Page 1

CAMPUS ELECTiOnS EnD AT 9 TOnigHT

HAvE YOU vOTED? viSiT ELECTiOnS.OU.EDU TO CAST YOUR BALLOT nEED MORE inFO? gO TO OUDAiLY.COM/UOSA FOR CAnDiDATE PROFiLES, STORiES AnD MORE

W E D N E S DAY, A P R I L 4 , 2 012

W W W.O U DA I LY.C O M

2 011 S I LV E R C R O W N W I N N E R

 HOUSing AnD FOOD

Student input welcomed for future project planning

RESEARCH

Initiative aims to better serve students with focus groups, firm involvement EMMA HAMBLEN Campus Reporter

OU Housing and Food Services administrators have begun a new initiative intended to help students influence the department’s future projects. Food services’ master planning process for residence halls started last week by inviting students to voice their opinions by participating in focus groups. “The goal of the master planning efforts for the university residence halls is to evaluate, with student opinions included, how to create the best residential experience to meet the needs of future residents,” Amy Buchanan, Housing and Food Assistant Director of Community Experience, said in an email. Goals for improvements to OU’s campus are documented in the Annual Campus Master Plan Submission Summary. Housing and Food’s master planning process is separate from this campus master plan but does work with it, Diane Brittingham, Housing and Food Director of Residence Life, said. “It’s all puzzle pieces … It’s not haphazard,” Brittingham said. “There’s a process to it all.” The master planning process last took place around 10 years ago, she said. The master plan is a road map or blueprint for how Housing and Food Services can best support students, Brittingham said.

riCardo patino/tHe daily

Gretchen Scheel (right), University College freshman, discusses the RNA structure with chemistry professor Susan Schroeder (left) Tuesday in the Stephenson Life Sciences Research Center. This is Scheel’s first semester working under Schroeder, and she plans on continuing throughout the summer. Scheel hopes to use her experience to better prepare herself for medical school.

Wanted: Freshman researchers Program to include other sciences next year PAIGHTEN HARKINS Campus Reporter

A pilot undergraduate research program is going to expand next year after a successful first semester targeting freshman chemistry

students. T h e F i r s t Ye a r R e s e a r c h Experience program, which brings freshman students to work in professional OU labs, expects to expand next year to include more faculty members and other departments on campus, Mark Morvant , program creator and chemistry professor, said.

Right now the only department working with the program is the chemistry department. However, o f f i c i a l s f ro m t h e C o l l e g e o f Engineering and other OU science departments have expressed interest in joining the program next year, Morvant said. see RESEARCH paGe 2

see HOUSING paGe 3

SCHOLARSHiPS

UOSA COngRESS

Students raise funds for fellow Sooners

Mistake could cost UPB an office

Organization to provide aid for students in emergency situations KATHLEEN EVANS

Assistant Campus editor

Life happens, and University College freshman Emma Lindgren learned this last semester when her mother died after a three-year fight with cancer. “The last thing I wanted to worry about on top of being a student, being involved on campus activities and simply wanting to be a teenager was finances,” Lindgren said. To help students in situations similar to hers, Lindgren joined the Sooners Helping Sooners executive committee, a student-led initiative to raise money for students in emergency situations. “There are so many times when a student has some sort of life event

AT A GLANCe Sooners Helping Sooners Sooners Helping Sooners will have a fundraising event April 23. Students will attempt to break the Guinness World Record for the largest simultaneous trust fall, an event in which students free fall backward into someone else’s arms.

CHASE COOK

managing editor

Source: Co-chairwoman Beth Huggins

that you cannot control and just seems to happen,” organization co-chairwoman Elizabeth Huggins said. “We want every student to have the opportunity to graduate reBeKaH CornWell/tHe daily and finish their academic careers. Jasmine Casey, anthropology senior, (right) accepts a button from international business Some circumstances beyond your and economics junior Andrew Belliveau (left) monday at the Sooners Helping Sooners table control shouldn’t stop you from in Oklahoma memorial Union. The new student-initiated program is seeking donations to fund scholarships for students struggling with unexpected emergency expenses, such as see SOONERS paGe 3 expensive surgeries or apartment fires.

EDiTORiAL VOL. 97, NO. 130

© 2012 OU Publications Board FREE — Additional copies 25 cents Campus ........................ Classifieds .................. Life & Arts ................... Opinion ...................... Sports .........................

2 6 5 4 7

Requested document and purpose

Sooners Helping Sooners will greatly benefit campus. But the group owes students accountability. (Page 4)

LiFE & ARTS

Language attracts young crowd to fair

new foundation exhibit showcases student work

The 10th annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair draws crowd to OU. (Multimedia)

First year art students celebrate their development with an exhibition in the Lightwell Gallery. (Page 5)

see UPB paGe 2

The Daily’s open record requests

Transparency will help student charity initiative

nOW OnLinE AT

The Union Programming Board may not have an office for the first time after officers failed to apply for space in the Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Archie W. Dunham-Conoco Student Leadership Center. Undergraduate Student Congress passed legislation allocating space to 40 student organizations Tuesday night. UPB

eriKa pHilBriCK/orGaniZation

University College freshman John Nguyen (foreground) casts his vote as he and University College freshman Yesenia Lopez work the UOSA election table Tuesday in Dale Hall.

Date requested

A list of all 2012 Big Event work sites — To compare the number of sites this year to previous years; to gather information about the site locations.

march 28

non-identifying aggregate data for the number of withdrawals, drops and failing grades for all May and August 2010 and 2011 intersession courses — To look for trends in performance and completion of intersession courses.

monday

Enrollment capacity and non-identifying aggregate grade data for undergraduate students of various May and August 2011 intersession courses — To look for trends in enrollment and grades.

monday

Visit OUDaily.com/openrecords for a complete list of The Daily’s requests


2

CAMPUS

• Wednesday, April 4, 2012

OUDaily.com ››

Campus

Norman resident Greg Jungman won the Ward 4 City Council nomination Tuesday night by earning nearly double the votes of his two competitors combined.

Laney Ellisor, campus editor Kathleen Evans, assistant campus editor Chris Miller, assistant campus editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

RESEARCH: Freshmen take advantage of lab time Continued from page 1 This year 15 students are participating in the program along with six members of the chemistry faculty who brought them into their labs, Morvant said. One of the major motivations behind starting the project was to involve students in research during their first year as opposed to during their sophomore or junior years, which is when most undergraduates begin their research, Morvant said. “It’s really important to encourage young students to get into research as early as possible so that they don’t get beat up from the grind of doing normal lecture work,” chemistry professor Rob Thomson said. When entering a lab, students have to learn a lot of new things before they can start doing research, freshman participant Gretchen Scheel said. “This program’s really great because there’s a big learning curve when you enter a lab because it’s so

Today around campus Health Sciences Center representatives will speak to students interested in pursuing a health-related career will take place 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at Wagner Hall, Room 145. A note-taking seminar by Student Success Series will be held at 2 p.m. in Adams Center’s Muldrow Tower, Room 105. A discussion with pop artist James Rosenquist will take place at 4 p.m. at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art’s Mary Eddy and Fred Jones Auditorium. Rosenquist will speak for 30 minutes after a 30-minute lecture by professor Susan Caldwell.

Corrections The Oklahoma Daily is committed to serving readers with accurate coverage and welcomes your comments about information that may require correction or clarification. To contact us with corrections, email us at dailynews@ou.edu. In a news story in Tuesday’s edition about uncontested elections, Brynn Daves’ title was misreported. Daves is Student Programs director. In a news story in Tuesday’s edition about a Native American celebration on the South Oval, Sigma Nu Alpha Gamma was misidentified. Visit OUDaily.com/corrections to see an archive of our corrections

Ricardo Patino/The Daily

Gretchen Scheel, University College freshman, prepares a pipette Tuesday in the Stephenson Life Sciences Research Center. Scheel is researching RNA structure and energetics to find the temperature at which the RNA structure begins to break down.

different than doing a general chemistry lab,” Scheel said. “You really have to learn the specifics of why you’re doing the research.”

The labs also serve to back up the things students learn in their chemistry classes, freshman participant Benjamine Welch said.

“Having the hands-on experience helps you just to remember things in a different way than you would [in a classroom],” Welch said. Overall, Morvant said he is pleased with how the program has fared during its first semester. “For our first run-through pilot, I think it’s been very positive,” Morvant said. This program was particularly helpful for Thomson because, as a new professor, he didn’t have an established lab space yet, he said. He has had a very good experience with his first-year students and will have them working on the project with him over the summer ­— and their participation doesn’t have to end there, Thomson said. “They learn very quickly, and I’d be happy to keep them in the lab for as long as they want to continue with it,” Thomson said. The student response was also positive. “It was a little overwhelming at first, but it’s starting to come all together,” Scheel said. “I think it’s been a really valuable experience.”

UPB: Leaders didn’t know application needed Continued from page 1 wasn’t included on the list because it didn’t apply. The board currently resides in the Archie W. Dunham-Conoco Student Leadership Center, Room 382. It is the first time UPB has not applied for space, board president Matt Farley said. Farley said he didn’t know the board had to apply for the

space, and the board never received the application. Farley attended the meeting to inform the body of the board’s mistake and request something be done to get an office. “I’m disappointed that Student Congress took what was easier for them at the time than what was best for the student body,” Farley said. Congress debated tabling

the space allocation legislation to allow the executive committee to consider giving the board an office, but the body decided to pass the bill by a vote of 15-9 with four abstaining. Student Congress should pass the bill as is because it has rules on how to apply for space, and they shouldn’t be broken because all organizations should receive equal treatment, Student Congress

secretary Sean Bender said during debate. The office-allocation legislation will move to the Graduate Student Senate at 7 p.m. Sunday in Sarkeys Energy Center, Room A-235. If the Senate approves the bill, the UOSA president must sign it before it becomes law. Farley said he will attend the Senate meeting to request it not pass the legislation.

Wednesday, April 4, 2012 •

HOusing: Plan to improve OU residence halls Continued from page 1 Housing and Food Services has contracted with a consulting firm to evaluate OU’s housing, Brittingham said. “They’re evaluating our space and talking about what’s good and what can be improved on,” Brittingham said. I m p rov e m e n t s c o u l d eventually entail anything from renovation to new buildings, Brittingham said. A rc h i t e c t u ra l D e s ig n G rou p, In c. , b a s e d i n Oklahoma City, is the consulting firm working with several different companies on the master planning process, Brittingham said. National architecture firm Mackey Mitchell specializes in buildings for education and residence halls, and Brittingham said they’re working with OU administrators. Program management firm Brailsford & Dunlavey researches trends at peer institutions, sets up interviews and focus groups, assesses the off-campus market and provides strategic analysis in a report, Brittingham said. The master planning process is intended to give the department the information needed to provide the right services to the right

SOONERS: Donations to go only to students Continued from page 1

Josh Blanco/The Daily

Two planning consultants and two architects listen to student input during an open forum Thursday in Adams Center. The group of consultants is working with OU’s Housing and Food department to create a new plan for campus resident life.

students, Brittingham said. “We were complimented on the things we’re doing for our freshmen, but are we providing everything we need for everybody? Sometimes I think you need that outside perspective,” Brittingham said. Brittingham was inter view e d last w e ek by Brailsford & Dunlavey representatives and asked what her dreams for the master planning process were, she said. “ Fl e x i b l e c o m mu n i t y space was my biggest thing,” Brittingham said. This might mean building

Campus speaker

Former presidential hopeful to head to OU A former U.S. Senator and Democratic presidential candidate will speak on campus later this month. George McGovern, 22-year U.S. Congressman and 1972 presidential candidate, will deliver his lecture “The State of U.S. Politics Today,” at 3 p.m. April 20 in the Thurman J. White Forum Building in conjunction with the Josh Lee lecture series.

a new hall that can be converted to host Zumba events or Sooner Ally training, Brittingham said. “Indirectly we’re all educators. But we have to have the space to have an opportunity to do that,” Brittingham said. At a 6 p.m. Wednesday focus group, students discussed housing as a whole, what attracted them to OU and what major issues they felt needed to be addressed, participant Tiffany Handel said. “We talked a little bit about restaurants,” Handel said. “A lot of us wanted to

Mc G ov e r n s e r v e d in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1956 until 1960, when P r e s i d e n t J o h n F. Kennedy named him special assistant to the president, according to a George McGovern press release. He is perhaps best known for being an outspoken opponent of U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War during his presidential campaign. Following his address, McGovern will participate in a signing of his book

see a sit-down restaurant for a more formal option.” The focus group also discussed the process for selecting a roommate and gender-neutral housing, Handel said. A sur vey will be released mid-April to every OU student regarding the housing master planning, Brittingham said. “We really want to hear what people have to say,” Brittingham said. “It’s just that it’s exciting that we’re being supported to do this. Lots of our Big 12 colleagues are doing the same thing, so it’s nice to be a part of that.”

“What It Means to Be a Democrat,” according to a press release. The Josh Lee lecture series is a biannual event, which began in 2000 to honor former U.S. Senator Josh Lee. The series’ emphasis on public speaking underscores Lee’s belief that a background in discourse is an important part of an educational foundation, according to a press release. Those wishing to attend the event may email pcc@ou.edu to request a reservation. Chris Miller, Assistant Campus Editor

reaching your goals.” Sooners Helping Sooners began in February after Huggins and co-chairman Corbin Carter attended a Big 12 conference and learned about a similar model at Kansas State University, Huggins said. There was no reason the program wouldn’t succeed here because OU fosters a strong sense of community, she said. A committee of an equal number of students and faculty will evaluate the applications and interview applicants to assess their level of need, Huggins said. The group has not reached that stage yet, and it does not know exactly how they will require verification of need, but they will most likely ask for receipts or documentation. Group adviser and Student Life director Kristen Partridge has met with students in need of financial support for special circumstances every semester, Huggins said. One memorable case was the friend of an international student who approached Partridge because her friend had a toothache but could not afford surgery, she said. The student was in so much pain she couldn’t attend classes or focus on schoolwork, Partridge said. Partridge asked staff members to write checks and raised the money to pay for the student’s eventual double root canal, Huggins said. “The staff was willing to give whatever they can,” Huggins said. “That really inspired us to actually make this happen. It is inspiring they would give up money that in no way benefits them.” The OU Financial Aid Services office can only look at and help with the long-term pictures, Huggins said. In cases such as emergency surgeries, sick parents, apartment fires and others, students don’t have options. “I know some things don’t come up six months in advance, so the goal is to reach beyond the realms of financial aid and share the love and compassion from students...,” Huggins said. OU President David Boren has backed and approved the group, according to the group’s Facebook page. A donation account has been set up through the OU Foundation. All student donations go to help students. Currently the group is reaching out to student organizations for donations and support, Huggins said. The group has secured corporate sponsorships for all operational costs, and the OU Alumni Association allocated $50,000. Any student who donates at least $15 will receive a T-shirt with the gift, Huggins said. Students can nominate themselves or a friend online, as well as donate online or at tabling locations in the Oklahoma Memorial Union for the next week, Huggins said. “We want it to be the kind of program that lasts forever because there are always going to be OU students that need help,” she said. “We want to build the foundation necessary for that to happen, and it comes from spreading awareness and showing students this is pure love and a way to participate in pure love and compassion.”

OU will be tobacco-free in July! It’s never too early to quit.

Stop by OU Health Services to find out about your resources and to pick up a quit kit today.

EGG HUNT AND DECORATING "QSJMáQN

Free cessation classes available. To view the schedule visit healthysooners.ou.edu/tobaccofree

Health Services ®

Student Affairs

OU Health Promotion Monday-Friday | 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 2nd Floor | Goddard Health Center 620 Elm Avenue | Norman, Ok 73019 (405)325-4611 ext. 41777 *Some restrictions apply. Offer valid April 2nd-8th. *Some

3

The University of Oklahoma is an Equal Opportunity Institution. For accommodations on the basis of disability, call 325-4611.

EGG HUNT W/CANDY & PRIZES PHOTOS WITH THE EASTER BUNNY EGG DECORATING CONTEST & PRIZE BASKETS

CALL 888.724.1594 FOR DETAILS. COME CELEBRATE SPRING WITH CRIMSON PARK! Now Leasing for Fall 2012 | Rates start at $424

CRIMSON PARK 2657 CLASSEN BLVD | NORMAN OK 73071


2

CAMPUS

• Wednesday, April 4, 2012

OUDaily.com ››

Campus

Norman resident Greg Jungman won the Ward 4 City Council nomination Tuesday night by earning nearly double the votes of his two competitors combined.

Laney Ellisor, campus editor Kathleen Evans, assistant campus editor Chris Miller, assistant campus editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

RESEARCH: Freshmen take advantage of lab time Continued from page 1 This year 15 students are participating in the program along with six members of the chemistry faculty who brought them into their labs, Morvant said. One of the major motivations behind starting the project was to involve students in research during their first year as opposed to during their sophomore or junior years, which is when most undergraduates begin their research, Morvant said. “It’s really important to encourage young students to get into research as early as possible so that they don’t get beat up from the grind of doing normal lecture work,” chemistry professor Rob Thomson said. When entering a lab, students have to learn a lot of new things before they can start doing research, freshman participant Gretchen Scheel said. “This program’s really great because there’s a big learning curve when you enter a lab because it’s so

Today around campus Health Sciences Center representatives will speak to students interested in pursuing a health-related career will take place 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at Wagner Hall, Room 145. A note-taking seminar by Student Success Series will be held at 2 p.m. in Adams Center’s Muldrow Tower, Room 105. A discussion with pop artist James Rosenquist will take place at 4 p.m. at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art’s Mary Eddy and Fred Jones Auditorium. Rosenquist will speak for 30 minutes after a 30-minute lecture by professor Susan Caldwell.

Corrections The Oklahoma Daily is committed to serving readers with accurate coverage and welcomes your comments about information that may require correction or clarification. To contact us with corrections, email us at dailynews@ou.edu. In a news story in Tuesday’s edition about uncontested elections, Brynn Daves’ title was misreported. Daves is Student Programs director. In a news story in Tuesday’s edition about a Native American celebration on the South Oval, Sigma Nu Alpha Gamma was misidentified. Visit OUDaily.com/corrections to see an archive of our corrections

Ricardo Patino/The Daily

Gretchen Scheel, University College freshman, prepares a pipette Tuesday in the Stephenson Life Sciences Research Center. Scheel is researching RNA structure and energetics to find the temperature at which the RNA structure begins to break down.

different than doing a general chemistry lab,” Scheel said. “You really have to learn the specifics of why you’re doing the research.”

The labs also serve to back up the things students learn in their chemistry classes, freshman participant Benjamine Welch said.

“Having the hands-on experience helps you just to remember things in a different way than you would [in a classroom],” Welch said. Overall, Morvant said he is pleased with how the program has fared during its first semester. “For our first run-through pilot, I think it’s been very positive,” Morvant said. This program was particularly helpful for Thomson because, as a new professor, he didn’t have an established lab space yet, he said. He has had a very good experience with his first-year students and will have them working on the project with him over the summer ­— and their participation doesn’t have to end there, Thomson said. “They learn very quickly, and I’d be happy to keep them in the lab for as long as they want to continue with it,” Thomson said. The student response was also positive. “It was a little overwhelming at first, but it’s starting to come all together,” Scheel said. “I think it’s been a really valuable experience.”

UPB: Leaders didn’t know application needed Continued from page 1 wasn’t included on the list because it didn’t apply. The board currently resides in the Archie W. Dunham-Conoco Student Leadership Center, Room 382. It is the first time UPB has not applied for space, board president Matt Farley said. Farley said he didn’t know the board had to apply for the

space, and the board never received the application. Farley attended the meeting to inform the body of the board’s mistake and request something be done to get an office. “I’m disappointed that Student Congress took what was easier for them at the time than what was best for the student body,” Farley said. Congress debated tabling

the space allocation legislation to allow the executive committee to consider giving the board an office, but the body decided to pass the bill by a vote of 15-9 with four abstaining. Student Congress should pass the bill as is because it has rules on how to apply for space, and they shouldn’t be broken because all organizations should receive equal treatment, Student Congress

secretary Sean Bender said during debate. The office-allocation legislation will move to the Graduate Student Senate at 7 p.m. Sunday in Sarkeys Energy Center, Room A-235. If the Senate approves the bill, the UOSA president must sign it before it becomes law. Farley said he will attend the Senate meeting to request it not pass the legislation.

Wednesday, April 4, 2012 •

HOusing: Plan to improve OU residence halls Continued from page 1 Housing and Food Services has contracted with a consulting firm to evaluate OU’s housing, Brittingham said. “They’re evaluating our space and talking about what’s good and what can be improved on,” Brittingham said. I m p rov e m e n t s c o u l d eventually entail anything from renovation to new buildings, Brittingham said. A rc h i t e c t u ra l D e s ig n G rou p, In c. , b a s e d i n Oklahoma City, is the consulting firm working with several different companies on the master planning process, Brittingham said. National architecture firm Mackey Mitchell specializes in buildings for education and residence halls, and Brittingham said they’re working with OU administrators. Program management firm Brailsford & Dunlavey researches trends at peer institutions, sets up interviews and focus groups, assesses the off-campus market and provides strategic analysis in a report, Brittingham said. The master planning process is intended to give the department the information needed to provide the right services to the right

SOONERS: Donations to go only to students Continued from page 1

Josh Blanco/The Daily

Two planning consultants and two architects listen to student input during an open forum Thursday in Adams Center. The group of consultants is working with OU’s Housing and Food department to create a new plan for campus resident life.

students, Brittingham said. “We were complimented on the things we’re doing for our freshmen, but are we providing everything we need for everybody? Sometimes I think you need that outside perspective,” Brittingham said. Brittingham was inter view e d last w e ek by Brailsford & Dunlavey representatives and asked what her dreams for the master planning process were, she said. “ Fl e x i b l e c o m mu n i t y space was my biggest thing,” Brittingham said. This might mean building

Campus speaker

Former presidential hopeful to head to OU A former U.S. Senator and Democratic presidential candidate will speak on campus later this month. George McGovern, 22-year U.S. Congressman and 1972 presidential candidate, will deliver his lecture “The State of U.S. Politics Today,” at 3 p.m. April 20 in the Thurman J. White Forum Building in conjunction with the Josh Lee lecture series.

a new hall that can be converted to host Zumba events or Sooner Ally training, Brittingham said. “Indirectly we’re all educators. But we have to have the space to have an opportunity to do that,” Brittingham said. At a 6 p.m. Wednesday focus group, students discussed housing as a whole, what attracted them to OU and what major issues they felt needed to be addressed, participant Tiffany Handel said. “We talked a little bit about restaurants,” Handel said. “A lot of us wanted to

Mc G ov e r n s e r v e d in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1956 until 1960, when P r e s i d e n t J o h n F. Kennedy named him special assistant to the president, according to a George McGovern press release. He is perhaps best known for being an outspoken opponent of U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War during his presidential campaign. Following his address, McGovern will participate in a signing of his book

see a sit-down restaurant for a more formal option.” The focus group also discussed the process for selecting a roommate and gender-neutral housing, Handel said. A sur vey will be released mid-April to every OU student regarding the housing master planning, Brittingham said. “We really want to hear what people have to say,” Brittingham said. “It’s just that it’s exciting that we’re being supported to do this. Lots of our Big 12 colleagues are doing the same thing, so it’s nice to be a part of that.”

“What It Means to Be a Democrat,” according to a press release. The Josh Lee lecture series is a biannual event, which began in 2000 to honor former U.S. Senator Josh Lee. The series’ emphasis on public speaking underscores Lee’s belief that a background in discourse is an important part of an educational foundation, according to a press release. Those wishing to attend the event may email pcc@ou.edu to request a reservation. Chris Miller, Assistant Campus Editor

reaching your goals.” Sooners Helping Sooners began in February after Huggins and co-chairman Corbin Carter attended a Big 12 conference and learned about a similar model at Kansas State University, Huggins said. There was no reason the program wouldn’t succeed here because OU fosters a strong sense of community, she said. A committee of an equal number of students and faculty will evaluate the applications and interview applicants to assess their level of need, Huggins said. The group has not reached that stage yet, and it does not know exactly how they will require verification of need, but they will most likely ask for receipts or documentation. Group adviser and Student Life director Kristen Partridge has met with students in need of financial support for special circumstances every semester, Huggins said. One memorable case was the friend of an international student who approached Partridge because her friend had a toothache but could not afford surgery, she said. The student was in so much pain she couldn’t attend classes or focus on schoolwork, Partridge said. Partridge asked staff members to write checks and raised the money to pay for the student’s eventual double root canal, Huggins said. “The staff was willing to give whatever they can,” Huggins said. “That really inspired us to actually make this happen. It is inspiring they would give up money that in no way benefits them.” The OU Financial Aid Services office can only look at and help with the long-term pictures, Huggins said. In cases such as emergency surgeries, sick parents, apartment fires and others, students don’t have options. “I know some things don’t come up six months in advance, so the goal is to reach beyond the realms of financial aid and share the love and compassion from students...,” Huggins said. OU President David Boren has backed and approved the group, according to the group’s Facebook page. A donation account has been set up through the OU Foundation. All student donations go to help students. Currently the group is reaching out to student organizations for donations and support, Huggins said. The group has secured corporate sponsorships for all operational costs, and the OU Alumni Association allocated $50,000. Any student who donates at least $15 will receive a T-shirt with the gift, Huggins said. Students can nominate themselves or a friend online, as well as donate online or at tabling locations in the Oklahoma Memorial Union for the next week, Huggins said. “We want it to be the kind of program that lasts forever because there are always going to be OU students that need help,” she said. “We want to build the foundation necessary for that to happen, and it comes from spreading awareness and showing students this is pure love and a way to participate in pure love and compassion.”

OU will be tobacco-free in July! It’s never too early to quit.

Stop by OU Health Services to find out about your resources and to pick up a quit kit today.

EGG HUNT AND DECORATING "QSJMáQN

Free cessation classes available. To view the schedule visit healthysooners.ou.edu/tobaccofree

Health Services ®

Student Affairs

OU Health Promotion Monday-Friday | 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 2nd Floor | Goddard Health Center 620 Elm Avenue | Norman, Ok 73019 (405)325-4611 ext. 41777 *Some restrictions apply. Offer valid April 2nd-8th. *Some

3

The University of Oklahoma is an Equal Opportunity Institution. For accommodations on the basis of disability, call 325-4611.

EGG HUNT W/CANDY & PRIZES PHOTOS WITH THE EASTER BUNNY EGG DECORATING CONTEST & PRIZE BASKETS

CALL 888.724.1594 FOR DETAILS. COME CELEBRATE SPRING WITH CRIMSON PARK! Now Leasing for Fall 2012 | Rates start at $424

CRIMSON PARK 2657 CLASSEN BLVD | NORMAN OK 73071


4

Reader comment on OUDaily.com ››

• Wednesday, April 4, 2012

“The uncontested elections are EXACTLY the reason I did not vote today. I feel student congress was wrong in not allowing the few late entries that were presented before them. But hey, it’s easier to pass socialist agendas such as gay housing and the campus ban on smoking if the candidates are ‘hand-picked.’” (simp9830, RE: ‘Election features most number of uncontested tickets since 2007’)

OPINION EDITORIAL

Organization needs transparency Our View: Student-created charity should emphasize transparency to best serve students.

organization is required to release very little information. But the students in charge of this initiative should hold themselves to a higher standard. Sooners Helping Sooners is a student-led charity Sooners who donate to this organization deserve that uses donations from students to help their fel- to know where their money is going, and there low Sooners in times of need. Though the organiza- must be some level of accountability about who tion is in its infancy, examples of situations it may is helped with these donations. Sooners Helping be able to provide aid for in the future inSooners should keep and periodically clude apartment fires, expensive surgeries release an operational budget and an acThe Our View and unexpected illnesses. is the majority count of the students helped. opinion of Of course, it’s good to see an organization Given the potentially delicate nature of The Daily’s providing help to Sooners in desperate sitproblems this organization will deal with, nine-member uations, but we’re even happier to see that no personal information from students editorial board such an organization has been thought of, should be released. created and led by students. But the group still can release a summary It’s easy to get into the mindset of waiting for the of the problems it has addressed and how much administration to act to address the needs of the money was spent on each. community. After all, it’s the job of administrators In addition, the group should make public what to consider student needs and respond to probfactors it considers when deciding which cases to lems. And they have the experience and resources help and how much money to allot. Even if no ofto start initiatives and programs. ficial rubric is used, the executive committee must But students shouldn’t just sit back and let have some established guidelines for how those dethe administration handle changes on campus. cisions are reached. Sooners have the experience and drive to accomIf the group decides to take these steps and make plish great things, and none of us can afford to wait transparency a core attribute of their mission, around for the administration to accomplish things above and beyond the legalities involved, these for us. students will be able to better serve the OU comStudent-led initiatives always will be better for munity. Accountability breeds trust, which will this campus. These programs get students involved increase donations and extend the reach of their and invested in their community and put control helping hand. in the right hands. After all, who knows more about Personal initiative has gotten these students this the needs and experience of students than their far — to an impactful and necessary organization peers? that will benefit the community. We hope they let it That control comes with a special responsibility. take them all the way to a transparent organization Because this is a student-led initiative funded with responsible to the students who help fund it. student donations, those involved owe the student body a high level of transparency. Legally, this Comment on this at OUDaily.com

COLUMN

GLBTQ, black struggles similar

M

y concern with because the person and spirit that best coordinates with GUEST COLUMNIST the black commine is the same sex. munity, the gay This stark judgment is nonsense at its finest; moreover, it community and the lack does not merit enough respect to be considered as justificaof cohesion therein is a tion to discriminate against, harbor anger toward, ostracize personal one. I am a black or marginalize, bully and persecute those who identify as American native of south GLBTQ. central Los Angeles. I speak for all when I declare that the GLTBQ will not I have resided in Texas for stand (or fall) for the blissful ignorance that characterSteven Dixon 15 years and in Oklahoma izes threats or for language that can be compared to verbal stevendixon@ou.edu for the past three. I would ethnocide. like to address OU and my I will not accept the physical assaults that inevitably create extended black community regarding the attitudes that fissures and dissonance in a community I prefer to keep coblacks have toward gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender hesive — or between two communities to which I belong. and questioning people. My intentions are never to assume a position that quesI think my history qualifies me to publicize my experitions what another holds dear and indispensable, but I will ences and opinions. when that viewpoint infringes on my liberties, freedoms and What unsettles me — and what I find to be more prevalent personhood. in Oklahoma and Texas than in southern California — is the So I ask, “what offense has the GLBTQ community done excessive amount of hate-mongering toward GLBTQ people to you, personally? Ideologies and beliefs aside, why do you in the black community. hate humans who happen to identify as GLBTQ?” I say black community not to marginalize blacks, to asI understand GLBTQ people are not well understood and sume this is exclusive to the black community or to offenthat may bring about discomfort that can evolve into stronsively target the South, but because opinions on homosexu- ger feelings of dislike. ality are uninformed and controversial in Norman. However, not understanding someone is never a justified These opinions need to surface and be examined. reason or excuse to victimize or encourage hate. The black community knows the plight King’s said in his August 28, 1963 “I Have of the 1960s civil rights movements, as do a Dream” speech, “I have a dream that one “I speak for all many other minorities (women, the disday this nation will rise up and live out the when I declare that abled and others). Or, they do not know that true meaning of its creed: ‘We hold these history, which could be the problem. truths to be self-evident: that all men are the GLTBQ will not More recent generations do not undercreated equal.’” stand (or fall) for the stand the struggle for equality (outside of The only addendum I can give this quote racism), which explains their extremely biis that all people — women and intersex blissful ignorance... ased views toward GLBTQ people. I will not accept the people included — are created as equals. Not understanding the struggle also exIf this declaration does not pertain to you, physical assaults plains the inability to sympathize and show then you have the liberty to not have your compassion for a contemporary group strivfeathers ruffled. If this address is directed to that inevitably ing for equality across all sectors of society. you too have the liberty to not feel discreate fissures and you, From where does the motivation to disrespected or attacked but, rather, addressed. dissonance in a criminate against GLBTQ people arise? I Nonetheless, I owe a reality check to the find religion to be a culprit (though not the black community for their unfair treatment community I prefer only reason) responsible for biased misconof GLBTQ people. Anyone can choose to to keep cohesive ceptions via enculturation. continually be anti-GLBTQ, but I will never — or between two Author Tracy Baim primarily references cower to a force that tries to delegitimize my Martin Luther King Jr. in a 2010 piece supcommunities to which significance as a human being. porting equal marriage with the quote, “a If this address does not awaken the conI belong.” right delayed is a right denied.” GLBTQ peoscience of those who support homophobia, ple are denied the same social privileges in homo-hatred and/or targeting GLBTQ perblack communities within the sanction of the church and its sons, at least I can say I have made one step toward promotvarious congregations. ing, and consequently furthering, the civil rights of GLBTQ Church is a derivative of the philosophy, ideas, essences people in this region by publicizing my stance on this conand actions of love, which were the heart of Jesus Christ’s troversial and sensitive issue. message. It is all about love, not hate. Am I truly set apart We do not see ourselves as victims but as role models for from heterosexuals because of the person I love and their acceptance of sexuality. biological classification? We are one; we are here. Should I ask, “Am I less deserving of equal treatment because I am gay?” I refuse to accept that I am a second- or third-class citizen Steven Dixon is an international and area studies junior.

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» Poll question of the day Did you vote in the Norman City Council election for Wards 2, 4, 6 and 8 Tuesday? To cast your vote, log on to COLUMN

U.S. must take stand against racism’s brutality

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first heard about OPINION COLUMNIST Trayvon Martin’s murder March 8, 11 days after this young black man was shot by a light-skinned Hispanic adult named George Zimmerman. I’m a somewhat jaded, bleedingElizabeth Rucker heart sort of person, so I wordful@ou.edu was deeply shaken and saddened by Martin’s death. But I did not foresee this case rocking our country as it has. Because, to be honest, my Tumblr dashboard regularly features the digital epigraphs of white supremacy’s victims; most of their stories never make it to cable news. Martin’s death has pried open a conversation about race that most white U.S. Americans don’t want to have. (For those who are still clueless: People can be both Hispanic and white. Comedian Louis C.K. is a particularly illustrative example.) Meanwhile, The Daily has joined multiple politicians, commentators and activists in critiquing how lax and absurd gun and “self defense” regulations facilitated Zimmerman’s crime and later Sanford Police Department’s obscurities. Over the last week, more details about the shooting, botched investigation and Martin’s personal life infiltrated the national discussion. There is so much to say. I could have weaved this column from a huge array of threads: the connections between this tragedy and Kony 2012, the prison-industrial complex, the intersection of race and gender, the construction of white identity, the links between corporate lobbies, gun law and Martin’s murder or the roles of direct action and the media. However, I will use this space to discuss one facet that has received too little attention in the mainstream media: One of the unique elements of Martin’s case is that he was not killed by a police officer. Exactly one week before Zimmerman murdered Martin, Troy Jones (unarmed) was shot in the back by an Oakland police officer also implicated in the fatal shooting of Antoine Jackson and John Sloan — both black and unarmed — in 2011. Jones survived, but he happens to be the cousin of Oscar Grant, a young black man who was shot in the back by a police officer while unarmed and physically restrained on New Year’s Day 2009. The day after I learned of Martin’s death, Wendell Allen was killed by a police officer during a marijuana raid in his mother’s New Orleans home. Wendell was 20 years old, black and unarmed. On March 14 in Del City, Dane Scott, Jr. — just a year older than Martin — was shot in the back by a Del City police officer. Witnesses said Scott had raised his hands in surrender when the officer opened fire. On March 21, Rekia Boyd, a 22-year-old black Chicago woman, was shot in the head by an off-duty police officer — aiming at Anthony Cross an unarmed black man . The evidence is not just tragic and anecdotal: the Bureau of Justice Statistics confirms that police officers murder non-Hispanic black men at much higher rates than non-Hispanic white men. The 2007 report shows that over half the black victims were under 35. The report also shows that the vast majority — regardless of race — would not have been charged with resisting arrest or attempting or completing violence against a police officer at the time of their death. Adam Weinstein’s article about the racial history of Sanford, Fla., and the very recent (2006 and 2010) instances of corruption surrounding the investigations of assaults and murders committed against a black teenager and man sets a damning precedent for analyzing Sanford Police Department’s involvement in Martin’s case. In his excellent essay about the shifting media narrative around Martin, Kai Wright reminds us: “All of us live in a country in which black men are defined as pariahs. All of us consume that message in ways both overt and implicit and, on some level, far too many of us use it to excuse the brutality we can see all around us.” When white people trust the police to keep “us” safe, we must remember exactly what that means. In many ways, racism is insidious, embedded and “invisible.” But I and my fellow white U.S. Americans should take this moment to acknowledge racism’s brutality — and our complicity with it. Then, rather than wallow in impotent guilt, we must find appropriate ways to help dismantle this system. Audre Lorde wrote, “Guilt is ... a response to one’s own actions or lack of action. If it leads to change then it can be useful, since it is then no longer guilt but the beginning of knowledge. Yet all too often ... it becomes a device to protect ignorance and the continuation of things the way they are, the ultimate protection for changelessness.” Elizabeth Rucker is an international studies and interdisciplinary perspectives on the environment senior.

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Wednesday, April 4, 2012 •

Life&arts

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OUDaily.com ›› Students from the African Student Association celebrate culture this week with “Africa Week 2012: Occupy Africa.”

Lindsey Ruta, life & arts editor Mariah Webb, assistant life & arts editor dailyent@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

School of art & Art History

Students build artistic skills for exhibition Sooners to feature artwork created in foundations classes

GO AND DO See the art WHEN: Today to April 18

Westlee Parsons Life & Arts Reporter

Today, the School of Art and Art History’s Lightwell Gallery opens an exhibition showcasing art students’ work to highlight their development through their first year in the school. “The Foundations Student Exhibition” showcases first-year student projects from Foundations Studio Art classes, Cedar Marie said. Marie, an art and art history professor, coordinates the exhibition and is responsible for selecting the artwork from students’ submissions. The artwork students are showcasing was created through various assignments students received over the course of the foundations classes. “The coursework [in foundations classes] offers [curriculum] that introduces incoming students to the concepts, practices and history of studio art and design,” Marie said. “These courses are the groundwork students need to proceed to the next [level in their studies].” Photography junior Seth Feken is currently in the foundations classes in the School of Art and Art History. “I have gotten a chance to look at all the different aspects of art [in foundations],” Feken said. Even if students enter the

WHERE: School of Art and Art History’s Lightwell Gallery, 520 Parrington Oval INFO: 405-325-2691

Melodie Lettkeman/The Daily

Art junior Nick Dwyer (left) explains to foundations professor Jeff Beakman (right) how his 3-D piece should be displayed Tuesday during set up for “The Foundations Student Exhibition” in the Lightwell Gallery. Dwyer’s piece, “Vertabrae,” was inspired by a monkey skeleton he saw at the Osteology Museum in Oklahoma City. The piece, as well as others created by students in the program at the School of Art and Art History, will be on display starting today, with an opening reception 5 p.m. Friday.

course with an idea of the type of art they want to pursue, the foundations give them a more in-depth understanding and experience in their preferred area while still exposing them to other options, he said. These courses include basic introductions in art theory, to courses on threedimensional design. All of these courses are necessary for students to graduate with a Bachelor

of Fine Arts in Art or Art History. “Courses address interrelated concepts, connect with each other thematically and introduce a wide range of visual and technical skills,” Marie said. “Students develop a vocabulary of processes, approaches and concepts that integrate reading, research and writing components with formal studio practice.” Feken said the classes

expose students to a little bit of everything in order to create a strong base to work up from. “The two-dimensional classes were where I felt I learned the most, because I had done 3-D work in high school,” Feken said. He could not draw very well when coming into the school, but having to take drawing classes for the major has helped him improve his drawing skills, he

said. “The exhibition is definitely a learning experience,” Feken said. “It teaches us how to talk about our art, take criticism from others and then use it to improve our art.” A piece from one of his 3-D design classes was selected for the exhibition, Feken said. “ The assignment was to make an object out of a material that contrasts that

object,” he said. “I made a city trash can out of trash that I found with my friend.” While balancing the formal, technical and conceptual aspects of our field, these courses make it clear to the students that there is a relationship between each art form; each element is a stepping stone to the next, Marie said. This exhibition is another stepping-stone for the students by exposing them to what participating in an art exhibition entails, she said. “The Foundations Student Exhibition” is a way for art students not only to learn how criticism works in the art world, but to feel the gratification of taking what they have learned and showing it off to family, friends, professors and the rest of the university, she said. Feken agrees the experience students get through the exhibition is crucial because it provides them with gallery experience, something they will need to have to better explain their art in their future careers, he said. The exhibition continues through April 18 with closing reception from 6 to 8 p.m. April 17.

Health COLUMN

Reduce physical, emotional ailments with aromatherapy

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romatherapy Life & Arts Columnist is defined by the National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy as the science of using naturally extracted aromatic essences from plants to balance, harmonize and promote the health of Mariah Webb body, mind and spirit. mariahwebb@ou.edu Humans have used aromatherapy for hundreds of years— from the pharaohs of Egypt to French chemists in the 1900s. It explores the human body’s reaction to aromatic extracts. These reactions can help with physical and emotional ailments such as sleeplessness, headaches and stress. You can buy essential oil at most health food markets. I recommend natural oils. Synthetic scents are made in a lab and not harvested directly from nature, so their effects vary from those of their natural counterparts. Another way to use aromatherapy is by starting an herb garden. Even if you’re living in the dorms, it is possible to keep a small potted herb garden in the windowsill. When selecting your herbs at the store, be sure to check how much sunlight the plant needs. If it requires little daily sun exposure, it should keep well in your dorm room. Gardening in itself is relaxing and fresh herbs have a powerful effect. When your plants are ready for harvest, you can brew them into tea, mix them into your bathwater or dry them to use as homemade potpourri. As a student, aromatherapy can help boost your performance and deal with the strain and stress of schoolwork. Here are some herbs that can help alleviate some of the dayto-day stresses as the semester winds down: Lavender: Lavender is a purple flower with a soothing

scent. When ingested, lavender can help aid digestion and soothe your system. Lavender easily can be grown in your own garden, and it has many psychologically soothing properties. It relieves stress and promotes deep sleep and serenity. Chamomile: Chamomile is a fantastic companion to lavender. It can be grown in your own garden. While many store-bought chamomile teas have an over-powering aroma, homemade chamomile tea is very gentle and promotes stress relief and deep sleep. Tea Tree: Tea tree oil is an age-old cure-all. It is an effective antiseptic and cold remedy. When used in aromatherapy, tea tree oil relaxes emotions and promotes clarity of mind. Jasmine: The seductive scent of jasmine is a strong aphrodisiac. This plant is cultivated in the dark of night and is a powerful antidepressant and nerve relaxer. Rose: Rose and heart of rose can be used in tea or capsules as a natural relief from premenstrual syndrome symptoms. Rose also is an antidepressant and nerve relaxer. Eucalyptus: Eucalyptus increases brainwave activity and counters mental fatigue. Not only does it help relieve stress, but it promotes clarity of mind and increases energy. Mint: Peppermint and spearmint easily can be grown in a herb garden. Mint is effective at nerve relaxation; it relieves pain, promotes healthy digestion and increases energy. Try combining various scents to reach your desired effect. Here are my personal favorite combinations: Fresh lavender and chamomile tea: There are many varieties of lavender, but I prefer English. French lavender has a more severe scent. You can hang the fresh flowers upside down and wait for them to dry, or use them straight from the garden. You can use a tea strainer if you like, but both lavender and chamomile are safe to

ingest and are good for your digestive system. Once you harvest the flowers, wash them thoroughly then drop them into a mug. Boil some water and pour it directly onto the herbs. This concoction will help you sleep like a baby. Another fantastic fresh tea is spearmint, which is good for your throat and stomach and promotes clarity of mind. Eucalyptus and spearmint bath oil: Just one or two drops of each essential oil should be enough. You can add more of one or the other if you prefer. As you are drawing a bath, add the oil as you would for a bubble bath. Afterward, you should feel refreshed and clearheaded. I like to do this before a night of heavy homework. If you prefer to take a bath before bed, you also can use a sleep mixture such as lavender and rose instead. Tea tree and chamomile hair rinse: Boil water and add it to a harvest of fresh chamomile as you would if you were making tea. Add a few drops of tea tree oil (be very sparing with essential oil). Instead of washing your hair with shampoo, try using baking soda to remove excess residue. Once you rinse, use a comb to make sure there is no powder left. Pour your tea-tree and chamomile brew into your hair. Tea tree oil is very good for your scalp and chamomile is calming to both your hair and skin. Mariah Webb is a University College freshman and the assistant life & arts editor of The Daily.

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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 4, 2012 You have the same potential as anyone else to make a number of solid achievements in the year ahead. However, in order to do so, some of your methods and tactics might have to be revised a bit.

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Previous Solution                                                               

        

        

Monday- Very Easy Tuesday-Easy Wednesday- Easy Thursday- Medium Friday - Hard

Instructions: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. That means that no number is repeated in any row, column or box.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- If you find yourself devoting too much time to trivial activities, put a stop to it as early in the day as you can. Once you get in gear, you can accomplish all your big objectives. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Even if your reasoning skills aren’t as sharp as they usually are, you’ll still be alert enough to get a reasonable amount done, and in a successful manner. It should be a decent day for you. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --Your chances for generating substantial material returns are excellent but, of course, it will be up to you to actually do so. Don’t just talk a good game, jump in and play. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Others will verify that you’re the one who

is making a major contribution to a joint endeavor, yet you won’t see it. That’s OK, as long as your partner recognizes it and appreciates what you do. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --Trust your luck, because developments over which you seem to have little control will be the ones that shower you with the largest rewards. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Avail yourself of a new organization or club that will give you a chance to mingle and meet with a number of influential people. Some of these big shots could become your buddies. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- When it comes to career-related issues, don’t hide your light under a bushel. If you believe that you have a constructive idea to contribute, make your concept known. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) --Whether or not you believe your social life is at a high point, there are some strong indicators that it is about to get even better. Someone fascinating and dynamic is about to enter the scene. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) --A transformation that you’ve been wishing would take place is about to happen. It will not only benefit you, but your loved ones or a close buddy as well. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- You might have a hard time believing it, but if you stand back a minute you would see that it is not only the other fella who is getting all the concessions, it’s you too.

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker April 4, 2012 ACROSS 1 Small, flightless bird 5 Hair hides them 11 Type of maniac 14 Cut text, say 15 Yank from the soil 16 “Smoking or ___?� 17 Quarterback’s command to his backup? 19 “Don’t ___ step farther!� 20 Aflame 21 What some people may try once 23 Be of benefit 26 Extra periods in NHL games 27 Lake in four states and Canada 28 Nebraska’s capital 30 Play to the crowd 32 Autograph hound’s necessity 33 “Rank� novice 36 Certain seafood 41 Birds in the finch family 42 Lie out in the sun 44 Heathens 47 Use an easy chair 50 Islamic holy man 51 A sheep remark 53 Bogart classic “Key ___�

4/4

54 Painter’s problem 57 Word with “generation� or “gender� 58 ___ Aviv 59 Type with two fingers, perhaps 64 A miner matter? 65 Big name in flatware 66 Case for pins and needles 67 “Deliverance� actor Beatty 68 Find a new table for 69 Acerb DOWN 1 Beer bust delivery 2 “If ___ say so myself� 3 Ad-libber’s asset 4 Biased type? 5 Animal fat 6 Accountant, briefly 7 Buddhist in Nirvana 8 Filet mignon sources 9 Slow as molasses 10 “Do not change,� to an editor 11 Surround 12 Any of the kids in a 1985 comedyadventure 13 Jackass’ Asian relative 18 1,000 grams 22 French painter Matisse 23 Austrian peak

24 Competes 25 “ ___ and the King of Siam� 26 Pope’s “An Essay ___� 29 Grassy grounds 30 By its very nature 31 “___ Wiedersehen� (German goodbye) 34 Scarfed down 35 Aquarium inhabitant 37 Alpaca’s cousin 38 “Cat on a Hot ___ Roof� 39 “Joy of Cooking� instruction 40 Suspend, as curtains 43 “The one� played by Keanu 44 Detroit

hoopster 45 Current measurement 46 Annoyed 48 Dressed (in) 49 Decorative fold on a garment 51 “Seinfeld� character Elaine 52 Big Band musician Shaw 55 “Kon-Tiki� author Heyerdahl 56 Adjust plugs and points 57 Pest you might slap 60 Toothpasteapproving org. 61 Abbr. at Kennedy 62 Hardly a show dog 63 Baby fox

PREVIOUS PUZZLE ANSWER

4/3

Š 2012 Universal Uclick www.upuzzles.com

CABIN IN THE WOODS By Donald Stubin


Wednesday, April 4, 2012 •

SPORTS

KAT ESPINOSA OKLAHOMA STATE

7

Greg Fewell, sports editor Kedric Kitchens, assistant sports editor dailysports@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

CHELSEA THOMAS MISSOURI

KEILANI RICKETTS OKLAHOMA

WHITNEY CANION BAYLOR

BLAIRE LUNA TEXAS

Need a pitcher? Check out the Big 12 Conference loaded with nation’s best on the mound

AT A GLANCE Pitcher comparison

TOBI NEIDY

ERA

0.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

Home runs allowed

0

3

6

9

12

15

Walks

0

5

10

15

pitcher Michelle Gascoigne has transformed her 2.66 ERA from last season to only giving up seven earned runs through If you want to see the nation’s top pitchers in action, look no 66 innings pitched (.74). further than the Big 12 conference. Although Canion suffered an ACL tear back in February, Of the four Big 12 teams that made up half of the 2011 her .35 ERA through the eight games preceding the injury still Women’s College World Series field, all four pitching aces re- remains the best in the conference. turn to the mound a year stronger for their prospective teams. Usual suspects Junior pitching aces Whitney Canion (Baylor), Kat Espinosa (Oklahoma State), Chelsea Thomas (Missouri) and OU’s Although the names may change from week to week, these Keilani Ricketts look to punch their tickets to the WCWS for particular pitchers are used to hearing them announced on what will be their second consecutive trip to the World Series, both conference and national honors lists. Ricketts has earned while junior Blaire Luna (Texas) continues to keep the No. 4 three Big 12 Pitcher of the Week honors and is the only Big 12 Longhorns in the top position in the Big 12 standings. player to earn a USA Softball Player of the Week award. Not only have the Big 12 pitchers taken opposing offenses “If she relaxes and does her thing, everything will work out,” to the wood shed already this season — the top five Big 12 Gasso said about her ace. “You used to see [Ricketts] get fruspitchers have a combined 27 shutouts and 547 Ks — but three trated at umpires and not make the right adjustments. Now of them have also earned opportunities to compete for the she’s answered her own call.” USA national team, an honor only bestowed among the naRicketts was also named to the 2012 USA Softball Player of tion’s most prolific softball players. the Year Watch List for the second consecuPlaying for Team USA also is something tive season during the preseason announceAT A GLANCE OU coach Patty Gasso confirms has helped ment in January. She joins Canion, Thomas Key upcoming her own team, including her pitching ace and Luna as the only four Big 12 pitchers repRicketts. resented on the national watch list. pitching duels “Being with that type of program surOklahoma currently holds the best earned • Missouri-Texas, Thursday rounds those players with big time competirun average in the nation at .72, and the to Saturday in Austin tion and big time athletes and really makes Sooner pitching staff is in a rhythm that them step up big,” Gasso said. “Ricketts’ tour doesn’t look like it will dissipate soon. Both • OU-Oklahoma State, with the national team has helped her unRicketts and Gascoigne are peaking on the April 11 in Stillwater derstand a lot about adversity.” mound this season, allowing a combined 98 Canion, Thomas and Ricketts round out hits in 689 at bats by opposing teams. • OU-Missouri, the top three pitchers in the Big 12. However, Missouri’s 1.07 combined ERA is ranked April 20-22 in Norman the trio shares another unique bond in the sixth in the country and good enough to give fact that all three have pitched for the USA the Tigers a 28-5 record this season. national team, helping the program earn gold medals in Thomas is 14-3 this year and continues to disrupt batters the Pan American Games and the World Cup of Softball last after collecting eight shutouts already this season. The eight year. shutouts is second best to Ricketts, who has the most shutouts “I think another advantage to playing in that type of pro- in the conference with 10. gram is that they all get to be friends,” Gasso said. “Those Another factor that makes these pitchers so volatile are their people are supposed to be your enemies, but they get to share strikeout performances. Ricketts (11.13) and Luna (11.53) are their programs and their training regimes with each other. both averaging over 11 strikeouts per game this season, while We always look for those players to come back and also share Thomas (9.77) could break the double digit strikeout barrier with us what they’ve learned out on the road where you’re not during the next weekend series. Ricketts has exploded to bejust representing your university but also your nation.” come the conference strikeout leader, posting 212 Ks in 22 And those type of elite experiences continuously are show- appearances. ing up on stat sheets inside the conference this season. While there do not seem to be any underclassmen lookCurrently four pitchers in the Big 12 sport ERAs under ing to challenge these tested veterans, the stakes are growing the 1.00 mark, while last season only one player — Thomas higher as these same pitchers are competing against one an— ended the season below that same mark with a .95 ERA. other in matchups during the regular conference schedule, In 2010, no Big 12 pitcher had below a 1.00 ERA in the and other conferences would be smart to watch these upconference. coming matchups to see who they may potentially be meetCanion, Thomas and Ricketts all have shrunk their ERAs ing during this year’s NCAA postseason. under .74 already this season, finding ways to keep runners And all of these top pitchers are battling it out for the Big 12 off of the bases and runs off of the scoreboard. Junior OU hardware.

Sports Reporter

20

25

30

Kat Espinosa, Oklahoma State

Whitney Canion, Baylor

Chelsea Thomas, Missouri

Blaire Luna, Texas

Keilani Ricketts, Oklahoma

Source: ncaa.com

35

GRAPH BY JAMES CORLEY/THE DAILY

Being

NUMBER ONE is nothing

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to celebrate.

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NUMBER ONE cancer killer.

But new treatments offer hope. Join Lung Cancer Alliance in the fight against this disease.

The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution.

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8

SPORTS

• Wednesday, April 4, 2012

Men’s gymnastics

COLUMN

Inexperienced OU squad responding well to pressure

Women’s tennis team plagued with inconsistency

Sooner freshmen step up

G

Greg Fewell Sports Editor

The No. 1 OU men’s gymnastics team is excruciatingly close to its goal. The team closed out the regular season as the top-ranked team with only one loss. The Sooners have had time to rest and heal minor injuries and are in prime position to do big things heading into the postseason. Only one thing remains to be seen: how will the young team respond to the pressure of the most important meets of the year? It is not uncommon for top-caliber teams to rely on a few freshmen for production. This season, though, the Sooners are relying on more than just a little production from their underclassmen. “At the beginning of the year, the freshmen were actually contributing 49 percent of our team’s score, and we have ten freshmen on the team right now,” senior Michael Heredia said. “So, them being able to step up is actually really crucial.” The Sooners’ roster of 18 men currently is made up of 10 freshmen, and all but one of those freshmen have competed in at least one event for Oklahoma in 2012. For the freshmen gymnasts, there was no easy transition period into college life. They entered college and immediately were put under trial by fire. “They have to consistently work probably harder than they have ever before at the sport,” coach Mark Williams said. “There are a few guys that are prepared that way, but for a majority of them, it’s a step up. That first year is all new.” Dylan Akers is one freshman who has contributed significantly to the Sooners’ 2012 championship run. Akers competes in the allaround competition for the team and already has put up some impressive scores in his freshman campaign. Akers echoed his coach’s s e nt i m e nt s, s ay i ng t h e level of competition and sheer volume of competitions can be overwhelming to newcomers to college gymnastics. “No matter how good of shape you’re in, you can’t really prepare for this before you come to college,” Akers

ricardo patino/the daily

Freshman Dylan Akers practices his vault routine in the Sam Viersen Gymnastics Center on Monday. Akers, who has competed in the all-around for Oklahoma this season, is one of nine freshmen that has seen action in his very first year at Oklahoma.

said. “Because before that, squad has exceeded expecyou’re competing maybe tations and handled the once every two or three pressure of college gymnasweeks. Here, you’re compet- tics better than could have ing five, six meets in a row. been expected. However, as the team goes It’s tough.” Tough, maybe. So far, into a conference champithough, the Sooners have onship and national chamha n d l e d t h e s t re nu ou s pionship, the pressure will schedule and pressure of the be on another level. When the season very “They have to team takes well. the floor at The team is consistently work Noble where every probably harder than Lloyd Center on other team in the nation is they have ever before April 19 for the NCAA striving to be: at the sport.” Qualifier, it on top. And Mark Williams, will be the with only two competitions OU men’s gymnastics coach biggest stage the OU freshleft this year, the Sooners seem poised to men have ever been on. How they respond to that not only meet, but exceed, any preseason expectations. kind of pressure remains In fact, given the number to be seen. The Sooners, of new faces on the squad, though, say they are ready. “I’m kind of nervous about Oklahoma probably has surprised most people around the postseason, but that’s only because I’m very excitthe country. “We’ve gotten a lot bet- ed,” Akers said. “It’s going to ter, I think, than most of the be my first time doing it, so people in the gymnastics I can’t really anticipate what community felt we would,” it’s going to be like. But I have Williams said. “We’ve gotten no doubt that we’re ready.” Of course, feeling ready in consistently better from the beginning of the season and the practice gym is entirely getting guys hitting routines different than feeling ready under pressure situations, in front of a crowd and video which for freshmen some- cameras on the national stage. times is difficult to do.” That is what separates the So far, the young Sooner

help is just a phone call away

9

number

crisis line

champions from the rest, though. Many of the Sooners on this year’s team are about to face the biggest two competitions of their young lives. They are competitors, though, at the highest level. If they weren’t, they wouldn’t be at Oklahoma. Besides, these freshmen have become accustomed to winning, regardless of the situation; they have been doing it all season. “I think we’ve handled it pretty well,” freshman Jacoby Rubin said. “And I don’t really mind the pressure.”

oing into the Sports Columnist 2012 season, coach David Mullins had relatively low expectations for his young squad. That is not to say, though, that Mullins and the players he coaches do Greg Fewell not want to win. greg_f@ou.edu “I didn’t have any grand expectations (coming into this season), Mullins said. “I knew we were going to use this year to develop and get better, and that we have lots of opportunities to knock some teams off.” While the team certainly has put itself in position to pull off some upsets, it has failed to capitalize on those chances. The Sooners currently are sitting at one game under .500 with a 9-10 record. The most frustrating thing about the team, though, is not its win-loss record, but its inconsistency. For proof, look no further than the team’s play since conference play began. The Sooners pulled out dominating 5-2 wins in back-to-back matches against Oklahoma State and Kansas. Then, Oklahoma failed to capitalize on the momentum, losing two close 4-3 matches on the road to Kansas State and College of Charleston, two teams the Sooners are very capable of beating. That was followed by two of the team’s best performances of the year, a 7-0 shutout of Iowa State and a 6-1 victory over Missouri. After those wins, the team seemed poised to do big things against Baylor and Texas Tech, the top two teams in the conference. Again, though, inconsistency crept in, and the Sooners came up flat. The first loss was a 4-3 heartbreaker in Waco. Then came a 5-2 loss at the hands of Texas Tech. Now, the team is back at square one trying to find a rhythm to finish out the conference slate above .500. If ever there was a time to find that rhythm, it would be now with only three games remaining before the Big 12 tournament. The Sooners are full of raw talent and are definitely building towards big things in the future. However, a strong finish to a sub-par season would do wonders for the team’s confidence going into next year, when Mullins will certainly be expecting more from the talented squad. Greg Fewell is a journalism senior and sports editor of The Daily

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Wednesday, April 4, 2012  

Wednesday, April 4, 2012

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