Issuu on Google+

Holistic admissions will raise OU’s standards (opinion, page 4) The University of Oklahoma’s independent student voice since 1916

F R I DAY, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 012

W W W.O U DA I LY.C O M

2 011 G OL D C ROW N F I N A L I S T

aDMissiOns

regents approve application changes OU Board of Regents votes to add recommendations, essay to application

The regents voted unanimously to adopt an application that would include essay and teacher or counselor recommendation sections for all high school students seeking fall 2014 chRIS MIlleR admission. assistant Campus Editor The approved measure also would The OU Board of Regents approved put an end to the automatic-admission a measure that would significantly criteria tied to ACT, GPA and class rank change the university’s admission pro- data currently in place. Administrators first considered the cess during its Thursday meeting.

changes when presented data compiled by University College Dean Doug Gaffin that showed the retention rates of students who gained automatic admission versus those who gained entry from a waiting list, said Nick Hathaway, OU executive vice president and vice president of administration and finance.

WHaT’S NEXT new admissions policy Before changes to the OU admissions policy are implemented, they must be approved by the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. The group’s next meeting is april 18-19, but OU

administrators likely will seek approval of the changes at the group’s meeting May 24-25 in Oklahoma City. If accepted, new applications will be presented this summer. Source: OU Board of Regents meeting agenda

see REGENTS page 2

MeDieval Fair

sOOner scanDals

Students strut their stuff during annual on-campus performance competition

Festival to host knights, damsels 36th annual fair kicks off today in Reaves Park MaRIah WeBB

life & arts Reporter

OUDaily.com

Upper left: Dorian Billups, Garrett Duty and Juanito Renteria (left to right) perform “Rooftop to Riches” during the Thursday night installment of Sooner Scandals 2012 in Donald W. Reynolds Performing arts Center. Brothers Under Christ members joined with the Kappa alpha Theta sorority for the production, which was set on a city rooftop where a group of young artists showcase their dance moves, killer voices and swagger, according to the event program.

Check out a photo gallery of thursday’s opening night of sooner scandals. read full coverage of the event during the weekend. oudaily.com/life&arts

left: Macey flowers performs during the Delta Delta Delta and Sigma Phi Epsilon “Bedazzled” performance Thursday in the Donald W. Reynolds Performing arts Center. Scandals 2012 tickets are $17 and available online. Scandals preparation includes envisioning and scripting a show, planning the logistics, creating sets and costumes and rehearsing. More than 450 students are involved in this year’s 69th-annual event.

above: Members of Delta Gamma, Beta Theta Pi and Pi Kappa Phi perform their “It’s a Wonderful life” routine. Thursday’s Scandals performances were the first of four scheduled during this year’s Campus activities Council-coordinated event. Event awards will be presented Saturday after the final Scandals performance for categories including best costumes, best choreography, best song, best supporting character, best female lead, best male lead and first place overall.

This weekend, a Norman tradition returns to Reaves Park in the form of kings, knights and other fantastical creatures. Today is the opening of the 36th annual Medieval Fair of Norman. The festival officially kicks off at 10 a.m. with an opening ceremony at the Royal Pavilion, located in the center of the park. Ann Marie Eckart, the Medieval Fair coordinator, said this year has seen an overwhelming rise in volunteers, specifically for roles in the royal court. “We held open auditions this year,” Eckart said. “We went from eight people in the royal court to 30.” With the increased interest, fair organizers were able to add some new characters to the royal court. “We have King Edward II, his son Edward the Black Prince, and a young Geoffrey Chaucer this year,” she said. The fair has also attracted new talent this year including The Duelists, a professional sword fighting comedy duo, and a group called Brizeus, Eckart said. Brizeus is a group of classical bagpipers who will be playing traditional medieval music on the Gryphon Stage. A popular attraction, the New Riders of the Golden see FAIR page 5

GO aND DO Medieval Fair WHEN: 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. friday through Sunday WHERE: Reaves Park, 2501 Jenkins ave.

pHotos By CHeLsea Lott/tHe daiLy

INFO: 405-325-8610

liFe & arTs VOL. 97, NO. 128

© 2012 OU Publications Board FREE — Additional copies 25 cents Campus ........................ Classifieds .................. Life & Arts ................... Opinion ...................... Sports .........................

2 6 7 4 8

The Daily’s open record requests

students show off their fashion for a cause

Requested document and purpose

Student fashion organization, Vintage Mahogani, raised money for the american Heart association. (page 7)

nOW Online aT

spOrTs

speaker addresses women, political change

OU baseball seeking first home big 12 win

Guest lecturer Haleh Esfandiari spoke about women’s affect on the changing political climate in the Middle East. (Multimedia)

The Sooners host the Kansas State Wildcats for a threegame series this weekend starting tonight. (page 8)

The most recent OU information Technology budget — To learn how funds are distributed and whether funding is allotted to pay fines for Internet piracy. a list of all 2012 big event sites — To compare the number of sites this year to previous years; to gather information about the site locations.

niKKi seLF/tHe daiLy

Kasey Catlett, letters senior, (left) gets his blood pressure taken Thursday by Norman Regional Hospital nurse ann Tobin at the UOSa Health fair on the South Oval. The fair also featured OUPD with drunk goggles.

all purchases of trees by OU landscape and grounds for OU arbor Day 2012 — To learn how much the department paid for the trees and what nurseries they came from.

Date requested

March 15

Wednesday

Thursday

visit OUDaily.com/openrecords for a complete list of The Daily’s requests


2

CAMPUS

• Friday, March 30, 2012

Campus

Laney Ellisor, campus editor Kathleen Evans, assistant campus editor Chris Miller, assistant campus editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

regents: Changes could take effect in summer Continued from page 1

Today around campus The 36th Annual Medieval Fair will take place through Sunday at Reaves Park. Admission is free. A forum about the future of American journalism will be held at 3 p.m. at Burton Hall, Room 210. A session about citing sources using Zotero, a Firefox add-on, will be held at 3 p.m. at Bizzell Memorial Library, Room 149D. A master class taught by mezzo-soprano Marilyn Horne will be held from 7 to 10 p.m. in Catlett Music Center’ Pitman Recital Hall. The baseball team will play Kansas State at 6:30 p.m. at L. Dale Mitchell Park. The softball team will play Kansas at 7 p.m. at Marita Hynes Field.

Saturday, MARCH 31 The baseball team will play Kansas State at 2 p.m. at L. Dale Mitchell Park. The softball team will play Kansas at 2 p.m. at Marita Hynes Field.

Corrections The Oklahoma Daily is committed to serving readers with accurate coverage and welcomes your comments about information that may require correction or clarification. To contact us with corrections, email us at dailynews@ou.edu. Visit OUDaily.com/corrections to see an archive of our corrections

The data essentially showed applicants who were above the automatic-admission criteria had a lower retention rate than those who were below it, Hathaway said. “That started to maybe point to a flaw in our criteria,” Hathaway said. Though the regents voiced approval for the altered admission plan, the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education must now vote on the matter as well. If the state regents approve, the university will begin to circulate fall 2013 applications featuring an essay component as soon as June, Hathaway said. The changes are a step that could help OU achieve a 75 percent graduation rate before his time in office is complete, OU President David Boren said during the meeting in the Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Scholars Room. “I think it’s very important, and I think we all know test scores don’t tell the whole story of a student,” Boren said. “(The changes) will give us the ability to look at the total person more effectively, and I think it will encourage more students to apply.” To do this, OU officials hope to implement the new Common Application system, which the regents’ agenda refers to as a more holistic approach. The additional information gathered about potential students from the application’s essay and recommendation sections will help administrators better focus academic services to fit first-year students’ needs, Boren said. “It’s so much better if you

REGENTS NOTEBOOK Thursday’s meeting in the Union

Designated smoking areas removed from OU tobacco-use policy

Scholars Walk, Asp Avenue renovations Given go ahead

Construction on the first components of a project that will eventually improve Asp In order to bring the OU Board of Regents’ Avenue and close the South Oval to all car recommendation for an on-campus tobacco and bus traffic has been allowed a $3.5 million maximum budget by the regents. ban into compliance with Gov. Mary Fallin’s That budget includes reconstruction of order, any mention of designated on-campus smoking areas was removed from OU’s policy a section of Asp Avenue north of Lindsey Street, expansion of the parking lot between Thursday by the regents. Brooks and Page Streets and construction of At its Jan. 24 meeting, the regents had approved a ban that allowed tobacco use at the Brooks Street bus transfer area. Once the South Oval is closed to vehicle two designated areas in the Dale Hall and traffic, the university’s proposed Scholars Lloyd Noble Center parking lots. Walk will honor the academic achievements Fallin overruled the regents’ decision of university professors, students and Feb. 6 by signing Executive Order 2012-01, which banned the use of tobacco on all state scholars, OU President David Boren said. “Great educators deserve to be property. The OU tobacco-use ban is still set to take remembered … and we should recognize students who have been outstanding effect July 1. Smoking cessation classes and resources scholars in their time,” Boren said. are currently available through OU Health Services and the Healthy Sooners Program. $15M budgeted for radar

OU Football stadium improvements approved

The regents unanimously approved an agenda item to improve Oklahoma Memorial Stadium’s east-side suites, Santee Lounge and Kerr McGee Stadium Club. The improvements will have a guaranteed maximum construction price of $950,000. Early construction work will commence this semester and be completed during the summer.

cannot have to wait until disasters occurred to identify people who, from day one, may need to get certain kinds of guidance,” Boren said. “We think the holistic admissions process will help us with that.” Though common applications would feature the essay component for fall 2013 applicants and the additional

innovations laboratory

The Radar Innovations Laboratory will be built on the University Research Campus south of One Partners Place and east of the National Weather Center. The center is intended to provide additional space for radar researchers and enhance researcher recruitment. The facility will be approximately 36,000 gross-square-feet when it is completed.

re c o m m e n dat i o n c o m ponent for fall 2014 applicants, an exception is made in the agenda for Oklahoma residents. In-state applicants will be automatically admitted until fall 2015 if they meet the current criteria, but some of those students will be expected to participate in focused gateway courses or

Compiled by Chris Miller

hold regular meetings with a graduation coach, Hathaway said. OU administrators likely will present the altered admissions policy to the state regents at their meeting scheduled for May 24 and 25 at the State Regents Office, 6 5 5 Re s ea rc h Pa rkway , Suite 200, in Oklahoma City, Hathaway said.

Friday, March 30, 2012 •

STORY LABEL

honors college

4x1 42-point header type type

Honors college to open new class

“XXXXXXXX X XXX XXXX XXXX XXXXX XXX XXXX XX XX XX XXX XXX XXXXXXX XXX XXX XXXXXXXXXXXX.”

1x3 14-point decka type type type type type xx Rachel Cervenka Campus Reporter

When Egyptian women called for a demonstration in Tahrir Square during International Women’s Day last year, they were physically attacked, subjected to virginity tests and chased from the square. An on-campus lecturer Haleh Esfandiari detailed the day’s events on Thursday and said a large cloud currently hangs over the future status of women’s rights in the Middle East. Esfandiari currently surves as director of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington D.C. Women’s rights in the Mi d d l e E a st have g o n e through a variety of changes since the Arab Spring began nearly a year ago, Esfandiari said. Men and women from all walks of life stood side by side during demonstrations calling for reform and regime change in certain Middle Eastern countries, she said. “Men and women called not for women’s rights but for human rights, human dignity, transparency, the rule of law and independent judiciaries,” Esfandiari said. These were 21st century revolutions born in the age of internet and social networks, she said. “The world could see revolutions unfolding before their eyes 24 hours a day,” Esfandiari said. Once uprisings ceased, women were returned to a lower status, Esfandiari said. They were routinely harassed, beaten and chased out of public places, she

XXXX XXX XXXX XXX, XXX XXXXXXX

Nikki Self/The Daily

Haleh Esfandiari, director and founder of the Middle East program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center in Washington, D.C., answers an audience member’s question Thursday at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum after a lecutre about women and the effect they have on the change in the Middle East.

said. “Unfortunately the Arab Awakening, for them, was a spring without flowers,” Esfandiari said. “Women w ere chas e d out of the squares they had once occupied and where they had been welcome as sisters in arms.” Some steps of democratization are taking place in these countries, yet women feel they are being marginalized by conservative groups,

Esfandiari said. “It is a fact of life in these countries that women are treated as foot soldiers that after the revolution must shed their uniform and return to their homes,” Esfandiari said. However, women are making strides in other areas in certain countries, she said. In Iran women have made significant progress since the revolution, she said. Education creates a sense

of self-confidence among women and raises their demands for opportunities, Esfandiari said. In post-Mubarak Egypt, the civility initially shown to women has evaporated, Esfandiari said. However, the women’s movement in Egypt has not been passive, she said. They are pushing for an article in the newly drafted Constitution that will preserve women’s rights and the advances women have made in the pre-revolutionary period, Esfandiari said. Esfandiari said she fears that Islamists will push for revision of the existing progressive personal statuses of women, but she remains optimistic that all is not lost. “Once women become aware of women’s power they cannot be delegated back to their homes and to traditional roles,” Esfandiari said. “Women must stay vigilant, remain one step ahead and continue the struggle for their rights.” Esfandiari addressed the OU community at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History in conjunction with the Stella Jo Morrisett Lectureship. The lecture was the third and final event of an annual symposium, which is presentedby the College of International Studies, Middle Eastern Studies coordinator Ariel Ahram said. The symposium features varying regions of the world each year, Ahram said.

Course to highlight iconic, obscure literature of 20th-century culture ARIANNA PICKARD Campus Reporter

An OU professor and her undergraduate assistant have put their heads together to choose literature iconic of 20th-century culture for a new course next fall. Julia Ehrhardt, OU honors and women’s and gender studies professor, and her honors research assistant Geraldine Richlin are developing a new honors class called “Perspectives on American Literary Cultures.” The class will begin by looking at “The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald, one of the most common books to read in a literature class, and then branch off to books that are rarely read in literature classes but had an immense impact on 20th-century culture, Ehrhardt said. “The idea is to start with something more familiar and then widen out people’s ideas and expectations of literature,” Ehrhardt said. There are other parts of literature, like comic books and detective novels, that do not get studied but played a huge part in 20th-century culture, she said. “I’m excited because I think it’s going to widen people’s perspective on literature and make people realize this is what people read in the 20th century,” Ehrhardt said. “I want people to read more and read more widely,” Ehrhardt said. “There’s a lot more to American literature than ‘The Scarlet Letter.’” The class is an honors perspectives course, but students not in the Honors College can take it with Ehrhardt’s permission, she said. English junior Richlin said she chose to assist Ehrhardt with developing this class through the Honors Research Assistant Program because she plans to become an English professor. “This is good for Geri because she’s going into the teaching field, so she needs to see what work goes into it, like the art of writing a syllabus,” Ehrhardt said. Richlin also helps decide which books to use for the new course, Ehrhardt said. Richlin said she really appreciates this experience because she was able to give input, make joint decisions with Ehrhardt and expand her own knowledge of literature. “I would’ve made huge mistakes if I hadn’t had Geri...,” Ehrhardt said. “She really did a herculean job.” The Honors Research Assistant Program is a unique opportunity for students because undergraduates get to participate, Ehrhardt said. “A lot of times, research assistants do slug work in the library,” Ehrhardt said. “I made sure that she got good experience that would be useful in her future career, instead of just Xeroxing.” This hands-on, real-world experience was enjoyable and beneficial, Richlin said. “I haven’t had to Xerox a singe thing,” Richlin said.

The University of Oklahoma Joe C. and Carole Kerr McClendon Honors College Invites the Public to UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH DAY Saturday, March 31, 2012 OCCE Forum Building, 1704 Asp Avenue SESSION I, 8:30 a.m.-10:00 a.m. Civic Engagement, Room A-1 Presenters: KatieBeth Gardner, Kelsey Kehlbeck, Hannah Kellogg Humanities I, Room A-2 Presenters: Jared Curran, Gerard Keiser, Patrick Winterrowd Health Issues I, Room A-3 Presenters: Jasmine Casey, Jay Kumar, Alim Ramji Economics, Technology, Room A-4 Presenters: Jerod Coker, Jennifer Quitoriano Engineering, Room A-5 Presenters: Alana Denning, Nhung Duong, Napat Kiatsakdawong, Zixin Wang, Henry Ware Education, Psychology, Sociology, Room A-6 Presenters: Trenton Haltom, Ewelina Ignaczak, Rachel Renbarger History I, Room B-1 Presenters: Cameron Dabiri, Joseph Foote, Ryan Geary, Meghan Riley Environments, Room B-2 Presenters: Madeline Dillner, Krystal Gayler, Stephen Pittman, Robert Rhoades, Juliet Sutton Computers, Room B-3 Presenters: Bryan Hoke, Joshua Maddux and James Shipe, Jeremy Rand, Khue Tran, Kevin Windham International Issues I, Room B-4 Presenters: Hallie Arias, Abby Coppedge, Amanda Niedzwiecki, Thomas Simpkins, Lena Tenney

SESSION II, 10:15 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Biomedical Engineering, Biochemistry, Room A-1 Presenters: Alexander Aria, Kevin Buettner, Nicholas Kirch and Brandon Smith, Jui-wen (Ryan) Liu, Abigail Overacre, Thomas Whittaker Humanities II, Room A-2 Presenters: Marcus Autry, Nicole Catterlin, Alison Frech, Brandon Harney, Jake Morgan, Mary Stanfield Health Issues II, Room A-3 Presenters: Morgan Fortner, Aamina Shakir, John Sosanya, Brian West Zoology, Room A-4 Presenters: Jordan Chapman, Nathan Clark, Maureen Lewis, Danielle Martin, Kristy Nguyen, Ross Sheline U. S. Politics, Room A-5 Presenters: Savannah Collins, Zach Deaton, Clayton Dodds, Jon Reynolds, Katherine Sasser Linguistics, Room A-6 Presenters: Ashley Davenport, William Fernandez, Pengpeng Jiang, Evan Pederson, Madison Sandefer, Tiegan Willoughby History II, Room B-1 Presenters: Grant Ashley, Kayla Pittman, Erin Smith Biochemistry, Physics, Room B-2 Presenters: Zachary Eldredge and Michael Reynolds, Madeline Murrell, Lauren Price, Mubeen Shakir, Nathan Thomas International Issues II, Room B-3 Presenters: Stuart Downey, Kristina King, Kiersten Strachan Fine Arts, Conference Room A Presenters: Elyse Emerich, Matthew Kaney, Austin Lintner, Dillon Votaw, Meredith Tyler, Nicole Arnone, Joel Behne, Alicia Clark, Carl Culley, Kate Dinsmore, Jamie Goldman, Shannon Hucker, Andrew Koslow, Emily Luhrs, Connor McCollum, Sophie Menas, Zachary Splittstoesser, Chelsea Stavis

3

Mom’s Day Tea 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. Saturday, March 31, 2012 Boyd House

For more information or accommodations on the basis of disability, please call (405) 325-3784.


2

CAMPUS

• Friday, March 30, 2012

Campus

Laney Ellisor, campus editor Kathleen Evans, assistant campus editor Chris Miller, assistant campus editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

regents: Changes could take effect in summer Continued from page 1

Today around campus The 36th Annual Medieval Fair will take place through Sunday at Reaves Park. Admission is free. A forum about the future of American journalism will be held at 3 p.m. at Burton Hall, Room 210. A session about citing sources using Zotero, a Firefox add-on, will be held at 3 p.m. at Bizzell Memorial Library, Room 149D. A master class taught by mezzo-soprano Marilyn Horne will be held from 7 to 10 p.m. in Catlett Music Center’ Pitman Recital Hall. The baseball team will play Kansas State at 6:30 p.m. at L. Dale Mitchell Park. The softball team will play Kansas at 7 p.m. at Marita Hynes Field.

Saturday, MARCH 31 The baseball team will play Kansas State at 2 p.m. at L. Dale Mitchell Park. The softball team will play Kansas at 2 p.m. at Marita Hynes Field.

Corrections The Oklahoma Daily is committed to serving readers with accurate coverage and welcomes your comments about information that may require correction or clarification. To contact us with corrections, email us at dailynews@ou.edu. Visit OUDaily.com/corrections to see an archive of our corrections

The data essentially showed applicants who were above the automatic-admission criteria had a lower retention rate than those who were below it, Hathaway said. “That started to maybe point to a flaw in our criteria,” Hathaway said. Though the regents voiced approval for the altered admission plan, the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education must now vote on the matter as well. If the state regents approve, the university will begin to circulate fall 2013 applications featuring an essay component as soon as June, Hathaway said. The changes are a step that could help OU achieve a 75 percent graduation rate before his time in office is complete, OU President David Boren said during the meeting in the Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Scholars Room. “I think it’s very important, and I think we all know test scores don’t tell the whole story of a student,” Boren said. “(The changes) will give us the ability to look at the total person more effectively, and I think it will encourage more students to apply.” To do this, OU officials hope to implement the new Common Application system, which the regents’ agenda refers to as a more holistic approach. The additional information gathered about potential students from the application’s essay and recommendation sections will help administrators better focus academic services to fit first-year students’ needs, Boren said. “It’s so much better if you

REGENTS NOTEBOOK Thursday’s meeting in the Union

Designated smoking areas removed from OU tobacco-use policy

Scholars Walk, Asp Avenue renovations Given go ahead

Construction on the first components of a project that will eventually improve Asp In order to bring the OU Board of Regents’ Avenue and close the South Oval to all car recommendation for an on-campus tobacco and bus traffic has been allowed a $3.5 million maximum budget by the regents. ban into compliance with Gov. Mary Fallin’s That budget includes reconstruction of order, any mention of designated on-campus smoking areas was removed from OU’s policy a section of Asp Avenue north of Lindsey Street, expansion of the parking lot between Thursday by the regents. Brooks and Page Streets and construction of At its Jan. 24 meeting, the regents had approved a ban that allowed tobacco use at the Brooks Street bus transfer area. Once the South Oval is closed to vehicle two designated areas in the Dale Hall and traffic, the university’s proposed Scholars Lloyd Noble Center parking lots. Walk will honor the academic achievements Fallin overruled the regents’ decision of university professors, students and Feb. 6 by signing Executive Order 2012-01, which banned the use of tobacco on all state scholars, OU President David Boren said. “Great educators deserve to be property. The OU tobacco-use ban is still set to take remembered … and we should recognize students who have been outstanding effect July 1. Smoking cessation classes and resources scholars in their time,” Boren said. are currently available through OU Health Services and the Healthy Sooners Program. $15M budgeted for radar

OU Football stadium improvements approved

The regents unanimously approved an agenda item to improve Oklahoma Memorial Stadium’s east-side suites, Santee Lounge and Kerr McGee Stadium Club. The improvements will have a guaranteed maximum construction price of $950,000. Early construction work will commence this semester and be completed during the summer.

cannot have to wait until disasters occurred to identify people who, from day one, may need to get certain kinds of guidance,” Boren said. “We think the holistic admissions process will help us with that.” Though common applications would feature the essay component for fall 2013 applicants and the additional

innovations laboratory

The Radar Innovations Laboratory will be built on the University Research Campus south of One Partners Place and east of the National Weather Center. The center is intended to provide additional space for radar researchers and enhance researcher recruitment. The facility will be approximately 36,000 gross-square-feet when it is completed.

re c o m m e n dat i o n c o m ponent for fall 2014 applicants, an exception is made in the agenda for Oklahoma residents. In-state applicants will be automatically admitted until fall 2015 if they meet the current criteria, but some of those students will be expected to participate in focused gateway courses or

Compiled by Chris Miller

hold regular meetings with a graduation coach, Hathaway said. OU administrators likely will present the altered admissions policy to the state regents at their meeting scheduled for May 24 and 25 at the State Regents Office, 6 5 5 Re s ea rc h Pa rkway , Suite 200, in Oklahoma City, Hathaway said.

Friday, March 30, 2012 •

Middle-eastern lecture

honors college

Arab women still face violence

Honors college to open new class

“Unfortunately the Arab Awakening, for them, was a spring without flowers.”

After Egyptian demonstrations, obstacles remain Rachel Cervenka Campus Reporter

When Egyptian women called for a demonstration in Tahrir Square during International Women’s Day last year, they were physically attacked, subjected to virginity tests and chased from the square. An on-campus lecturer Dr. Haleh Esfandiari detailed the day’s events Thursday and said a large cloud currently hangs over the future status of women’s rights in the Middle East. Esfandiari currently serves as director of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington D.C. Women’s rights in the Mi d d l e E a st have g o n e through a variety of changes since the Arab Spring began over a year ago, Esfandiari said. Men and women from all walks of life stood side by side during demonstrations calling for reform and regime change in certain Middle Eastern countries, she said. “Men and women called not for women’s rights but for human rights, human dignity, transparency, the rule of law and independent judiciaries,” Esfandiari said. These were 21st century revolutions born in the age of internet and social networks, she said. “The world could see revolutions unfolding before their eyes 24 hours a day,” Esfandiari said. Once uprisings ceased, women were returned to a lower status, Esfandiari said. They were routinely harassed, beaten and chased out of public places, she

Haleh Esfandiari, director of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

Nikki Self/The Daily

Haleh Esfandiari, director and founder of the Middle East program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center in Washington, D.C., answers an audience member’s question Thursday at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum after a lecutre about women and the effect they have on the change in the Middle East.

said. “Unfortunately the Arab Awakening, for them, was a spring without flowers,” Esfandiari said. “Women w ere chas e d out of the squares they had once occupied and where they had been welcome as sisters in arms.” Some steps of democratization are taking place in these countries, yet women feel they are being marginalized by conservative groups,

Esfandiari said. “It is a fact of life in these countries that women are treated as foot soldiers that after the revolution must shed their uniform and return to their homes,” Esfandiari said. However, women are making strides in other areas in certain countries, she said. In Iran women have made significant progress since the revolution, she said. Education creates a sense

of self-confidence among women and raises their demands for opportunities, Esfandiari said. In post-Mubarak Egypt, the civility initially shown to women has evaporated, Esfandiari said. However, the women’s movement in Egypt has not been passive, she said. They are pushing for an article in the newly drafted Constitution that will preserve women’s rights and the advances women have made in the pre-revolutionary period, Esfandiari said. Esfandiari said she fears that Islamists will push for revision of the existing progressive personal statuses of women, but she remains optimistic that all is not lost. “Once women become aware of women’s power they cannot be delegated back to their homes and to traditional roles,” Esfandiari said. “Women must stay vigilant, remain one step ahead and continue the struggle for their rights.” Esfandiari addressed the OU community at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History in conjunction with the Stella Jo Morrisett Lectureship. The lecture was the third and final event of an annual symposium, which is presented by the College of International Studies, Middle Eastern Studies coordinator Ariel Ahram said. The symposium features varying regions of the world each year, Ahram said.

Course to highlight iconic, obscure literature of 20th-century culture ARIANNA PICKARD Campus Reporter

An OU professor and her undergraduate assistant have put their heads together to choose literature iconic of 20th-century culture for a new course next fall. Julia Ehrhardt, OU honors and women’s and gender studies professor, and her honors research assistant Geraldine Richlin are developing a new honors class called “Perspectives on American Literary Cultures.” The class will begin by looking at “The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald, one of the most common books to read in a literature class, and then branch off to books that are rarely read in literature classes but had an immense impact on 20th-century culture, Ehrhardt said. “The idea is to start with something more familiar and then widen out people’s ideas and expectations of literature,” Ehrhardt said. There are other parts of literature, like comic books and detective novels, that do not get studied but played a huge part in 20th-century culture, she said. “I’m excited because I think it’s going to widen people’s perspective on literature and make people realize this is what people read in the 20th century,” Ehrhardt said. “I want people to read more and read more widely,” Ehrhardt said. “There’s a lot more to American literature than ‘The Scarlet Letter.’” The class is an honors perspectives course, but students not in the Honors College can take it with Ehrhardt’s permission, she said. English junior Richlin said she chose to assist Ehrhardt with developing this class through the Honors Research Assistant Program because she plans to become an English professor. “This is good for Geri because she’s going into the teaching field, so she needs to see what work goes into it, like the art of writing a syllabus,” Ehrhardt said. Richlin also helps decide which books to use for the new course, Ehrhardt said. Richlin said she really appreciates this experience because she was able to give input, make joint decisions with Ehrhardt and expand her own knowledge of literature. “I would’ve made huge mistakes if I hadn’t had Geri...,” Ehrhardt said. “She really did a herculean job.” The Honors Research Assistant Program is a unique opportunity for students because undergraduates get to participate, Ehrhardt said. “A lot of times, research assistants do slug work in the library,” Ehrhardt said. “I made sure that she got good experience that would be useful in her future career, instead of just Xeroxing.” This hands-on, real-world experience was enjoyable and beneficial, Richlin said. “I haven’t had to Xerox a singe thing,” Richlin said.

The University of Oklahoma Joe C. and Carole Kerr McClendon Honors College Invites the Public to UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH DAY Saturday, March 31, 2012 OCCE Forum Building, 1704 Asp Avenue SESSION I, 8:30 a.m.-10:00 a.m. Civic Engagement, Room A-1 Presenters: KatieBeth Gardner, Kelsey Kehlbeck, Hannah Kellogg Humanities I, Room A-2 Presenters: Jared Curran, Gerard Keiser, Patrick Winterrowd Health Issues I, Room A-3 Presenters: Jasmine Casey, Jay Kumar, Alim Ramji Economics, Technology, Room A-4 Presenters: Jerod Coker, Jennifer Quitoriano Engineering, Room A-5 Presenters: Alana Denning, Nhung Duong, Napat Kiatsakdawong, Zixin Wang, Henry Ware Education, Psychology, Sociology, Room A-6 Presenters: Trenton Haltom, Ewelina Ignaczak, Rachel Renbarger History I, Room B-1 Presenters: Cameron Dabiri, Joseph Foote, Ryan Geary, Meghan Riley Environments, Room B-2 Presenters: Madeline Dillner, Krystal Gayler, Stephen Pittman, Robert Rhoades, Juliet Sutton Computers, Room B-3 Presenters: Bryan Hoke, Joshua Maddux and James Shipe, Jeremy Rand, Khue Tran, Kevin Windham International Issues I, Room B-4 Presenters: Hallie Arias, Abby Coppedge, Amanda Niedzwiecki, Thomas Simpkins, Lena Tenney

SESSION II, 10:15 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Biomedical Engineering, Biochemistry, Room A-1 Presenters: Alexander Aria, Kevin Buettner, Nicholas Kirch and Brandon Smith, Jui-wen (Ryan) Liu, Abigail Overacre, Thomas Whittaker Humanities II, Room A-2 Presenters: Marcus Autry, Nicole Catterlin, Alison Frech, Brandon Harney, Jake Morgan, Mary Stanfield Health Issues II, Room A-3 Presenters: Morgan Fortner, Aamina Shakir, John Sosanya, Brian West Zoology, Room A-4 Presenters: Jordan Chapman, Nathan Clark, Maureen Lewis, Danielle Martin, Kristy Nguyen, Ross Sheline U. S. Politics, Room A-5 Presenters: Savannah Collins, Zach Deaton, Clayton Dodds, Jon Reynolds, Katherine Sasser Linguistics, Room A-6 Presenters: Ashley Davenport, William Fernandez, Pengpeng Jiang, Evan Pederson, Madison Sandefer, Tiegan Willoughby History II, Room B-1 Presenters: Grant Ashley, Kayla Pittman, Erin Smith Biochemistry, Physics, Room B-2 Presenters: Zachary Eldredge and Michael Reynolds, Madeline Murrell, Lauren Price, Mubeen Shakir, Nathan Thomas International Issues II, Room B-3 Presenters: Stuart Downey, Kristina King, Kiersten Strachan Fine Arts, Conference Room A Presenters: Elyse Emerich, Matthew Kaney, Austin Lintner, Dillon Votaw, Meredith Tyler, Nicole Arnone, Joel Behne, Alicia Clark, Carl Culley, Kate Dinsmore, Jamie Goldman, Shannon Hucker, Andrew Koslow, Emily Luhrs, Connor McCollum, Sophie Menas, Zachary Splittstoesser, Chelsea Stavis

3

Mom’s Day Tea 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. Saturday, March 31, 2012 Boyd House

For more information or accommodations on the basis of disability, please call (405) 325-3784.


4

Reader comment on OUDaily.com ››

• Friday, March 30, 2012

“Funny how the university plants all of these trees and acts ‘green’......but then I see the University WASTING TONS of water everyday by washing sidewalks and watering in the middle of the day... Good work, Boren.” (trey08, RE: ‘Sooners plant new roots during University’s Arbor Day celebration’)

OPINION EDITORIAL

University must raise standards Our View: Admissions changes will make OU a more competitive, higher quality university — if administrators use them right.

We’re not denying this is a big change. It’s another step in a substantial shift in the culture of this institution and how Sooners view themselves. Any big change is bound to produce resistance and concern. OU could have one more thing in common with But raising the standards of this university can only the Ivy League if the Oklahoma State Regents for stand to improve the education of all its students. It Higher Education approves changes to the univerwill improve class quality, raise the level of discourse sity’s admissions process. and increase opportunities for students. And The changes, approved Thursday by the it will increase the value of that long-sought The Our View OU Board of Regents, would replace the curis the majority piece of paper. opinion of rent automatic admissions requirements OU already is an institution that provides The Daily’s with a “holistic” application. This new apquality education and opportunities for its nine-member plication would include an essay, letters of students. But it could be more. This change editorial board recommendation and other factors. is one step on the path toward the prestiUnder the current system, students who gious, competitive institution OU could be. meet the automatic requirements based on comOf course, this proposal comes with questions. binations of GPA, test scores and high school class What exactly will be on these new applications? And ranking are accepted to OU. But this system is how will the admissions office avoid delays or money based on requirements, such as SAT scores, which spent on new staff, considering the time needed to have been shown to unfairly disadvantage mievaluate the new writing requirement? nority students or those from low socioeconomic We don’t know what will be on the new applicabackgrounds. tion. But whatever is included, much thought must A landmark 1993 study in the Hispanic Journal of go into evaluating this information in the right way. Behavioral Sciences showed that standardized test Leadership and community involvement should scores of Hispanic students consistently underprebe evaluated in terms of length and depth of commitdicted their college grades — results that have been ment, not just number of bullet points. And, given the supported by several other studies. importance of written communication in modern Several reports from the Journal of Higher society, the essay should be examined for technical Education also show that standardized test scores for ability, not just the ideas expressed. black students are less reliable in predicting college As for the other question, we see an easy fix: move success than those scores are for white students. OU’s admissions deadline earlier. OU’s deadline, in A holistic approach to admissions will help inearly April, is later than many other schools’ deadcrease the diversity of OU’s student body by bringing lines. Moving it to February would give the admisother factors into the admissions decision — factors sions office time to make the best decisions without that education experts like William E. Sedlacek have over-stressing the staff. found to be better indicators of college success. Other questions remain — such as who will evaluBy considering these factors along with the curate the written portion, given that current admissions rent information, OU can build a student body that is staff were not hired with this task in mind — and more likely to succeed, excel and graduate. This new work remains to be done, both on our end in followapplication process could raise the retention rate — a ing up on questions and on the administration’s end state goal of both OU President David Boren and Gov. in deciding details. We look forward to staying with Mary Fallin — as well as improve the average GPA this story and seeing OU’s next move. and boost student accomplishments. We laud OU’s regents for taking this step to raise But that will only happen if administrators view admissions standards and improve the institution this as a way to increase standards, not just open up as a whole. We urge the state regents to approve this admission to more students. In order to raise stanchange, and we caution the administration to caredards, some students who would have been accepted fully consider the best way to use this change to acunder the current requirements (but who are weak in complish its goals. the new areas) will have to be rejected. We hope this is what the university has in mind. Comment on this at OUDaily.com

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

It’s time UOSA becomes relevant at OU Editor’s Note: This letter outlines the planned platform positions of Jeffrey Moseley and Andrew Belliveau, who petitioned UOSA for the ability to run for UOSA president and vice president after the filing deadline. UOSA denied the request.

to attend our university, and they have a fundamental right to know where their money is being spent. This information needs to be traced to its final destination — it is not enough to know that $50,000 is allocated for “activities.” It is in this spirit that as president and vice president, we Accountability and advocacy would refuse our salaries for the next school year. We admit “We are all members of UOSA.” That is the catchphrase that this is a token amount, and while the office is a great that gets repeated year after year as elections draw near. We deal of work, we do not believe that we need to be incentivwholeheartedly agree with that statement. Service to one ized to serve our student body. another should be our highest calling, and student governAdvocate for the Common Student ment is a great outlet through which individuals can serve their academic communities. Perhaps the greatest strength of UOSA Executive Office However, something is ailing student government at OU. is the relative ease of access to members of the administraDespite having some of our most talented student leaders, tion. Using this access, we would emphasize the concerns of it is not taken seriously by the general student body. It is students — financial accountability again being a significant seen as an avenue for networking or career building. concern. This will not change in one academic year, but it is time Much like the “student activity fee,” the university has nuthat this change begins. merous, almost comically named charges on student’s burWe also understand that UOSA has significant con- sars. While we indeed have an excellent library and I occastraints; ultimately, some of UOSA’s decisions are mere sionally see people walking on the grass on the North Oval, suggestions to the real authority at this university. we believe that students and their families have a right to Decision-makers at the university may disagree with the know exactly where these monies are being spent. opinions of the student body. Despite this, it is our job and We agree that some of these fees are absolutely necessary responsibility to bring constant advocacy for the voice of to the operation of our university, but we need to know where the students. they are being spent. There needs to be some sort of accountIt is with these observations that we humbly submit our ability so all stakeholders at the university readily can access platform for UOSA president and vice president. information about where their money is going. We want to be straight with you: The university may simply Accountability with ‘Student Activity Fee’ disagree and refuse to change course on these policies. That Roughly $6 is tacked onto each credit hour at the universi- is its imperative. ty for “student activities.” OU has some great organizations, Regardless, it is our duty to bring these concerns to decision and it has been our honor and privilege to serve in several of makers at the university at every opportunity and venue. these groups on campus. A Recipe for Change This fee funds these organizations and, quite simply, without it some of OU’s greatest traditions would not mateDespite not being able to run for office, we believe that rialize. Regardless of its importance, students need to know these issues need to be brought to the attention of the incomwhere their money is going. We wish to open the allocation ing administration. Due to their experience and ability to process to the student body. Every cent needs to be account- follow deadlines, Joe Sangirardi and Rainey Sewell can help ed for. bring that change to the organization. It is time that student Despite the necessity of this fee, there inevitably is waste government is relevant at this university, and we hope that in the system. Our nation’s system of public higher educa- these issues are addressed in the upcoming academic year. tion is supposed to be one of the great equalizers in our sociJeffrey Moseley, finance junior, and Andrew Belliveau, ety, a way for all citizens to get ahead through hard work and economics and international business junior academic achievement. Students make financial sacrifices

Mary Stanfield, opinion editor dailyopinion@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

?

» Poll question of the day Should OU drop automatic admission and consider more factors on the application? To cast your vote, log on to COLUMN

‘Hunger Games’ casting sparks racial skirmish

T

he film “The OPINION COLUMNIST Hunger Games” came at a good time for our generation. After “Harry Potter” ended and “Twilight” diminished, “The Hunger Games” filled the void. Many welcomed it with open arms. Maya Sykes Of course, as is always Maya.S.Sykes-1@ou.edu the case, some ditched the books and waited for the premiere of the movie. Some fans — who I assume are these non-reading moviegoers, because the book clearly states what I am about to assert — were unaware of one seemingly minute detail: That the tributes from District 11, Rue and Thresh, were black. Page 98 of the first book states, “She has bright, dark, eyes and satiny brown skin.” The books are set in Panem, which is a fictitious representation of future North America. There are black people living in America right now, ergo it is completely logical for there to be black people in Panem. It saddens me to say, after the release of the movie, this one minuscule detail opened up a Pandora’s box of broken paradigms that despoil the lives of many black Americans. The fact people are upset that Rue and Thresh are black illustrates that black people face challenges well outside rectangular silver screens. And may I retract the word “upset,” as it is far too light a word to describe these fans’ reactions — devastation, anguish and offense better portray these opinions. A Tumblr called “Hunger Games Tweets” was made to expose these opinions. Degrading tweets like, “KK call me racist but when I found out Rue was black her death wasn’t sad” and “You wish we would cry over the black guy dying Lmao.” Many murders of blacks go unsolved because of hateful ideals like these. There also are tweets that questioned the film’s quality: “Why did Rue have to be black not gonna lie kinda ruined the movie?” “Why did the producer make all the good characters black smh?” “I was pumped about the Hunger Games. Until I learned that a black girl was playing Rue.” And lastly, “Eww Rue is black?? I’m not watching.” I do not understand why the color of someone’s skin is an important factor in whether that character is sympathetic or whether that movie is worth seeing. Some tweets stereotyped blacks. This tweet conveys that when this user thinks of a gangster, they picture a black man: “Thresh is a black gangster.” The author of this tweet alludes that blacks are ugly: “[Rue is] some ugly little girl with nappy ass hair. Pissed me off. She was supposed to be cute.” It is statements like these that make black Americans feel unwanted. Another tweet points out the “Awkward moment when Rue is some black girl and not the blonde innocent girl you picture.” So blacks are inherently villainous and untrustworthy? Lastly, the tweets, “I did not picture Rue being black” and “I imagined everyone to be white” shows how people of color can be pushed out of situations completely. Obviously, not all fans have the same views as these tweets. But clearly racism is still prominent in our society. These tweets are the preface for greater injustices. As a black woman, I have seen and heard firsthand how many black citizens are denied opportunities because of their race. And yet, Americans preach this is a land of equal opportunity. How hypocritical. The media portrays blacks in an unfair way. When Hurricane Katrina hit in 2005, photos showed people swimming in chest high water with bags of food. The caption for the photograph of a black resident said, “a young man walks in chest deep water after looting a grocery store,” whereas the caption for the photograph of two white residents read, “two residents wade though chest-deep water after finding bread and soda from a local grocery store.” When I went to New Zealand on a student ambassador program, I was asked by a student there if I was a gangster. She did not ask my white, Hispanic or other race peers, she asked only me. Why? Because I am black. Not all gangsters are black, but the media portrays it as if they are. But there is hope. People are not born racist; society makes them racist. Racism, prejudice and injustice can be stopped by not tying problems like poverty and drug addiction to the color of one’s skin. These are universal problems, not race-specific problems. So, next time you see a movie, do not focus on skin color. Pay attention to the acting. The color of an actor’s skin should not determine the value of a movie — or the value of a person. Maya Sykes is a University College freshman.

The Oklahoma Daily is a public forum, the University of Oklahoma’s independent student voice and an entirely student-run publication.

Chris Lusk Chase Cook James Corley Laney Ellisor Greg Fewell Lindsey Ruta

contact us

Editor in Chief Managing Editor Night Editor Campus Editor Sports Editor Life & Arts Editor

Mary Stanfield Kingsley Burns Melodie Lettkeman Katherine Borgerding Kyle Margerum Kristen Milburn

160 Copeland Hall, 860 Van Vleet Oval Norman, OK 73019-2052

phone:

405-325-3666

Opinion Editor Visual Editor Photo Chief Online Editor Copy Chief Advertising Manager

email:

dailynews@ou.edu

Letters should concentrate on issues, not personalities, and must be fewer than 250 words, typed and signed by the author(s). Letters will be edited for accuracy, space and style. Students must list their major and classification. To submit letters, email dailyopinion@ou.edu. Our View is the voice of the Editorial Board, which consists of nine student editors. The board meets at 5 p.m. Sunday to Thursday in 160 Copeland Hall. Board meetings are open to the public.

Guest columns are accepted and printed at the editor’s discretion. Columnists’ and cartoonists’ opinions are their own and not necessarily the views or opinions of The Oklahoma Daily Editorial Board. To advertise in The Oklahoma Daily, contact advertising manager Kristen Milburn by calling 405-325-8964 or emailing dailyads@ou.edu. One free copy of The Daily is available to members of the OU community. Additional copies may be purchased for 25 cents by contacting The Daily business office at 405-325-2522.


CAMPUS

Friday, March 30, 2012 •

fair: Event to include jousting, lectures, musical numbers Continued from page 1 Age, will once again occupy the Jousting Field, she said. Although they are funded by the local Arthurian Order of Avalon, the New Riders of the Golden Age group is an internationally recognized theatrical jousting group based out of Florida, Eckart said. Today also is the fair’s educational day. Several special performances will be held for students on field trips. Many schools from around the state will visit the fair today, Eckart said. The educational performances offered to them include chivalry class by the jousters, as well as several lectures by the Society for Creative Anachronism, including: Weapons of the Middle Ages, What Ails You? A brief overview of natural cures of the Middle Ages and Songs of the Middle Ages, Eckart said. Another anticipated performance this year is from a troupe called The Bilge Pumps, who perform as a group of professional pirates, she said. “They joke about the fact that we make them tone down their show. We are a family-friendly show,” Eckart said. “Their humor gets a little bit bawdy, but for us they stick to double entendres.” Eckart said The Bilge Pumps’ general rule of thumb is, “If your children get our jokes, it’s not our fault!” There also are several new vendors this year including Highland Rat, Eckart said. “They sell stuffed ‘plague rats’ that are actually just

Photos by Kingsley Burns/the Daily

Top: Leslie Gillies (right) helps vendors locate their spots Thursday in Reeves Park to prepare for this weekend’s Medieval Fair. Gillies said she has attended the Medieval Fair since 1982. The annual event has been a Norman tradition since 1977, when it was first held on the South Oval.

really cute plush rats,” she said. “My favorite is the Pi Rat. It has a little eye patch and the Pi symbol on its back.” Another event Eckart recommends is the costume contests Saturday and Sunday. Registration for each contest is at 1:15 p.m. at the Camelot Stage and the contest will take place at 1:45 p.m. each day. There are prizes for the winners in the men’s, women’s, teens’ and children’s categories. The Medieval Fair runs through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. each day.

Left: Scott Swendsen displays a wooden longsword Thursday in Reeves Park to prepare for this weekend’s Medieval Fair. Swendsen said the family-owned wood shop has participated in the Medieval Fair for more than 15 years.

Campus Briefs Charitable Gifts

Financial aid

Masons donate $250K Scholarships created to fund OU Leader Summit for OU female journalists The Masonic Charity Foundation of with endowment funds Oklahoma donated $250,000 for the an-

nual OU Leader Summit, OU President David Boren announced Thursday at the OU Board of Regents meeting in the Oklahoma Memorial Union. Student Affairs has hosted the leadership summit every January for the past seven years to teach students networking and leadership skills, according to a press release. More than 300 students representing various OU organizations participate each year. The endowment is “one of the most significant in the history of Student Affairs,” Vice President for Student Affairs Clarke Stroud said in the press release. “We know this is a quality program that makes a positive impact in students who we hope will make a positive impact on their communities and our state,” Grand Master of Masons Randall Rogers said in the press release. Because of the gift, the summit will be called the OU Leader Summit, Presented by the Masonic Fraternity of Oklahoma, according to the press release. Max Janerka, Campus Reporter

OU will use a new $1 million endowment to create scholarships for female journalism students. OU journalism alumna Mildred Nichols Hamilton, the first woman to serve as editor of The Oklahoma Daily and to report from the stadium press box, established the endowment when she died in 2010, according to a press release. OU President David Boren announced the endowment, one of the largest in the Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication, Thursday at the OU Board of Regents meeting in the Oklahoma Memorial Union. The college will award five women with four-year, $2,000 scholarships at its ceremony April 21, according to a release. “Her gift will continue to help students for years to come,” Boren said in a release. “It is especially needed now as decreasing state support has driven up costs for students, many of whom work at extra jobs to afford a college education.” Max Janerka, Campus Reporter

NUMBER ONE is nothing Eyebrow Waxing $8.00

Discount with OU ID or this coupon!

116 S. Main, Noble 127 N. Porter 360-4247 872-1661

The Works $16.99 Shampoo/ Cut/Blowdry

$6 Bang Trim 1100 E. 1215 W. Lindsey Constitution 129 N.W. Ave. 364-1325 Themaneman.net 360-4422 579-1202

X This year, more than

172,000 people will be diagnosed with lung cancer, and more than 163,000 will die —

Expires on May 31, 2012

making it America’s

NUMBER ONE cancer killer.

But new treatments offer hope. Join Lung Cancer Alliance in the fight against this disease.

lungcanceralliance.org

The OU debate team won the largest collegiate debate tournament in the U.S. on Monday, making this their fourth title in the past six years. The competition included 167 two-person teams from 65 colleges and universities nationwide, according to a press release. Te a m m e m b e r s R J Giglio, business management senior, and Chris Leonardi, political science freshman, defeated the opposition from Whitman College by a margin of 6-3, securing the title, according to a release. Giglio also was named t h e N o. 2 s p e a k e r a t t h e t o u r na m e nt, a n d Leonardi won the No. 7 spot, according to a release. OU team members Rashid Campbell, African American studies sophomore, and George Lee, African American studies junior, were defeated by Giglio and Leonardi in the Octa-Final debate after winning their two elimination debates on a 3-0 decision, according to a release. The championship is awarded by the Cross Examination Debate Association, which was founded in 1971 and is the principal national debate association. The debate team was reinstated at OU about eight years ago, said university press secretary Michael Nash. “The fact that it is so new and has done so well speaks volumes about what type of students we have here at OU,” Nash said. Rachel Cervenka, Campus Reporter

atbtanning.com

HAIRCUT • $11.99 Non-Requested Stylist Only

Sooner debate team triumphs at tournament

UE!

WITH HAIRCUT • $54.99 WEAVE OR FOIL ADD $10.00

to celebrate.

Academic competition

1 1 5 VAL

HIGHLIGHTING OR COLOR

Being

.

*Some restrictions apply.

5


6

• Friday, March 30, 2012

Classifieds L

PLACE AN AD Phone: 405-325-2521 E-mail: classifieds@ou.edu

Fax: 405-325-7517 Campus Address: COH 149A

DEADLINES Line Ad..................................................................................3 days prior Place line ad by 9:00 a.m. 3 business days prior to publication.

Display Ad ............................................................................3 days prior Classified Display or Classified Card Ad Place your display, classified display or classified card ads by 5:00 p.m. 3 business days prior to publication.

classifieds@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-2521

Lost? Stolen? Motorcycle jacket, camera, phone at “The Abner,� downtown Norman, Saturday, March 17, 2012. Any information, call Bill 996-0411

C Transportation

AUTO INSURANCE

Auto Insurance Quotations Anytime

Foreign Students Welcomed JIM HOLMES INSURANCE, 321-4664

Military Sales & Service Company has an opening for a part-time Electronics salesperson to work at Tinker Air Force Base exchange, primarily on weekends, for 710 hours per week. If you desire parttime work, are available on Friday/Saturday/Sunday, have general knowledge of computer and audio/video hardware and good communication skills, please apply. Call Tamarra 469-221-4147

TM

Payment is required at the time the ad is placed. Credit cards, cash, money orders or local checks accepted.

DUPLEXES UNFURNISHED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

LOST & FOUND

PAYMENT s r r

J Housing Rentals

Lost & Found

Research volunteers needed! Researchers at OU Health Sciences Center need healthy volunteers ages 18 to 30 who have a parent with or without a history of an alcohol or drug problem. Qualified participants will be compensated for their time. Call (405) 456-4303 to learn more about the study and to see if you qualify. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution.

Charleston’s

300 Ed Noble Pkwy, Norman Hiring FT/PT waitstaff, hosts, curbside, kitchen. Must be energetic and outgoing. Apply in person, M-F, 2-5 p.m Research Participants Conflicting information-processing study at OUHSC seeks 17-19 year old volunteers. Single 2.5 hour test session, flexible hours, cash compensation. Include your name, phone, e-mail. Contact: 405271-4214 xt 46073. Email blas-espinoza-varas@ouhsc.edu Bartending! Up to $300/day. No exp nec. Training available. 800-965-6520, x133

$5,500-$10,000

PAID EGG DONORS. All Races needed. Non-smokers, Ages 18-27, SAT>1100/ACT>24/GPA>3.00 Contact: info@eggdonorcenter.com STUDENTPAYOUTS.COM Paid survey takers needed in Norman 100% FREE to join. Click on Surveys. O Asian Fusion at East 12th & Alameda NOW HIRING EXPERIENCED SERVERS Apply within 10-11am or 2-5pm daily Voted Best Sushi Bar and Asian restaurant by Norman Transcript and OU Daily readers! Patio Now Open! Make extra summer $$! SOONER BLOOMERS, seasonal retail garden center, now hiring for spring season, April, May & June. Full & Part time positions, call Debbie at 405-476-2977 for interview.

$525/mo! Walk to OU! 2bd, 2 blocks from Sarkey’s Energy Center. Carpet, blinds, NEW CH/A, appliances, W/D & new storm shelter: 203-3493

HOUSES UNFURNISHED WALK TO OU! Secluded 2bd/1ba cottage. $480/mo + dep. Call Don 204-4016 Nice historic home, perfect for small family, professor or grad student. 404 Chautauqua 2bd/1.5ba - $1000/mo, $1000/dep 366-1111

Being

NUMBER ONE is nothing to celebrate.

FIND A JOB in the CLASSIFIEDS

RATES Line Ad

There is a 2 line minimum charge; approximately 42 characters per line, including spaces and punctuation. (Cost = Days x # lines x $/line) 10-14 days.........$1.15/line 15-19 days.........$1.00/line 20-29 days........$ .90/line 30+ days ........ $ .85/line

1 day ..................$4.25/line 2 days ................$2.50/line 3-4 days.............$2.00/line 5-9 days.............$1.50/line

This year, more than

172,000 people will be diagnosed with lung cancer, and more than 163,000 will die — making it America’s

NUMBER ONE cancer killer.

Classified Display, Classified Card Ad or Game Sponsorship

But new treatments offer hope. Join Lung Cancer Alliance in the fight against this disease.

Contact an Acct Executive for details at 325-2521. 2 col (3.25 in) x 2 inches Sudoku ..............$760/month Boggle ...............$760/month Horoscope ........$760/month

2 col (3.25 in) x 2.25 inches Crossword ........$515/month lungcanceralliance.org

POLICY

Give your friend or loved one a gift they will never forget. Celebrate with the rest of campus in The Oklahoma Daily!

The Oklahoma Daily is responsible for one day’s incorrect advertising. If your ad appears incorrectly, or if you wish to cancel your ad call 3252521, before the deadline for cancellation in the next issue. Errors not the fault of the advertiser will be adjusted. Refunds will not be issued for late cancellations. The Oklahoma Daily will not knowingly accept advertisements that discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, religious preference, national origin or sexual orientation. Violations of this policy should be reported to The Oklahoma Daily Business Office at 325-2521.

Con

Help Wanted ads in The Oklahoma Daily are not to separate as to gender. Advertisers may not discriminate in employment ads based on race, color, religion or gender unless such qualifying factors are essential to a given position.

grat

s Lil

, thday r i B y Happ

Sis!

Celebration Ads

All ads are subject to acceptance by The Oklahoma Daily. Ad acceptance may be re-evaluated at any time.

2 column x 3�-Black and White $45 2 column x 3�-1 Spot Color $80

Spring Specials

CONGRATULATIONS, ANNIE! *Ask for Process Color pricing

HOROSCOPE By Bernice Bede Osol

Copyright 2012, Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 2012 After suffering many disappointments in the past, exciting developments could now be in the offing for you in the year ahead. More than a few of last year’s losers could become big winners in the months that follow.

$445 $515 $440 $510 $700

ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- People you’ll be dealing with will be just as anxious to protect their interests as you are to protect your own. Don’t expect any concessions or indulgences. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- The longer you weigh something, the more you are likely to be affected by a case of paralysis. Besides, your first evaluation is apt to be most accurate anyway.

    



 

     

 

   



 

  

Previous Solution                                                                        

        

Monday- Very Easy Tuesday-Easy Wednesday- Easy Thursday- Medium Friday - Hard

Instructions: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. That means that no number is repeated in any row, column or box.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -Provided you are as good in the final stretches as you are during your opening gambit, your chances for acquisition look reasonably possible. Hopefully, your material motivation will be strong enough. CANCER (June 21-July 22) --Being able to accurately assess matters will not be your problem today. Your headache is likely to come from a failure to act in accordance with your better judgment. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --Although you’ll be reasonably astute at judging commercial matters, you might not be quite as shrewd when doing business with others. As the saying goes: “Keep your powder dry.� VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Don’t make promises to a friend request-

ing a favor unless you truly mean it. This person will be counting on you, and if you renege, hard feelings will come of it. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --Someone who had no hand in what you accomplished lately might attempt to take the credit for all of your efforts. Set the record straight immediately, so she or he won’t try again. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) --If you stand by without intervening, you will be judged by some bad opinions being expressed by your companions. When you’re not in accord with their views, make your position known. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Put the interests of your family or loved ones above all others, especially when you are placed in the awkward position of having to make a choice. No one should be more important than your kin. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) --Just because certain morals or principles by which you abide are unpopular with some of your peers, it’s no reason to dilute or lower your standards just to fit in. Stay the course. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- You might not receive everything to which you’re entitled if you fail to stand up for your rights. Think about it: If you’re timid, louder personalities will take over the spotlight. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --When it comes to involvements where teamwork is essential, be sure to link up only with those who can pull their own weight. You’ll fail if you’re harnessed with weaklings.

Joe!

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT FOR DETAILS

325-2521

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker March 30, 2012 ACROSS 1 Autumn bloomers (Abbr.) 5 “Back to the Future� bully 9 Adult tent caterpillar (Var.) 14 At the high point of 15 Citrus fruit similar to a grapefruit 16 World’s largest producer of rice 17 Delhi princess 18 Remains to be seen? 19 Accept, as a credit card 20 Cause of a diet setback, perhaps 23 10 jiao 24 Wildcatter’s strike 25 Brick bearer 28 Afflicted with muscle tremors 31 Volcanic fallout 34 Clear sky’s color 36 His partner 37 Vocal quartet member 38 Cause of a diet setback, perhaps 42 “It follows logically ...� 43 “___ Miss Brooks� 44 Like many Poe stories 45 “Lucy in the ___ with Diamonds� 46 Chinese

3/30

restaurant appetizer 49 “Old college� effort 50 ___ Lanka 51 “___ contendere� (no contest) 53 Cause of a diet setback, perhaps 61 Sans companions 62 Revise writing 63 A psychic may claim to see it 64 Hindu princes 65 “... to form a ___ perfect union� 66 Varieties or types 67 Angry bull’s sound 68 Wintertime slider 69 Take a breather DOWN 1 Wine press residue 2 Its state flower is the sego lily 3 “The kissing disease,� casually 4 Hot, on a Chinese menu 5 Potato sack material 6 Williams title lizard 7 Act the butterfly 8 “Can’t complain� 9 Imitative of a natural sound 10 One who commits grave

offenses? 11 Array on a bar shelf 12 Adam’s grandson 13 Seldom seen 21 Common black European thrush (Var.) 22 Ripple pattern on a stamp 25 Wealthy bunch 26 Arkansas’ ___ Mountains 27 Super Bowl XLI-winning coach Tony 29 Bake in a shallow dish, as eggs 30 Gumshoe, briefly 31 All-points bulletin 32 Device for upward mobility 33 Comfy-cozy 35 “Road to ___� 37 Be in another form?

39 Careful reasoning 40 Calendar abbr. 41 Instrument played sitting down 46 “KnowwhutImean?� character 47 In the middle of a hot streak 48 Hit high 50 Bat’s detection tool 52 “Live� 53 “___ and the Real Girl� (2007 movie) 54 Distinctive and stylish elegance 55 Austin Powers’ “power� 56 Does a tailoring job 57 “American ___� 58 Act like a baby 59 Gets under the skin of 60 Geographical region

PREVIOUS PUZZLE ANSWER

3/29

Š 2012 Universal Uclick www.upuzzles.com

I’LL START DIETING TOMORROW By Rob Lee


Friday, March 30, 2012 •

Life&arts

7

OUDaily.com ›› If your first week back from break was stressful, let the life and arts desk help you make it up with a great weekend. Check out our weekend suggestions.

Lindsey Ruta, life & arts editor Mariah Webb, assistant life & arts editor dailyent@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

Sorority partners with student bloggers for night of fashion

Photos by Carey Flack/The Daily

Uche Ukuku, graduate student, and Brent Corley, political science senior, walk the runway during “Fashion goes Red” on Thursday night in the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. The event was held to benefit The American Heart Association, and was hosted by Delta Sigma Theta and Vintage Mahogani.

Sooners rock the catwalk

for a cause

Westlee Parsons Life & Arts Reporter

The thumps of hip-hop bass filled the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art as spectators filed in to watch “Fashion Goes Red,” a fashion show put on Thursday by Delta Sigma Theta with styling and direction from Vintage Mahogani, a fashion blog run by two OU students. But helping people find their perfect look is not all communications sophomore Angela Douglass and human resources senior Tavona Traylor are doing for the campus and the community. “We do a lot of philanthropy,” Douglass said. The “Fashion Goes Red” show was set up by Delta Sigma Theta in order to raise money for the American Heart Association. Douglass and Traylor coordinated the walks and fashion while the sorority handled the logistics like booking the venue, Douglass said. “The Deltas actually approached us to do the show because we did [a philanthropy event with them] in

AT A GLANCE Vintage Mahogani Vintage Mahogani is a fashion blog started by communications sophomore Angela Douglass and human resources senior Tavona Traylor. The blog features women’s and men’s clothing, and special pieces for causes and inspirational tips. Vintage Mahogani is more than just a fashion blog that tells people what is in style, Douglass said. “We do actual tutorials about how to put things together,” she said. Douglass said she and Traylor believe it is important for people to not only know what is in fashion, but how to make it look good on.

October,” Douglass said. T h e s h o w ’s t h e m e w a s D e l t a Airlines, a play on the sorority’s name, and aimed for an experience of traveling all across the U.S. and how that effects style; for example, how clothing differs in the Hamptons from Miami,

Douglass said. The masters of ceremonies were Charles Atchison, human resources senior, and Candace Jordan, Miss Black OU 2011. Jordan’s platform when participating in the Miss Black OU pageant was heart disease awareness, Douglass said. Jordan made an introduction in the style of the theme of Delta Airlines. “All passengers must remain seated at takeoff and at landing. No smoking because smoking causes heart disease, and all passengers must be open to receive the awesomeness that is about to happen,” Jordan said. Throughout the show, Jordan and Atchison gave facts about heart disease with clever references to the audience being on an airplane. Red was not the first color to walk to runway — white and black clothing kicked off the show first. Women wore pops of red in lipstick or accessories and the men in ties or shoes. Styles ranged from sundresses to corporate casual. The styles changed as the location

Lauren Whiteman, public relations senior, was one of many students involved in the fashion fundraiser. Early outfits in the “Fashion goes Red” show featured subtle shades of red, but the color became more prominent in the clothing as the night continued.

of the imaginary airplane moved from place to place. As the show went on, red became more prominent in the outfits from striped tops and polos to chiffon evening wear. The gradients of red also ranged from light pink to bright primary red and were paired with not only white and black but also navy blue, animal prints and more. The house was packed with fashion lovers of all ages to watch the ladies and gentlemen walk the runway and help heart disease awareness. The audience cheered and clapped the night away for fashion and for healthy hearts.

St. Thomas More University Parish Holy Week Mass Times April 5th Holy Thursday: 7:00pm

April 6th Good Friday Veneration of the Cross: 7:00pm April 7th Easter Vigil Mass 5:00pm April 8th Easter Sunday 8:30am, 11:00am, 5:00pm

100 E. Stinson


8

• Friday, March 30, 2012

SPORTS More online at

OUDaily.com ›› OU women’s tennis, fresh off a pair of conference wins at home, hits the road to take on the No. 11Baylor Bears in Waco.

Greg Fewell, sports editor Kedric Kitchens, assistant sports editor dailysports@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

| GOLF: The Sooner women’s golf team will be looking for its third straight top-three finish this weekend at the Liz Murphey Collegiate Classic

SOFTBALL

Sooners to host Big 12 home debut Team coming off of four-run win over Oklahoma State

AT A GLANCE Softball schedule Today vs. Kansas Saturday vs. Kansas Sunday vs. Kansas Thursday vs. Texas Tech April 6 vs. Texas Tech April 7 vs. Texas Tech April 11 at Oklahoma State April 13 at Texas A&M April 14 at Texas A&M April 15 at Texas A&M April 18 vs. North Texas April 20 vs. Missouri April 21 vs. Missouri April 22 vs. Missouri April 25 vs. Oklahoma State April 28 at Central Arkansas April 29 at Central Arkansas May 4 vs. Texas May 5 vs. Texas May 6 vs. Texas May 11 at Iowa State May 12 at Iowa State May 13 at Iowa State

TOBI NEIDY

Sports Reporter

With a 47-41 overall series lead, No. 7 Oklahoma softball prepares to extend its grasp over Kansas by hosting the Jayhawks for a three game series this weekend in Norman. The game at 7 tonight also marks the home opener for the Sooners’ 2012 conference slate. OU (27-4, 3-1 Big 12) is coming off a 4-0 shutout victory over Bedlam rival, Oklahoma State, Wednesday. Junior ace Keilani Ricketts gave up just one hit and one walk during the seven inning affair, shrinking her ERA to 0.69 after producing a 1.48 ERA last season. OU will need to continue to see this type of maturation from their ace pitcher as it tries to remain perfect at home this season (8-0). But more importantly, this single season growth from Ricketts has given OU head coach Patty Gasso something to appreciate when the team gets into a jam. “Ricketts is not allowing outside influences to get to her like she used to,� Gasso said. “Surrounding herself with elite athletes on the national team has helped her get to that level. In the past, you would start to see things unravel with her and what she’s done now is answer her own call.� That maturation in the circle also has built a new respect between head coach and ace pitcher that will play

Bold games are in Norman REBEKAH CORNWELL/THE DAILY

Freshman Georgia Casey tags out an Austin Peay baserunner during the first inning of OU’s March 6 victory. Since the home victory over Austin Peay, the Sooners are 12-1 with the only loss coming on the road this team needs the underclassmen to do big things against No. 15 Baylor. Oklahoma still has yet to lose a game in the state of Oklahoma this season.

KEY OPPONENT Maggie Hull Year: Junior Position: Outfield Hometown: Lawrence, Kan. Season stats: Leads the Jayhawks with a .374 batting average.

a big role in helping this team get through the Big 12 stint and into the NCAA postseason. “Usually now if I call a

time-out, I’ll walk out there to just give her a breath and actually just talk to infield,� Gasso said. “That’s because she’s in her zone and there just isn’t a lot for me to say, because she knows how to handle things now.� On the other side of the plate, the Sooner offense is quickly becoming known as one of the most potent offenses in the country. During the Bedlam win, OU’s offense scored four runs on seven hits that included a solo home run by sophomore Javen Henson, her third of the season. With the sixth inning

homer, OU now has produced 46 bombs in 31 games t h i s s e a s o n . F re s h ma n Lauren Chamberlain, who led off the scoring onslaught against OSU, continues to lead the Big 12 conference with 12 home runs this year. Although it is Chamberlain’s first year in a Sooner uniform, Gasso sees the team’s veteran leadership playing a big role in allowing the newcomers to gain confidence and maturity. “Leaders like (Jessica) Shults and Ricketts are telling this freshman class that they can’t wait to step up,� Gasso said. “They’re saying

now.� The Jayhawks (23-7, 2-4 Big 12) have played 27-of-30 games away from home already this year. While the team isn’t a stranger to facing opponents on the road, KU head coach Megan Smith knows what kind of team to expect when her team travels to Marita Hynes field. “(Oklahoma) has one of the best team in the country, year in and year out,� Smith said. “We’re in a conference where we play the best every weekend and this weekend will be no different.� OU holds a 26-12 advantage in games played in Norman.

BASEBALL

Oklahoma eyes first home victory in conference UP NEXT vs. Kansas State

John to get second start of season against Wildcats

When: 6:30 tonight

DILLON PHILLIPS Sports Reporter

Oklahoma’s baseball team has the opportunity to capture its first home victory in conference play Friday night when the Kansas State Wildcats come to town for a three-game weekend series. The Sooners have won five of their last six games, including a 2-1 series win on the road against Texas Tech, after being swept by No. 25 Texas in Norman two weeks ago and falling from the Top 25. For the second week in a row, sophomore Jordan John will be the Friday night starter, followed by undefeated sophomore Dillon Overton on Saturday and sophomore Jonathan Gray closing out the series Sunday. John began the season as the top reliever in the

help is just a phone call away

9

number

crisis line

325-6963 (NYNE)

OU Number Nyne Crisis Line

8 p.m.-4 a.m. every day

except OU holidays and breaks South Canadian Valley Church of Christ

Come join us to learn God’s word. 4VOEBZBN UI4VOEBZQN 8FEOFTEBZQN 

UI"WF48tXXXOPSNBODIVSDIDPN

REBEKAH CORNWELL/THE DAILY

Junior pitcher Drew Harrison prepares to release a pitch during Oklahoma’s March 6 home matchup with Arkansas-Pine Bluff. The Sooners won, 9-4. The team is 8-4 at home this season but still is looking for a conference win at L. Dale Mitchell Park.

Sooners’ bullpen but has recently been moved into OU’s starting rotation. Although John leads all Sooner pitchers with 18

appearances, Friday night will be only his second start of the season. In his first outing, John gave up five runs on 10 hits

through 7 1/3 innings in a 6-1 loss to Tech, but he received virtually no support from the Sooners’ sticks. With the exception of Max White, OU’s offense went a miserable 3-for-29 against the Red Raiders with six Sooners failing to record a single hit. John will need to receive better run support when he takes the mound against K-State, a team that boasts a pair of wins against ranked Big 12 opponents. The Wildcats topped No. 6 Texas A&M in a 15-12 slugfest March 16 in College Station

and put together a 5-2 victory over Texas in Manhattan, Kan., just a week ago. Since the victory over Texas, though, K-State is on a three-game losing streak. The Wildcats will try to remedy that when they take the field against the streaking Sooners at 6:30 tonight at L. Dale Mitchell Park.

MEN’S TENNIS

OU tries to knock off No. 13 Texas Team to open Big 12 play in Austin CAMERON STROCK Sports Reporter

After being predicted to finish second in the Big 12 coaches poll behind Texas, the No. 21 OU men’s tennis team travels to Austin today to face the 13thranked Longhorns in a matchup to decide which team really is the best in the Big 12 conference. With conference play just beginning, the UP NEXT S o o n e r s at Texas appear to be peaking When: 6 tonight at the right time. The team has won four straight matches, beating Maryland, Florida State, TCU and Tulsa, with all of those wins coming on the road. The team will need to show up with that same level of play and then some to compete with the No. 13 Longhorns, who currently sit at 13-5 this year. Of those losses, only one came on Texas’ home court, and that was against USC, the nation’s No. 1 team. After facing the Big 12’s top team, the Sooners will not have the opportunity for a breather. Oklahoma will have only one day off before they face another conference championship contender. From Austin, the team will head over to College Station to face the No. 25 Texas A&M Aggies. The Aggies are coming off a 7-0 sweep of SMU Sunday in College Station and will be looking for another dominant performance against Oklahoma. The latest edition of the Red River Rivalry is slated to start at 6 tonight, while the team will face the Aggies at 1 p.m. Sunday.


Friday, March 30, 2012