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T H u R s DaY, a p R I L 2 6 , 2 012

FAcULty

tenure faces legislation opposition State representatives consider benefits of tenure, faults of higher education SARAH MARTIN campus reporter

Physics professor Braden Abbott has taken some research risks during his six years of tenure at OU he would not have taken if his employment was not guaranteed.

“If you’re worried about if doing something and it doesn’t pan out, I lose my job, you’re not going to take these risks,” Abbott said, “And a lot of research results come from high risk, high reward type of things.” Guaranteed employment has

been ensuring tenured professors academic freedom and financing research, but some Oklahoma legislators are questioning if professors are taking advantage of this process. Almost half (48 percent) of OU faculty are tenured, according to the 2012 OU Factbook. During this Oklahoma legislative session, Rep. Corey Holland,

R-Marlow , proposed a bill that would limit university professors to no more than one-year contracts. Holland’s bill, HB 2598 , never made it out of the higher education and career technology committee, but it began a discussion. “It is important that scholars and researchers will not come under undue political influence or pressure in doing their work,” OU

President David Boren said in an email. Problems with tenure could occur when there is not a post-tenure review process, Holland said. Although some universities have this process, many of the smaller universities in the state have no structure in place for assessing see FACULTY paGe 3

SOFtBALL

cOLLeGe OF ArchitectUre

Sooners score Bedlam sweep Freshman hits 21st, 22nd homers to claim single-season record TOBI NEIDY

Sports reporter

The No. 5 OU softball team completed the second Big 12 conference series sweep of the season with a 7-1 win against Oklahoma State on Wednesday night in Norman. Three home runs by two OU freshmen helped propel the Sooners to their 15th Oklahoma consecutive victory over their in-state rival. Oklahoma St. “It’s a big deal to win three games against anyone whether they’re in the Big 12 or not,” OU coach Patty Gasso said. “But I worked these girls hard yesterday, and we cleaned up our defense.” While the sweep was another highlight added to the resume of this team, which has yet to lose a Big 12 series, freshman first

7

ally Burt/tHe daily

The crew members working on the Philadelphia Project take in their final presentation Wednesday for the area between the University of Pennsylvania and downtown Philadelphia. The final review included presentations by the students, diagrams on the area and a scale model that lit up.

Sooners build foundation for futures Final project connects OU students with design firm to prepare future architects for profession ELYSSA SZKIRPAN campus reporter

OU College of Architecture students unveiled a yearlong urban design concept project for final review Wednesday. The presentation was 1 p.m. in Gould Hall’s Buskuhl Gallery and showed a scaled replica of a design plan for downtown Philadelphia, the result of eight months of work. Bradford White Fiske and Joseph Castner, consultants for KlingStubbins design firm, attended the review. The pair lectured

to faculty and students about KlingStubbins’ design projects and critiqued student designs, architecture professor Khosrow Bozorgi said. The one-sixteenth scale replica of downtown Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania is in a fifth-year student studio, littered with Plexiglass, wood glue, cardboard remnants and model tree, Bozorgi said. Fiske and Castner individually

pHoto proVided

see ARCHITECTURE paGe 2

A model of the Philadelphia design project, which took nearly eight months to research and produce, sits in a student studio.

see SOFTBALL paGe 6

PlAYEr ProfilE Lauren chamberlain

eDitOriAL VOL. 97, NO. 146

© 2012 OU Publications Board FREE — Additional copies 25 cents Campus ........................ Classifieds .................. Life & Arts ................... Opinion ...................... Sports .........................

2 8 9 4 6

Requested document and purpose

republicans are using the Violence Against Women Act as leverage in the worst kind of election-year politics. (Page 4)

LiFe & ArtS

OU baseball drops 2nd game to Dallas Baptist

there are more useful apps than Angry Birds

The Sooners fell, 8-2, and let the Patriots score four runs in the top of the ninth en route to a second-straight loss. (Sports)

Smartphones have changed the way we live our lives, and they can change the way we study, too. (Page 9)

Year: freshman Position: first base Hometown: Trabuco canyon, calif. Game stats: 2-for-2 with two homers and two rBis to lead oU past the cowgirls

The Daily’s open record requests

concern for women should be bipartisan

NOW ONLiNe At

1

Pharmaceutical invoice data from Goddard health center from August 2011 to present — To learn if the use of certain drugs increases as finals week approaches.

Ben Williams/tHe daily

University college freshman Jesse Harter plays the didgeridoo Wednesday outside Dale Hall. Harter’s music underscored a discussion between open-air preacher micah Armstrong and a crowd gathered across the lawn.

Date requested

Tuesday

Most recent contract between OU and Apple inc. — To better understand Apple’s relationship with oU’s journalism college after it was named to the Apple Distinguished Educators program.

friday

List of events that served alcohol during fiscal year 2011 at the Oklahoma Memorial Union — To better understand the number and types of events granted the ability to serve alcohol.

April 13

Visit OUDaily.com/openrecords for a complete list of The Daily’s requests


2

Campus

• Thursday, April 26, 2012

Campus

Laney Ellisor, campus editor Kathleen Evans, assistant campus editor Chris Miller, assistant campus editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

Architecture: Model 95% accurate, critic says Continued from page 1 critiqued student designs and were able to point out design flaws, learned from years of their own experience. Both encouraged students to research building structures and areas more and praised them for undertaking such a large design without having lived in the Philadelphia area. By selecting an urban city, such as Tulsa, London, Boston or Philadelphia, students can determine the needs of that city and create a design idea to fit those needs, he said. The goals of the assignment are to exercise professional judgment, use real-world situations and prepare for entry into the profession, according to the class syllabus. Students completed the model in three stages, which included constructing the Philadelphia-area model, creating the urban design concept and submitting the entire project for review, according to the syllabus. After approximately eight months of research and model production, the students finally submitted their project for its final review. “The model is over 95-percent accurate,� Bozorgi said. “It shows the [University of Pennsylvania] and downtown Philadelphia area, as well as the urban design concept.� KlingStubbins acted as the consultant firm for this project. Using video conference technology, students were able to constantly communicate with consultants, who advised students on everything from urban needs to helping with the blueprint of the city, Bozorgi said. Working alongside

Today around campus Write Club Creative Writers Writing Group will host its weekly open mic at 7 p.m. at CafÊ Plaid, located at 333 West Boyd St. The event is open to all community members to read their works or listen to other’s. Opera Scenes, a look at some of opera’s greatest moments, will be presented by OU School of Music’s opera theatre. It will take place at 8 p.m. in the Reynolds Performing Arts Center. Juggling Club will meet at 8 p.m. in the Huston Huffman Fitness Center, Room 140.

Corrections The Oklahoma Daily is committed to serving readers with accurate coverage and welcomes your comments about information that may require correction or clarification. To contact us with corrections, email us at dailynews@ou.edu. A Wednesday headline, “Sig Ep boxing tournament knocked out,� erroneously abbreviated Sigma Alpha Epsilon’s name to “Sig Ep,� which refers to Sigma Phi Epsilon. Sigma Alpha Epsilon was scheduled to host the charity boxing event. Visit OUDaily.com/corrections to see an archive of our corrections

A drunk driver ruined something precious. Amber Apodaca.

If I’m going to kick the habit, I need to be afraid of cigarettes

T

Ally Burt/The Daily

“Our education here has taught us design principles, knowledge and skills that we will be able to use anywhere in the world and not just here in Oklahoma, as we might have thought at the beginning of the year.� Denisa Wohnoutka, architecture senior

KlingStubbins was exciting for students, architecture senior Denisa Wohnoutka said. “ Throughout the sem e s t e r, w e h a d t w o o r three teleconferences with KlingStubbins, which was very exciting for us, as they are an international firm,� Wohnoutka said. “They encouraged and inspired our ideas. ... They also explained to us what it was like in that area now.� The project was difficult, but it boosted students’ confidence about designing and allowed for students to practice the skills they’ve acquired during their years in

college, Wohnoutka said. “This project has given the students in my class the opportunity to design outside of their comfort zone and also to feel confident about designing in a new place that is well away from Oklahoma,� Wohnoutka said. “We were also given a very difficult site to work with, which helped us to learn how to work within an urban environment that was already very developed.� Architecture senior Tanner McGreevy said he was more personally connected to the project than to the critiques. “[The project] was more

for me than for the critique,� McGreevy said. “Critiques make your building better, [and] you should take them one step further and correct your designs.� With the largest project of their college experience finally finished and reviewed, fifth-year architecture students can finally look forward to their graduation in a few weeks. The main point Bozorgi said he aims to make with this vast design project and review is how important OU is as a college. “Working with K lingStubbins has also helped us to realize that our education here is going to take us very far,� Wohnoutka said. “Our education here has taught us design principles, knowledge and skills that we will be able to use anywhere in the world and not just here in Oklahoma, as we might have thought at the beginning of the year.�

he cessation classes are a good thing, and when I say that, I mean they aren’t a bad thing. That is really a generous way of me saying the smoking cessation classes are a thing. I’m still not entirely sure, going in, what I expected of these classes. Their obvious goal was to get people to quit smoking, but the woman running the program doesn’t seem to know much about addiction. She knows about proper health, which includes not smoking, but she can’t empathize with our plight. I want to make it very clear that the classes didn’t fail me. I failed me. It’s my responsibility to take care of myself and care enough about my own well-being not to smoke. I will say I have significantly reduced the number of cigarettes I smoke, “The only reason people will quit smoking is but I still smoke nonetheless. I attribute my because they are smoking less not to the afraid. Because they classes, but to the damn beautiful weather we’ve embrace the fear and been having lately. let it facilitate a healthy Something about the change. In order to quit heat and sunlight. The sun highlights the disthe thing I like so much, taste and the stale toI need to be afraid of it.� bacco smell in a way that seems to defy the optimistic and clean atmosphere around me. God, I hate that flamboyant yellow bastard in the sky. Looking back on the experience, I realize the classes failed to introduce the key element of fear. Fear gets difficult things done. Fear makes a man run a great distance at an inconceivable pace or lift a heavy object to save a life. Fear is what gets people to vote for or against a certain political candidate, find a ride home from the bar, practice safe sex and join the National Rifle Association. Without

Continued from page 1 performance. OU is one university that does have a post-tenure review process to ensure that professors’ research and performance are not below acceptable standards, Boren said. In order to receive tenure, professors must be appointed as tenure tracked and work full time at OU, completing six years of pretenure, according to the OU policy manual. A professor who was not productive would not be approved through the pretenure process, Abbott said. Holland said he supports employing top professors, but the rewards system could be done in a better way. To name only the tenured professors as the best and the brightest would be to imply students being taught by other professors are receiving an inferior education, he said. “Part of it is that they are trying to save money (by changing tenure), but tenure actually saves money,� Abbott said. Part of the reason many faculty do not seek the same salary on campus they would make in industry is because they are offered the benefit of tenure, Abbott said. “If you get rid of tenure, you are going to have more and more people going out into industry, and it is going to be harder to attract high quality professors,� Abbott said. Fiscal policy director of Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs Jonathan Small said he has outlined inefficient spending in higher education that needs to be cut; tenure is not an issue creating unnecessary cost, he said. But, research and teaching should not be linked under tenure, Small said. OU professors generally decide what percent of time they spend researching and what percent of their time they spend in the classroom, Abbott said. A 2002 study of Oklahoma business professors found professors teaching only two classes with 70 students but making $188,000, Small said. Small is doing more extensive studies of professor workloads at OU and Oklahoma State University. Though the bill did not make it out of committee, Holland said he feels like his efforts were successful because he primarily wanted to create an open dialogue about the faults of higher education. “I am trying to create as many opportunities for people to take advantage because we do have a great higher education system,� Holland said.

Staff Columnist

fear, there would be no shelter. Smoking is the No. 1 preventable cause of death. Smoking costs the country billions of dollars. So why did the classes frame the issue of sweet, deadly tobacco use in terms of the Sam Higgins positives of quitting rather samuel.b.higgins-1@ou.edu than the negatives of continuing? What am I really supposed to take away from four one-hour classes where three to four people, one of them being the counselor, talk about their feelings of frustration? The classes weren’t aggressive or inspiring. The program kindly and detachedly let you know that smoking is something you should not do, that it’s going to be difficult and that withdrawal symptoms will last about two weeks. It offered a few good methods for relaxation and words of encouragement and not much else. The only reason people will quit smoking is because they are afraid. Because they embrace the fear and let it facilitate a healthy change. In order to quit the thing I like so much, I need to be afraid of it, and I need to change the way I view the world. I have to see myself as someone who doesn’t smoke and is happy. I need to exist in the moment and get out of my head. I need to quit caring so much about the security smoking provides. I need to think of myself as someone who doesn’t smoke and not someone who is trying to quit. I know I will quit if I ever desire to become a complete and self-actualized person. I just need to embrace a healthy amount of fear in my life and focus on the moment. The withdrawal is fleeting, I just have to let it go and stop caring about the cigarette. The longer I go without one, the harder and harder it is to go back. Sam Higgins is a journalism junior and a campus reporter for The Daily.

HIGHLIGHTING OR COLOR

Be

WITH HAIRCUT • $54.99 WEAVE OR FOIL ADD $10.00

HAIRCUT • $11.99 Non-Requested Stylist Only

Eyebrow Waxing $8.00

Discount with OU ID or this coupon!

127 N. Porter 360-4247

1100 E. Constitution 579-1202

Paint Your Own Pottery & Glass Fusing (405) 307-9971

The Works $16.99 Shampoo/ Cut/Blowdry

bewildforart.com $6 Bang Trim

129 N.W. Ave. 360-4422

1215 W. Lindsey 364-1325 Themaneman.net

 tUI"WF/8 4VJUF /PSNBO 0,

University Theatre

Weitzenhoffer School of Musical Theatre

Friends Don’t Let Friends Drive Drunk.

April 26-29

Photo by Michael Mazzeo

ENROLL NOW FOR SUMMER CLASSES

help is just a phone call away

9

number

crisis line

325-6963 (NYNE)

OU Number Nyne Crisis Line

8 p.m.-4 a.m. every day

except OU holidays and breaks

Thursday, April 26

An adventurous story of friendship for the young and the young at heart.

Film Screening: “Run to the East� | 7 p.m. in the Sam Noble Museum. FREE admission to the screening.

Book by Lynn

Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty Music by Stephen Flaherty, Lyrics by Lynn Ahrens

Co-conceived by Lynn Ahrens, Stephen Flaherty and Eric Idle Based on the books by Dr. Seuss

8 p.m. April 27-28, May 3-5 3 p.m. April 29, May 6 Rupel J. Jones Theatre www.ou.edu/finearts

Friday, April 27

Fine Arts Box Office

(405) 325-4101

Art After Hours | 6 p.m. in the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. Get acquainted with works from the museum’s collection in these 45-minute discussions featuring Southwest art from the Euene B. Adkins Collection. Admission is FREE and light refreshments will be served.

Seussical the Musical is produced in arrangement with Musical Theatre International, WWW.MTISHOWS.COM The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. For accommodations on the basis of disability call (405) 325-4101.

Classes Begin

JUNE 4TH

Spring Fling – Graduate Student Family Night | 6:30 - 8 p.m. in the Huston Huffman Fitness Center. Free to all OU graduate students and their families. Dancing, games, treats, refreshments and drawings for child swim lessons! For more information contact Hannah, Matt or Andrew at (405) 325-3053.

$IFDL$MBTT"WBJMBCJMJUZ

FREE Movie: “Haywire� | 6, 9 p.m. and midnight in Meacham Auditorium, Oklahoma Memorial Union. Courtesy of the Union Programming Board and Campus Activities Council.

XXXSPTFFEVTVNNFS

t'MFYJCMFTDIFEVMFoEBZ FWFOJOHBOE POMJOFDMBTTFT t4BWFPOHBT.855IDMBTTFT t#VEHFUGSJFOEMZUVJUJPO

tSPTFFEV

3

Faculty: Tenure saves money, director says

COLUMN

Editor’s Note: Sam Higgins is a Campus Reporter who started the university-sponsored smoking cessation class three weeks ago. He has written a column once a week to describe his first-person experiences and struggles with trying to quit smoking.

Students discuss the final review of a project designed by fifth-year architecture students who were consulted by members of a leading U.S. architecture firm, KlingStubbins, on Wednesday afternoon at Gould Hall. The project was an urban design concept for an area of downtown Philadelphia.

Thursday, April 26, 2012 •

Saturday, April 28 Sooner Idol | 7-10 p.m. in Meacham Auditorium. Come and watch OU students sing for the title of Sooner Idol 2012! Admission is FREE but crowd favorite ballots will be sold for $1 each.

Sunday, April 29 Sutton Concert Series: Collegium Musicum | 3 p.m. at Sharp Concert Hall. For ticket information and general information please call the Fine Arts Box Office at (405) 325-4101.

Spring Golf Championship | Tee-times are first come first serve at Westwood Golf and Country Club. Individual stroke play event, $29 per player. Late registration is limited. For more information contact Dewhirst@ou.edu.

This University in compliance with all applicable federal and state laws and regulations does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, genetic information, age, religion, disability, political beliefs, or status as a veteran in any of its policies, practices or procedures. This includes but is not limited to admissions, employment, financial aid and educational services. For accommodations on the basis of disability, please contact the sponsoring department of any program or event.


2

Campus

• Thursday, April 26, 2012

Campus

Laney Ellisor, campus editor Kathleen Evans, assistant campus editor Chris Miller, assistant campus editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

Architecture: Model 95% accurate, critic says Continued from page 1 critiqued student designs and were able to point out design flaws, learned from years of their own experience. Both encouraged students to research building structures and areas more and praised them for undertaking such a large design without having lived in the Philadelphia area. By selecting an urban city, such as Tulsa, London, Boston or Philadelphia, students can determine the needs of that city and create a design idea to fit those needs, he said. The goals of the assignment are to exercise professional judgment, use real-world situations and prepare for entry into the profession, according to the class syllabus. Students completed the model in three stages, which included constructing the Philadelphia-area model, creating the urban design concept and submitting the entire project for review, according to the syllabus. After approximately eight months of research and model production, the students finally submitted their project for its final review. “The model is over 95-percent accurate,� Bozorgi said. “It shows the [University of Pennsylvania] and downtown Philadelphia area, as well as the urban design concept.� KlingStubbins acted as the consultant firm for this project. Using video conference technology, students were able to constantly communicate with consultants, who advised students on everything from urban needs to helping with the blueprint of the city, Bozorgi said. Working alongside

Today around campus Write Club Creative Writers Writing Group will host its weekly open mic at 7 p.m. at CafÊ Plaid, located at 333 West Boyd St. The event is open to all community members to read their works or listen to other’s. Opera Scenes, a look at some of opera’s greatest moments, will be presented by OU School of Music’s opera theatre. It will take place at 8 p.m. in the Reynolds Performing Arts Center. Juggling Club will meet at 8 p.m. in the Huston Huffman Fitness Center, Room 140.

Corrections The Oklahoma Daily is committed to serving readers with accurate coverage and welcomes your comments about information that may require correction or clarification. To contact us with corrections, email us at dailynews@ou.edu. A Wednesday headline, “Sig Ep boxing tournament knocked out,� erroneously abbreviated Sigma Alpha Epsilon’s name to “Sig Ep,� which refers to Sigma Phi Epsilon. Sigma Alpha Epsilon was scheduled to host the charity boxing event. Visit OUDaily.com/corrections to see an archive of our corrections

A drunk driver ruined something precious. Amber Apodaca.

If I’m going to kick the habit, I need to be afraid of cigarettes

T

Ally Burt/The Daily

“Our education here has taught us design principles, knowledge and skills that we will be able to use anywhere in the world and not just here in Oklahoma, as we might have thought at the beginning of the year.� Denisa Wohnoutka, architecture senior

KlingStubbins was exciting for students, architecture senior Denisa Wohnoutka said. “ Throughout the sem e s t e r, w e h a d t w o o r three teleconferences with KlingStubbins, which was very exciting for us, as they are an international firm,� Wohnoutka said. “They encouraged and inspired our ideas. ... They also explained to us what it was like in that area now.� The project was difficult, but it boosted students’ confidence about designing and allowed for students to practice the skills they’ve acquired during their years in

college, Wohnoutka said. “This project has given the students in my class the opportunity to design outside of their comfort zone and also to feel confident about designing in a new place that is well away from Oklahoma,� Wohnoutka said. “We were also given a very difficult site to work with, which helped us to learn how to work within an urban environment that was already very developed.� Architecture senior Tanner McGreevy said he was more personally connected to the project than to the critiques. “[The project] was more

for me than for the critique,� McGreevy said. “Critiques make your building better, [and] you should take them one step further and correct your designs.� With the largest project of their college experience finally finished and reviewed, fifth-year architecture students can finally look forward to their graduation in a few weeks. The main point Bozorgi said he aims to make with this vast design project and review is how important OU is as a college. “Working with K lingStubbins has also helped us to realize that our education here is going to take us very far,� Wohnoutka said. “Our education here has taught us design principles, knowledge and skills that we will be able to use anywhere in the world and not just here in Oklahoma, as we might have thought at the beginning of the year.�

he cessation classes are a good thing, and when I say that, I mean they aren’t a bad thing. That is really a generous way of me saying the smoking cessation classes are a thing. I’m still not entirely sure, going in, what I expected of these classes. Their obvious goal was to get people to quit smoking, but the woman running the program doesn’t seem to know much about addiction. She knows about proper health, which includes not smoking, but she can’t empathize with our plight. I want to make it very clear that the classes didn’t fail me. I failed me. It’s my responsibility to take care of myself and care enough about my own well-being not to smoke. I will say I have significantly reduced the number of cigarettes I smoke, “The only reason people will quit smoking is but I still smoke nonetheless. I attribute my because they are smoking less not to the afraid. Because they classes, but to the damn beautiful weather we’ve embrace the fear and been having lately. let it facilitate a healthy Something about the change. In order to quit heat and sunlight. The sun highlights the disthe thing I like so much, taste and the stale toI need to be afraid of it.� bacco smell in a way that seems to defy the optimistic and clean atmosphere around me. God, I hate that flamboyant yellow bastard in the sky. Looking back on the experience, I realize the classes failed to introduce the key element of fear. Fear gets difficult things done. Fear makes a man run a great distance at an inconceivable pace or lift a heavy object to save a life. Fear is what gets people to vote for or against a certain political candidate, find a ride home from the bar, practice safe sex and join the National Rifle Association. Without

Continued from page 1 performance. OU is one university that does have a post-tenure review process to ensure that professors’ research and performance are not below acceptable standards, Boren said. In order to receive tenure, professors must be appointed as tenure tracked and work full time at OU, completing six years of pretenure, according to the OU policy manual. A professor who was not productive would not be approved through the pretenure process, Abbott said. Holland said he supports employing top professors, but the rewards system could be done in a better way. To name only the tenured professors as the best and the brightest would be to imply students being taught by other professors are receiving an inferior education, he said. “Part of it is that they are trying to save money (by changing tenure), but tenure actually saves money,� Abbott said. Part of the reason many faculty do not seek the same salary on campus they would make in industry is because they are offered the benefit of tenure, Abbott said. “If you get rid of tenure, you are going to have more and more people going out into industry, and it is going to be harder to attract high quality professors,� Abbott said. Fiscal policy director of Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs Jonathan Small said he has outlined inefficient spending in higher education that needs to be cut; tenure is not an issue creating unnecessary cost, he said. But, research and teaching should not be linked under tenure, Small said. OU professors generally decide what percent of time they spend researching and what percent of their time they spend in the classroom, Abbott said. A 2002 study of Oklahoma business professors found professors teaching only two classes with 70 students but making $188,000, Small said. Small is doing more extensive studies of professor workloads at OU and Oklahoma State University. Though the bill did not make it out of committee, Holland said he feels like his efforts were successful because he primarily wanted to create an open dialogue about the faults of higher education. “I am trying to create as many opportunities for people to take advantage because we do have a great higher education system,� Holland said.

Staff Columnist

fear, there would be no shelter. Smoking is the No. 1 preventable cause of death. Smoking costs the country billions of dollars. So why did the classes frame the issue of sweet, deadly tobacco use in terms of the Sam Higgins positives of quitting rather samuel.b.higgins-1@ou.edu than the negatives of continuing? What am I really supposed to take away from four one-hour classes where three to four people, one of them being the counselor, talk about their feelings of frustration? The classes weren’t aggressive or inspiring. The program kindly and detachedly let you know that smoking is something you should not do, that it’s going to be difficult and that withdrawal symptoms will last about two weeks. It offered a few good methods for relaxation and words of encouragement and not much else. The only reason people will quit smoking is because they are afraid. Because they embrace the fear and let it facilitate a healthy change. In order to quit the thing I like so much, I need to be afraid of it, and I need to change the way I view the world. I have to see myself as someone who doesn’t smoke and is happy. I need to exist in the moment and get out of my head. I need to quit caring so much about the security smoking provides. I need to think of myself as someone who doesn’t smoke and not someone who is trying to quit. I know I will quit if I ever desire to become a complete and self-actualized person. I just need to embrace a healthy amount of fear in my life and focus on the moment. The withdrawal is fleeting, I just have to let it go and stop caring about the cigarette. The longer I go without one, the harder and harder it is to go back. Sam Higgins is a journalism junior and a campus reporter for The Daily.

HIGHLIGHTING OR COLOR

Be

WITH HAIRCUT • $54.99 WEAVE OR FOIL ADD $10.00

HAIRCUT • $11.99 Non-Requested Stylist Only

Eyebrow Waxing $8.00

Discount with OU ID or this coupon!

127 N. Porter 360-4247

1100 E. Constitution 579-1202

Paint Your Own Pottery & Glass Fusing (405) 307-9971

The Works $16.99 Shampoo/ Cut/Blowdry

bewildforart.com $6 Bang Trim

129 N.W. Ave. 360-4422

1215 W. Lindsey 364-1325 Themaneman.net

 tUI"WF/8 4VJUF /PSNBO 0,

University Theatre

Weitzenhoffer School of Musical Theatre

Friends Don’t Let Friends Drive Drunk.

April 26-29

Photo by Michael Mazzeo

ENROLL NOW FOR SUMMER CLASSES

help is just a phone call away

9

number

crisis line

325-6963 (NYNE)

OU Number Nyne Crisis Line

8 p.m.-4 a.m. every day

except OU holidays and breaks

Thursday, April 26

An adventurous story of friendship for the young and the young at heart.

Film Screening: “Run to the East� | 7 p.m. in the Sam Noble Museum. FREE admission to the screening.

Book by Lynn

Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty Music by Stephen Flaherty, Lyrics by Lynn Ahrens

Co-conceived by Lynn Ahrens, Stephen Flaherty and Eric Idle Based on the books by Dr. Seuss

8 p.m. April 27-28, May 3-5 3 p.m. April 29, May 6 Rupel J. Jones Theatre www.ou.edu/finearts

Friday, April 27

Fine Arts Box Office

(405) 325-4101

Art After Hours | 6 p.m. in the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. Get acquainted with works from the museum’s collection in these 45-minute discussions featuring Southwest art from the Euene B. Adkins Collection. Admission is FREE and light refreshments will be served.

Seussical the Musical is produced in arrangement with Musical Theatre International, WWW.MTISHOWS.COM The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. For accommodations on the basis of disability call (405) 325-4101.

Classes Begin

JUNE 4TH

Spring Fling – Graduate Student Family Night | 6:30 - 8 p.m. in the Huston Huffman Fitness Center. Free to all OU graduate students and their families. Dancing, games, treats, refreshments and drawings for child swim lessons! For more information contact Hannah, Matt or Andrew at (405) 325-3053.

$IFDL$MBTT"WBJMBCJMJUZ

FREE Movie: “Haywire� | 6, 9 p.m. and midnight in Meacham Auditorium, Oklahoma Memorial Union. Courtesy of the Union Programming Board and Campus Activities Council.

XXXSPTFFEVTVNNFS

t'MFYJCMFTDIFEVMFoEBZ FWFOJOHBOE POMJOFDMBTTFT t4BWFPOHBT.855IDMBTTFT t#VEHFUGSJFOEMZUVJUJPO

tSPTFFEV

3

Faculty: Tenure saves money, director says

COLUMN

Editor’s Note: Sam Higgins is a Campus Reporter who started the university-sponsored smoking cessation class three weeks ago. He has written a column once a week to describe his first-person experiences and struggles with trying to quit smoking.

Students discuss the final review of a project designed by fifth-year architecture students who were consulted by members of a leading U.S. architecture firm, KlingStubbins, on Wednesday afternoon at Gould Hall. The project was an urban design concept for an area of downtown Philadelphia.

Thursday, April 26, 2012 •

Saturday, April 28 Sooner Idol | 7-10 p.m. in Meacham Auditorium. Come and watch OU students sing for the title of Sooner Idol 2012! Admission is FREE but crowd favorite ballots will be sold for $1 each.

Sunday, April 29 Sutton Concert Series: Collegium Musicum | 3 p.m. at Sharp Concert Hall. For ticket information and general information please call the Fine Arts Box Office at (405) 325-4101.

Spring Golf Championship | Tee-times are first come first serve at Westwood Golf and Country Club. Individual stroke play event, $29 per player. Late registration is limited. For more information contact Dewhirst@ou.edu.

This University in compliance with all applicable federal and state laws and regulations does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, genetic information, age, religion, disability, political beliefs, or status as a veteran in any of its policies, practices or procedures. This includes but is not limited to admissions, employment, financial aid and educational services. For accommodations on the basis of disability, please contact the sponsoring department of any program or event.


4

• Thursday, April 26, 2012

Reader comment on OUDaily.com ››

Opinion

“Bicyclist gets hit by a car: ‘SHARE THE F_CKING ROAD!’ Bicyclist hits a pedestrian: ‘GET OUT OF THE F_CKING BIKE LANE!’” (braceyourself, RE: Editorial: OU, community must encourage biking culture)

Mary Stanfield, opinion editor dailyopinion@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

Editorial

GOP must leave women’s act alone Our View: Stop the political games — the Violence Against Women Act must be reauthorized now.

based on sexual orientation. • Funding community violence prevention programs, survivors legal aid, programs for immigrant This election season has been characterized by communities, services for survivors with disabilities political gridlock, and the newest victim of this pa- and rape crisis centers. ralysis could well be women affected by domestic • Protecting women in Native American tribal violence, sexual assault and abuse. jurisdictions by enabling tribal courts to prosecute The federal Violence Against Women non-native individuals living on tribal Act, first passed in 1994, provides more lands. The Our View than $600 million annually to 25 programs The fact that Republicans are willing to is the majority opinion of that help prevent and respond to violence risk such an essential bill to participate The Daily’s against women. These programs give law in election-year games illustrates exactly nine-member enforcement, prosecutors and judges the where their priorities lie. editorial board tools to hold offenders accountable and So what’s the problem? support victims. Republicans are up in arms about three main adThough it has been reauthorized twice with ditions to this year’s bill: provisions that make more unanimous support — both times with improvetemporary visas available for victims in the country ments — Senate Republicans are challenging this illegally, greater protections for Native American year’s reauthorization. women and clarifications that the act applies The bill barely passed the Senate Judiciary equally to gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender Committee on a party-line vote, and since then has been stalled. Now, it competes with a toothless individuals. Some Republicans have claimed these additions and drastically reduced Republican version in the are needless forays into controversial issues. Sen. House. John Cornyn, R-Texas, even accused Democrats of If the parties cannot reconcile their views on trying to “score cheap political points” with the rethe bill, the law and all its provisions will expire in authorization of this act. But it is Republicans who September — leaving hundreds of thousands of are turning this clearly necessary law into a political women without protection or recourse. playing piece. What does it do? If they had bothered to do their research, they The impact of the Violence Against Women Act would have discovered exactly why Democrats incannot be overstated, and extends beyond the fedcluded these provisions. Two years ago, a nationeral level. It has provided more than $4 billion to wide effort was launched to gauge the effectiveness state and local agencies in its history. of domestic and sexual violence proNorman alone has received $100,000. grams. More than 2,000 individual The act’s provisions have substanresponses and feedback from local, Check out more tially raised awareness of the issues, state and federal programs were anainformation about removed obstacles to enforcing proteclyzed to find the most pressing issues Violence Against Women Act grants received by tion orders across state lines and profor survivors. Oklahoma, a sample tected women from having their sexual The results showed a lack of service letter for contacting your histories used against them in most to GLBT victims, barriers to service representative and a link legal proceedings. It also has helped for undocumented victims and conto talking points. start and support family justice centers, oudaily.com/opinion tinually high levels of violence against which localize resources for victims in Native American women. one location. In fact, a report by the National Coalition of AntiAnd this year’s bill significantly expanded protec- Violence Programs released in October shows tions, including: double-digit increases in intimate partner violence • Strengthening federal penalties for repeat sex in the GLBT community, including in the severity of offenders. the violence and the frequency with which they were • Mandating survivors of all income levels not be turned away from violence shelters. compelled to bear the expense of their own rape And Native American women face violence at a exams. rate three and a half times the national average, ac• Creating a federal “rape shield law,” which procording to reports from the Department of Justice. tects survivors from having their past sexual conduct It is utterly despicable for Republicans to ignore used against them in all rape trials. such an obvious need and turn the lives of women • Forbidding grant recipients from discriminating into election-year collateral.

OUDaily.com

AT A GLANCE Contact your representative • Representative Thomas Cole, R-Okla. Call: 202-225-6165 Fax: 202-225-3512

Write: U.S. House of Representatives, 2458 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20515

The Republican option But, of course, Republicans in the House and Senate couldn’t simply try to block the reauthorization: They don’t have the votes, and they can’t risk furthering the image of their “war on women.” So they offered up versions of their own, one in the House and one in the Senate. The Republican versions of the bill remove the controversial new provisions, and add a host of damaging and unworkable provisions. They would decrease the definition of youth from 24 to 20 (taking away funding and services from those most at risk of dating violence: college-aged youth), strip the Office on Violence Against Women of its authority — which will reduce accountability and inevitably raise costs — and add mandatory sentences that The American Bar Association and the Judicial Conference of the United States fear would harm reporting.

The solution The Democratic version of the act is the only one that explicitly extends protection to all victims of domestic and sexual violence. This is the version that must pass the House and Senate. Though the Democratic version is likely to pass the Senate, Republicans are focusing their efforts on supporting their version in the House. If both pass, a battle to reconcile the two versions will ensue, likely requiring harmful compromises. So those who want to fully protect victims and fund programs with the teeth necessary to fight violence against women must take their voices to the source. This battle will be fought in the House, and it will only be won by swaying members of the Republican majority to the Democrat’s side. Call Rep. Thomas Cole, R-Okla. Make an appointment to speak with him in person or express your support for the Democratic version of the bill over the phone. Go to OUDaily.com for a list of talking points, as well as a link to a sample letter to send or fax. It’s up to the constituents now. It’s up to you. Don’t let Republicans sacrifice abused, battered and raped women on the altar of their election hopes.

Comment on this at OUDaily.com

Letter to the editor

COLUMN

Court not media should be ones to judge Zimmerman

Coming out not a trivial matter to be joked about on Facebook

The thought of defending George Zimmerman at all may seem strange, and it may upset some people who feel the events of Feb. 26 were the manifestation of unbridled racism. I do not mean to exonerate Zimmerman, but would instead ask that people — especially those who wield the power of the media — wait a bit longer to declare him guilty. The death of Trayvon Martin is a sad event. No life should end so young, but an untimely death does not murder make. Many conflicting stories have evolved throughout this investigation, and Daily columnist Jason Quaynor offered one such hypothetical scenario in his column last week. In an attempt to defend Zimmerman, I could propose an entirely different scenario. The truth is, though, that such a proposal would do little good because neither Quaynor nor I actually know what happened that night. One life already has been lost in this case, and now another hangs in the balance. If he is guilty, Zimmerman should face every appropriate punishment. However, his guilt should be decided in a courtroom, not in the media. The media and general public do not know exactly what happened. To assume otherwise is arrogant, and to cry for vengeance without such knowledge is reckless. Many may feel Zimmerman is guilty, but many legal professors have questioned this conclusion, especially considering the lack of evidence. While we wait for a jury to decide this case on its merits, perhaps we should stop deciding it on hearsay. Eric Smith, letters senior

S

o your friend has left Staff Columnist the room, leaving his computer unattended. You wait a few seconds to make sure he’s not coming back, then you pounce. You go to his favorites toolbar and keep scrolling until you spot the Facebook Steven Zoeller icon. You click it and it loads stevenv.zoeller@gmail.com the page. He’s still logged in. Score. Now, you’ve “hacked” his page. What will you do? Change his profile picture to something embarrassing? Post something outrageous on one of his friends’ walls? Add Hitler to his list of “inspirational people?” These are all good ideas, but you don’t have all day to deliberate. Your friend could return at any moment. You decide to settle for just updating his status. But to what? “I eat poop?” “I am taking a poop?” “I think Nicholas Cage is a good actor?” There’s no shortage of outrageous things you could say with your friend’s status. You hear his footsteps down the

Do you have thoughts and views about issues affecting the university community? Do you want to share them with those around you?

hallway. You have to make up your mind. Quickly, you type two words: “I’m gay.” You close the window, sniggering to yourself. You’re looking innocently at your friend as he walks into the room. So funny, right? You’re a comic genius. And you think surely his Facebook friends who see the status will agree. Well, at least the straight ones will. Maybe one or more of his friends who are actually gay won’t find it so hilarious. It might cause them to reflect. “Why was that meant to be funny?” “Is the act of coming out that silly to straight people?” “I came out via Facebook. Did people think that was a joke, too?” Perhaps one of your friend’s Facebook friends is still closeted. He wants to come out, but he’s afraid he won’t be taken seriously. Then he sees his friend’s status update, and his fears are confirmed. Meanwhile, you’re laughing it up as your friend, having realized you did something, looks for the status. You both agree it was a good joke, though. Boy, gay people sure are funny. Steven Zoeller is a journalism sophomore.

The Daily is searching for opinion columnists. Email dailyopinion@ou.edu to apply.

The Oklahoma Daily is a public forum, the University of Oklahoma’s independent student voice and an entirely student-run publication.

Chris Lusk Chase Cook James Corley Laney Ellisor Greg Fewell Lindsey Ruta

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Mary Stanfield Kingsley Burns Melodie Lettkeman Katherine Borgerding Kyle Margerum Kristen Milburn

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Letters should concentrate on issues, not personalities, and must be fewer than 250 words, typed and signed by the author(s). Letters will be edited for accuracy, space and style. Students must list their major and classification. To submit letters, email dailyopinion@ou.edu. Our View is the voice of the Editorial Board, which consists of nine student editors. The board meets at 5 p.m. Sunday to Thursday in 160 Copeland Hall. Board meetings are open to the public.

Guest columns are accepted and printed at the editor’s discretion. Columnists’ and cartoonists’ opinions are their own and not necessarily the views or opinions of The Oklahoma Daily Editorial Board. To advertise in The Oklahoma Daily, contact advertising manager Kristen Milburn by calling 405-325-8964 or emailing dailyads@ou.edu. One free copy of The Daily is available to members of the OU community. Additional copies may be purchased for 25 cents by contacting The Daily business office at 405-325-2522.


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Thursday, April 26, 2012 •

President David Boren

Invites All Students To an open discussion of the University’s budget, including possible impacts related to tuition and fees for the next school year.

3 p.m. Monday, April 30 Beaird Lounge Oklahoma Memorial Union For accommodations on the basis of disability, please call the Office of Special Events at (405) 325-3784. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution.

5


6

• Thursday, April 26, 2012

OUDaily.com ››

SPORTS

The OU baseball team dropped its second game in a row Wednesday night, losing to Dallas Baptist for the second time this season by a score of 8-2.

Softball: Chamberlain breaks 12-year record Continued from page 1 baseman Lauren Chamberlain stole the show with her record-setting performance at the plate. “It’s been a long-standing record, and for a freshman to come in here and dismantle it with a few games left is amazing,” Gasso said. Oklahoma waited 12 seasons for the record to fall, but Chamberlain waited through just two pitches during her first at-bat against OSU before launching her 21st bomb of the season to claim sole ownership of OU’s singleseason home run record. “I’m honored to be on the board with players like our own, Coach (Lisa) Carey,” she said. “She’s been joking, ‘You’re going to beat my record,’ but I’m just honored to be up there with her.” To prove the feat wasn’t a fluke, Chamberlain went yard again during her next at bat to collect her sixth multiple home-run game this season and give the OU an insurance lead in the third inning. “I was just seeing the pitches well tonight,” Chamberlain

Greg Fewell, sports editor Kedric Kitchens, assistant sports editor dailysports@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

COLUMN

OU track and field exceed expectations

T

carey flack/the daily

Freshman Lauren Chamberlain rounds the bases after one of her two homers in the Sooners’ 7-1 victory over Bedlam rival Oklahoma State. Chamberlain set a new program record for home runs in a single season with her first bomb of the night. The freshman leads the Big 12 with 22 home runs this season.

said. “Sometimes I get a little antsy, but I just focused on tracking those pitches down tonight.” The first shot over the center field fence cleared both fences and departed from the OU Softball complex, giving the Sooners a 1-0 lead in the final game of the 2012 Bedlam series. The second bomb sailed

just to the right of the homerun bullseye located on the center field fence. While Chamberlain, who finished 2-for-2 in the contest, was honored to have her name next to the record, Gasso said she was relieved to finally have that monkey off of her freshman’s back. “Although she’s done a great job not talking about it, now we can move on to what we need to accomplish next,” Gasso said. Not to be outdone by her fellow freshman teammate, rookie outfielder Erica Sampson hit her third home

run of the season, a threerun shot that gave OU a comfortable five-run lead in the fourth inning. Sampson, who has typically seen reserve time this season, entered the game as a replacement for sophomore left fielder Brittany Williams who was injured while attempting to go after a fly ball. OSU scored its only run in the top of the fifth on a walk issued by junior pitcher Keilani Ricketts to avoid the shutout. Ricketts earned the win, giving up just four hits to the 22 batters she faced.

he Oklahoma Sports Columnist track and field team started the year with a top-25 ranking and high expectations. So far, Oklahoma has not only met, but exceeded, its early season goals. The men have shot all Greg Fewell the way from No. 23 when greg_f@ou.edu the season began to No. 12 in the nation. The catalyst for the team’s ascension has been the distance runners. Junior Bill Kogel ran a collegiate-best 28 minutes, 39.54 seconds in the 10,000-meter run on April 6 at the Stanford Invitational. Senior Kevin Schwab put up a time of 28:53.7 in the same race for the sixth fastest time of the year. Another senior, George Alex, lowered his own program record in the men’s 5,000-meter run and currently has the eighth fastest time in the nation. Finally, two runners, senior Eric Harasyn and junior Riley Masters, posted top-10 times in the 1,500-meter run at the Stanford Invitational. This weekend, the team takes its newfound program records and top-15 ranking to Philadelphia for the nation’s oldest and largest track meet, the Penn Relays. The meet will put the team up against the top competition the nation has to offer, and with only two weeks before the Big 12 Outdoor Championships, should be a good barometer for how prepared the team is for the most important part of the season. After all, high rankings and program records are great, but those stats don’t amount to much at the end of the year without championships to go along with them. Greg Fewell is a journalism senior and the sports editor for The Daily.

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SPORTS

Thursday, April 26, 2012 •

7

Women’s tennis

OU looks to rally for Big 12 comeback Sooners need upset to secure NCAA tournament berth

PLAYER PROFILE Whitney Ritchie Year: Sophomore Position: No. 1 doubles Hometown: Oklahoma City Season stats: 16-6 overall at No. 1 doubles spot with senior Marie-Pier Huet.

Greg Fewell Sports Editor

The 46th-ranked OU women’s tennis team will begin play in the Big 12 Championship tournament at 10 a.m. today when the seventh-seeded Sooners take on Kansas, a 10 seed, from George P. Mitchell Tennis Center in College Station. While any conference championship holds a little more weight than the everyday tennis match, this weekend will be particularly crucial for Oklahoma, a team struggling to pad its résumé in hopes of making the NCAA tournament in May. The Sooners are coming off two straight home losses at the hands of No. 6 Texas and No. 24 Texas A&M. With the loss to the Aggies on Sunday, OU fell to 10-12 for the season and just 5-5 in Big 12 play. Because of that, coach David Mullins knows his team will need to make a statement in College Station to keep any national title hopes alive. “This is definitely the most

melodie lettkeman/the daily

Sophomore Whitney Ritchie defends the net in a doubles match during the Sooners’ 6-1 victory over drake on Jan. 21. Oklahoma (10-12) needs at least two more wins to secure a spot in the NCAA tournament.

important Big 12 championship I have been involved in,” Mullins said. “We are running out of time to create an upset in order to make the NCAA tournament. We will most likely have to pick up at least two wins this week in order for us to be playing in

May.” The good news for Oklahoma is 10th-seeded Kansas, a team OU beat, 5-2, on March 9 in Lawrence, awaits in the first round. In the last meeting between the two squads, OU swept the doubles portion of the match,

winning the three matches by a combined score of 24-7. Then, sophomore Whitney Ritchie, senior Marie-Pier Huet, and freshmen Abbi Melrose and Nicole Long all swept their singles competitors in straight sets to give OU the easy victory.

That victory moved the Sooners to 2-0 in conference play. However, things snowballed from there. The team went on to lose four out of its next six matches, including a close, 4-3, loss to No. 13 Baylor and a 5-2 loss to No. 19 Texas Tech, both on the road. The Sooners then beat Bedlam rival Oklahoma State for the second time this season before losing the final two at home to the Longhorns and Aggies. If Oklahoma can get past Kansas again, the team will get a chance at redemption against two-seeded Baylor, who received a bye in the first round of the tournament.

Before the team’s loss to the favored Bears earlier in the year, Mullins said he needed to see more toughness out of his team for it to have a chance. “Really just need to play like there’s nothing to lose,” Mullins said. “There’s definitely been a lack of toughness on this team that I’ve not coached before and not seen in my teams before, and that’s been disappointing.” His team responded to the callout by coming within one match of upsetting the No. 13 team in the nation. However, it is too late in the season for “almost” to count for anything now. The team has created a win or go home scenario, and that toughness Mullins referenced is more crucial now than ever before. The coach thinks his team has made the strides necessary for this kind of highpressure, high-stakes competition, though. “We have made tremendous improvement since spring break,” Mullins said. “We are definitely capable of winning two matches at the championships, and the team certainly believes that this is possible.”

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8

• Thursday, April 26, 2012

Classifieds Fax: 405-325-7517 Campus Address: COH 149A

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Research volunteers needed! Researchers at OU Health Sciences Center need healthy volunteers ages 18 to 30 who have a parent with or without a history of an alcohol or drug problem. Qualified participants will be compensated for their time. Call (405) 456-4303 to learn more about the study and to see if you qualify. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. Youth Ministries Assistant St. Stephen’s UMC seeks PT youth assistant. Helps with youth programming. Must work Sunday. 12 hr/wk. Send resume to ststephensumc@coxinet.net

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Previous Solution                                                               

        

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4/26

46 “Ages� follower 47 “Yes ___, Bob!� 50 They don’t make cents? 56 “Cool� heist quantity 57 Anticipate 58 Louis Jolliet discovery of 1669 59 1871 Cairo premiere 60 Chutzpah 61 Span’s inches 62 “Do not change,� to an editor 63 Aconcagua’s chain 64 Ruler in old St. Petersburg 65 Combustible funeral heap DOWN 1 Friend of Jerry or George 2 Bunk option 3 Verb form used as an adjective 4 Clandestine and canny 5 Free of four-letter words 6 Painful cry 7 Genesis name 8 “Quo Vadis� emperor 9 Greyhound pacer 10 Under way, as a game 11 Sauce thickened with flour and fat 12 Bird around the shore

13 Wines that go with steaks 21 Community of plant and animal life 22 “To ___ own self be true� 24 “M*A*S*H� film star Elliott 27 “___ circumstances beyond our control ...� 28 Less healthy 29 Beta’s follower 30 Regularity 31 “Critique of Pure Reason� philosopher Immanuel 32 They break for a morning meal 33 “Anatomy of a Murder� director Preminger 34 “Alas ___ Yorick ...� 36 Bulldogger’s

beast 38 Good physical health 39 Welcoming New York island 44 5.5-point type sizes 46 “Stayin’ ___� (disco hit) 47 Scornful facial expression 48 Down for a pillow 49 Be heartpleasing 50 “Diff’rent Strokes� actress Plato 51 “The Virginian� writer Wister 52 Cooking fat 53 ___ packing (dismissed) 54 It controls a pupil’s size 55 “Dennis the Menace� girl 59 Egyptian slitherer

PREVIOUS PUZZLE ANSWER

HOROSCOPE By Bernice Bede Osol

Copyright 2012, Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 2012 If the year ahead appears to be a bit topsy-turvy, it will be because endeavors that you think would be big winners aren’t apt to pan out, while the notions that you deem duds will produce some impressive rewards. Take what you can get and run with it. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Your inability to properly evaluate information that is essential to your plans could be due to not having all the necessary information at your disposal. Don’t try to make a call without all the facts. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -Disappointment is likely if you build your expectations upon questionable premises. It’s good to be optimistic, but only if you’re also in touch with reality.

4/25

Š 2012 Universal Uclick www.upuzzles.com

TOYS IN THE ATTIC By Potter Stern

CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- If you want others to accept you and treat you nicely, you must first reach out to them. Keep being warm and friendly, even when you get the cold shoulder. Eventually they’ll come around.. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- The only person you have to genuinely please is you. If you think you’ve done your best to be warm and giving, you don’t need any additional applause. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Be careful not to commit any selfish acts or act indifferently to someone who is nice to you. If you do so, it will be quite a while before you can look at yourself in the mirror again. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --Be observant, because someone you

recently met might not be everything that he or she pretends to be. When this person has to perform under pressure, this will become apparent to you. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Should a friend come to you for advice, instead of telling your pal what you think she or he wants to hear, tell the truth. Be kind about it, and you’ll do a world of good. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Your ability to recognize a real bargain might not be operating very well. If something is expensive, sleep on it for a while before committing a sizable chunk of change. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) --Something might arise that could force you to choose between feathering your own nest or helping out a friend, partner or loved one. You can’t have your cake and eat it too. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) --Be extremely selective of your choice of companions, because what they do will reflect on you for either good or ill. Don’t gain a bad reputation based on your friends. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --You could find yourself involved in a social event where everybody but you knows one another, leaving you feeling like an outsider. If you can, take a friend along. ARIES (March 21-April 19) --Your personal ambitions and your abilities might not complement one another. It’s OK to want certain things but only if you have the ability to get what you desire.


Thursday, April 26, 2012 •

LIFE&ARTS

9

OUDaily.com ›› Stay current with Norman Music Festival news and updates, including reviews and photos, starting today and through the weekend.

Lindsey Ruta, life & arts editor Mariah Webb, assistant life & arts editor dailyent@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

COLUMN

Study help? ‘There’s an app for that’ LIFE & ARTS COLUMNIST

are some personal recommendations you may find helpful as we round the last curve of the semester. As an iOS user, it’s hard for me to make recommendations for the other phone types. So rather than suggest apps I have never tried, I will Shawn Stafford note if a version exists for shawn.a.stafford@ou.edu other phone types. WolframAlpha. If you ollege is an exerhaven’t heard of this beast, cise in looking up it’s like the next step in logic things to find out from Wikipedia. It can solve what other things you need equations and give inforto look up. mation on a variety of topThere are times I feel like if I was dropped back in time ics, like demographics for example. without all of my smartAt $2.99 in the App Store, phone’s trickery, I would I feel like this is a must for have no clue what I was anyone in a number-heavy doing. major or who needs to beef It’s no secret we have up an essay with some numbecome very comfortbers. It’s also on Android, so able using our phones for check it out my green, robotthe dirty work. Looking up wielding friends. words, quick math and — I highly suggest investing even though we don’t want in one of the dictionary apps. to admit it — spelling have been outsourced to our elec- My only experience is with French and Japanese. tronic companions. For lower-level It wasn’t until BlackBerrys, iPhones and, more recently, French, I recommend the WordReference.com app. It Androids started gaining traction before the modern smartphone was really crystallized in our minds and everyday lives. Over the past half a decade, we have seen these pocket computers change from simple extensions of our digital self, offering email and web browsing, into devices that seem to be on track to replace our laptops before everything is said and done. This has happened, in part, thanks to the growth of the app market. I’m not a proponent of the “there’s an app for that” mantra, but I am a proponent of using apps to get an edge in classes. But it can be difficult it is to find good ones with the current search engine, so here

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meets the needs of a beginning student and has the nice price of free. Japanese, by codefromtokyo, is an app I can’t recommend enough. It features a full Japanese dictionary with example sentences, flash cards and many different ways to look up kanji. It sits a little steep in price for an app, $9.99, but it really is worth it. With finals coming up, you are starting to see people making/lugging around those big stacks of flash cards. I don’t know about you, but I always have had trouble with physical flash cards. Lose some, run out of cards; you get the picture. What I have found is that most of those problems vanish when I move to digital flash cards. That’s why I use A+ FlashCards Pro. It has an easy-to-use interface, and you can download premade flashcard packs from the Internet. I’ve even found study sets for some of my books.

The app is free, but it’s been $4.99 in the past, so grab it before finals week. If you are an Android user, I’ve heard that the AnkiDroid Flashcards app is a very good flashcard app. The last app I’d like to talk about isn’t as much of an education app as it is an enabler, AppShopper. This free app lets you search the app store in a much more specific and easier manner. It also shows you price drops and update trends. This app is a must for everyone with any iOS device. The next time you are cruising the net looking for apps, check for some that have to do with your classes. Maybe they won’t guarantee you an A+, but they will take some of the stress off when crunch time rolls around.

AT A GLANCE Helpful academic apps

Shawn Stafford is an international area studies junior.

WOLFRAM ALPHA — iOS, Android Helps with: More than 20 categories of math, science, history and culture Cost: $2.99 WORDREFERENCE.COM — iOS, Android Helps with: Learning another language, including Spanish, French and Italian Cost: Free JAPANESE — iOS Helps with: Learning Japanese, including about 12,000 kanji symbols Cost: $9.99 A+ FLASH CARDS PRO — iOS Helps with: Studying and memorizing terms, words or other types of information Cost: Free (for limited time; regularly $4.99) APPSHOPPER — iOS Helps with: Finding useful apps by simplifying app browsing and providing trend updates Cost: Free

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SO DON’T FORGET... The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution.


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Thursday, April 26, 2012