about it and inform the students, but it will be pretty much be next year’s students.” OU has a similar service that lets students upload resumes for potential employers to look at, according to its website. Currently, more than 5,000 people have uploaded resumes to OKJobsMatch.com, but the site won’t let employers start accessing it until late spring, McWaters-Khalousi said. “We need a strong talent pool of Oklahomans first,” she said. Part of the delay is legislation to allow more data sharing, which is how part of the website operates, McWatersKhalousi said. The website works by asking users questions to determine their skills and matching those with abilities that employers need. Users also can look at specific career paths and see what credentials they may need to qualify for a position. This spring, approximately 32,400 students will graduate from Oklahoma universities and seek more education or employment, particularly in business and nursing, according to a press release from the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. For the website to be more successful, the state is trying to create a more diverse economy offering these students and Oklahomans job opportunities in a variety of fields. The legislature has focused on that by creating the right kind of environment where businesses would want to locate, said Rep. Randy McDaniel, R-Oklahoma City, chair of the Economic Development, Tourism and Financial Services Committee. Examples include trying to improve the workers’ compensation system, one of the main reasons employers don’t want to come to Oklahoma, McDaniel said. The committee also focuses on cleaning up the state budget. “Most employers will realize if state budgets are not financially sound, and it would put them in a situation where tax increases would prevent them from wanting to do business,” McDaniel said. “We don’t want the writing on the wall that a tax increase is inevitable.” However, even these efforts to diversify the Oklahoma economy still revolve around energy because that is the staple of Oklahoma’s economy, political science professor Keith Gaddie said. “If we’re not doing energy, Oklahoma isn’t worth living in,” Gaddie said. “It’s like taking the whiskey and tobacco and coal out of Kentucky.”

PHI BETA KAPPA

the premier honorary society for the liberal arts and sciences is pleased to announce the seniors & juniors elected to membership for 2012

Jeff Abbott Paige Abernathy Chinwe Ajalla Brooke Allen Alexander Anand Christine Ariana Dayana Arteaga Yasmin Baksh Kelsey Barrow Jonathan Bateman Laura Bock Julianne Bonifield Jacquelyn Boyd Amy Brackenbury Meghan Bragers Adam Breipohl Lauren Brentnell Catherine Brothers Brittney Brown Joshua Burks Kelcie Burks Jordan Cannon Caitlin Capps Katherine Carruth Kathleen Chaplin Matthew Chapman Gina Circelli Kristen Cline Savannah Collins Aaron Conrado Abigail Coppedge Nathan Crain Kelly Crane Maura Cremin Sarah Croft Katherine Cunningham Jared Curran Natalie Daab Rachelle David Kimberlee Davies Matthew Day Brett Deatherage Aubrey Delafield Mary Dewers Thanh-Nhan Do John Doerfel Paul Dollahite Lane Donaldson Haley Doran Alisha East Breanna Edwards

Jinwoong Kim Summer Kimbrough Kathryn Kinser Jay Kumar Sandra Kunzweiler Charles Lackey Emily Langhorst Cara Lasley Melissa Laub Hilary Ludwig Dilip Mahale Logan Maingi Joshua Malone Sara Marin Melissa Mathewson Scott Mauldin Sean McCormick Alia McCrite Alexis Graham-Stephenson Heather McDonald Brian Graves Amber McKnight Sarah Graybill Trevor McMichael Amy Grosser Caitlin Miles Brett Gudgel Molly Miller Erica Halley Sarah Miller Erin Hampton Dana Mohammad-Zadeh Rachel Hardcastle Ganga Moorthy Evan Hardesty Aubrey Morris Angelica Harper Ashley Morris Audrey Harris Anthony Morris Sarah Hauptman Mason Morrow Kaitlin Hawkins Allison Mrasek Dana Haymon Ellen Mueller Daniel Helm Margaret Mulcahy Millard Henry Andrew Nguyen Alyssa Hill Kristy Nguyen Vianne Hinsdale Hoang Nguyen Stacey Hitchcock Tuan Nguyen Steven Hudec Amanda Niedzwiecki Hilary Hudson Amy Oden Christine Hursh Nathaniel Odor Alison Huskey Alexander Parker Paige Iven Sarah Parrish Blake Jenkins Laura Patterson Ashley Johnson Chelsea Pierce Blakeley Jones David Pierce Heather Jones Stephen Pittman Peter Jones Emily Powell Bhargav Karamched Caleb Prentice Mohammed Kayyali Lauren Price Jennifer Keller Lyssa Prince Randi Kennedy Alim Ramji Scott Renner

Ashley Edwards Constance Eimer Patrick Ernst Elena Eva Kathleen Evans Adam Fallon Lacy Fannell Kathleen Fenwick Riane Fern Werner Ferrone Michael Fons Elizabeth Forsythe Sarah Franklin Alexandra Glavas Megan Godwin John Goetzinger Andre Goran Kevin Grabski

Richard Rhodes Casey Richardson Shannon Rickley Meghan Riley Jillian Robinson Jose Roman Elizabeth Rucker Jacob Rupert Annelise Russell Austin Scheller Taylor Schmidt Kevin Scoggin Preston Seaberg Lydia Sexton Dhara Sheth Ashley Shovanec Anna Skupin Andrew Slagle Cameron Smithee Ali Somjee Sarah Stough Jamie Sykes Jessie Tanner Lucas Toho Michael Treptor Evan Trinidad Becky Varghese Keely Voytovich Emily Ward Jillian Ward Lauren Weaver Elise Wenzel Shelly Wernette Kaitlin West Katherine Wiarda Tiegan Willoughby Jennifer Wilt Kalli Wolf Hailon Wong Ashleigh Woodall

Phi Beta Kappa was founded in 1776 at the College of William and Mary, and the University of Oklahoma’s chapter, Alpha of Oklahoma, was chartered in 1920. For over two hundred years, election to Phi Beta Kappa has been a recognition of intellectual capacities well employed, especially in the acquiring of an education in the liberal arts and sciences. Phi Beta Kappa — recognizing OU’s excellence. For more information, please contact Sherry Cox at scox@ou.edu or Craig Hayes at rchayes@ou.edu.

Congratulations to the University of Oklahoma Chapter 251 Phi Kappa Phi Members 2012

Paige Abernathy Maria Acevedo Amy Anderson Jessica Anthony Hallie Arias Cindi Atkinson Karis Barnett Heather Bateman Lisa Bierema Rebecca Borden Samuel Briggs Brittney Brown Meredith Brown Robert Bruce Kathleen Burns Anna Butcher Courtney Carroll Allison Childers Sara Ciccolari-Micaldi Kendra Collins Christine Connolly Jodie Cook Natalie Daab Matthew Davis Lisa DeSpain Thai Dinh Nhung Duong Angela Edwards Zachary Eldredge Michelle Farabough Jamie Farmer Amanda Fehlbaum Nubia Fiesel Christopher Foster Summer Frank Shawn Garmon Gwendolyn Gillson LeNece Glossett Karen Goodnight Brent Greyson Shelley Groves

Anna Gurley Edward Hagen Dayna Hamilton Kimberly Haney Drew Hendrix Jennifer Hermann Jason Herron Brett Herzog Cathleen Hewett Stacey Hitchcock Caleb Holt Allison Hopper Shannon Hucker Rachel Jackson Krysten Jenkins Amanda Johnston Jessica Johnston Blakeley Jones Jessica Jones Kelley Jones Cael Josephson Samantha Kahoe Shellie Keast Jerod Keith Ann Kientz Emily Kilpatrick Kathryn King Katharine Kosniewski JoAnne Kosta Alexandra LaFalce Mallory Lambert Christie Latimer Gina Leger Brian Li Kayla Lilley Larissa Lynn Hannah Magruder Verna Martin Mary Mason Michael Masterson Harvey Matlock

3

Amber McConnell Cameron McCoy Alison McMahan Chloe MeChloe Meek Mylo Miller Patrick Miller Jessica Mitzner Nathan Moore Katherine Morrow Jeffrey Moseley Dana Mueller Jordan Naylor Wendy Newton Andrew Nghiem Linh Nguyen Nor Norazman Haley Noteboom Mary O’Neill Lauren Oatman Alexandra Obregon-Tito Lauren Patton Gretchen Peirce Danielle Peters Delphine Piguet Pragya Rampuria Andrew Rathgeber Chris Ray Emily Reed Dylan Reif Scott Renner Hannah Rieger Thomas Romano Amanda Ross Madeline Ross Kira Roth Jennifer Roulet Tyson Roulston David Rouse Tim Saidi Alexandra Sampson Karl Schaettle

Briana Schroeder Tashanda Scruggs Erin Shore Robert Shoup Emily Siegrist Zane Simmons Helga Skaftason Brandon Smith Katie Smith Michael Smith Morgan Smith GeorgeAnn Stoops Wassim Tabet Ishita Tejani Jennifer Terry Caramia Testa Emily Thoes Tanner Tiedeman Katy Tipton Caroline Trump Kyle Vanderburg Kristen Veal Justina Violette Christopher Vu Todd Walker Rebecca Wallman Michael Warren Katherine Wiarda Erin Williams Katie Williams Keitha Wilson Jennifer Wilt William Womble Ashleigh Woodall Robert Woods Jeffrey Yanchick Xiyao Yang Adelle York Jacob Young


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Reader comment on OUDaily.com ››

• Friday, April 27, 2012

“Yes, be afraid of lung cancer, throat cancer, reduced quality of life.... and the fact that you are ADDICTED to something. It controls you. You are a junkie looking ahead to your next fix. I think your assessment of the smoking cessation class is probably correct.” (kagou, RE: ‘COLUMN: If I’m going to kick the habit, I need to fear my cigarettes’)

OPINION EDITORIAL

Gov can’t fight trafficking alone Our View: Human trafficking is a local issue, and the state legislature can’t fight it alone. They need your help.

AT A GLANCE Human trafficking terms Labor trafficking: The forced exploitation of workers, often immigrants, through debt bondage

Child sex trafficking: The exploitation of minors for commercial sex, such as prostitution and child porn

The state legislature has managed to stop sniping at each other over abortion and the state motto long enough to pass powerful legislation to Intimate partner trafficking: Sex trafficking: The help fight human sex trafficking. When a family member or exploitation of people for This bill is the first of what Rep. Sally Kern, loved one is the trafficker, commercial sex trading the victim for drugs or R-Oklahoma City, said she hopes will be a series Source: Oklahomans Against money Trafficking Humans of bills to strengthen the state’s human trafficking laws. This focus on human trafficking is long overBefore this legislation, human trafficking for due. Human trafficking is one of the fastestcommercial sex was defined as the “recruiting, growing crimes in the country, according to U.S. enticing, harboring, maintaining, transporting, Immigration and Customs Enforcement. providing or obtaining, by any means, another And despite its prime location in the human person through deception, force, fraud, threat or trafficking industry, at the crossroads of three coercion for purposes of engaging the person in a major interstates, Oklahoma recently received a commercial sex act.” D grade for its human trafficking laws from the This required proof of force or fraud used to coAmerican Center for Law & Justice. erce the victim into commercial sex. Just Thursday, 40 people were arrested in The new law expands the definition of this kind Oklahoma and Texas in a coordinated human of trafficking to explicitly include minors and trafficking sweep. takes away the requirement that minors must be The new state legislation, signed into law this coerced into the sex trade. week, focuses on minors trafficked for commerIt specifically states that a minor cannot concial sex. sent to engaging in commercial sex and broadens It strengthens and broadens the definition of the definition of what counts as trafficking where human trafficking to include the recruitment, har- minors are concerned, both of which help law enboring, transportation and purchasing or obtain- forcement fight this widespread crime. ing stages of the trafficking process. This is a great first step — exactly the kind of legIt also states that a minor cannot consent to islation Oklahoma legislators should be focusing prostitution, taking away one legal defense often on. used in trafficking cases. But there is more to be done. Human trafficking This expanded definition was necesof all kinds is still a growing problem. It’s sary to close the gaps and loopholes in the time to raise Oklahoma’s grade to an A. The Our View original human trafficking law. We have a The legislature has not yet discussed is the majority hard time understanding how such loopseveral other bills that would further opinion of holes, which benefited those involved in strengthen Oklahoma’s efforts to end The Daily’s nine-member the child sex trade and made it more difhuman trafficking. editorial board ficult to prosecute such crimes, were alWe urge them to pass these bills quickly lowed to exist for so long. and listen to the suggestions of advocates But we can’t blame the legislature for this for future legislation. oversight — it stems from a statewide lack of But this epidemic cannot be fought through the awareness. legislature alone. In 2009, the U.S. was named the number one naFighting the growing human trafficking probtion in the world for child sex trafficking. Though lem in this state will require a coordinated effort there are many kinds of human trafficking, more from lawmakers, law enforcement and advocacy than 70 percent of the cases in the U.S. involve U.S. groups — and this effort is built on the attention citizens and, of those cases, 90 percent are women and effort of regular citizens. involved in sex slavery, according to Oklahomans You can help. Oklahomans Against Trafficking Against Trafficking Humans. Humans, at OathCoalition.com, provides more inThe FBI estimates more than 300,000 young girls formation about the different kinds of human trafin the U.S. are enslaved in human trafficking each ficking in the state and the U.S. year, and that number is expected to increase. You also can donate to the group or volunteer to That’s 300,000 young women — most between help with their advocacy, education and victims the ages of 12 and 17 — whose bodies and lives are services. controlled by violent traffickers. More locally, you can join an OU student Who were taken from their homes and coerced group that deals with trafficking issues, such as through financial bondage and physical intimida- Law Students Against Trafficking or InterVarsity tion into sexually servicing multiple men every Christian Fellowship, next semester. night. At the very least, you can keep an eye out for Who have no money, no identity, no control and related events on campus to help out and learn no ability to say “no.” more, and keep tabs on future legislative efforts to Who may not even be able to imagine another fight all forms of trafficking. life. This is modern-day slavery, widespread and This is happening here, in the U.S. And with systematic. It must be stopped. Interstate 35 passing right through Norman, it’s a very local problem indeed. Comment on this at OUDaily.com

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Arezzo’s benefits to OU, state worth cost Editor’s Note: This letter is in response to Tuesday’s editorial, “Arezzo expansion is worth the money unless costs burden future students.” I was glad to read The Oklahoma Daily’s support for OU in Arezzo. However, your readers should know what OU in Arezzo already has accomplished for OU and for the state of Oklahoma. OU in Arezzo has sent over 700 students to Arezzo, providing students the chance to live in an international setting. Our students have interned at schools, the city hall, businesses and even the U.S. Embassy in Rome. These experiences have made our graduates more competitive in the global labor market.

“We ... should remember that our university is uniquely positioned to bring great benefits to our students and to the state.” OU in Arezzo is bringing important benefits to Oklahoma as well. I recently accompanied the Italian Consul G eneral, the Honorable Fabrizio Nava, to the Capitol for a meeting with Gov. Mary Fallin. Consul Nava lauded the OU in Arezzo program as just the first in a series of new connections between Italy and Oklahoma. He informed Fallin that Norman and Arezzo are now sister cities, noting

that a first fruit of this new relationship is an Italian business, Fabbrica del Sole, choosing to incorporate in Oklahoma. Additionally, the governor learned that Enel Green Power, an Italian energy company, has partnered with GE to invest $375 million in Oklahoma wind farms. These are important benefits to OU students and to Oklahomans. Yes, we ought to be prudent about the costs of running a flagship public university, but we also should remember that our university is uniquely positioned to bring great benefits to our students and to the state. OU in Arezzo is already proving a sound investment. Jason Houston, associate professor of Italian

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» Poll question of the day Do you plan to attend Norman Music Festival this weekend? To cast your vote, log on to COLUMN

Do your shopping locally for best produce, goods

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gnorance for OPINION COLUMNIST Americans, Normanites included, is bliss. The clothes we wear, the electronics we operate and the supermarkets we frequent all fit into a global picture. With the shop local Kayley Gillespie movement under our kayley.m.gillespie-1@ou.edu heels and “small business Saturday” an unofficial holiday, it’s important to understand not only where our products come from and by what means we obtain them, but how consumers are players within a giant industry. Recently, Walmart has been under fire for its poor sustainability efforts. As one of our country’s largest private employers, the largest in Mexico and one of the largest in Canada, Walmart’s $419 billion in net sales for the fiscal year ending January 2011 was earned irresponsibly and recklessly. No attention was paid to its 2.1 million employees and its customers. Since 2005, Walmart has publicly announced that it is a “green” corporation. The term “green,” though, is thrown around without accountability or repercussion. Though Walmart was recognized as a Champion of Energy Efficiency by the American Council for an EnergyEfficient Economy in 2010, it has done little to reduce its footprint on the environment. In fact, it has increased its environmental impact, according to a report by The Institute for Local Self-Reliance (ILSR). First, Walmart’s never ending demand for rollback prices perpetuates poor quality and durability of consumer goods. On a fast-track from factory to landfill, the millions who shop at Walmart are discarding their goods at an alarming rate. As you may have guessed, Walmart’s sustainability program doesn’t take into account the short life of its products. The retailer also fails to address the failed sustainability measures of Chinese factories that supply the retail giant. Though Walmart has tirelessly promoted its renewable energy initiatives, the retailer derives less than 4 percent of its electricity from renewable power and solar power projects. While large companies like Kohls and Whole Foods have completely converted to renewable power, Walmart reps have noted “it has been difficult to find and fund lowcarbon technologies that meet our return-on-investment requirements.” With increased output and expansion, the retail giant’s greenhouse gas emissions grew by 14 percent between 2005 and 2010. As demonstrated by the 22 million metric tons of greenhouse gases annually released into our environment by Walmart, its 2005 promise to improve energy efficiency is a sham. Interestingly, the same year that it promised to improve its energy efficiency, Walmart expanded its store footprint in the U.S. by one-third. Instead of refurbishing some of the 150 vacant Walmarts across the nation, Walmart builds on virgin land. The retailer recently has been exposed after officials administered millions of dollars in bribes to Mexican officials in exchange for speedier building permits. While expanding its footprint both nationally and internationally, Walmart uses its space as a grocer to shrink the competition within the food industry. It currently controls more than 50 percent of sales in 29 metro markets, which has triggered multiple mergers among meatpackers and dairies. Walmart has redefined the terms “local” and “organic” for its personal benefit. “Local,” in Walmart terms, means that a product is produced within the same state, while “organic” largely means a big food company creates organic versions of processed foods. It focuses on the increase of local products sold in all stores, instead of focusing on individual stores. So, stores located in agricultural states make up for those that aren’t. Finally, studies have shown when Walmart superstores enter a community, incomes decline and poverty increases. Though Forbes magazine has ranked Walmart one of the best 100 corporations to work for, the majority of its employees’ children qualify for free lunch at school. According to a December 2011 report by Business Insider, the average Walmart associate makes $11.75 an hour, which yields $20,744 annually. In a single-earner family of four household, this figure falls below the poverty threshold. These figures prove that now, more than ever, it is important to shop local and to vote accordingly. Remember, we vote each day when we purchase food, goods and services. Kayley Gillespie is a literature and cultural studies junior.

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Friday, April 27, 2012 •

SPORTS

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OUDaily.com ›› OU men’s golf tries for its first Big 12 Conference title since 2006 this weekend when it hosts the conference championships in Trinity, Texas.

Greg Fewell, sports editor Kedric Kitchens, assistant sports editor dailysports@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

Baseball

softball

After back-to-back losses, OU looks to bounce back vs. KU

One-game weekend vs. Central Arkansas up for No. 5 Sooners

Sooners to face Jayhawks

Sooners to get ‘a breather’ as OU only plays one game Saturday, coach says

DILLON PHILLIPS Sports Reporter

After dropping back-toback midweek games against Dallas Baptist and Oklahoma State, the OU baseball team will took to turn things around and bump its conference record above .500 when it travels to Lawrence to take on the Kansas Jayhawks this weekend. The Sooners (26-16, 7-8 Big 12) entered this week on an eight-game winning streak, their longest of the season. Oklahoma had a chance to extend that winning streak to 10 games against in-state rival Oklahoma State and Dallas Baptist, but things did not go the Sooners’ way as the team lost to OSU on Tuesday and fell to Dallas Baptist for the second time this season Wednesday night. Now, after the consecutive losses, the Sooners finds themselves with their back against the wall, senior outfielder Erik Ross said. “Right now in the season, we can’t really afford to lose these kind of games,” Ross said. “I feel like sometimes our guys are kind of pressing some.” While OU’s defense has faltered during the past two games, the team’s lackluster offense has been the main culprit behind the Sooners’ recent struggles. In the last two contests, the Sooners have managed only 11 total hits and a mere three runs. OU coach Sunny Golloway said he doesn’t know what has gotten into his team, which started out the season with hot bats before going cold recently.

TOBI NEIDY

Sports Reporter

rebekah cornwell/The daily

Senior outfielder Erik Ross sprints to first base during Oklahoma’s 8-2 home loss to Dallas Baptist on Wednesday night. The loss was the second in as many days for the Sooners, who were on an eight-game winning streak prior to losing to Oklahoma State on Tuesday in Stillwater.

UP NEXT at Kansas Game 1: 6 tonight Game 2: 6 p.m. Saturday Game 3: Noon Sunday

“I’m not sure what’s wrong with our hitters, but they’re just not hitting the ball right now,” Golloway said. “I’m not sure what’s going on.” But Oklahoma’s slump at the plate hasn’t affected the entire lineup. Junior outfielder Max White has come through consistently for the struggling Sooners.

White has strung together five consecutive multi-hit games as the top Sooner slugger in the team’s lineup. “We just got to keep our heads up, keep getting better everyday, do the little things right,” White said. Sophomore pitchers Jordan John and Jonathan Gray will take the hill for the Sooners on Friday and Saturday, respectively. Sunday’s starter was not set as of press time, but Oklahoma’s ace sophomore Dillon Overton — who pitched five innings Wednesday night — will be available to pitch this

weekend, Golloway said. With a hot team suddenly going cold, the pressure turns up for the Sooners. Golloway said the team is not where it needs to be right now, and that makes the upcoming schedule all the more important. “Because we didn’t play early, we’re trying to make up for lost time,” Golloway said. “And that’s one thing you can’t do in baseball.” The first game of the weekend series is slated for a 6 p.m. first pitch in Lawrence.

With finals and the 2012 postseason approaching, OU softball coach Patty Gasso said she’s glad her No. 5 Sooners are scheduled to play a single game against Central Arkansas at 1 p.m. Saturday in Conway, Ark. The schedule worked out for Oklahoma, Gasso said. “We have one game and then we get a breather, which we really need,” she said. “They’re getting ready for finals, too, so this weekend is really timely for us.” UP NEXT OU’s brief departure at Central Arkansas from Big 12 action comes right after completing When: 1 p.m. Saturday the team’s second sweep of conference oppo- Where: Farris Field in Conway, Ark. nent Oklahoma State on Wednesday and precedes the pivotal showdown for Big 12 dominance between the top-ranked Sooners and the second-ranked Texas Longhorns. After several hitting slumps during the Missouri series, which featured Team USA pitcher Chelsea Thomas, OU looks to improve its hitting going into the final games of the regular season. With 70 total home runs, the Sooners have the power hitters that can drain opposing pitching staffs, but their short game also is something Gasso said she is enjoying about coaching this lineup. “We love home runs, but I love those absolute rockets where you can see runners running around the bases,” Gasso said. “This team has both: slappers that can make things happen on the base paths and you have RBI hitters that hit through the gap to score runs.” After freshman Lauren Chamberlain broke the OU single-season home-run record against Oklahoma State, juniors Jessica Shults and Keilani Ricketts tabbed RBI hits to help give OU its final seven runs of the game. Those timely hits from the veteran players are starting to fire up the rest of the team, Gasso said. “All of those big hitters are calling out the rest of the team, and we’re seeing action from the bottom half of the lineup,” Gasso said. “That’s really becoming the difference in our team and it makes us tough to pitch to. “Any opposing pitcher has nightmares about this lineup.”

Spiritual self worth, identity and freedom Explore your spiritual nature International speaker, Rob Gilbert, is a practitioner and teacher of Christian Science healing and a member of the Christian Science Board of Lectureship.

“Spiritual self-worth heals and transforms human character.”

Sunday, April 29, at 2pm First Church of Christ, Scientist 510 S. Santa Fe

*Some restrictions apply. Offer valid April 2nd-8th. *Some


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PLACE AN AD Phone: 405-325-2521 E-mail: classifieds@ou.edu

classifieds@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-2521

Crossword ........$515/month

Con

POLICY The Oklahoma Daily is responsible for one day’s incorrect advertising. If your ad appears incorrectly, or if you wish to cancel your ad call 3252521, before the deadline for cancellation in the next issue. Errors not the fault of the advertiser will be adjusted. Refunds will not be issued for late cancellations.

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The Oklahoma Daily will not knowingly accept advertisements that discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, religious preference, national origin or sexual orientation. Violations of this policy should be reported to The Oklahoma Daily Business Office at 325-2521. Help Wanted ads in The Oklahoma Daily are not to separate as to gender. Advertisers may not discriminate in employment ads based on race, color, religion or gender unless such qualifying factors are essential to a given position.

my friend’s got mental illness

All ads are subject to acceptance by The Oklahoma Daily. Ad acceptance may be re-evaluated at any time. To a friend with mental illness, your caring and understanding greatly increases their chance of recovery. Visit whatadifference.samhsa.gov for more information. Mental Illness – What a difference a friend makes.

Spring Specials

HOROSCOPE By Bernice Bede Osol

Copyright 2012, Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

FRIDAY, APRIL 27, 2012 Your imprint is likely to be more widely felt in the year ahead than it ever was in the past, mostly because you’ll have your fingers in many new pies. Success is now possible in areas where you previously met with disappointment.

$445 $515 $440 $510 $700

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Don’t wait for others to put a fun activity together, be the one who initiates good times. If you do, this can be an extremely enjoyable day. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Those who love you are likely to do all they can to help satisfy both your material and emotional interests as unobtrusively as possible. Show your appreciation.





 

  

    



   

    





Previous Solution                                                                        

        

Monday- Very Easy Tuesday-Easy Wednesday- Easy Thursday- Medium Friday - Hard

Instructions: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. That means that no number is repeated in any row, column or box.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- It’s one of those rare days where some of your more expansive hopes have better- than-average chances of being gratified. Be optimistic about the outcome of events. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Don’t sit around waiting for something good to happen. If you get on things immediately and strike while the iron is hot, you can realize some gangbusters opportunities. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Forget about all the petty things going on in your life and focus your energies and efforts on endeavors that are near and dear to you. When you do, life can be pretty darn great. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --Collective endeavors look extremely promising at this point in time. Check to see if there is room for you in a coalition

that is engaged in something interesting. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- One of your better assets is your knack for encouraging people to get together to work on a common goal. Instinctively you will know who should be part of this effort. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- If you’ve been considering making a major change that you believe would better your working conditions, now’s the day to implement it. Delay will only dull your fervor. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) --Trust your instincts, common sense and good judgment. Snap decisions could actually turn out to be better than those over which you ponder for some time. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) --Timing can be extremely important in situations where you are trying to put together some kind of deal. Don’t present your case without having all your ducks in a row, and don’t delay the arrangement of said quackers, either. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --You might not have any fresh ideas yourself, but there will be no one better than you for improving upon the innovations of others. You’ll know how to polish up what they envision. ARIES (March 21-April 19) --This could be one of your better days, with everything going well. The happiest surprise, however, will be running into excellent bargains for everything you need.

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker April 27, 2012 ACROSS 1 What the humbled eat 5 Start of a classic Christmas poem 9 Laughter syllables 14 Alphabetic symbol of yore 15 Nambypamby 16 Muse holding a lyre 17 Key in the water 18 Reminder to take out the trash 19 Starboard side 20 Leafy vegetable in Asian cuisine 23 Home of many marathon winners 24 Lennon’s Yoko 25 “He maketh me to ___ down in green ...� 27 “Didn’t I tell you that would happen?� 28 Was on the ballot 31 Like most modern dental practices 34 ___ a high note (finish well) 36 Actors’ quests 37 Beets without swollen roots 40 Blurb specialists 42 Vegas 4/27

spectacle 43 Alternative to rubber bullets 46 “Hold on just a ___� 47 “The Good Wife� network 50 Way beyond -er 51 Tilly or Ryan 53 Deadly virus named for a river 55 Garnish that has flat leaves 60 Place for NBA games 61 Do drudgery 62 “___ helpless as a kitten up a tree� 63 Joanna of “Growing Pains� 64 “My Cup Runneth Over� singer Ed 65 LAPD investigators 66 Balance sheet positive 67 Fiddling Roman emperor 68 “Put a tiger in your tank� sloganeer DOWN 1 Pains in the neck 2 Fraternity hopeful 3 Accessing the Internet 4 Teeny-___ 5 Three of them make six 6 Ample, as a doorway 7 Oil giant acquired by BP 8 Vaulted 9 Oregano or sage

10 Operatic tune 11 Verbal bargain seekers 12 Believer’s antithesis 13 One who likes cheap shots? 21 Bringing home the bacon 22 Breathtaking snake? 26 Genderchanging suffix 29 They’re often classified 30 Rejecting replies 32 More up-todate in dress and manners 33 Load cargo 34 Pitcher in a painting 35 Manufacturer of the first mechanical cash registers 37 Dabbles (in) 38 “___ making a list ...� (Christmas

lyric) 39 Blvd. cousin 40 Consumed 41 Ardent impulses 44 “What ___, chopped liver?� 45 “Able-bodied� military figure 47 Hannity’s former foil, on Fox News 48 Babbles 49 Utters decisively 52 Diminutive being of folklore 54 Throwaway song on a 45, usually 56 William Shakespeare’s wife 57 Have staying power 58 Boardwalk structure 59 “I almost forgot ...� 60 “Alias� equivalent

PREVIOUS PUZZLE ANSWER

4/26

Š 2012 Universal Uclick www.upuzzles.com

FOREIGN FOODS By Edna Staples


Friday, April 27, 2012 •

7

OUDaily.com ››

Life&arts

Did you miss the first night of Norman Music Fest? If you couldn’t make it out to Main Street, The Daily has all the Thursday night details you need.

Lindsey Ruta, life & arts editor Mariah Webb, assistant life & arts editor dailyent@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

Shows, events and more

THe Daily’s

Oklahoma Weekender Read more at OUDaily.com

Norman Music Festival

NMF, duh. Be sure to see DEERPEOPLE and Dead Sea Choir today at The Opolis and Blackwatch, respectively. Finally, you can’t miss Portugal. The Man, Other Lives, Damn Quails and Modern Rock Diaries on Saturday. — Courtney Goforth

sooner idol

G o s e e S ooner Idol at 7 p.m. Saturday in Oklahoma Memorial U n i o n ’s M e a c h a m Auditorium. Admission is free, so make sure to take a break from Norman Music Fest and support your fellow students. — Erin Roberts

Nuts for Nutella? F

or those of you Life & Arts Columnist who have yet to try the hazelnut spread, Nutella, beware. The Italian spread is highly addicting, and I recommend caution when buying a jar. However, if you get the Rachael Cervenka urge to splurge on Nutella, rachmarie@ou.edu you will open a large door of possibilities. The spread was created more than 70 years ago in Italy by Pietro Ferrero, a pastry maker and founder of the Ferrero Co. Yes, this is the same company that makes the little Ferrero Rocher truffle chocolates — and strangely enough, Tic Tac as well. Nutella spread only has been in the U.S. for about 25 years, yet its popularity has grown vastly over the years. There is just something about the spread that sets it apart from others. The spread is simple; consisting primarily of roasted hazelnuts, cocoa, skim milk and sugar. There are no artificial colors or preservatives. Although Nutella is branded as a breakfast food to be spread on a slice of toast and topped with fruit, I am personally a big fan of eating a spoonful — or several spoonfuls — in one sitting right out of the jar. You can find the spread at your local grocery store for about $3 to $7. Let’s be honest, Nutella is not just meant for toast, you can use the spread to make a variety of different and delicious dishes. If you Google “Nutella� or search it on Pinterest, you will find an abundance of recipes featuring the nutty, sweet spread. For those of you who are just as addicted to Nutella as I am, or may be looking to try something new, experimenting with the spread is something I highly recommend. I’ve scoured the web to find my favorite Nutella recipes. This hazelnut spread can take your typical sweet treat and give it a bit of flair.

Four-ingredient Nutella brownies

Ingredients: • 1/2 cup Nutella spread • 1 large egg • 5 tablespoons all-purpose flour • 1/2 cup chopped hazelnuts (optional)

The American Indian Student Association is having its 98th Annual Spring Contest Powwow from 1 to 10 p.m. Saturday at Lloyd Noble Center. The cultural event is free and open to the public. — Maya Sykes

Source: SavorySweetLife.com

1

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Line a 12-cup mini muffin pan with paper or foil liners.

OkC Festival of Arts

Once you’ve had your fill of NMF, head to downtown OKC for the 2012 Festival of the Arts. The festival goes through Sunday and features some of the best of Oklahoma’s visual, performing and culinary arts. — Lindsey Ruta

2

Put the Nutella and egg in a medium bowl and stir until smooth and well blended. Add the flour and stir until blended.

Hairspray

3

The Harding Fine Arts Academy presents its production of “Hairspray� at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Admission is $3, so support some young, local talent and say good morning to Baltimore. — Jalisa Green

Spoon the batter into the prepared muffin tins (about 3/4 full) and sprinkle with the chopped hazelnuts if desired.

4

Disaster training

Bake until a toothpick comes out with wet, gooey crumbs, 11 to 12 minutes. Set on a rack to cool completely. Serve immediately or cover and store at room temperature for up to three days.

Nutella also can add delicious flavor to granola, puppy chow, cheesecakes and French toast. Or, if you’ve got the time and the resolve, whip up your own homemade hazelnut spread. oudaily.com/life&arts

The School of Musical Theatre opens “Seussical The Musical� at 8 p.m. Friday. This fun production would be a great way to forget about dead week and your impending finals. So lose yourself for a while in the world of Dr. Seuss. —Westlee Parsons

powwow

Rachael Cervenka is journalism junior.

OUDaily.com Âť More tasty recipes

‘Seussical the musical’

Photos by Kelsey Higley/The Daily

You could go get ready for a disaster. The Norman Fire Department Training Center is hosting a disaster training certification class this weekend. The class is from 6 to 10 p.m. Friday and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. You never know when you need to be ready. — Shawn Stafford

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8

PHOTO ESSAY

• Friday, April 27, 2012

norman music

Day One Thursday

PHOTOS BY BEN WILLIAMS/THE DAILY

Cody Fowler, the bass player for Horse Thief, performs Thursday at The Opolis, 113 N. Crawford Ave., for the first night of the Norman Music Festival. The psychedelic folk-rock band is based in Oklahoma City but was formed in Flower Mound, Texas. The band members are studying music at the Academy of Contemporary Music in downtown Oklahoma City to “hone their craft,” according to Horse Thief’s Facebook page.

Left: The guitarist for Brother Bear, a band from Stillwater, performs Thursday at The Opolis for the opening night of Norman Music Festival 5. The band was formed by members of another local group, Mayola, and a former member of Kunek (which birthed NMF5 Main Stage act Other LIves) who’s now a guitarist for Sherree Chamberlain’s band. Bottom: The bass player for Horse Thief performs Thursday at The Opolis. The music venue, located at 113 N. Crawford Ave., will host musical performances inside tonight and Saturday, and it also will have an outdoor stage tonight behind its building.

Horse Thief lead singer Cameron Neal performs Thursday at The Opolis for the fifth annual Norman Music Festival. This year’s fest features almost 300 live musical performances at more than 20 music venues or stages along Norman’s East Main Street and the surrounding area. It runs through Saturday.

South Canadian Valley Church of Christ

Saturdays & Wednesdays

8am - 12noon

Cleveland County Fairgrounds 615 E. Robinson

Norman, OK 73071

(405) 360-4721 or ccfb@sbcglobal.net

help is just a phone call away

9

number

crisis line

325-6963 (NYNE)

OU Number Nyne Crisis Line

8 p.m.-4 a.m. every day

except OU holidays and breaks

Come join us to learn God’s word. Sunday 10:00 a.m. 4th Sunday 1:00 p.m. Wednesday 7:00 p.m. 405.364.4051

2217 24th Ave. SW • www.normanchurch.com


Friday, April 27, 2012