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Plus/minus grading would reflect student effort (opinion, page a4) The University of Oklahoma’s independent student voice since 1916

W E D N E S DAY, A P R I L 18 , 2 012

W W W.O U DA I LY.C O M

2 011 S I LV E R C R O W N W I N N E R

lAngUAgE

{ learn Arabic }

niKKi seLF/tHe daiLy

Professor Abdulrahman Kelani (center) teaches his advanced Arabic class Monday in the Carson Energy Center. His advanced class has only eight students, but they speak Arabic the whole class period.

In matters of reproductive health, knowledge is power. But recent comments by political figures show how little some know about contraceptives.

Arabic program to provide dual summer session Classes intended to address language and cultural divide CoCo CoURToIs Campus reporter

Ignorance clouds health debate OUDaily.com

MaRIah WeBB

Life & Arts reporter

In May 1960, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the drug Enovid-10 as the first oral medication to be an effective form of birth control. Approval of the drug by the FDA was met with controversy, and it was not until 1965 that the U.S. Supreme Court struck down many state laws that banned the use of contraception. Now, half a century later, birth control continues to take the front line in American social controversy. Stigma continues to attach itself to the reputation of girls and

estimate the cost of birth control for the remainder of your fertile years with an online calculator or complete a short questionnaire to see which form of birth control may benefit you most. oudaily.com/life&arts

women who use family planning techniques. There are many forms of birth control now available. However, knowledge on the topic tragically is limited, and prices hinder many from using it.

In February, President Barack Obama announced a mandate that would require health insurance plans to make birth control widely affordable. House speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, called it “an unambiguous attack on religious freedom.” Former Republican presidential nominee hopeful Rick Santorum dismissed the mandate at the Conservative Political Action Conference in February, claiming that it was unnecessary as birth control “costs just a few dollars.” Sandra Fluke, third-year law see BIRTH CONTROL paGe a3

The university’s Arabic Flagship Program will feature an intensive summer program for the first time this year. The summer program will allow students to finish the equivalent of the AT A GLANCE first year of Arabic classSummer session es, totalling the 10 credit hours of ARAB 1115 and ArAb 1115: May 29 to ARAB 1225, during two June 29 sessions, according to the program. ArAb 1225: July 2 to The summer program Aug. 3 will be offered to highschool students, incoming Applications will be freshmen and current OU accepted after the original students, and neither prior deadline, Friday. involvement in the flagFor more information, ship program nor Arabic email flagship@ou.edu or speaking experience are go to ou.edu/flagship. required to participate. “A lot of OU students realize that learning Arabic would be valuable and this gives them the opportunity to catch up, and be ready to keep learning it the second year,” program coordinator Heidi Logsdon said. see ARABIC paGe a3

PriDE WEEK

Students to strut their stuff for first Queer Royalty title Inaugural on-campus pageant intended to showcase pride, campus involvement ChRIs MILLeR

Assistant Campus Editor

The campus Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Friends organization will host the inaugural OU Queer Royalty Pageant today on campus. The event will allow members of the on-campus GLBT community an opportunity to express themselves as the face of the organization’s campus involvement, GLBTF President Devin Luxner said. “We want people to get on stage, put themselves out there and celebrate one another,” Luxner said.

“Everybody should have a chance to put their best queer face forward.” The pageant will take place in conjunction with a drag show at 9 p.m. in Wagner Hall, Room 280, and will feature four judging categories, including formal presentation, beauty event, personality walk and on-stage interview, according to the event’s Facebook page. The formal presentation will involve a quick walk on stage with the other contestants; the beauty event will feature a longer, solo walk in a “glitzy” outfit; the personality walk will feature each

Go AND Do royalty Pageant WHEN: 9 tonight WHERE: 280 Wagner Hall

contestant in an outfit showcasing their “unique queerness;” and the on-stage interview will involve a few questions about the OU queer community, according to the event’s Facebook page. At the conclusion of the event, a judging panel consisting of long-time GLBTF members will determine the two winners of the title OU Queer Royalty, Luxner said. The winners will not earn the title of king and queen

“We want people to get on stage, put themselves out there and celebrate one another. everybody should have a chance to put their best queer face forward.” DEVIN LUXNEr, GLBTF PrEsIDENT

because the winners may not necessarily identify themselves by traditional gender roles, Luxner said. “Even though the vast majority of people in attendance may identify with the gender binary, we didn’t want to limit it like that,” he said.

SPOrtS VOL. 97, NO. 140

© 2012 OU Publications Board FREE — Additional copies 25 cents Campus ........................ Classifieds .................. Life & Arts ................... Opinion ...................... Sports .........................

A2 B4 B5 A4 B1

Sooners tie-dye free t-shirts on South Oval

Students travel to D.c. for theater festival finals

As part of student Congress’ Green Week, students were given shirts to tie-dye Tuesday afternoon. (Multimedia)

Two acting majors will compete in the Irene ryan finals this week at the prestigious Kennedy Center. (Page b5)

Editor’s Note: Daily opinion editor Mary Stanfield will be among the GLBTF members judging the group’s Queer Royalty Pageant.

Requested document and purpose

The oU baseball team shut down a Golden Eagle comeback to win its fifthstraight game. (Page b1)

liFE & ArtS

encouraged to participate in an on-campus Day of Silence on Friday to protest GLBT harassment and discrimination, Luxner said. The group will set up a booth Friday on the South Oval with speaking cards to hand out explaining why participating students are silent, according to the group’s Facebook page. Students will be allowed to break their silence at a “Breaking the Silence Open Mic Night” at Second Wind Coffeeshop, 564 Buchanan Ave.

The Daily’s open record requests

Sooners use late push to best Oral roberts

nOW OnlinE At

“We’ll pick two people, and then they’ll have the freedom to pick their titles as queer royalty.” The pageant is being held in conjunction with OU Pride Week, a weeklong celebration of the campus GLBT community, which will culminate with an art show from 3-10 p.m. Saturday at Downtown Sound, 115 S. Crawford Ave. The art show is part of a larger day of queer events hosted by Downtown Sound. The show will feature art from local queer artists and help support Norman’s artistic community, according to the GLBTF Pride Week Facebook page. In addition to the pageant and art show, students are

meLodie LettKeman/tHe daiLy

Letters junior Joe sangirardi eyes a pie about to be smashed in his face Tuesday. Pi Kappa Phi used the event to raise money for Push America, a philanthropy started by the fraternity that supports people with disabilities. (Page b6)

Date requested

list of current tenured professors — This was requested to find tenured professors and ask them about oklahoma’s attempts to eliminate tenure.

Friday

Amount of commission received by the Oklahoma Memorial Union from the University club on liquor catering sales for the 2011 fiscal year— This was requested to learn how much money the university makes from events at which alcohol is served.

Friday

OU Admissions Office budget proposal for fiscal year 2013 — To gather proprietary information regarding proposed changes to the university’s application and admission process, including budget allotments for the hiring of application readers.

April 11

Visit OUDaily.com/openrecords for a complete list of The Daily’s requests


A2

CAMPUS

• Wednesday, April 18, 2012

OUDaily.com ››

Campus

When the State Regents for Higher Education meet today in Oklahoma City, they’ll discuss tuition, present awards and discuss educational records .

Laney Ellisor, campus editor Kathleen Evans, assistant campus editor Chris Miller, assistant campus editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

Student Congress

Applications available for UOSA Executive Cabinet

Selected students to attend retreat for fall semester

Today around campus Pot a cilantro plant as part of Green Week from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the South Oval. There will be chips and guacamole from Chipotle. The softball team will play North Texas at 6 p.m. at Marita Hynes Field. A lecture about environmental concerns and policy changes of the Keystone XL Pipeline will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. at Gould Hall, Room 155. A lecture, “Women Nobel Laureates and ‘Scientists Interrupted:’ Reflections on the Lost Generation of the 1970s,” will be given at 7:30 p.m. at Gaylord Hall’s Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation Auditorium. A concert by the OU Wind Symphony and Symphony Band will be held at 8 p.m. at Catlett Music Center’s Sharp Concert Hall.

Thursday, April 19 A symposium about copyright, fostering creativity for business goals and brand management will take place from 10 a.m. to noon and from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art’s Mary Eddy and Fred Jones Auditorium. A social responsibility fair displaying how the OU community is going green will be held from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Union Courtyard. A seminar about how to manage stress will be held at 4 p.m. at Wagner Hall, Room 245. The men’s gymnastics team will compete in an NCAA championship qualifier all day at Lloyd Noble Center.

AT A GLANCE Upcoming plans Before the end of the year, Joe Sangirardi and Rainey Sewell have a few things to address:

Chase Cook

Managing Editor

The UOSA president and vice president are actively accepting applications for positions in the UOSA Executive Cabinet. Student government President Joe Sangirardi and Vice President Rainey Sewell already have contacted specific student groups, but they are currently taking applications from all interested students. The applications are due 5 p.m. April 25 in UOSA’s main office in the Conoco Student Leadership Center. Students who apply for the executive branch will be interviewed and selected, but they won’t immediately be appointed to a department in the branch, Sangirardi said. Students selected for the executive branch will go on a retreat at the beginning of the fall semester to determine the best place for them within the branch’s departments, he said. The goal of the retreat will be to get students working together and figure out what everyone is interested in. “This allows for more authenticity because it shows the work that they will do rather than the position they will have,” Sangirardi said.

• Establishing a calendar for the summer and upcoming academic year, which will consist of planning dates for events and meetings.

Kingsley Burns/The Daily

UOSA President Joe Sangirardi (right) and Vice President Rainey Sewell are looking for students to join the executive cabinet. The duo’s next step is to assemble an interim summer staff to plan the fall semester.

OUDaily.com Learn how to apply for UOSA Executive Cabinet positions within Joe Sangirardi and Rainey Sewell’s administration. oudaily.com/news

There are plans to try and incorporate the Oklahoma State University student government into the retreat so both groups can brainstorm ideas, Sewell said. No specific date has been set for the retreat.

The interviews for the executive branch office will occur April 26 and April 27, the week before OU’s dead week. Dead week prohibits registered student organizations from mandating student involvement, according to Student Life policies. Sangirardi said every administration goes through time constraints when trying to hire new people, but he said his administration should be able to get it done. “I was fearful we wouldn’t have time,” Sangirardi said.

• Appointing the chair and vice chair of the Sooner Freshmen Council. This council is filled with freshmen OU students that intern with various positions in UOSA’s student government to learn more about the organization.

Source: Joe Sangirardi and Rainey Sewell

The push to hire members of the executive branch is one of the first moves made by Sangirardi and Sewell after they assumed power of the president and vice presidential offices at 5 p.m. Monday. The duo said their next step is to put together an interim summer executive branch staff, Sangirardi said. He, Sewell, an interim chief of staff and any other volunteers will work during the summer ­— for free — to plan the upcoming fall semester.

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 •

birth control: Methods have health benefits Continued from page A1 student at G eorgetow n Un i ve r s i t y , t e st i f i e d i n Congress to defend the mandate. She was met with fire by conservative talk-show host Rush Limbaugh, who concluded that Fluke’s defense of affordable birth control made her a “slut” and a “prostitute.” Comments such as these indicate a clear misunderstanding of birth control, what it does and the health benefits it provides. There are a lot of factors to consider when considering a method of birth control, said Terry Dennison, director of educational services for Planned Parenthood of Central Oklahoma. Dennison said she encourages women to consider factors such as sexual activity, health risks, convenience and motivation when weighing birth control options. “If you have a regular partner and want continuous protection, or if timing is unpredictable, an ongoing method like the pill, shot, implant, etc. is great,” Dennison said. “If you have sex infrequently, you might consider using a method only used during the act, such as condoms.” However, there are other factors besides sex that should go into the decisionmaking, she said. “If you have trouble remembering to take a pill every day, oral contraceptives could be a problem,” Dennison said. “If you live 400 miles from the nearest doctor or clinic, traveling the long distance to get your DMPA shot every three months could be a problem.” Cost and convenience can play a role as well, she said. “If you feel an unplanned pregnancy would be a horrible experience for you at this point in your life, consider options that are highly effective and do not depend on

follow-up,” she said. “If you want to avoid a pregnancy but know you could deal with a pregnancy if it occurred, the convenience and cost might outweigh effectiveness for you.” Though the obvious use of birth control is to prevent pregnancy, there are many other uses for the medication. Dennison said other health benefits of birth control include controlling menstrual irregularities, treating endometriosis, endometrial cancer, ovarian cancer, cervical cancer, premenstrual syndrome, ectopic pregnancy and the management of some forms of cysts and tumors. You don’t have to look far to find women who benefit from non-sexual uses of birth control. In fact, many women who take the pill are not sexually active, like University College freshman Caroline Jackson. “I have never been sexually active, but I started the pill when I was 15,” she said. “It’s to control my periods and help with cramping. I used to have to miss two to three days of school every month because I couldn’t get out of bed. My mom approved it and took me to the doctor.” For University College freshman Colby Lower, birth control could be the difference between life and death. As a Type I juvenile diabetic, Lower began taking the pill at age 14. When Lower began to go through puberty, she started to notice her insulin levels gradually rising. “In 2008, I was hospitalized three times before the doctor recommended I start the pill,” Lower said. Now, Lower benefits from the simplicity of Merena, a low-hormone intrauterine device. “The pill was hard to remember to take, and the injection caused unpleasant side effects,” she said. Maggie Pool, resident

AT A GLANCE Types of birth control Hormonal methods are usually made of estrogen and progestin. These hormones prevent pregnancy by stopping the ovaries from releasing eggs. Forms of hormonal birth control include: • The pill is the traditional form of hormonal birth control. It must be taken at the same time every day to ensure the maximum benefit. • The patch is placed on the skin once a week for three weeks in a row. It is usually removed for one week at the end of the month. • The ring is a relatively new form of hormonal birth control that is inserted by the user into the vagina at the beginning of the month. After three weeks, the ring usually is disposed of. After one week without the ring, a new one is inserted.

• The injection is birth control injected directly into your system by a doctor during an appointment. The injection helps prevent pregnancy for up to three months. • The implant is a matchsticksized flexible rod that is inserted directly under the skin, usually in the arm. It can be left in place for up to three years. At the end of three years, a small incision is made and the rod is extracted. • The intrauterine device (IUD) is a T-shaped rod inserted into the uterus by a doctor. Depending on the IUD, it can be effective for five to 12 years. It prevents pregnancy by effecting the way sperm moves and preventing its attachment to an egg. Although IUD’s are highly effective for anyone, they are typically only issued to women who have already born children.

Source: PlannedParenthood.org

nurse at Goddard Health Center, said students should talk with a health care provider to decide which birth control is right for them. “Reason for use, risk factors, ease of use and cost are just a few of the things to consider when choosing birth control,” she said. In matters of reproductive health, knowledge is power. Researching the facts behind birth control enables women to make well-informed decisions about their health. Although talking with your gynecologist is an important step toward acquiring that knowledge, it is important to educate yourself so you know exactly what to discuss during your appointment. For more information about birth control or to discuss options with a health care professional, make an appointment at Goddard’s Women’s Center by calling 405-325-4441.

AT A GLANCE Effectiveness • The pill Fewer than one in 100 women will get pregnant • The ring Fewer than one in 100 will get pregnant • The patch Fewer than one in 100 women will get pregnant • The injection Fewer than one in 100 women will get pregnant • The implant Fewer than one in 100 women will get pregnant • IUD Fewer than one in 100 women will get pregnant • Condoms (male/female) Two in 100 women will get pregnant

Source: PlannedParenthood.org

Arabic: OU one of five flagship schools Continued from page A1 OU is one of five universities in the country to offer the Arabic Flagship Program, including Arabic classes, extracurricular activities, guest speakers, discussions, cooking classes, movies and other culture-specific events. The flagship program’s overall focus is on creating proficient speakers who also are able to read and write on the level of people who use Arabic as their native language, Logsdon said. “Arabic is not offered in any high school, even though it is such a beautiful and critical language,” Logsdon said. “We hope to awake the passion of studying Arabic in some students who don’t have the opportunity to do so.” “There’s also a need The summer program of Arabic teachers ... will familiarize students with the Arabic script and and the career path develop basic proficienin those domains [is] cy in reading, writing, tremendous.” speaking and listening. Students also will work Heidi Logsdon, in smaller groups with Program coordinator language tutors who will assist them in practicing material, completing homework assignments and carrying out tasks assigned by the class instructor, according to the program. Like the flagship program, the summer program also will offers exposure to Arab culture through films, presentations and cooking. The program’s curriculum is intended to combat a current lack of Arabic speakers in the U.S., Logsdon said. “We have a lack of people trained in Arabic language and culture for our national security and our diplomatic relations,” Logsdon said. “There’s also a need of Arabic teachers and the personal growth and career path in those domains are tremendous.” To accelerate the program’s impact, students will be asked to communicate in Arabic whenever possible, and the use of English during the program will be kept to a minimum, according to the program. In addition to the intensive summer program, the Arabic flagship program offers several study abroad opportunities, including a 12-month program to Alexandria, Egypt, that only one OU student has experienced thus far. “It’s certainly a challenging program ... You have to be ambitious and know where you’re getting yourself to,” program participant and political science senior Chase Smithburg said. Smithburg said he has been studying Arabic since 2007 but was still surprised when he used it in real situations. “The Arabic we learned, the formal Arabic used by media for example, is completely different than the colloquial Arabic,” Smithburg said. “They sure keep you very busy, which is good, because you’re forced to be constantly in an Arabic-speaking environment and that is the only way to learn.”

Being

NUMBER ONE is nothing to celebrate.

Corrections The Oklahoma Daily is committed to serving readers with accurate coverage and welcomes your comments about information that may require correction or clarification. To contact us with corrections, email us at dailynews@ou.edu. Visit OUDaily.com/corrections to see an archive of our corrections

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CAMPUS

• Wednesday, April 18, 2012

OUDaily.com ››

Campus

When the State Regents for Higher Education meet today in Oklahoma City, they’ll discuss tuition, present awards and discuss educational records .

Laney Ellisor, campus editor Kathleen Evans, assistant campus editor Chris Miller, assistant campus editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

Student Congress

Applications available for UOSA Executive Cabinet

Selected students to attend retreat for fall semester

Today around campus Pot a cilantro plant as part of Green Week from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the South Oval. There will be chips and guacamole from Chipotle. The softball team will play North Texas at 6 p.m. at Marita Hynes Field. A lecture about environmental concerns and policy changes of the Keystone XL Pipeline will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. at Gould Hall, Room 155. A lecture, “Women Nobel Laureates and ‘Scientists Interrupted:’ Reflections on the Lost Generation of the 1970s,” will be given at 7:30 p.m. at Gaylord Hall’s Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation Auditorium. A concert by the OU Wind Symphony and Symphony Band will be held at 8 p.m. at Catlett Music Center’s Sharp Concert Hall.

Thursday, April 19 A symposium about copyright, fostering creativity for business goals and brand management will take place from 10 a.m. to noon and from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art’s Mary Eddy and Fred Jones Auditorium. A social responsibility fair displaying how the OU community is going green will be held from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Union Courtyard. A seminar about how to manage stress will be held at 4 p.m. at Wagner Hall, Room 245. The men’s gymnastics team will compete in an NCAA championship qualifier all day at Lloyd Noble Center.

AT A GLANCE Upcoming plans Before the end of the year, Joe Sangirardi and Rainey Sewell have a few things to address:

Chase Cook

Managing Editor

The UOSA president and vice president are actively accepting applications for positions in the UOSA Executive Cabinet. Student government President Joe Sangirardi and Vice President Rainey Sewell already have contacted specific student groups, but they are currently taking applications from all interested students. The applications are due 5 p.m. April 25 in UOSA’s main office in the Conoco Student Leadership Center. Students who apply for the executive branch will be interviewed and selected, but they won’t immediately be appointed to a department in the branch, Sangirardi said. Students selected for the executive branch will go on a retreat at the beginning of the fall semester to determine the best place for them within the branch’s departments, he said. The goal of the retreat will be to get students working together and figure out what everyone is interested in. “This allows for more authenticity because it shows the work that they will do rather than the position they will have,” Sangirardi said.

• Establishing a calendar for the summer and upcoming academic year, which will consist of planning dates for events and meetings.

Kingsley Burns/The Daily

UOSA President Joe Sangirardi (right) and Vice President Rainey Sewell are looking for students to join the executive cabinet. The duo’s next step is to assemble an interim summer staff to plan the fall semester.

OUDaily.com Learn how to apply for UOSA Executive Cabinet positions within Joe Sangirardi and Rainey Sewell’s administration. oudaily.com/news

There are plans to try and incorporate the Oklahoma State University student government into the retreat so both groups can brainstorm ideas, Sewell said. No specific date has been set for the retreat.

The interviews for the executive branch office will occur April 26 and April 27, the week before OU’s dead week. Dead week prohibits registered student organizations from mandating student involvement, according to Student Life policies. Sangirardi said every administration goes through time constraints when trying to hire new people, but he said his administration should be able to get it done. “I was fearful we wouldn’t have time,” Sangirardi said.

• Appointing the chair and vice chair of the Sooner Freshmen Council. This council is filled with freshmen OU students that intern with various positions in UOSA’s student government to learn more about the organization.

Source: Joe Sangirardi and Rainey Sewell

The push to hire members of the executive branch is one of the first moves made by Sangirardi and Sewell after they assumed power of the president and vice presidential offices at 5 p.m. Monday. The duo said their next step is to put together an interim summer executive branch staff, Sangirardi said. He, Sewell, an interim chief of staff and any other volunteers will work during the summer ­— for free — to plan the upcoming fall semester.

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 •

birth control: Methods have health benefits Continued from page A1 student at G eorgetow n Un i ve r s i t y , t e st i f i e d i n Congress to defend the mandate. She was met with fire by conservative talk-show host Rush Limbaugh, who concluded that Fluke’s defense of affordable birth control made her a “slut” and a “prostitute.” Comments such as these indicate a clear misunderstanding of birth control, what it does and the health benefits it provides. There are a lot of factors to consider when considering a method of birth control, said Terry Dennison, director of educational services for Planned Parenthood of Central Oklahoma. Dennison said she encourages women to consider factors such as sexual activity, health risks, convenience and motivation when weighing birth control options. “If you have a regular partner and want continuous protection, or if timing is unpredictable, an ongoing method like the pill, shot, implant, etc. is great,” Dennison said. “If you have sex infrequently, you might consider using a method only used during the act, such as condoms.” However, there are other factors besides sex that should go into the decisionmaking, she said. “If you have trouble remembering to take a pill every day, oral contraceptives could be a problem,” Dennison said. “If you live 400 miles from the nearest doctor or clinic, traveling the long distance to get your DMPA shot every three months could be a problem.” Cost and convenience can play a role as well, she said. “If you feel an unplanned pregnancy would be a horrible experience for you at this point in your life, consider options that are highly effective and do not depend on

follow-up,” she said. “If you want to avoid a pregnancy but know you could deal with a pregnancy if it occurred, the convenience and cost might outweigh effectiveness for you.” Though the obvious use of birth control is to prevent pregnancy, there are many other uses for the medication. Dennison said other health benefits of birth control include controlling menstrual irregularities, treating endometriosis, endometrial cancer, ovarian cancer, cervical cancer, premenstrual syndrome, ectopic pregnancy and the management of some forms of cysts and tumors. You don’t have to look far to find women who benefit from non-sexual uses of birth control. In fact, many women who take the pill are not sexually active, like University College freshman Caroline Jackson. “I have never been sexually active, but I started the pill when I was 15,” she said. “It’s to control my periods and help with cramping. I used to have to miss two to three days of school every month because I couldn’t get out of bed. My mom approved it and took me to the doctor.” For University College freshman Colby Lower, birth control could be the difference between life and death. As a Type I juvenile diabetic, Lower began taking the pill at age 14. When Lower began to go through puberty, she started to notice her insulin levels gradually rising. “In 2008, I was hospitalized three times before the doctor recommended I start the pill,” Lower said. Now, Lower benefits from the simplicity of Merena, a low-hormone intrauterine device. “The pill was hard to remember to take, and the injection caused unpleasant side effects,” she said. Maggie Pool, resident

AT A GLANCE Types of birth control Hormonal methods are usually made of estrogen and progestin. These hormones prevent pregnancy by stopping the ovaries from releasing eggs. Forms of hormonal birth control include: • The pill is the traditional form of hormonal birth control. It must be taken at the same time every day to ensure the maximum benefit. • The patch is placed on the skin once a week for three weeks in a row. It is usually removed for one week at the end of the month. • The ring is a relatively new form of hormonal birth control that is inserted by the user into the vagina at the beginning of the month. After three weeks, the ring usually is disposed of. After one week without the ring, a new one is inserted.

• The injection is birth control injected directly into your system by a doctor during an appointment. The injection helps prevent pregnancy for up to three months. • The implant is a matchsticksized flexible rod that is inserted directly under the skin, usually in the arm. It can be left in place for up to three years. At the end of three years, a small incision is made and the rod is extracted. • The intrauterine device (IUD) is a T-shaped rod inserted into the uterus by a doctor. Depending on the IUD, it can be effective for five to 12 years. It prevents pregnancy by effecting the way sperm moves and preventing its attachment to an egg. Although IUD’s are highly effective for anyone, they are typically only issued to women who have already born children.

Source: PlannedParenthood.org

nurse at Goddard Health Center, said students should talk with a health care provider to decide which birth control is right for them. “Reason for use, risk factors, ease of use and cost are just a few of the things to consider when choosing birth control,” she said. In matters of reproductive health, knowledge is power. Researching the facts behind birth control enables women to make well-informed decisions about their health. Although talking with your gynecologist is an important step toward acquiring that knowledge, it is important to educate yourself so you know exactly what to discuss during your appointment. For more information about birth control or to discuss options with a health care professional, make an appointment at Goddard’s Women’s Center by calling 405-325-4441.

AT A GLANCE Effectiveness • The pill Fewer than one in 100 women will get pregnant • The ring Fewer than one in 100 will get pregnant • The patch Fewer than one in 100 women will get pregnant • The injection Fewer than one in 100 women will get pregnant • The implant Fewer than one in 100 women will get pregnant • IUD Fewer than one in 100 women will get pregnant • Condoms (male/female) Two in 100 women will get pregnant

Source: PlannedParenthood.org

Arabic: OU one of five flagship schools Continued from page A1 OU is one of five universities in the country to offer the Arabic Flagship Program, including Arabic classes, extracurricular activities, guest speakers, discussions, cooking classes, movies and other culture-specific events. The flagship program’s overall focus is on creating proficient speakers who also are able to read and write on the level of people who use Arabic as their native language, Logsdon said. “Arabic is not offered in any high school, even though it is such a beautiful and critical language,” Logsdon said. “We hope to awake the passion of studying Arabic in some students who don’t have the opportunity to do so.” “There’s also a need The summer program of Arabic teachers ... will familiarize students with the Arabic script and and the career path develop basic proficienin those domains [is] cy in reading, writing, tremendous.” speaking and listening. Students also will work Heidi Logsdon, in smaller groups with Program coordinator language tutors who will assist them in practicing material, completing homework assignments and carrying out tasks assigned by the class instructor, according to the program. Like the flagship program, the summer program also will offers exposure to Arab culture through films, presentations and cooking. The program’s curriculum is intended to combat a current lack of Arabic speakers in the U.S., Logsdon said. “We have a lack of people trained in Arabic language and culture for our national security and our diplomatic relations,” Logsdon said. “There’s also a need of Arabic teachers and the personal growth and career path in those domains are tremendous.” To accelerate the program’s impact, students will be asked to communicate in Arabic whenever possible, and the use of English during the program will be kept to a minimum, according to the program. In addition to the intensive summer program, the Arabic flagship program offers several study abroad opportunities, including a 12-month program to Alexandria, Egypt, that only one OU student has experienced thus far. “It’s certainly a challenging program ... You have to be ambitious and know where you’re getting yourself to,” program participant and political science senior Chase Smithburg said. Smithburg said he has been studying Arabic since 2007 but was still surprised when he used it in real situations. “The Arabic we learned, the formal Arabic used by media for example, is completely different than the colloquial Arabic,” Smithburg said. “They sure keep you very busy, which is good, because you’re forced to be constantly in an Arabic-speaking environment and that is the only way to learn.”

Being

NUMBER ONE is nothing to celebrate.

Corrections The Oklahoma Daily is committed to serving readers with accurate coverage and welcomes your comments about information that may require correction or clarification. To contact us with corrections, email us at dailynews@ou.edu. Visit OUDaily.com/corrections to see an archive of our corrections

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Reader comment on OUDaily.com ››

• Wednesday, April 18, 2012

“I would like to express my gratitude to the person who wrote the editorial, ‘More than a silly course topic.’I appreciate someone voicing this information that Intersession isn’t just an easy A, but a solid component of the university that assists students with their degree.” (mitc0635, RE: ‘EDITORIAL: May Intersession courses are more than a silly topic’)

OPINION EDITORIAL

A plus/minus grading system would increase value of GPAs Our View: The university should switch to a

difficult for some high-achieving students to lose plus/minus grading system so GPAs better reflect their 4.0. But ultimately, this system would benefit students’ academic achievements. the top-performing students by raising the value of a 4.0 from OU. Oklahoma State University recently considered This system would deflate the grading system switching to the plus/minus grading system. But and ensure that such a high GPA actually reflects after the Student Government Association sugthe best of the best who have put in exceptional gested the university consider the new policy, the work above and beyond the requirements, as it resolution was vetoed by the student body should. president Thursday. And if this loss of 4.0s ends up being parThe Our View In short, the Cowboys chickened out. ticularly troubling for individual students is the majority It may not have happened in Stillwater, or the university’s average GPA, some plus/ opinion of but it’s time that OU considers plus/minus minus grading systems disregard the A+ The Daily’s grading. category and give A’s a 4.0, only lowering nine-member Under the current system, students are editorial board the grade point value of an A-. It will take a given grades A, B, C, D, F corresponding to careful discussion — between faculty, adgrade points — an A corresponds to a 4.0, a ministrators and students — to determine B to a 3.0, and so on. the fairest and best version of the system for OU. Under the plus/minus system, students could reBut either version of this policy would benefit the ceive the grades A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, etc. university, making a GPA from OU mean more next The plus/minus system would increase the acto a GPA from a school still on the traditional grade curacy of grades earned at OU. Professors would scale. It would be a sign to graduate school admishave more grading options, which would give them sions and employers that a GPA from OU is an acmore room to precisely gauge the effort and mascurate, competitive reflection of the student’s work tery of each student. This would ensure that stuand abilities — increasing the value of OU students dents truly earned the precise grade they are given, in the job and graduate school markets. instead of the current broad categories. And adopting this system would put OU in good Under the current system, a student who does company. All the Ivy League institutions and many just enough work to qualify for an A and a student of the premier private universities in the U.S. use a who goes above and beyond exversion of the plus/minus gradpectations both earn the same A. “This system would deflate the ing system. As Boren is so fond of This doesn’t provide much inreminding us, OU shares many grading system and ensure centive for students to perform features in common with these that such a high GPA actually institutions. This grading system at their very peak, especially in classes with particularly inflated reflects the best of the best should be one more. grades. Of course, changing to a new who have put in exceptional The plus/minus system gives grading system would require a work above and beyond the faculty greater freedom to reward transition period. It would cost requirements, as it should.” students who do particularly well money to switch software over and accurately reflect the work to the new system, and students of students who do less — without being forced to may find it a little difficult to adjust to at first. It bump them down an entire letter grade, which may could also lead to more students appealing grades not be warranted. at the end of the semester, given the greater speciOf course, in some cases, this new system would ficity of the new system. But these small setbacks result in a lowering of GPAs, particularly at the would be outweighed by the substantial benefits. high end. But the system would also raise GPAs for OU should create a committee to consider maksome. Given some professors’ propensity to “round ing the switch now, or risk OSU beating us to it. up” borderline grades, the addition of pluses could Students (and administrators) may initially balk at raise the GPAs of students who were making B’s the added challenge and grade deflation, as OSU before. has. Regardless, it is unavoidable that the plus/minus It seems the Cowboys are too scared to make the system would result in fewer 4.0s, which could change. Are we? (but would not necessarily) result in a lower average GPA for OU. On a personal level, it might be Comment on this at OUDaily.com

COLUMN

Stronger laws needed for true justice

D

id you know in many European countries, if someone is dying in front of you, you’re legally obligated to try to save them, even if that only means calling Melodie Leekeman emergency services? mlettkeman@ou.edu Did you know that obligation does not exist in most of the United States? I first met Linzi Dudding in eighth grade. She was a tall, lanky girl with a contagious laugh and no room in her heart for hatred. A lot of people only say nice things about dead people because it’s not polite to say mean things. But people said these things even when she was alive. Linzi was driving around town last summer and offered a ride to a stranger who was walking in the rain. She gave that stranger her phone number and said to call her if the stranger ever needed a ride. A few days later, Linzi died of an overdose of painkillers at that stranger’s house. She had been taking the painkillers for back problems. They were not hers. According to drugs.com, an overdose of the painkiller Linzi was taking is shown through extreme dizziness or weakness, pinpoint pupils, cold and clammy skin, weak pulse, fainting and/or slow breathing. I hope that if I was exhibiting those signs, someone would take me to the hospital. The stranger did not. I cannot say for certain if Linzi passed out, showed those signs and dropped dead, or if she just dropped dead on the spot. But I know she was with this

stranger when it happened. I cannot say for certain that, assuming Linzi did pass out, getting her to a hospital would have saved her. But I know it wasn’t an impossibility. Instead of taking her to the hospital, or calling for help, this person and the man they were with drove Linzi’s body two blocks away, where they left her in her car for the police to find when Linzi’s parents grew worried. The horror of this may only strike Linzi’s loved ones, but it strikes profoundly. Just under a year after we lost Linzi, we learned that her death might have been prevented. And the people who could have prevented it? The maximum penalty they faced was a year in jail and a $1,000 fine for a misdemeanor charge for failure to notify the coroner or law enforcement of a death. The stranger got 30 days and a $325 fine. It’s time for lawmakers to hold those who could help each other accountable. In Vermont and Minnesota, there are misdemeanor charges for a violation of the duty-to-assist portion of their Good Samaritan laws. But 4 percent of the United States is not enough. I’m not asking everyone be taught comprehensive first-responder medical care. I just want people to be held accountable when they have the power to call 911 or drive a person to a hospital. It may have been Linzi’s choice to use prescription painkillers that were not hers, but how could a person she selflessly helped watch her die, then dump her body? We need better duty-to-assist laws. A month in jail and $325 does not spell justice to me. Melodie Lettkeman is a University College freshman and the photo chief for The Daily.

?

» Poll question of the day Should the university switch to a grading system with pluses and minuses? To cast your vote, log on to COLUMN

More gun control is not the answer

W

OPINION COLUMNIST ith the arrest of George Zimmerman, it is becoming more likely there might be justice for Trayvon Martin. Given the symbolic meaning Martin’s killing has taken on, this would have imporJason Byas tance stretching beyond jason.l.byas-1@ou.edu the individual case. However, that meaning should not be overstated. If Zimmerman is found guilty, racism will not magically be over. The importance cannot be used as a way of sidestepping and whitewashing the social realities of 2012 America. Rather, the importance should be used as a sign Americans need to begin to have key discussions in order to prevent such killings. One common theme some have taken away from this horrible event is the fact that Zimmerman used a gun. Which is to say, there has been a concerted effort by some to use Martin’s death as an argument for gun control. While I don’t doubt the sincerity or well-meaning intentions of those doing so, I think this would be a step backward in rectifying those social ills against Martin. To reduce a killing that was likely the product of racial bias to an argument for gun control does something particularly chilling. It makes the atrocities suffered by Americans in minority groups at the hands of the police invisible. No matter how much damage a Zimmerman can do, it pales in comparison to the damage an Officer Zimmerman could accomplish, and accomplish without it being a national news story. It’s telling, by the way, that Zimmerman expressed interest in eventually becoming a police officer. Strengthening gun control over private citizens would do nothing to address the even more empowered danger of police using the law to act on ingrained racist impulses. It would not only mischaracterize the nature of what happened to Martin, it would entirely forget what happened to Rodney King, Oscar Grant or countless others. Furthermore, relinquishing the ability of individual citizens to properly protect themselves not only ignores sins of commission from the police, but also those of omission. The experience of the oppressed with the police force is not only violent repression but also a failure to do the one job that they forcibly monopolize: to protect. The systematic, willful decision on the part of many police forces to flagrantly ignore calls to certain underprivileged neighborhoods does not make the idea of restricting the gun access of the individual citizen very appealing. What is seen in the media discourse is Zimmerman: The example of an individual citizen acting in what was nothing close to his self-defense. This is a frightening possibility, and something to take action against. But what is not seen in the media discourse is equally important: The individual citizen who cannot count on the police to get to them in time, and must actually protect themselves or their loved ones. This is especially important if the innocent person defending himself is physically weaker than his attacker. Rendering the already powerless even more powerless is not a strategy for empowerment. And the naïve paternalism of gun control, which leaves people in the arms of “protectors” who may never come (except for the purpose of harassment), has historically worked against real strategies for empowerment. Regardless of the spectacle we know as the gun control debate, conservatives have not always been concerned with having the appearance of opposing gun control. In fact, it was Ronald Reagan who first signed into law the Mulford Act, California’s first major gun control legislation. Why would this hero of “limited government” be the one to do so? First, because his triumphing of “limited government” was limited to what was necessary for maintaining that guise. Second, because it was necessary in order to prevent community self-organization from happening outside of the confines of the prevailing power structure. In 1967, Huey P. Newton of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense was stopped by a police officer who wanted to inspect his guns (despite the fact open carry was legal at the time). After Newton refused, and informed the officer he didn’t have to tell him anything other than basic personal identification, the officer asked Newton who he thought he was. Newton respond with the same question. “What are you going to do with that gun?” the officer asked. “What are you going to do with your gun?” Newton returned. Which, really, is the question that everyone should be asking. From then on, the Panthers began policing the police. The Mulford Act was then devised as one of many ways of preventing them from furthering their successful venture in community self-organization. And now we are told in the name of the oppressed, rather than against them, we should prohibit the individual ownership of firearms. I don’t think this is a ruse on the part of gun control advocates, or they actually want to disempower people. But regardless of the intentions, that is the effect. Jason Byas is a philosophy junior.

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NEWS

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 •

A5

TORNADOES

Midwest town officials credit early storm warnings with saving lives Forecasters issued alert more than 24 hours in advance WOODWARD, Okla. — The TV was tuned to forecasters’ warnings of a storm when Greg Tomlyanobich heard a short burst from a tornado siren blare after midnight Sunday. Then silence. Then rumbling. The 52-year-old quickly grabbed his wife and grandson, hurrying them into the emergency cellar as debris whirled around their heads at their mobile home park in northwest Oklahoma. They huddled inside with about 20 other people before the tornado roared across the ground above, ripping homes from their foundations. “It scared the hell out of me,” Tomlyanobich said. The storm killed five people and injured more than two dozen in Woodward, about 140 miles northwest of Oklahoma City. But it was the only tornado that caused fatalities. The storms were part of an exceptionally strong system tracked by the National Weather Service’s Storm Prediction Center in Norman. The center took the unusual step of warning people more than 24 hours in advance of a possible “high-end, lifethreatening event.” Center spokesman Chris Vaccaro said the weather service received at least 120 reports of tornadoes by dawn Sunday and was working to confirm how many actually touched down. Woodward suffered the worst of the destruction from the storms, which also struck in Kansas, Iowa and

2 1

NATION NEWS BRIEFS 1. ALEXANDRIA, VA.

13 defendants in million-dollar drug smuggling case on trial

BRYAN TERRY/THE OKLAHOMAN

Carole Beckett reacts as she sorts through belongings at her home after a tornado moved through Woodward, Okla., on Sunday. Residents of several states scoured through the wreckage of battered homes and businesses after dozens of tornadoes blitzed the Midwest on Saturday night.

Nebraska. Woodward City Manager Alan Riffel said 89 homes and 13 businesses were destroyed, and survivors in the 12,000-resident town emerged to find flipped cars and smashed trailers. Retired firefighter Marty Logan said he spotted the tornado when it knocked down power lines, causing flashes of light, and saw a radio tower’s blinking lights go black. He later saw a man emerge from a wrecked sport utility vehicle that had been tossed along the side of the road. “The guy had blood coming down his face,” Logan said. “It was scary, because I knew it was after midnight and a lot of people were in bed.” Authorities said a signal tower for Woodward’s tornado sirens was struck by

“The guy had blood coming down his face. It was scary, because I knew it was after midnight and a lot of people were in bed.” MARTY LOGAN, WOODWARD RESIDENT

lightning and hit by a tornado early Sunday morning. Police Chief Harvey Rutherford said the tower that was supposed to send a repeating signal to the town’s tornado siren system was knocked out. Considering the tornado struck at night and the sirens were damaged, it was remarkable there wasn’t a greater loss of life, Rutherford said. Frank and Treva Owens

knew dangerous storms were moving toward Woodward, and although they didn’t hear sirens, the couple was watching TV reports all day. “I heard them say we had nine minutes and that’s when I hit the cellar,” Frank Ownes said, noting that the 12-foot by 12-foot shelter was prepped with their medications, food and clothing. Gov. Mary Fallin toured the area by helicopter before walking through some of the hardest-hit neighborhoods. “Getting the response out immediately throughout the community — it’s just remarkable what you have done,” Fallin told a group of emergency officials. “Once again that emphasizes how important it is to have a plan.” The Associated Press

A federal trial is under way against 13 people accused of illegally smuggling millions of dollars’ worth of the illegal African drug khat. Prosecutors in Alexandria charged the 11 men and two women, all natives of Somalia or Yemen, last year with operating a smuggling ring that imported nearly 10,000 pounds of the leaf since 2005. The drug is popular in East Africa and parts of the Arabian peninsula; users chew on the leaf to induce feelings of euphoria. Two of the ring’s ringleaders have pleaded guilty and were sentenced to multiple years in prison. A judge has barred one potential defense. He told lawyers they may not argue to the jury that use of khat is culturally acceptable in the defendants’ home countries. Jury selection began Tuesday. The Associated Press

2. HARRISBURG, PA.

Penn State officials seek delay in next pretrial court filings Two Penn State administrators charged with lying to the grand jury that investigated Jerry Sandusky asked a judge Tuesday for more time to make their next pretrial court filing. Lawyers for Tim Curley and Gary Schultz told Dauphin County Judge Todd Hoover that the state attorney general’s office has not turned over promised records, and asked him to extend the due date for their responses to May 4. Curley, the school’s athletic director on leave, was to file his written answer sometime Tuesday. Schultz, a now-retired university vice president, was given an April 27 deadline. The nearly identical motions said prosecutors told them on April 3 that “substantial additional discovery” would be provided within 10 days. The Associated Press

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A6

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SPORTS

B

W E DN E SDAY, A PR I L 18 , 2 012

baSeball

Strong final inning lifts oU to victory key perFOrMer evan Mistich Year: senior Position: infielder Hometown: Houma, la. Game stats: did his job as designated hitter with two hits, two runs and two rBis

Sooners snuff out comeback with two runs in top of ninth DILLON PHILLIPS sports reporter

Oklahoma (23-15) extended its winning streak to five games and completed a season series sweep of Oral Roberts with a 6-3 win against the Golden Eagles on Tuesday night in Tulsa.

O U ’s f i v e - g a m e w i n ning streak ties a season Oklahoma high as the Sooners go into a nonconference series against Alabama State this weekend. Oral Roberts Oral Roberts held the Sooners scoreless with a 1-0 lead until the top of the fifth, when senior Evan Mistich’s two-run double to left field put OU on the board. sacrifice fly in the next at Junior infielder Garrett bat, giving the Sooners a 3-1 Carey scored Mistich on a lead.

6

3

The Golden Eagles brought it back within one in the bottom half of the fifth and forced Oklahoma’s s t a r t e r, j u n i o r D a m i e n Magnifico, to make an early exit. After an impressive outing in which he shut out Arkansas last week, Magnifico was unable to keep the momentum going against Oral Roberts. In four innings of work,

the junior hurler surrendered two runs on four hits with a pair of strikeouts and a walk, but he struggled with consistency and control throughout. Sophomore Dillon Overton, who began the season 4-0 as the Sooners’ Friday night starter, came out of the bullpen in relief. He entered the game with see BASEBALL paGe B2

Softball

MeN’S gYMNaStiCS

Former Sooner still lifting team

Team to host five straight contests Sooners to face North Texas Mean Green to open home stand TOBI NEIDY

sports reporter

No. 6 Oklahoma (35-6) softball returns from the road to host a five-game home stand beginning with a rematch against Sun Belt rival North Texas (19-21-1) tonight at 6. OU is looking to take the twogame series against the Mean Green before taking on No. 9 Missouri in a pivotal threesee SOFTBALL paGe B2

aT a GlaNce Softball schedule today vs. North texas friday vs. Missouri Saturday vs. Missouri Sunday vs. Missouri april 25 vs. oklahoma State april 28 at central arkansas april 29 at central arkansas May 4 vs. texas May 5 vs. texas May 6 vs. texas May 11 at iowa state May 12 at iowa state May 13 at iowa state bold games are in Norman

SportS brief Track & Field ricardo patino/the daily

Former sooner and current U.s. national team member steven legendre practices a high bar routine in the sam Viersen Gymnastics center earlier this year. Though legendre no longer competes with Oklahoma, he is still works out with the team and tries to critique and encourage the many underclassmen.

Gymnast offers help to inexperienced squad Former Sooner playing his part to prep team for nationals while training GREG FEWELL sports editor

William clement, one of 10 freshmen on OU’s team this year, practices a vault routine april 2 at sam Viersen Gymnastics center. The presence of former sooner steven legendre and the upperclassmen that learned from him has played a big part in the development of the young squad.

Though his NCAA eligibility ran out at the conclusion of last year’s NCAA championships, Steven Legendre has yet to miss a home meet for the Oklahoma men’s gymnastics team this year. However, that may change Thursday when the team faces its biggest meet thus far — the NCAA championship qualifiers. “I know with NCAA’s they’re really strict on the number of people that can be down here, so I don’t think I’ll be down on the floor,” Legendre said. L e g e n d r e ’s c a r e e r w i t h Oklahoma was nothing short of spectacular. As a freshman in 2008, he won an individual national title on the floor exercise and finished second on both the vault and high bar,

helping OU claim its eighth team title. He topped that in 2009 by claiming an NCAA all-around national championship. Then, in 2010, he cemented his legacy at OU by tying Jonathan Horton with a program-record six individual national titles. Since his eligibility ran out in 2011, Legendre has continued training with the Sooners as he prepares for his own competitions, which he hopes includes this summer’s Olympic games. Most recently, Legendre finished in second for team U.S.A on both floor and vault at the China World Cup in Zibo City, China. While the U.S. national team member has plenty on his plate and a lot to look forward to, Legendre said it doesn’t take his mind fully off his former teammates’ NCAA season. “ It ’s k i n d o f b i t t e r s w e e t ,” Legendre said. “It’s obviously fun being out there with the guys, see LEGENDRE paGe B3

Men continue to move up rankings The men’s track team continues to cement its standing in the top-25 poll this week, moving to No. 21 in the country, thanks to numerous outstanding individual performances. The move primarily came because of the team’s perf o r ma n c e at t h e St a n f o rd Invitational on April 6 in Stanford, Calif. Junior Bill Kogel posted the best time on the team, and made history along the way, with his 28 minutes, 39.54 seconds in the 10,000-meter run. Kogel was the first-place collegiate competitor in the event, and his time is the fastest by a collegiate athlete all season. Two competitors, junior Riley Masters and senior Eric Harasyn, put up solid times in the men’s 1,500-meter run. Masters set a new program record with his 3:41.80, currently the sixth-best time in the country. Harasyn came in just behind his teammate with a time of 3:42.15, good enough for the nation’s eighth-best collegiate time. The team will look for a repeat performance in the distance categories at the John McDonnell Invitational on Friday and Saturday in Fayetteville, Ark. Daily staff reports


B2

Sports

• Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Sports

Baseball: Lockwood single puts Sooners on top for good in 9th Continued from page B1

astrud reed/the daily

Freshman outfielder Erica Sampson slides into home plate during an April 1 home contest against Kansas. The Sooners went on to beat the Jayhawks, 6-2. Since that game, the Sooners have clinched four season series. The team will go for a fifth series win tonight when it hosts North Texas. Oklahoma beat the Mean Green, 4-1, on February 29 in Denton.

Softball: OU coming off 2-1 series win against Texas A&M Continued from page B1 game, Big 12 series this weekend at Marita Hynes Field. The Sooners also host the third game of the Bedlam series next week to wrap up the weeklong home stance. With five Big 12 series wins already this season, the Sooners are poised to collect their sixth non-conference series win tonight after OU pulled out the 4-1 victory during the Feb. 29 meeting between the two squads. Junior ace Keilani Ricketts controlled the game’s tempo on both sides of the plate, throwing a one-hitter with 14 strikeouts while also giving the Sooners the first two runs of the game with a home run in the top of the fourth. Ricketts was one out away

Key Opponent Maddelyn Fraley Year: Senior Position: Infielder Hometown: Adair, Okla. Season stats: The team’s leading hitter this season, Fraley went .647 with seven RBIs in UNT’s two victories last week.

from collecting her first career perfect game until the southpaw walked two consecutive batters and allowed a hit that turned into the Mean Green’s only run of the game. North Texas is 9-8-1 this year in the Sun Belt conf e re n c e a n d s p o r t s t h e Conference Player of the

Week, senior Maddelyn Fraley, in its lineup. After collecting her teamleading 10th home run last week, Fraley keeps climbing up the Mean Green records lists. She is currently fifth on the single-season home run list, and her 39 RBIs is enough for fourth best by a Mean Green player. The Sooners fell a spot in the national polls this week after completing the 2-1 series win over Texas A&M last weekend in College Station. OU still remains atop the Big 12 standings with a league best 11-3 record. However, the team will be looking to get back in the win column after losing the final series game to Texas A&M, 4-3, Saturday in College Station. Riding a win, and the confidence that comes along

AT A GLANCE Sooner home stand Oklahoma’s meeting with North Texas at 6 tonight opens up a 5-game home stand for the team. Following tonight’s game, the Sooners get a day off before the 10th-ranked Missouri Tigers come to town to renew Big 12 softball’s biggest rivalry one last time

with it, will be crucial as the team prepares to host one of the premier conference matchups of the year when Missouri comes to Norman for a three-game, weekend series. The 10th-ranked Tigers (32-8) are right on pace with the league-leading Sooners with a 10-5 record in conference. Unlike the Sooners, Missouri is currently riding

before heading to the SEC. The series kicks off with a night game at 7 on Friday and concludes with afternoon games at 2 Saturday and 2:30 Sunday. After that, the team hosts Oklahoma State for the conclusion of the Bedlam series at 7 p.m. Wednesday.

a win. The Tigers will try to advance their winning streak to two games when they take on Western Illinois in Columbia. Oklahoma and Missouri have provided the Big 12 with its most heated rivalry over the years, with OU holding a slight 49-40 edge all-time over the Tigers. So, records aside, the teams should provide plenty of excitement.

no outs and two on in the bottom of the fifth and retired the side for the Sooners, ending ORU’s scoring threat. Overton finished out the game for the Sooners and allowed just one run on four hits while recording seven strikeouts on the way to his fifth win. O k l a h o ma a d d e d a run in the eighth, when Mistich scored on a sacrifice fly and put two more runs on the board in the ninth to give the Sooners some breathing room. Freshman first baseman Hunter Lockwood, who has struggled at the plate after firing out of the gate to start the season, came through in the clutch with a two-run single in the ninth that gave Oklahoma a three-run lead to put the game out of reach for the Golden Eagles.

AT A GLANCE Baseball schedule Friday vs. Alabama St. Saturday vs. Alabama St. Sunday vs. Alabama St. Tuesday at Oklahoma St. April 25 vs. Dallas Baptist April 27 at Kansas April 28 at Kansas April 29 at Kansas May 1 at TCU May 4 vs. Oklahoma St.* May 5 vs. Oklahoma St.** May 6 vs. Oklahoma St.** May 11 vs. Baylor May 12 vs. Baylor May 13 vs. Baylor May 15 vs. TCU May 17 vs. Samford May 18 vs. Samford May 19 vs. Samford Bold games are in Norman *Game held in Tulsa **Games held in Oklahoma City

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$1,200 NEW DRIVER BONUS program for qualified CDL Drivers to drive and deliver new vehicles regionally and nationally. Flexible schedule, competitive rates, quick pay. Towcar a plus but not required. 1-866-764-1601 or www.QualityDriveAway.com. Hurry, spots are limited!

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-579-2843. www.CenturaOnline.com.

DRIVERS - STUDENTS. 18 Days from Start to Finish! Earn your CDL-A. No out-of-pocket tuition cost. Step up to a New Career with FFE. www.driveffe.com. 855-356-7126. DRIVERS- NEW FREIGHT LANES in your area. Annual Salary $45K to $60K. Flexible hometime. Modern Fleet of trucks. CDL-A, 3 months Current OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com COMPANY DRIVERS/RECENT TRUCKING SCHOOL GRADUATES. Your new career starts now! *Up to $4,800 tuition reimbursement (for a limited time only) *Great Pay & Benefits *Excellent Training Program *Industry-leading safety program. New to trucking? Call us for opportunities. Call: 866-530-2076 www.JoinCRST.com.

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Continued from page B1 especially since they’re having a great season so far. You always wish you could really be a part of that. Now, as far as the actual team goes, I’m kind of a part of it on the other side trying to help out with coaching and little corrections.� Even with Legendre’s international competition to worry about, he says it still would be difficult to fill the void where NCAA competition used to be if not for the fact that he is able to remain around his former team. Once out of college, gymnasts train primarily on their own, not as part of a team. They no longer have teammates going through training with them every day and urging them on while they compete at meets. That is why Legendre still seeks that team atmosphere as much as possible, helping out Oklahoma’s current gymnasts as they try to capture a national title. “He’s always yelling at me about something on floor that I don’t do right or something,� freshman Dylan Akers said. “He’s an awesome person to have in the gym because of the experience he’s had at the NCAA level and what he’s done for USA gymnastics. He’s a great influence in the gym.� Legendre still plays a role in helping the Sooners fine tune their mistakes, and he even has done exhibition routines at Oklahoma home meets this season. One role that he can no longer fill, though, is that of a leader. Unfortunately for Oklahoma, that is something it needs with 10 freshmen on its roster. He may not be able to fill that role any longer. He was able to make sure people behind him would be able to, though. “He definitely helped me when I first got here,� junior Jake Dalton said. “So, I just try to take that and give that information to the freshmen when they get here and they’re having hard times.� When Dalton arrived at Oklahoma in 2009, Legendre was just two seasons

NUMBER ONE is nothing to celebrate.

Great Home Cooking You’ve Been Missing!

Open Tues-Sat 11am-8pm 100 S. Main Street Noble, OK 405.872.0303 kendallsrestaurant.com

Sports briefs Junior hurler honored by Big 12 after first victory of season Junior pitcher Damien Magnifico was honored as Big 12 Newcomer of the Week on Monday following a dominating performance in a win over Arkansas on April 10. Magnifico threw 8 2/3 innings of shutout baseball against the Razorbacks. In his first win as a Sooner ­­— 1-0 after two starts and 14 appearances — the righthander held Arkansas to just three hits while striking out four. Magnifico reached triple digits on the radar gun on 22 of his 103 pitches. The junior college transfer was efficient in his Damien dealings, including three innings of less Magnifico than 10 pitches thrown. Magnifico posted season highs in innings pitched, pitches and strikeouts. He ranks third on the team with 14 appearances and second in saves with two. Magnifico shares this week’s accolade with Baylor freshman Michael Howard. Magnifico is eligible as a newcomer after transferring this year from Howard College in Big Spring, Texas. This award marks the seventh accolade garnered by a Sooner so far this season. This was the third Newcomer of the Week award and sophomores Dillon Overton and Jordan John have both won Pitcher of the Week honors.

Track & Field Ricardo patino/the daily

Former Sooner gymnast Steven Legendre works a pommel horse routine during a March 6 practice at Lloyd Noble Center. Legendre is busy honing his skills for international competition. However, he says he is glad to still be able to help out his former program, even in a limited role.

PLAYER PROFILE Steven Legendre Events: Vault, floor exercise Hometown: Port Jefferson, N.Y. Season stats: Finished second on floor and vault for U.S. national team at China World Cup

removed from winning his first national title. Dalton said the junior helped him adapt to the structured environment of college gymnastics and even helped get messages through to him when coaches couldn’t. Now a junior himself, Dalton already has two individual NCAA titles of his own and a spot on the U.S. national team.

He still has plenty to prove at Oklahoma, though. Namely, helping the Sooners claim a team title. It takes an entire team, though, not just an individual, for that feat. That is why Dalton has put the guidance he got from Legendre to good use this season, helping groom OU’s freshmen into big-time collegiate athletes. “Coaches want to win, everybody on the team wants to win, and the coaches find ways to push you,� Dalton said. “Sometimes you don’t see it like that. But that’s kind of our job as upperclassmen to relate it to the freshmen who don’t see that yet. “You’ve kind of got to let them know ‘we’re pushing for that goal at the end of the year, national championships. It’s at home. That’s what we’re striving for, and you’ve just got to buy into the system.’� For the entire OU squad,

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This year, more than 163,000 people will die from lung cancer—making it America’s

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University Theatre

Weitzenhoffer School of Musical Theatre

from the freshmen getting thrown in the fire right off the bat to the upperclassmen trying to make sure they can handle it, the culmination of the season begins Thursday at the NCAA Qualifiers from Lloyd Noble Center. As for Dalton, who has been building an impressive collegiate resume of his own, he will try to match Legendre in one of the few ways he hasn’t already by helping the Sooners win a team national title. As for Legendre, he hopes his former teammate is able to match him. He’ll be rooting for Dalton and the rest of the Sooners — even if he’s not allowed on the floor.

Senior recognized by conference for success on track, in classroom Senior sprinter Sherine Wells was named to the 2012 Big 12 Conference Spring Community of Champions on Monday. The community is chosen during the fall, winter and spring and is comprised of one athlete from each school in the conference. The student-athletes who are chosen must maintain a GPA of 3.00 or higher and must also be involved in at least one community service program. Wells serves as secretary for the Student Athlete Advisory Committee and the African-American student-athlete net- Sherine work at OU, Bridge Builders. Wells In both roles, she participates in various community service and on-campus activities, volunteering at Crossroads Shelter, Habitat for Humanity and the Salvation Army. Wells is a two time All-American in the 4x100-meter relay and a member of current school record holding teams in the 200-meter and 400-meter relays. The elementary education major is a two-time first team Academic All-Big 12 honoree and maintains a 3.53 GPA. Daily staff reports

SOPHOMORES

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During the Regular Meeting Of The University of Oklahoma PUBLICATIONS BOARD 9:30 a.m. Friday Copeland Hall, Room 146 Students, staff, faculty and others in the community are invited to express their views concerning The Oklahoma Daily or Sooner yearbook to the Publications Board.

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Legendre: Gymnast leaves legacy in teammates

Being

Stay connected with the sports desk for news and updates about Sooner sports by following the action at

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 •

An adventurous story of friendship for the young and the young at heart. Book by Lynn

Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty Flaherty, Lyrics by Lynn Ahrens

Music by Stephen

Co-conceived by Lynn Ahrens, Stephen Flaherty and Eric Idle Based on the books by Dr. Seuss

8 p.m. April 27-28, May 3-5 3 p.m. April 29, May 6 Rupel J. Jones Theatre www.ou.edu/finearts

Fine Arts Box Office

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Seussical the Musical is produced in arrangement with Musical Theatre International, WWW.MTISHOWS.COM The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. For accommodations on the basis of disability call (405) 325-4101.

SO DON’T FORGET... The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution.


B2

Sports

• Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Sports

Baseball: Lockwood single puts Sooners on top for good in 9th Continued from page B1

astrud reed/the daily

Freshman outfielder Erica Sampson slides into home plate during an April 1 home contest against Kansas. The Sooners went on to beat the Jayhawks, 6-2. Since that game, the Sooners have clinched four season series. The team will go for a fifth series win tonight when it hosts North Texas. Oklahoma beat the Mean Green, 4-1, on February 29 in Denton.

Softball: OU coming off 2-1 series win against Texas A&M Continued from page B1 game, Big 12 series this weekend at Marita Hynes Field. The Sooners also host the third game of the Bedlam series next week to wrap up the weeklong home stance. With five Big 12 series wins already this season, the Sooners are poised to collect their sixth non-conference series win tonight after OU pulled out the 4-1 victory during the Feb. 29 meeting between the two squads. Junior ace Keilani Ricketts controlled the game’s tempo on both sides of the plate, throwing a one-hitter with 14 strikeouts while also giving the Sooners the first two runs of the game with a home run in the top of the fourth. Ricketts was one out away

Key Opponent Maddelyn Fraley Year: Senior Position: Infielder Hometown: Adair, Okla. Season stats: The team’s leading hitter this season, Fraley went .647 with seven RBIs in UNT’s two victories last week.

from collecting her first career perfect game until the southpaw walked two consecutive batters and allowed a hit that turned into the Mean Green’s only run of the game. North Texas is 9-8-1 this year in the Sun Belt conf e re n c e a n d s p o r t s t h e Conference Player of the

Week, senior Maddelyn Fraley, in its lineup. After collecting her teamleading 10th home run last week, Fraley keeps climbing up the Mean Green records lists. She is currently fifth on the single-season home run list, and her 39 RBIs is enough for fourth best by a Mean Green player. The Sooners fell a spot in the national polls this week after completing the 2-1 series win over Texas A&M last weekend in College Station. OU still remains atop the Big 12 standings with a league best 11-3 record. However, the team will be looking to get back in the win column after losing the final series game to Texas A&M, 4-3, Saturday in College Station. Riding a win, and the confidence that comes along

AT A GLANCE Sooner home stand Oklahoma’s meeting with North Texas at 6 tonight opens up a 5-game home stand for the team. Following tonight’s game, the Sooners get a day off before the 10th-ranked Missouri Tigers come to town to renew Big 12 softball’s biggest rivalry one last time

with it, will be crucial as the team prepares to host one of the premier conference matchups of the year when Missouri comes to Norman for a three-game, weekend series. The 10th-ranked Tigers (32-8) are right on pace with the league-leading Sooners with a 10-5 record in conference. Unlike the Sooners, Missouri is currently riding

before heading to the SEC. The series kicks off with a night game at 7 on Friday and concludes with afternoon games at 2 Saturday and 2:30 Sunday. After that, the team hosts Oklahoma State for the conclusion of the Bedlam series at 7 p.m. Wednesday.

a win. The Tigers will try to advance their winning streak to two games when they take on Western Illinois in Columbia. Oklahoma and Missouri have provided the Big 12 with its most heated rivalry over the years, with OU holding a slight 49-40 edge all-time over the Tigers. So, records aside, the teams should provide plenty of excitement.

no outs and two on in the bottom of the fifth and retired the side for the Sooners, ending ORU’s scoring threat. Overton finished out the game for the Sooners and allowed just one run on four hits while recording seven strikeouts on the way to his fifth win. O k l a h o ma a d d e d a run in the eighth, when Mistich scored on a sacrifice fly and put two more runs on the board in the ninth to give the Sooners some breathing room. Freshman first baseman Hunter Lockwood, who has struggled at the plate after firing out of the gate to start the season, came through in the clutch with a two-run single in the ninth that gave Oklahoma a three-run lead to put the game out of reach for the Golden Eagles.

AT A GLANCE Baseball schedule Friday vs. Alabama St. Saturday vs. Alabama St. Sunday vs. Alabama St. Tuesday at Oklahoma St. April 25 vs. Dallas Baptist April 27 at Kansas April 28 at Kansas April 29 at Kansas May 1 at TCU May 4 vs. Oklahoma St.* May 5 vs. Oklahoma St.** May 6 vs. Oklahoma St.** May 11 vs. Baylor May 12 vs. Baylor May 13 vs. Baylor May 15 vs. TCU May 17 vs. Samford May 18 vs. Samford May 19 vs. Samford Bold games are in Norman *Game held in Tulsa **Games held in Oklahoma City

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Paint Your Own Pottery & Glass Fusing (405) 307-9971

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EXP. FLATBED DRIVERS: Regional opportunities now open with plenty of freight & great pay! 800277-0212 or primeinc.com.

STEEL BUILDINGS Remaining 2011 Blow-Out! Lowest Prices Around! LOW Monthly payments. 4 left, Make offer. 16x20, 20x26, 25x32, 30x40, 40x60 Call Now! 1-800-991-9251 Tara.

APPLY NOW, 12 Drivers Needed. Top 5% Pay. 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp. 877-258-8782

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OWNER OPERATOR $2,500 SIGN-ON. Dedicated Runs. Class-A CDL. Ask about our Greatcare plan options for: Healthcare, Retirement, Wellness & Business Svcs. 866-915-3910. driveforgreatwide.com

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY CLAIMS. Saunders & Saunders Attorneys at Law. No Recovery – No Fee. 1-800-259-8548. DRIS

$1,200 NEW DRIVER BONUS program for qualified CDL Drivers to drive and deliver new vehicles regionally and nationally. Flexible schedule, competitive rates, quick pay. Towcar a plus but not required. 1-866-764-1601 or www.QualityDriveAway.com. Hurry, spots are limited!

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-579-2843. www.CenturaOnline.com.

DRIVERS - STUDENTS. 18 Days from Start to Finish! Earn your CDL-A. No out-of-pocket tuition cost. Step up to a New Career with FFE. www.driveffe.com. 855-356-7126. DRIVERS- NEW FREIGHT LANES in your area. Annual Salary $45K to $60K. Flexible hometime. Modern Fleet of trucks. CDL-A, 3 months Current OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com COMPANY DRIVERS/RECENT TRUCKING SCHOOL GRADUATES. Your new career starts now! *Up to $4,800 tuition reimbursement (for a limited time only) *Great Pay & Benefits *Excellent Training Program *Industry-leading safety program. New to trucking? Call us for opportunities. Call: 866-530-2076 www.JoinCRST.com.

MISCELLANEOUS

DISH NETWORK. Starting at $19.99 for 12 months. PLUS 30 Premium Movie Channels FREE for 3 Months! SAVE! & Ask About SAME DAY Installation. CALL 1-888-678-0043.

 tUI"WF/8 4VJUF /PSNBO 0,

ADVERTISE STATEWIDE ADVERTISE STATEWIDE! For more information or to place an ad, call Courtni at (405) 499-0035 or toll-free in OK at 1-888-815-2672.

OCAN041512

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Continued from page B1 especially since they’re having a great season so far. You always wish you could really be a part of that. Now, as far as the actual team goes, I’m kind of a part of it on the other side trying to help out with coaching and little corrections.� Even with Legendre’s international competition to worry about, he says it still would be difficult to fill the void where NCAA competition used to be if not for the fact that he is able to remain around his former team. Once out of college, gymnasts train primarily on their own, not as part of a team. They no longer have teammates going through training with them every day and urging them on while they compete at meets. That is why Legendre still seeks that team atmosphere as much as possible, helping out Oklahoma’s current gymnasts as they try to capture a national title. “He’s always yelling at me about something on floor that I don’t do right or something,� freshman Dylan Akers said. “He’s an awesome person to have in the gym because of the experience he’s had at the NCAA level and what he’s done for USA gymnastics. He’s a great influence in the gym.� Legendre still plays a role in helping the Sooners fine tune their mistakes, and he even has done exhibition routines at Oklahoma home meets this season. One role that he can no longer fill, though, is that of a leader. Unfortunately for Oklahoma, that is something it needs with 10 freshmen on its roster. He may not be able to fill that role any longer. He was able to make sure people behind him would be able to, though. “He definitely helped me when I first got here,� junior Jake Dalton said. “So, I just try to take that and give that information to the freshmen when they get here and they’re having hard times.� When Dalton arrived at Oklahoma in 2009, Legendre was just two seasons

NUMBER ONE is nothing to celebrate.

Great Home Cooking You’ve Been Missing!

Open Tues-Sat 11am-8pm 100 S. Main Street Noble, OK 405.872.0303 kendallsrestaurant.com

Sports briefs Junior hurler honored by Big 12 after first victory of season Junior pitcher Damien Magnifico was honored as Big 12 Newcomer of the Week on Monday following a dominating performance in a win over Arkansas on April 10. Magnifico threw 8 2/3 innings of shutout baseball against the Razorbacks. In his first win as a Sooner ­­— 1-0 after two starts and 14 appearances — the righthander held Arkansas to just three hits while striking out four. Magnifico reached triple digits on the radar gun on 22 of his 103 pitches. The junior college transfer was efficient in his Damien dealings, including three innings of less Magnifico than 10 pitches thrown. Magnifico posted season highs in innings pitched, pitches and strikeouts. He ranks third on the team with 14 appearances and second in saves with two. Magnifico shares this week’s accolade with Baylor freshman Michael Howard. Magnifico is eligible as a newcomer after transferring this year from Howard College in Big Spring, Texas. This award marks the seventh accolade garnered by a Sooner so far this season. This was the third Newcomer of the Week award and sophomores Dillon Overton and Jordan John have both won Pitcher of the Week honors.

Track & Field Ricardo patino/the daily

Former Sooner gymnast Steven Legendre works a pommel horse routine during a March 6 practice at Lloyd Noble Center. Legendre is busy honing his skills for international competition. However, he says he is glad to still be able to help out his former program, even in a limited role.

PLAYER PROFILE Steven Legendre Events: Vault, floor exercise Hometown: Port Jefferson, N.Y. Season stats: Finished second on floor and vault for U.S. national team at China World Cup

removed from winning his first national title. Dalton said the junior helped him adapt to the structured environment of college gymnastics and even helped get messages through to him when coaches couldn’t. Now a junior himself, Dalton already has two individual NCAA titles of his own and a spot on the U.S. national team.

He still has plenty to prove at Oklahoma, though. Namely, helping the Sooners claim a team title. It takes an entire team, though, not just an individual, for that feat. That is why Dalton has put the guidance he got from Legendre to good use this season, helping groom OU’s freshmen into big-time collegiate athletes. “Coaches want to win, everybody on the team wants to win, and the coaches find ways to push you,� Dalton said. “Sometimes you don’t see it like that. But that’s kind of our job as upperclassmen to relate it to the freshmen who don’t see that yet. “You’ve kind of got to let them know ‘we’re pushing for that goal at the end of the year, national championships. It’s at home. That’s what we’re striving for, and you’ve just got to buy into the system.’� For the entire OU squad,

South Plaza, OK Capitol 12:30-4:20pm Harm Reduction Policy Reform Rationalize The Law Regulate The Drugs http://home.dprnok.net

This year, more than 163,000 people will die from lung cancer—making it America’s

NUMBER ONE cancer killer.

But new treatments offer hope. Join Lung Cancer Alliance in the fight against this disease. lungcanceralliance.org

University Theatre

Weitzenhoffer School of Musical Theatre

from the freshmen getting thrown in the fire right off the bat to the upperclassmen trying to make sure they can handle it, the culmination of the season begins Thursday at the NCAA Qualifiers from Lloyd Noble Center. As for Dalton, who has been building an impressive collegiate resume of his own, he will try to match Legendre in one of the few ways he hasn’t already by helping the Sooners win a team national title. As for Legendre, he hopes his former teammate is able to match him. He’ll be rooting for Dalton and the rest of the Sooners — even if he’s not allowed on the floor.

Senior recognized by conference for success on track, in classroom Senior sprinter Sherine Wells was named to the 2012 Big 12 Conference Spring Community of Champions on Monday. The community is chosen during the fall, winter and spring and is comprised of one athlete from each school in the conference. The student-athletes who are chosen must maintain a GPA of 3.00 or higher and must also be involved in at least one community service program. Wells serves as secretary for the Student Athlete Advisory Committee and the African-American student-athlete net- Sherine work at OU, Bridge Builders. Wells In both roles, she participates in various community service and on-campus activities, volunteering at Crossroads Shelter, Habitat for Humanity and the Salvation Army. Wells is a two time All-American in the 4x100-meter relay and a member of current school record holding teams in the 200-meter and 400-meter relays. The elementary education major is a two-time first team Academic All-Big 12 honoree and maintains a 3.53 GPA. Daily staff reports

SOPHOMORES

ENROLL NOW!

DID YOU KNOW THAT ENROLLING IN AT LEAST 15 HOURS EACH SEMESTER OR 30 HOURS EACH YEAR HELPS YOU STAY ON TRACK FOR GRADUATION?

During the Regular Meeting Of The University of Oklahoma PUBLICATIONS BOARD 9:30 a.m. Friday Copeland Hall, Room 146 Students, staff, faculty and others in the community are invited to express their views concerning The Oklahoma Daily or Sooner yearbook to the Publications Board.

NOW HIRING

$9/hr. plus tips

Apply in Person @ 201 N. Porter Ave. Norman, OK 73071 www.littleguys.com

B3

Baseball

NOTICE OF PUBLIC ACCESS

s=s CAREER TRAINING/EDUCATION AIRLINES ARE HIRING – Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified – Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-802-6655.

Legendre: Gymnast leaves legacy in teammates

Being

Stay connected with the sports desk for news and updates about Sooner sports by following the action at

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 •

An adventurous story of friendship for the young and the young at heart. Book by Lynn

Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty Flaherty, Lyrics by Lynn Ahrens

Music by Stephen

Co-conceived by Lynn Ahrens, Stephen Flaherty and Eric Idle Based on the books by Dr. Seuss

8 p.m. April 27-28, May 3-5 3 p.m. April 29, May 6 Rupel J. Jones Theatre www.ou.edu/finearts

Fine Arts Box Office

(405) 325-4101

Seussical the Musical is produced in arrangement with Musical Theatre International, WWW.MTISHOWS.COM The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. For accommodations on the basis of disability call (405) 325-4101.

SO DON’T FORGET... The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution.


B4

• Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Classifieds Fax: 405-325-7517 Campus Address: COH 149A

DEADLINES Line Ad..................................................................................3 days prior Place line ad by 9:00 a.m. 3 business days prior to publication.

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SPECIAL NOTICES AA Meeting Serenity Group 7:30 - 8:30pm Mondays St John’s Episcopal Church 235 W Duffy, North Entrance Step Study/Discussion 388-4849

C Transportation

AUTO INSURANCE

Auto Insurance Quotations Anytime

Foreign Students Welcomed JIM HOLMES INSURANCE, 321-4664

PAYMENT s r r

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TM

Parks Temporary Laborer (10 Positions) Parks & Rec/Park Maintenance Must be at least sixteen (16) years of age. Valid Oklahoma driver’s license and satisfactory motor vehicle record. Ability to perform general maintenance work, follow oral and written instructions, safely operate City equipment, and work outdoors in extreme heat. $8.00 per hour. Work Period: 7:00am to 3:30pm or 8:00am to 4:30pm, Monday - Friday, or 7:00am to 5:30pm, Saturday and Sunday. May be required to work special events and weekends. Selected applicant must pass background investigation, physical examination, and drug screen. Application deadline: Open Recruitment. A complete job announcement is available at www.normanok.gov/hr/hr-job-postings. To request an application, email HR@NormanOK.gov, call (405) 3665482, or visit us at 201-C West Gray, Human Resources Dept., City of Norman. EOE

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There is a 2 line minimum charge; approximately 42 characters per line, including spaces and punctuation. (Cost = Days x # lines x $/line) 10-14 days.........$1.15/line 15-19 days.........$1.00/line 20-29 days........$ .90/line 30+ days ........ $ .85/line

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HELP WANTED

The Cleveland County Family YMCA is seeking Lifeguards & Swim Instructors! Apply in person at 1350 Lexington Ave. EOE Bartending! Up to $300/day. No exp nec. Training available. 800-965-6520, x133

$5,500-$10,000

PAID EGG DONORS. All Races needed. Non-smokers, Ages 18-27, SAT>1100/ACT>24/GPA>3.00 Contact: info@eggdonorcenter.com MISAL OF INDIA BISTRO Now accepting applications for waitstaff. Apply in person at 580 Ed Noble Pkwy, across from Barnes & Noble, 579-5600. Temporary Laborer (2 Positions) Utilities/Water Reclamation Facility Must be at least sixteen (16) years of age. Ability to perform general building, grounds and basic maintenance work, follow oral and written instructions, safely operate City equipment, and work outdoors in extreme heat. Selected applicant must pass background investigation, physical examination, and drug screen. $7.25 per hour. Work Period: 7:00am to 3:30pm, Monday - Friday. Application deadline: Open Recruitment. A complete job announcement is available at www.normanok.gov/hr/hr-job-postings. To request an application, email HR@NormanOK.gov, call (405) 3665482, or visit us at 201-C West Gray, Human Resources Dept., City of Norman. EOE Part Time Administrative Assistant Needed Must be able to pass background check & drug test. 20 hrs per week preferred. Fax resumes to 405.321.8046 or email brookechiles@oklahomacourtservices.net

FIND A JOB in the CLASSIFIEDS

Research volunteers needed! Researchers at OU Health Sciences Center need healthy volunteers ages 18 to 30 who have a parent with or without a history of an alcohol or drug problem. Qualified participants will be compensated for their time. Call (405) 456-4303 to learn more about the study and to see if you qualify. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. STUDENTPAYOUTS.COM Paid survey takers needed in Norman 100% FREE to join. Click on Surveys. Youth Baseball/Softball Umpires (10 Positions) Parks and Recreation Applicants must be at least 16 years of age. Must have thorough knowledge of the rules of baseball and/or softball. Salary $10.00 to $15.00 per game. Work Period: 5:30pm until games are over. Applicants must pass umpire test prior to receiving employment application. Tests are given in the Human Resources office. Selected applicants must pass physical examination, drug screen, and background investigation. A complete job announcement is available at www.normanok.gov/hr/hr-job-postings. To request an application, email HR@NormanOK.gov, call (405) 3665482, or visit us at 201-C West Gray, Human Resources Dept., City of Norman. EOE

Three roommates each for 2 quiet 3/bd near OU. 101 ($1245) and 103 ($1260) Linn. $1200 deposit, 1st mo 1/2 off. CH/ A, dishwasher, microwave, W/D, parking. Available June 1st. See on Appt. 6004363 Elisabeth or eleja@sbcglobal.net $525/mo! Walk to OU! 2bd, 2 blocks from Sarkey’s Energy Center. Carpet, blinds, NEW CH/A, appliances, W/D & new storm shelter: 203-3493

HOUSES UNFURNISHED 4bd/2ba Available May 13th! 902 Creston Way - 6 blks east of The Mont. Large house, wood floors, all appliances + W/D. $1400/mo. (405)208-3303

J

Housing Sales

MOBILE HOMES 3bd/1ba single wide, 1999 Clayton mobile home. CH/A. Covered porch, 3-car enclosed carport. 5 mi from campus. $15,000. Call 301-5105 or 301-5805

J Housing Rentals APTS. UNFURNISHED CAMPUS AREA: 1bd efficiency, large kitchen, utilities PAID - $595. 329-2310

DUPLEXES UNFURNISHED 1 bd, close to campus, smoke-free, no pets, $395 + bills, $395/dep. 360-3850.

Give your friend or loved one a gift they will never forget. Celebrate with the rest of campus in The Oklahoma Daily!

2 col (3.25 in) x 2.25 inches

2 col (3.25 in) x 2 inches Sudoku ..............$760/month Boggle ...............$760/month Horoscope ........$760/month

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Con

grat

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hday, t r i B y Happ

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Spring Specials

HOROSCOPE By Bernice Bede Osol

Copyright 2012, Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 2012 Those of you who are celebrating a birthday are likely to get involved in several new, successful endeavors in the year ahead. Although each might be relatively small, their collective returns could add up into a hefty sum.

$445 $515 $440 $510 $700

ARIES (March 21-April 19) --Establish your own agenda if you can. You’ll know better than anyone what you need to accomplish and what can wait. Don’t let anybody or anything take you off course. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Being in a devilish mood, you’re dying to tell others the secret you possess. If you give in and tell all, you’ll be in the soup.

    

   

 

  



    

        



        

Previous Solution                                                               

        

Monday- Very Easy Tuesday-Easy Wednesday- Easy Thursday- Medium Friday - Hard

Instructions: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. That means that no number is repeated in any row, column or box.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- A social involvement could prove to be both enjoyable and instructive, especially if you’re interacting with a small group. Intimate circles have a way of revealing much. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Because you have the capacity to focus on significant objectives, achieving success in your endeavors is likely. Once you establish a goal, you won’t be dissuaded from your task. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --You’re not likely to be much of a talker, but when you do speak up it will be with something that needs to be said, and will be of extreme value to your listeners. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- A close friend of yours could receive some important information from a

reliable source and won’t be remiss about sharing it with you. What you learn could make or save you money. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --When making an important agreement with another, be sure to scrutinize all the fine print. Chances are it’ll be those nasty “insignificant� items that cause trouble down the line. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- This is an excellent day to rid get rid of all those nasty, minor jobs that have piled up. Clear the decks so that you can make room for more important projects coming your way. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- A social contact you’ve established could be of big help concerning something that is occurring in another area of your life. She or he will be just the person you need to help out. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) --Drop everything and take care of something important that only you can bring to a successful conclusion. It probably involves a domestic affair. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -A perfect opportunity to bring out into the open a critical matter that you’ve been reluctant to discuss may present itself. Don’t waste this chance to unload. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --Think in terms of making a lot of small profits instead of scoring one big kill. Little gains have better chances of occurring, and they can add up into something significant.

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker April 18, 2012 ACROSS 1 By order of 6 Crime-scene noise 11 Work with patterns 14 Tiny Mediterranean republic 15 One way to come clean 16 Color and cry 17 “My mind isn’t made up yet� 20 Elsinore or Balmoral, e.g. 21 Joined a write-in campaign 22 Play for a sucker 24 One of the Jetsons 27 Ellington of jazz 28 Capital of Belarus 31 Vegas transaction 33 Apartment, in hippie slang 34 Little feet do it 36 Beautiful and graceful girls 38 Answer that’s up in the air 42 Displaying enthusiasm 43 Coffee shop emanations 45 Whom the A.G. might address 48 Boring necessity? 49 Cleaned, as a driveway 50 Having a hard time deciding 52 Cool place in the summer

4/18

56 “Now I ___ me down to sleep� 57 Kind of table in elementary school? 59 Angler’s hope 62 Iffy response from the boss 67 Big name in jeans 68 Rustic poetry piece 69 Broadway performer 70 Imitator of life, it’s said 71 Medieval war clubs 72 “Bopper� lead-in DOWN 1 Bon ___ (cleanser) 2 Cul-de-___ 3 Nourishment in the womb 4 Sicilian gusher 5 “Curses!� to Charlie Brown 6 Have ___ (enjoy yourself) 7 Cake section 8 Agcy. that moved from Treasury to Justice in 2003 9 Air-density symbol 10 “Jeopardy!� creator Griffin 11 “Not another word out of you!� 12 “Aha!� 13 Did some gardening 18 Abbr. in many French street names 19 Chunk of

lawn 22 Stereotypically blind official 23 Chang and Eng’s land 25 Word in old wedding vows 26 San Francisco Bay’s ___ Buena island 29 Affliction of the eye 30 Food that’s stuck on a plate? 32 Amphitheater features 35 One-time co-host with Kelly 36 ___ for the course 37 Winter-traction reducer 39 “Amphetamine� lead-in 40 Brunch selection (Var.) 41 Acapulco

appetizer 44 Slob’s apartment 45 Hun called the “scourge of God� 46 Part of an old heating system 47 Band around a sleeve 51 .com alternative 53 Foot joint 54 Tuners on some radios 55 Tidal withdrawal 58 Adjust with a wedge 60 Bad thing to rock 61 “Time� founder Henry 63 “Apple cider� gal 64 “The city that never sleeps,� for short 65 “Tract� ending 66 “Don’t ___ this at home!�

PREVIOUS PUZZLE ANSWER

4/17

Š 2012 Universal Uclick www.upuzzles.com

CERTAINLY UNCERTAIN By Jill Pepper


Wednesday, April 18, 2012 •

Life&arts

B5

Tomorrow ›› National Record Store Day is coming up — do you know where to buy your CDs? The Daily’s Courtney Gorforth gives you the details.

Lindsey Ruta, life & arts editor Mariah Webb, assistant life & arts editor dailyent@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

Theater

Acting students to compete in festival Role in ‘Dracula’ earned student spot at competition

AT A GLANCE Irene Ryan Since 1972, the Irene Ryan Foundation has awarded scholarships to the outstanding student performers at each regional festival. These scholarships are named for the actress best known for her role of Granny Clampett in “The Beverly Hillbillies.”

Rachael Cervenka Life & Arts Reporter

After playing a mad man in a mental asylum obsessed with consuming as much life as possible in the form of live flies, spiders and birds, acting senior Kevin Percival, was chosen to compete in a prestigious national theater festival. Percival embraced his role as Dracula’s insane henchman, Robert Renfield, in University Theatre’s production of “Dracula,” last fall. His performance gained him a spot in the regional Irene Ryan competition as part of the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival — a festival involving 18,000 students from colleges and universities nationwide, according to the website. The theater festival is a year-round program in eight geographic regions in the United States, according to the festival’s website. In January and February each year, regional festivals showcase their best productions from that year. Percival chose his longtime girlfriend and acting junior Laurel Sein as his scene partner. After selecting his scene, he decided Sein would fit perfectly due to their natural chemistry. The couple met in a theater class at Edmond Memorial High School and have been dating for nearly five years. Percival and Sein won the regional festival in February, beating out students from other universities — including a fellow OU drama student. Percival and Sein have been preparing for the finals competition ever since. The two left for Wa s h i ng t o n , D. C . , o n Tuesday, where they will compete at the Kennedy Center for a chance to win prestigious fellowships and the Irene Ryan title.

Source: www.kennedy-center.org

Ally Burt/the daily

Hanna Goff (left), scenic design senior; Laurel Sein, drama junior; Kevin Percival, drama senior; and Brad Gray, scenic lighting senior, during a send-off for the students who are in Washington, D.C., this week for the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival where they will be competing. Percival and Sein won the regional acting competition in February, while Goff and Gray won in the technical competition.

The drama students will participate in workshops taught by renowned theater professionals Wednesday and Thursday, then they perform their scenes Friday, Percival said. Professionals from Moscow Art Theatre, Cincinnati Playhouse, Shakespeare Theatre Company and many more will be in attendance at the festival, Percival said. “Cincinnati Playhouse is huge; it is like one step below Broadway,” Sein said. Most of the competition is through the workshops, Percival said. The professionals teaching the workshops will decide which actors or actresses they want to join their respective schools and theater companies. “You want to be seen and you want to be noticed,” Sein

said. “I’d much rather spend my time focusing on learning everything I can and making an impression.” Scholarship money, job opportunities and cash prizes are up for grabs at this competition, Sein said. “It’s great networking because in theater, it is all about who you know,” Percival said. Percival and Sein have been rehearsing for at least an hour a day for the last two weeks, Sein said. “We really liked where the scenes were when we did them, so we have just been getting them back on their feet,” Percival said. They will perform scenes from the plays “The Open Couple” and “Gruesome Playground Injuries” together, and then Percival will perform a monologue

Column

Pets can soothe school stress Life & Arts Columnist

on stress and organizational perceptions.” This investigation focused on a company in North Carolina. In the study, it was observed that the average scores of the group were significantly higher in physiological and perceived Mariah Webb stress, perceptions of job mariahwebb@ou.edu satisfaction, organizational affective commitment, and perceived organizational he American Centers for Disease support. When dogs are present Control credits a in the workplace, everyone variety of health benefits is more relaxed and coopto animal companionship. erative. Principal author on These benefits include dethe study, Randolph Barker creases in blood pressure, said, “pet presence may cholesterol levels and trigserve as a low-cost, welllyceride levels, as well as ness intervention readily an increased likelihood of available to many organisocialization and exercise. zations.” Barker also noted Other organizations, such as the American Veterinary that pet presence might reduce absenteeism and Medical Association, supburnout while increasing port these claims. productivity. Many of these organizaIf pets have this positive tions also conduct research effect on cooperate America, on the link between health what is stopping people and access to an animal. from exploring their possiParticularly interestbilities in academia? ing research on the topic As college students, our is discussed in “Stress in everyday lives are constantly Pet Owners and Non-Pet burdened by unrelenting Owners” by Jill A. Kraus. Kraus concludes, “regard- stress. It is possible, however, that there is a very simple less of objective stress or cure for this stress in the perceived social support form of man’s best friend. levels, pet ownership is asFor three days in March sociated with lower levels of of 2011, the Yale Law School subjective stress.” library provided a very unIn March, the conventional service to “International Journal stressed students before of Workplace Health finals. Management” published Monty — a hypoallergenic “Preliminary investigation of employee’s dog presence certified therapy dog — was

T

AT A GLANCE Study results Self-reported stress patterns throughout the work day revealed generally lower stress levels for employees with their dogs present.

from “Death Watch.” The three acts will last six minutes total, Percival said. “With a six minute scene, you do not want to over work it because it will get stale and boring,” Percival said. “We have been working to get things fresh and solid again, and then we will work every night at the competition to make sure

we still have it.” Percival began acting his sophomore year of high school, he said. A friend signed him up for a theater audition as a joke and was too embarrassed to take it off, so he went with it and continued to act throughout high school. Percival has acted in 10 OU theater productions, and

he eventually wants to teach acting, he said. His acting strengths lie in character acting; He usually plays a clown or a psychopath. “I am interested in live theater and having someone right in front of you telling a story, and I want to keep that going,” Percival said. Sein started acting as a little girl in church theater and has continued to act ever since, she said. She has acted in five OU theater productions and some local film productions as well. She aspires to be a fight master, specializing in stage combat, she said. She describes her and Percival as total opposites when it comes to acting. Sein’s favorite part of acting is being able to stay five years old for the rest of her life and playing pretend every day, she said. “It is getting to be the thing that people always imagine or that they always want to be and making it accessible to an audience,” Sein said.

ING S A LE NOW UMMER ! S 12 FOR ALL 20 F AND

E V R E S E N R O S E H N I T T S ON

Source: International Journal of Workplace Health Management

available to be “checked out” for 30-minute sessions. It was considered an experimental period, but the feedback was widely successful. Students reported the presence of the dog was soothing and reminiscent of home. While pets are not allowed in the dorms, OU does have a policy allowing students to have service animals on campus, said Suzette Dyer, director of the disability resource center. A service animal is a dog that is trained to work for the benefit of a person with a disability, according to the center’s website. “There is one service animal on campus and two assistance animals in the residence halls,” Suzette Dyer said. “We’ve had a number of students with service animals over the years.” Mariah Webb is a University College freshman and the assistant life & arts editor of The Daily.

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B6

CAMPUS IN PHOTOS

• Wednesday, April 18, 2012

the Daily’s

Campus SNAPshots

Tuesday Melodie Lettkeman/The Daily

Melodie Lettkeman/The Daily

Above: Whipped cream splatters on letters junior and 2012-13 UOSA president Joe Sangirardi (right) as Alexis Taitel, international studies sophomore, (left) pushes pies into Sangirardi’s face Tuesday on the South Oval with political science sophomore Akash Patel (center) watching. Pi Kappa Phi fraternity sold tickets to pie its members along the South Oval to raise funds and awareness for Push America, a philanthropy created by the fraternity that works with disabled people.

Left: A stained old mattress and sign asking for “loose change to loosen chains” sits Tuesday outside Dale Hall. The items, including signs along the South Oval — asking questions like “What if it was your brother or sister?” — are part of Intervarsity Christian Fellowship’s weeklong fundraising efforts for the International Justice Mission, which seeks to end human trafficking.

Right: Accounting junior Estevan Molinar (left), finance sophomore Krishan Patel (center) and marketing junior Brittany Heflin (right) pump each other up Tuesday while selling OU playing cards to send a girl named Isabel to Disney World. The group is selling the cards as part of its Integrated Business Core, in which students were challenged to create a product to raise funds for a monetary philanthropy. The group chose to support the Make a Wish Foundation. Melodie Lettkeman/The Daily

Ricardo Patino/The Daily

Left: Joey Foote, international area studies senior, dyes a Green Week T-shirt Tuesday on the South Oval. Green Week, presented by Student Congress, passed out free shirts to tie-dye.

Where do you see yourself? Our alums have landed some of the greatest jobs in the best cities.

New York City Entertainment Weekly Euro RSCG Ogilvy Everyday with Rachael Ray People Magazine Ralph Lauren

Start here:

studentmedia.ou.edu Apply by April 20

Not enough?

Our students and alums intern and work at the nation’s finest media: The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, The Los Angeles Times, The Dallas Morning News, Glamour, People, Spirit magazine, Associated Press, The San Francisco Chronicle, The Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Cultura, Omnicom, Ivie Marketing, The Sporting News, Entertainment Weekly, ESPN and many, many more.

OU Student Media is a department within OU’s division of Student Affairs. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. For accommodations on the basis of a disability, call 325-2521.


Wednesday, April 18, 2012