Page 1

readers respond to housing issue (opinion, page 4) The University of Oklahoma’s independent student voice since 1916

T H U R S DAY, M A R C H 8 , 2 012

W W W.O U DA I LY.C O M

2 011 G OL D C ROW N F I N A L I S T

Men’s BasKetBall

GendeR-neutRal housinG

Boren makes surprise visit

A&M beats OU 62-53 Sooners lose in opening round of Big 12 tourney GReG FeWell Sports Editor

KinGsLey Burns/tHe daiLy

OU President David Boren speaks to students while walking along the South Oval during a rally in support of gender-neutral housing Wednesday afternoon.

Students rally in support of housing policy OUDaily.com

Boren shows up to speak, takes group’s proposal

see The Daily’s video coverage of Wednesday afternoon’s rally.

hillaRY mClaiN

oudaily.com/multimedia

Campus Reporter

OU President Boren surprised students rallying for a gender-neutral housing policy Wednesday on the South Oval by attending the event MORE INSIDE and addressing Read more their concerns. about the rally Before his ap- for a genderpearance, “Safe neutral housing housing for all! option at OU. Gender-neutral PaGe 3 this fall!” and “We are Oklahoma!” were the rallying cries of dozens of students gathered in the South Oval’s Unity Garden. Rally organizers spoke to a crowd of more than 50 people about their desires for gender-neutral housing

and why it’s important to stand up for this issue in Oklahoma. Rally members had planned to march to Boren’s office in Evans Hall after the rally to deliver a gender-neutral housing proposal drafted by members of Students for a Democratic Society and Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Friends. Boren appeared at the rally 15 minutes after the speakers began. “It is very important that we create an environment where every student riCardo patino/tHe daiLy feels comfortable and respected,” Sarah Garrett, anthropology senior, demands a date for President David Boren said. see rAlly paGe 2

ReseaRCh

Boren to respond to a request for gender-neutral housing at OU during a rally Wednesday afternoon on the South Oval.

OU made several runs and had a chance, but Texas A&M held its ground in the end and sent the Sooners back to Norman with a 62-53 loss after only one Big 12 tournament game. The Sooners trailed by five at halftime but quickly cut the lead to two in the second half. Junior guard Steven Pledger hit a jumper to get things started after the break, and junior forward Romero Osby made one of two free throws. One play later, Pledger found Osby wide open under the bucket for the assist to make the score 29-27 in favor of A&M. From that point, the two teams traded buckets, with A&M clinging to a four-point lead. Eventually, OU tied things up for the first time since the first half. Junior guard Sam Grooms grabbed one of his five assists to set up junior forward Andrew Fitzgerald for a widesee HOOPS paGe 9

PLAyER PROFiLE sam Grooms Year: Junior Position: Guard Hometown: Greensboro, N.C. Game stats: 13 points, five assists and seven rebounds

state PolitiCs

Team tests video game Debate continues about abortion issues designed to prevent Senate passes AT A GLANCE new version of decision-making bias senate bills on heartbeat bill abortion issues

PaiGhteN haRKiNS Campus Reporter

Testing began Monday on a video game created by OU researchers to prevent the effects of biases on decisionmaking. An OU team of researchers received a $10.7 million grant in October to create a video game for the Air Force Research Laboratory to combat the effects of biases, which could lead to costly mistakes in decision-making for intelligence

sB 1274 — Requires doctors to inform patients they have the right to listen to the fetal heartbeat sB 1433 — Defines life as beginning at conception

see GAME paGe 5

Source: www.oklegislature.gov

RaChael CeRVeNKa Campus Reporter

As state legislators debate the future of abortion in Oklahoma, citizens and lawmakers on both sides of the issue are speaking out for what they think is fair. The Senate approved a measure Tuesday requiring

neWs VOL. 97, NO. 117

© 2012 OU Publications Board FREE — Additional copies 25 cents Campus ........................ Classifieds .................. Life & Arts ................... Opinion ...................... Sports .........................

2 7 10 4 8

discover a whole new world with disney exhibit

Women’s hoops prepares to open tournament play

The Daily’s Westlee Parsons says why you need to visit the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art’s newest exhibit. (life & arts)

After a first-round bye, the Sooners will open up Big 12 tournament play against Missouri today. (Page 8)

see ABOrTION paGe 5

Requested document and purpose

Studies indicate that emotions can influence one’s ability to make decisions in central and necessary ways. (Page 6)

sPoRts

according to a Senate press release. In conjunction with the legislation, the Abolitionist Society of Oklahoma has promoted its cause on campus by handing out anti-abortion fliers in the Oklahoma Memorial Union and on the South Oval, organization secretary Katherine Hunter said. The Abolitionist Society of Oklahoma aims to encourage

The Daily’s open record requests

ou professor researches affects of emotions

noW online at

doctors to inform a patient she has a right to hear the heartbeat of her unborn child before it is aborted, according to a press release. The patient is not required to listen to the heartbeat, bill author Sen. Brian Crain, R-Tulsa, said. SB 1274 was proposed in an effort to give women as much information as possible before undergoing the procedure, he said. The bill has advanced to the House for consideration,

riCardo patino/tHe daiLy

Students perform “indelible Grace: A Tribute to 9/11,” choreographed by OU dance professor Derrick Minter. The piece is the second of five that make up the School of Dance’s “Contemporary Dance Oklahoma.” (Page 11)

Date requested

Reports filed by the ou Police department for sexual assaults since 1980 — To learn more about the number of sex-related crimes reported in the past and how they were handled by OUPD.

March 2

dorm costs for single and double rooms for the last 10 years — To learn how the price of living at OU has changed during the span of a decade.

March 2

all construction contracts regarding the renovation of Cate Center’s Quad 1 — To learn more about the terms and conditions of those contracts and to gather more information about the cost of renovating part of Cate Center.

Monday


2

CAMPUS

• Thursday, March 8, 2012

Campus

Laney Ellisor, campus editor Kathleen Evans, assistant campus editor Chris Miller, assistant campus editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

Rally: Boren to meet with leaders before May Continued from page 1

Today around campus A discussion focused on women in Classical Greek and Modern Irish theater, part of the Puterbaugh Festival, will take place at 10 a.m. in Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Meacham Auditorium. A film festival featuring Irish films, part of the Puterbaugh Festival, will take place from 12:45 to 4 p.m. in the Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Meacham Auditorium. A seminar about effective studying called “A Study Skills System,” presented by Sophia Morren from Student Life, will take place at 5 p.m. in Wagner Hall, Room 245. A free lecture about fair wages in the workplace regardless of gender called “Fighting for Fairness,” presented by Lilly Ledbetter, will be given from 7 to 8 p.m. in Gaylord Hall’s Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation Auditorium. The Juggling Club will meet to teach others how to juggle at 8 p.m. in Huston Huffman Fitness Center, Room 140. An exhibit called “A Veritable Menagerie,” presented by the OU School of Art & Art History and the Visual Art Student Association, will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art’s Lightwell Gallery.

Corrections The Oklahoma Daily has a commitment to serve readers with accurate coverage and analysis. Readers should bring errors to The Daily’s attention by emailing dailynews@ou.edu.

Boren has reviewed the gender-neutral housing policies of other universities sent to him by Students for a Democratic Society members, he said. After members of the crowd asked him to announce his support immediately, Boren said he couldn’t be expected to decide that quickly. Boren promised to meet with the rally’s leaders to discuss their views on the issue but declined a Wednesday meeting, saying he didn’t know if his schedule was free. He also wanted to read the full proposal first, he said. “I take it very seriously,” Boren said. “I’ll understand it even more after reading about it.” Boren said the meeting with leaders will take place before spring graduation, but as of Wednesday, the OU Board of Regents will not be ready to address the proposal by their March 28 meeting. “I’ve been waiting for a long time for any other Big 12 school policy,” Boren said. Students responded by asking him to be the first. “You don’t jump out and be the first just for the sake of being first,” Boren said. “There may be very good reasons why other institutions have decided to not be first.” First, Boren will have to understand why other universities have turned down this policy, he said. “Do you want to be first in doing the wrong thing? Do you want to be first at putting the university financially at risk?” Boren said. “I’m not saying this would … but let some others do some experimenting, and then draw the best practices.” He said he has to take into account the views of students, faculty, staff, parents

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OU would be first Big 12 school to adopt policy Natalia Smith-Roberson Campus Reporter

Kingsley Burns/The Daily

“I’m going to do what I think is right, I’m going to do what I think is fair and I’m going to do what would reflect my very strongly held personal views of respect for all people.”

WHAT’S NEXT Proposal After receiving the proposal Wednesday afternoon, OU President David Boren said he looked forward to reading it and considering it.

David Boren, university president

Boren will choose whether to approve the proposal and whether to send it to the OU Board of Regents to finalize the decision. The regents will meet March 28-29 and May 10-11 in Norman. Source: Boren, OU Board of Regents

and taxpayers before making a decision. Boren will meet with OU Housing & Food administrators and university legal counsel to aid in his decisionmaking process, he said. “I’m going to do what I

think is right, I’m going to do what I think is fair and I’m going to do what would reflect my very strongly held personal views of respect for all people,” Boren said. After he spoke and addressed questions, the rallying members walked with him to Evans Hall. Boren said he could not stay at the rally longer; he had to attend a meeting. While marching to his office, several students spoke with Boren one-on-one about their personal experiences. While speaking to Robert Wild, international studies senior, Boren expressed his sympathy for GLBT students when they broach the subject

of their sexuality with their friends and families. “There’s a lot of courage that comes with that,” Boren said. “There’s a lot of pain that comes with that. It’s not easy to hide your true self from the world.” Boren made it clear he has not yet made his decision on the issue. Whichever decision he makes, he said he knows it will not be accepted by 100 percent of the public. Women’s and gender studies professor A.E. Davis was among the rally speakers. “It’s absolutely inconceivable to me that in the 21st century, a fine institution like see rally page 3

Students expressed dissatisfaction with the university’s lack of a gender-neutral housing policy during an oncampus rally Wednesday. Students for a Democratic Society member Sarah Garrett has been actively involved in the push for a policy change for three years, she said. During that three-year period, organization members consistently have heard that gender-neutral housing cannot happen in Oklahoma, Garrett said. “‘This is Oklahoma’ should mean that change can happen and this is a place where people stand up and make things happen,” Garrett said. If OU were to accept students’ gender-neutral proposal, OU would be the first university in the Big 12 to have such a policy, Garrett said. “It will prove that this is a leading school that makes changes and that we are prepared to lead on the front of social change and progress,” she said. Robert Wild, international studies senior, said he supports gender-neutral housing due to a series of negative experiences his freshman year. Wild said he didn’t feel safe in the dorms because people on his hall called him and his friends names, trying to intimidate and threaten them. The discourse eventually devolved to a point where one of Wild’s good friends had to change dorms and move into a private room for an added

Kingsley Burns/The Daily

A group of student demonstrators marches past the clock tower Wednesday afternoon during a rally in support of gender-neutral housing.

“ ‘This is Oklahoma’ should mean that change can happen and this is a place where people stand up and make things happen.” Sarah Garrett, Students for a Democratic Society member

cost, he said. “Students should be able to be comfortable in the place they have to live,” Wild said. Michael Carango, history sophomore, said he believes policies should not be dictated by the closed-minded. “Everyone has the right to be safe and not be forced to live in a hostile environment,” Carango said.

Timeline History of gender-neutral housing proposal at OU Feb. 9, 2010 — OU President David Boren said he doesn’t see gender-neutral housing as an option because of conservative Oklahoma values. March 2, 2010 — OU Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Friends and Students for a Democratic Society hosted a panel discussion of professors to advocate for gender-neutral housing policies. OU Housing and Food representatives attending the panel said the option was ultimately up to Boren and the OU Board of Regents. March 2, 2010 — Undergraduate Student Congress passed a resolution in support of genderneutral housing.

S U P AM

F

C M RO

fully furnished Y fitness center & tanning ONL resort style pool & spa basketball & volleyball courts covered parking huge bedrooms with private baths computer lab all bills included

8B

������ A DISTURBING IMAGE AND A CRUDE GESTURE

NOW PLAYING AT THEATRES EVERYWHERE

Department officers broke up the protest after students tried to set up a bunk bed and sign.

March 21, 2011 — SDS attempted to interrupt a prospective student tour to educate visitors about the gender-neutral housing campaign and OU’s policies. The tour did not stop, but the group distributed fliers.

September 2011 — Housing Center Student Association officers heard gender-neutral housing proposals from SDS and GLBTF members and discussed options. The groups did not reach a consensus on the best course of action.

April 18, 2011 — The Gender Neutral Housing Coalition planned to sleep overnight in the Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Crossroads Lounge to protest housing policies. OU Police

Wednesday — GLBTF and Students for a Democratic Society organized a rally on the South Oval and delivered a proposal to Boren.

May 24, 2011 — OU added sexual orientation to its list of anti-discriminatory policies.

Source: Daily archives

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$95 $25

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Fill your 4 bedroom apartment, Get a DVR upgrade!

730 STINSON STREET NORMAN, OK 73072 (405) 310-6000

www.reservestinson.com

April 2010 — OU Housing and Food Services officials said residence halls would have coed floors for upperclassmen. In coed housing, men and women live in separate rooms and suites but in the same wings.

the University of Oklahoma does not have a genderneutral housing policy,” Davis said. The gender-neutral housing proposal is not a policy that would apply to everyone; it is a policy of volunteers, Davis said. It is a policy of creating a place where people can feel safe to be themselves — with their own sexuality and gender presentation — and not face the same fear and hate they meet on an everyday basis, Davis said. “If we don’t make these changes in Oklahoma, where will they be made? The University of Oklahoma leads the social policies of the outside,” Davis said. Elizabeth Rucker, SDS member and Daily columnist, spoke afterward. She mentioned the names of many students who have committed suicide because of harassment due to their sexuality. After marching to Evans Hall and Boren’s departure, rally members gathered on the north side of the building to discuss the events. After a vote, rally members decided to meet and demand support from Boren before the March 28 Regents meeting. If he does not give his support, a sit-in likely will be organized as voted upon by the members, they said.

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E V R E S E N R O S E H N I T T S ON

rally: Students propose likely sit-in Continued from page 2

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Students rally for equal opportunity

Advocates push for policy reformation

OU President David Boren speaks to students during a rally in support of gender-neutral housing Wednesday on the South Oval. Boren met with demonstrators and accepted a copy of their proposal before walking back to Evans Hall with the students in tow.

3

Gender-neutral housing

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2

CAMPUS

• Thursday, March 8, 2012

Campus

Laney Ellisor, campus editor Kathleen Evans, assistant campus editor Chris Miller, assistant campus editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

Rally: Boren to meet with leaders before May Continued from page 1

Today around campus A discussion focused on women in Classical Greek and Modern Irish theater, part of the Puterbaugh Festival, will take place at 10 a.m. in Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Meacham Auditorium. A film festival featuring Irish films, part of the Puterbaugh Festival, will take place from 12:45 to 4 p.m. in the Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Meacham Auditorium. A seminar about effective studying called “A Study Skills System,” presented by Sophia Morren from Student Life, will take place at 5 p.m. in Wagner Hall, Room 245. A free lecture about fair wages in the workplace regardless of gender called “Fighting for Fairness,” presented by Lilly Ledbetter, will be given from 7 to 8 p.m. in Gaylord Hall’s Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation Auditorium. The Juggling Club will meet to teach others how to juggle at 8 p.m. in Huston Huffman Fitness Center, Room 140. An exhibit called “A Veritable Menagerie,” presented by the OU School of Art & Art History and the Visual Art Student Association, will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art’s Lightwell Gallery.

Corrections The Oklahoma Daily has a commitment to serve readers with accurate coverage and analysis. Readers should bring errors to The Daily’s attention by emailing dailynews@ou.edu.

Boren has reviewed the gender-neutral housing policies of other universities sent to him by Students for a Democratic Society members, he said. After members of the crowd asked him to announce his support immediately, Boren said he couldn’t be expected to decide that quickly. Boren promised to meet with the rally’s leaders to discuss their views on the issue but declined a Wednesday meeting, saying he didn’t know if his schedule was free. He also wanted to read the full proposal first, he said. “I take it very seriously,” Boren said. “I’ll understand it even more after reading about it.” Boren said the meeting with leaders will take place before spring graduation, but as of Wednesday, the OU Board of Regents will not be ready to address the proposal by their March 28 meeting. “I’ve been waiting for a long time for any other Big 12 school policy,” Boren said. Students responded by asking him to be the first. “You don’t jump out and be the first just for the sake of being first,” Boren said. “There may be very good reasons why other institutions have decided to not be first.” First, Boren will have to understand why other universities have turned down this policy, he said. “Do you want to be first in doing the wrong thing? Do you want to be first at putting the university financially at risk?” Boren said. “I’m not saying this would … but let some others do some experimenting, and then draw the best practices.” He said he has to take into account the views of students, faculty, staff, parents

WINNER ACADEMY

AWA R D S

BEST PICTURE

©A.M.P.A.S.®

BEST DIRECTOR BEST ACTOR BEST COSTUME DESIGN BEST ORIGINAL SCORE MICHEL HAZANAVICIUS

JEAN DUJARDIN

MARK BRIDGES

LUDOVIC BOURCE

OU would be first Big 12 school to adopt policy Natalia Smith-Roberson Campus Reporter

Kingsley Burns/The Daily

“I’m going to do what I think is right, I’m going to do what I think is fair and I’m going to do what would reflect my very strongly held personal views of respect for all people.”

WHAT’S NEXT Proposal After receiving the proposal Wednesday afternoon, OU President David Boren said he looked forward to reading it and considering it.

David Boren, university president

Boren will choose whether to approve the proposal and whether to send it to the OU Board of Regents to finalize the decision. The regents will meet March 28-29 and May 10-11 in Norman. Source: Boren, OU Board of Regents

and taxpayers before making a decision. Boren will meet with OU Housing & Food administrators and university legal counsel to aid in his decisionmaking process, he said. “I’m going to do what I

think is right, I’m going to do what I think is fair and I’m going to do what would reflect my very strongly held personal views of respect for all people,” Boren said. After he spoke and addressed questions, the rallying members walked with him to Evans Hall. Boren said he could not stay at the rally longer; he had to attend a meeting. While marching to his office, several students spoke with Boren one-on-one about their personal experiences. While speaking to Robert Wild, international studies senior, Boren expressed his sympathy for GLBT students when they broach the subject

of their sexuality with their friends and families. “There’s a lot of courage that comes with that,” Boren said. “There’s a lot of pain that comes with that. It’s not easy to hide your true self from the world.” Boren made it clear he has not yet made his decision on the issue. Whichever decision he makes, he said he knows it will not be accepted by 100 percent of the public. Women’s and gender studies professor A.E. Davis was among the rally speakers. “It’s absolutely inconceivable to me that in the 21st century, a fine institution like see rally page 3

Students expressed dissatisfaction with the university’s lack of a gender-neutral housing policy during an oncampus rally Wednesday. Students for a Democratic Society member Sarah Garrett has been actively involved in the push for a policy change for three years, she said. During that three-year period, organization members consistently have heard that gender-neutral housing cannot happen in Oklahoma, Garrett said. “‘This is Oklahoma’ should mean that change can happen and this is a place where people stand up and make things happen,” Garrett said. If OU were to accept students’ gender-neutral proposal, OU would be the first university in the Big 12 to have such a policy, Garrett said. “It will prove that this is a leading school that makes changes and that we are prepared to lead on the front of social change and progress,” she said. Robert Wild, international studies senior, said he supports gender-neutral housing due to a series of negative experiences his freshman year. Wild said he didn’t feel safe in the dorms because people on his hall called him and his friends names, trying to intimidate and threaten them. The discourse eventually devolved to a point where one of Wild’s good friends had to change dorms and move into a private room for an added

Kingsley Burns/The Daily

A group of student demonstrators marches past the clock tower Wednesday afternoon during a rally in support of gender-neutral housing.

“ ‘This is Oklahoma’ should mean that change can happen and this is a place where people stand up and make things happen.” Sarah Garrett, Students for a Democratic Society member

cost, he said. “Students should be able to be comfortable in the place they have to live,” Wild said. Michael Carango, history sophomore, said he believes policies should not be dictated by the closed-minded. “Everyone has the right to be safe and not be forced to live in a hostile environment,” Carango said.

Timeline History of gender-neutral housing proposal at OU Feb. 9, 2010 — OU President David Boren said he doesn’t see gender-neutral housing as an option because of conservative Oklahoma values. March 2, 2010 — OU Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Friends and Students for a Democratic Society hosted a panel discussion of professors to advocate for gender-neutral housing policies. OU Housing and Food representatives attending the panel said the option was ultimately up to Boren and the OU Board of Regents. March 2, 2010 — Undergraduate Student Congress passed a resolution in support of genderneutral housing.

S U P AM

F

C M RO

fully furnished Y fitness center & tanning ONL resort style pool & spa basketball & volleyball courts covered parking huge bedrooms with private baths computer lab all bills included

8B

������ A DISTURBING IMAGE AND A CRUDE GESTURE

NOW PLAYING AT THEATRES EVERYWHERE

Department officers broke up the protest after students tried to set up a bunk bed and sign.

March 21, 2011 — SDS attempted to interrupt a prospective student tour to educate visitors about the gender-neutral housing campaign and OU’s policies. The tour did not stop, but the group distributed fliers.

September 2011 — Housing Center Student Association officers heard gender-neutral housing proposals from SDS and GLBTF members and discussed options. The groups did not reach a consensus on the best course of action.

April 18, 2011 — The Gender Neutral Housing Coalition planned to sleep overnight in the Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Crossroads Lounge to protest housing policies. OU Police

Wednesday — GLBTF and Students for a Democratic Society organized a rally on the South Oval and delivered a proposal to Boren.

May 24, 2011 — OU added sexual orientation to its list of anti-discriminatory policies.

Source: Daily archives

help is just a phone call away

9

number

crisis line

325-6963 (NYNE)

OU Number Nyne Crisis Line

8 p.m.-4 a.m. every day

except OU holidays and breaks

Six Packs aren’t only for drinking, I got mine at...

Conan’s

GTL

Kickboxing, Boxing, Karate Academy

Spring Break Special

GYM. TAN. LAUNDRY.

$95 $25

for the month of March

“March Special”

We have an upgraded fitness center, new HEX stand-up tanning bed, and full-sized washer/dryer in every unit. No other residence can compete.

Fill your 4 bedroom apartment, Get a DVR upgrade!

730 STINSON STREET NORMAN, OK 73072 (405) 310-6000

www.reservestinson.com

April 2010 — OU Housing and Food Services officials said residence halls would have coed floors for upperclassmen. In coed housing, men and women live in separate rooms and suites but in the same wings.

the University of Oklahoma does not have a genderneutral housing policy,” Davis said. The gender-neutral housing proposal is not a policy that would apply to everyone; it is a policy of volunteers, Davis said. It is a policy of creating a place where people can feel safe to be themselves — with their own sexuality and gender presentation — and not face the same fear and hate they meet on an everyday basis, Davis said. “If we don’t make these changes in Oklahoma, where will they be made? The University of Oklahoma leads the social policies of the outside,” Davis said. Elizabeth Rucker, SDS member and Daily columnist, spoke afterward. She mentioned the names of many students who have committed suicide because of harassment due to their sexuality. After marching to Evans Hall and Boren’s departure, rally members gathered on the north side of the building to discuss the events. After a vote, rally members decided to meet and demand support from Boren before the March 28 Regents meeting. If he does not give his support, a sit-in likely will be organized as voted upon by the members, they said.

BUY SELL TRADE VINTAGE CLOTHING 318 E. MAIN 12-6 M-SAT NORMAN OK 405-310-6771

@OUDaily @OUDailySports @OUDailyArts @OUDailyOpinion

E V R E S E N R O S E H N I T T S ON

rally: Students propose likely sit-in Continued from page 2

Stay connected with The Oklahoma Daily

SING A E L NOW UMMER ! S 12 FOR ALL 20 F AND

S K C LO

Check Local Listings for Theaters and Show Times.

Students rally for equal opportunity

Advocates push for policy reformation

OU President David Boren speaks to students during a rally in support of gender-neutral housing Wednesday on the South Oval. Boren met with demonstrators and accepted a copy of their proposal before walking back to Evans Hall with the students in tow.

3

Gender-neutral housing

Are you on Twitter? ®

Thursday, March 8, 2012 •

Now Leasing for Fall 2012 | Rates start at $424

Located off HWY 9 and Chautauqua 405.329.GOGA Monday Thursday 8-8pm Friday 8-6pm Saturday 10-4pm

FREE 1 Week Student Oasis Membership Pass - Show student ID

CRIMSON PARK | 888.724.1594 2657 CLASSEN BLVD | NORMAN OK 73071


4

Reader comment on OUDaily.com ››

• Thursday, March 8, 2012

“Politics is the art of compromise. Americans should want compromise and bipartisanship on issues, rather than want a division. The United States was founded upon compromise, yet this young man says he does not want any of it. I find that disappointing to say the least.” (scpeyton, RE: ‘Rick Santorum wins Oklahoma’s GOP primary race’)

OPINION EDITORIAL

We gave our thoughts Wednesday, today is about sharing your views

I

n light of Wednesday’s large editorials, we’ve devoted today’s editorial space to your words. You’ve heard a lot of what we have to say about this issue. Now, it’s time to share what you think. These comments about gender-neutral housing have been compiled from OUDaily.com, Facebook and Twitter. They represent a broad slice of the views expressed on Wednesday, but it’s not too late to join the discussion. Of course, we always encourage you to comment online or send a letter to the editor to dailyopinion@ou.edu. But we also want to remind you of a more direct approach. If you feel strongly about this issue — or any issue we cover in the future — you can share your thoughts at our daily editorial meetings. These public meeting take place at 12:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday in 160 Copeland Hall, or 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Your opinions matter, so whether through a letter to the editor or an appearance out our editorial meetings, we hope to hear from you soon. Here are some comments from those of you we’ve already heard from:

Financial concerns OUDaily.com: “If you want to create specific floors where gays and lesbians can live together, so be it, but if President Boren passes this, the University of Oklahoma will never get another dime of my money.” (bamasooner) OUDaily.com: “If you stop donating to OU simply because you don’t want homosexuals to have the option to live on the same floor, you are a bigot that is donating money to an educational institution for the wrong reasons. Donate for the academics. Someone’s personal life isn’t your business. Homosexuals should have access to the same education you think you were entitled to (as an alum).” (ohyou9033) OUDaily.com: “I am disgusted at all the negative responses to this! How are you harmed in ANY WAY by this legislation?? It gives everyone more freedom. If parents are concerned about their kids ‘shacking up,’ then quit paying for their things. If you’re not paying for their things, then mind your own business. I simply do not understand the bigotry and hatred toward this act when it does nothing whatsoever to any heterosexual, and in fact gives them freedoms as well.” (baconbits)

OUDaily.com: “When did ‘minority rules’ replace ‘majority rules’? why must a small sector of a much LARGER community be catered to? if one voluntarily enters an LARGE bureaucracy, then one must play by the rules or voluntarily leave the bureacracy if one finds his/her/it’s experience less than stellar or unsatisfactory. what’s next? catering to pet owners, purple people-eaters, right-handed caffiene addicts, wiccans, and left handed harry potter fans???” (kdbp1213) OUDaily.com: “Just because you didn’t see it does not mean it does not happen. Have you not heard about the students who have committed suicide after bullying by their homophobic roommates? It’s real. You just choose not to see it.” (melmo)

Moral questions OUDaily.com: “As an OU graduate and donor, I am shocked and appalled at this. What has happened to common decency in our society? Men live with men and women live with women until marriage, unless of course they want to “shack up” together, which I suspect that is what this is primairly about, only using the GLBT society at OU as an excuse.” (bamasooner) OUDaily.com: “This legislation is not a farfetched dangerous piece of legislation to pass. The only reason gender-neutral housing doesn’t exist currently is to keep parents with a safe mind while their children are away. Their kids are fornicating all the same.” (baconbits) OUDaily.com: The term “shacked up” instantly makes me think of love shack and how my generation is no different than the generations passed. Even if it was though, why should we hinder people from their choice to do just that? Why stand in the way of people’s personal decisions? (Bbates728)

Does this matter? Facebook: “This is a completely rational, practical, forward-thinking policy that addresses a need and would go a long way to promote justice and tolerance. Which is why it has absolutely no chance whatsoever.” (Stephen Martin)

OUDaily.com: “Wow, stop trying to shove this liberal BS down our throats. Realize if this happens, OU will loose A LOT of money from donors, as stated from the alum above.” (BoomerSooner25)

OUDaily.com: “Students worry about the cost of books, whether or not they will be able to find a job after they graduate, and who they are going out with on Saturday night. Everybody is concerned about the economy and the price of gasoline. No one really cares about this subject or any of the other extreme oddball rants found in the Daily.” (briareus)

GLBT rights Facebook: “Transgender individuals and other members of the GLBTQ community face discrimination every day and this provides an option for them, for us, to choose their living quarters and live comfortably without fear of hate and bullying. Trans men and women (that do in fact exist at our school mind you) are people who may be physically male or female but do not identify as such and may even identify as a third or fourth gender. These people deserve every right to a safe environment.” (Derek Wanker) OUDaily.com: “It is about respect. It’s not about shacking up. It’s about tolerance. It’s about the struggles GLBT face on our campus every single day.” (commentah)

we can even attend a University.” (trey08)

Twitter: “Newspapers should report news, not create it.” (jodaciousjody) OUDaily.com: “The editorial board describes taking a step that in no significant way inconveniences non-LGBT students, that may provide comfort for individuals who otherwise feel awkward, frightened, or marginalized. The number of students who feel as described above is ultimately irrelevant, as there is no jeopardy or cost to enacting the proposed gender-neutral housing option. The proposal represents solid, cost-effective policy to create an accepting atmosphere for Sooners for whom the current housing model may not be ideal.” (Scrob) OUDaily.com: “This is a tiny step, folks, and the vehemence with which some seem to protest is further evidence of why it is so necessary.” (K8ie)

OUDaily.com: “It’s not about intolerance. People ... grow a pair ... whether you’re gay, straight, bisexual, transsexual, I don’t care. Grow a pair, Twitter: “Syrian women and children being live by the rules. If you’re a guy, live with a guy for a year ... you’ll be fine. If you’re a girl, live with killed, super tuesday, gas prices, economic downfall fear.and thats what you put on the front a girl, you’ll be fine. Stop complaining and be happy for the fact that we live in a country where page? #oudaily” (Irfanistan)

Mary Stanfield, opinion editor dailyopinion@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

?

» Poll question of the day Can Rick Santorum challenge President Barack Obama in the general election? To cast your vote, log on to LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Students will hold Boren to his promise Editor’s Note: This letter to the editor was written on behalf of the entire Gender-Neutral Housing Coalition. On Wednesday, the Gender-Neutral Housing Coalition — made up of Students for a Democratic Society, Student Organizer’s Collective, Friends and Friends, Occupy Norman, and Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Friends — rallied between 75 and 100 students on the South Oval to support the implementation of a gender-neutral housing option in the residence halls. Student organizers, a professor and individual students loudly proclaimed that not only do students have the right to judge for themselves what housing situation is best for them, but this right is especially critical for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and intersex students who face harassment, bullying and intolerance on a daily basis. Gender-neutral housing, as we have been arguing for three years, protects queer students while creating a community of people who understand there are far more interesting and beautiful ideas to order our lives around than gender. Over and over again, we have pointed to the more than 54 institutions that already have a gender-neutral housing policy, but we have recently realized something just as profound: many insti“As we have made tutions allow students of difsexes to room togethclear over the past ferent er, but there is no name for three years, gender- it. That’s just how it is — beneutral housing may cause gender-neutral housing is a radically simple idea be a small change that it’s a no-brainer. We deeply appreciate and simple idea, President David Boren’s afbut it is critical firmation when he visited to ensuring the the rally that OU is an institution that welcomes diversafety and well celebrates all people as being of our fellow sity, part of the Sooner family and students.” creates a safe environment for everyone. But we know these words will be swept away by Oklahoma wind if he does not honor his commitment to the student body. He promised Wednesday to read through our proposal and meet with us within a month or so. After we marched with our university president back to his office in Evans Hall, the Gender-Neutral Housing Coalition held a meeting on the North Oval to determine our course of action. We will hold Boren to his promise. We intend to set up a meeting with him before the next OU Board of Regents’ meeting, which is scheduled for March 28-29. We hope he will lend his support to the proposal by that date so we can move quickly to ensure this policy change can be ready for the incoming freshmen of 2013. Whatever comes out of this meeting, we expect an answer from Boren in support or opposition to the policy by April 2. He was not able to give us a date, so we’ve set one for him. Further, as our proposal states, we will urge him to form a committee that includes student organizers, university staff and administrators to oversee the implementation of gender-neutral housing. We emphasize “implementation” because we will not be satisfied by a committee with no power or ability to affect change. This coalition will not be co-opted into a warm, fuzzy example of superficial gestures toward student involvement. As we have made clear over the past three years, gender-neutral housing may be a small change and simple idea, but it is critical to ensuring the safety and well being of our fellow students. We affirm that this is our state and our university — and it is up to us to engage with our administration to further this initiative. If you support us, we invite you to join us at Students for a Democratic Society’s next meeting at 9 p.m. Sunday in Kaufman 132, GLBTF’s meeting at 7 p.m. Wednesday in Wagner 180, or Friends and Friends’ meeting at 9 tonight in Kaufman 132.

Do you have thoughts and views about issues affecting the university community? The Daily is searching for opinion columnists. Email dailyopinion@ou.edu to apply.

The Oklahoma Daily is a public forum, the University of Oklahoma’s independent student voice and an entirely student-run publication.

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campus

Thursday, March 8, 2012 •

5

Abortion: Senate has approved bill to grant rights to unborn child Continued from page 1

Erika Philbrick/The Daily

Chelsey Schuessler, communications senior, uses the computer after completing a session of video game testing Monday. Schuessler said she will complete more tests in the following weeks to help work out problems with the system.

game: Students to check for coding typos, errors Continued from page 1 analysts, according to Daily archives. Students signed up to play the game and check for coding typos and other obvious problems, play tester and communications senior Chelsey Schuessler said. “I’m the editor for the game,” she said, equating the experience to revising a paper. The play testing for the game is done in the OU K20 center on the research campus. In the 2-D game, students play in first-person mode as an intelligence analyst. “[The game is] almost like a board game where you’re trying to solve a mystery, but we tried to gear it more toward the intelligence agencies,” research team leader Norah Dunbar said. The game has come a long way since its conception,

AT A GLANCE Game timeline October: Researchers receive $10.7 million grant to create video game February: Game finished development and returned to the university Monday: Testers began playing game to find bugs August: Research will start to see if game prevents biases in decision-making Source: Norah Dunbar, team leader

researcher and graduate communication student Cindy Vincent said. “The design is looking cool versus the original design, which was pretty simplistic,” Vincent said. The first time any of the researchers played the game, it

was done with pen and paper, Dunbar said. “On pen and paper, you don’t get that natural intuition that you get maybe playing it on the computer,” Vincent said. Since October, when the team first received its funding, the game has had two developments, Dunbar said. First, researchers sent the game to the Morgridge Institute for Research in Wisconsin to be developed. Dunbar and her group of researchers also hired “like crazy,” including a production manager and an entire team of programmers and artists. In all, six people on campus are dedicated to the game, Dunbar said. On Feb. 3, the game was handed off to OU from the Morgridge Institute, which finished developing the whole game and one minigame within it. A little more than a week ago, Dunbar and

her team played the game’s first prototype. “It’s still pretty bare-bones,” Dunbar said. Despite the game being unfinished, Vincent said she still was able to find parallels between this game and games she has played in the past. “Growing up, it reminds me of games like ‘Where in the World Is Carmen San Diego?’ or spy games like that,” Vincent said. Now, the developers are working on fixing the kinks in the game and developing smaller parts, which Dunbar calls mini-games. During the summer, the team will run pilot tests on the game, and in August, the real experiment will begin when OU students become test subjects to see if the game is working and meeting its educational goals, Dunbar said. “It has to be fun, but it still has to teach people something,” Dunbar said.

discussion about abortion. The society’s membership consists of OU students, alumni and members of the Norman community, Hunter said. The name of the organization is taken from the original slavery abolitionists, Hunter said. Tuesday marked the 155th anniversary of the Dred Scott decision, which stated that slaves were not viewed as people in the eyes of the law. As members of the abolitionist group engaged students on campus, they wore shirts reading, “Remember Dred, Abolish Roe.” The society used the anniversary as an opportunity to educate students about current events in the state leg“This is not the first islature, director Russell time our country Hunter said. has decided a group “This is not the first time our country has decided a of human beings group of human beings are are not humans.” not humans,” he said. In addition to SB 1274, Russell Hunter, SB 1433 — other wise Abolitionist Society of Oklahoma director known as the personhood bill — has incited debate. On Feb. 15, the Senate passed the bill, 34-8. The bill, which declares a developing fetus is legally a person at the moment of conception, is awaiting House approval. The abolitionist society supports the legislation because it is in support of life, Katherine Hunter said. Hundreds rallied Feb. 27 on the north steps of the Capitol to voice their opposition to the personhood legislation. “It is an insult to the women of Oklahoma, and it’s pretty pompous for the men, particularly Republican legislators, to try to impose their values on others,” said Sen. Judy Eason McIntyre, D-Tulsa. Sen. Jim Wilson, D-Tahlequah, also opposes the abortion bills under the legislature’s consideration. Wilson senses a majority of the legislators don’t care about abortion, and the issue is being used to incite political passions, he said. “For some reason, in Oklahoma, it feels real good to be able to intimidate a woman,” Wilson said. According to the 14th Amendment, women are entitled to privacy, and the personhood bill’s proposal is not a necessary medical procedure and, therefore, will not hold up in court if passed in the House, he said. “The people who are writing the bills to intimidate her could just as easily write a bill to encourage it if they thought it would get them elected,” Wilson said. “There is no sincerity about it.” However, Sen. Greg Treat, R-Oklahoma City, said he ran for public office because of his views against abortion. Treat said he has been against abortion since he was 10 years old and is in support of the personhood bill. “I do not even refer to it as a fetus — I refer to it as a human being from conception,” Treat said. “Every human being has value in my eyes, even in the womb.”

March 8-11 Thursday, March 8

Friday, March 9

University Theatre presents: Contemporary Dance Oklahoma | 8 p.m. in the Rupel J. Jones Theater. Contact the OU Fine Arts Box Office for more information, (405) 3254101.

OU Softball: OU vs. Indiana | 6 p.m. at Marita Hines Field. FREE admission with a valid OU I.D. Visit soonersports.com for more information.

Union Sound Lounge: Featuring The Lower 40 and Jeffrey Thompson | 8-10 p.m. in Beaird Lounge. Come to our relaxed Sound Lounge concert series and enjoy FREE music from local and student bands. This month we have a folk and country theme with FREE biscuits and gravy!

Saturday, March 10 Disney Film: One Hundred and One Dalmatiansî | 10:30 a.m. in Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. Seating is limited and children must be accompanied by an adult.

FREE Movie: The Three Musketeers | FREE screening at 6 and 9 p.m. and midnight in Meacham Auditorium, Oklahoma Memorial Union. Come and see this blockbuster, courtesy of the Union Programming Board and Campus Activities Council. UPBís Minute to Win It! | 6-8 p.m. in Crossroads Lounge. Come and try your hand at Minute to Win It challenges and trivia to win great prizes from UPB! Snacks provided. Art a la Carte | 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. in Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. The Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art provides live music and independent films. Admission to Art ìå la Carte is FREE and open to all ages. Live music and films run 6:30-8:30 p.m. Films should be considered for mature audiences only. University Theatre presents: Contemporary Dance Oklahoma | 8 p.m. in the Rupel J. Jones Theater. Contact the OU Fine Arts Box Office for more information, (405) 325-4101.

Meacham Matinee | 1 p.m. in Meacham Auditorium. Presented by the Union Programming Board and Campus Activities Council. OU Softball: OU vs. Wichita State | 1:30 p.m. at Marita Hines Field. FREE admission with a valid OU I.D. Visit soonersports.com for more information. University Theatre presents: Contemporary Dance Oklahoma | 8 p.m. in the Rupel J. Jones Theater. Contact the OU Fine Arts Box Office for more information, (405) 3254101. CAC presents: Sooner Soundwave | 5 p.m. at the Opolis (113 N. Crawford, Norman) Taking place on an indoor and outdoor stage, the music showcase will feature noisemakers from near and far on their way to SXSW. Best of all, the event is free to OU students and the general public alike. DJ duo The Hood Internet will headline, with Class Actress, The Chain Gang of 1974, Horse Thief and The Gentle Art.

Sunday, March 11 Huston Huffman Fitness Center | 10 a.m. the OU Huston Huffman Fitness Center will now be open at 10 a.m. on Sundays! The Huff is a 150,000 square feet state-of-the-art indoor fitness facility for a variety of programs, services and equipment to meet the recreational and fitness needs of the OU community. Family Day, A Century of Magic: The Animation of the Walt Disney Studio | 1-4 p.m. Explore art in the museums special exhibition, and enjoy a variety of hands-on art activities for all ages. OU Softball: OU vs. Wichita State | 1 p.m. at Marita Hines Field. FREE admission with a valid OU I.D. Visit soonersports.com for more information.

OU Softball: OU vs. Indiana | 6 p.m. at Marita Hines Field. FREE admission with a valid OU I.D. Visit soonersports.com for more information.

OU Mens Rugby: OU vs. Notre Dame | 1 p.m. at the Al Velie Rugby Complex.

OU Menís Gymnastics: OU vs. Michigan | 7 p.m. at the McCasland Field House. 250 FREE BOOMER SOONER fan banners and FREE admission with a valid OU I.D. Visit soonersports.com for more information.

University Theatre presents: Contemporary Dance Oklahoma | 3 p.m. in the Rupel J. Jones Theater. Contact the OU Fine Arts Box Office for more information, (405) 3254101.

Lab Theatre presents: By the Bog of Catsî | 8 p.m. in the Old Science Hall Lab Theatre. The presentation is in conjunction with World Literature Today. Tickets are $5 and available at the OU Fine Arts Box office or at (405) 325-4101.

Lab Theatre presents: By the Bog of Cats | 3 p.m. in the Old Science Hall Lab Theatre. The presentation is in conjunction with World Literature Today. Tickets are $5 and available at the OU Fine Arts Box office or at (405) 325-4101.

This University in compliance with all applicable federal and state laws and regulations does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, genetic information, age, religion, disability, political beliefs, or status as a veteran in any of its policies, practices or procedures. This includes but is not limited to admissions, employment, financial aid and educational services. For accommodations on the basis of disability, please contact the sponsoring department of any program or event.


6

CAMPUS

• Thursday, March 8, 2012

Faculty

Culture

Professor to research how emotions influence decision-making process

OU to host Japanese cultural gathering

“For any significant choice in our lives where we consider all the pros and cons, we have to consider so many things that it’s cognitively impossible to make a decision without using emotions.”

Riggs has breakthrough contrary to previous conventional thought ARIANNA PICKARD Campus Reporter

An OU professor is researching a new theory about the role emotions play in decision-making to dispel centuries of philosophical thinking. OU philosophy professor Wayne Riggs recently found work in social science and neuroscience that strongly suggests the way we reason involves emotions in a central and necessary way, he said. “For example, we’d never be able to make a practical decision about what to do if we didn’t have certain emotions attached to the possible outcomes,” Riggs said. This theory is a breakthrough in social science and neuroscience because scientists and philosophers always have thought if you wanted to think clearly, you would have to leave out your emotions, he said. Riggs expects to find that the previous ideas about decisionmaking now should be recognized as outdated, he said. “I don’t yet have a clear idea on what I think the replacement view should be or exactly how that’s going to affect how we evaluate things,” Riggs said. One way emotions play a role in our decision-making process is that as we’re considering all the different possibilities before making a decision, each possibility invokes a reaction or repulsion in us, he said. “For any significant choice in our lives where we consider all the pros and cons, we have to consider so many things that it’s cognitively impossible to make a decision without using emotions,” he said. Researching and understanding the decision-making process is important because it tells us

Wayne Riggs, philosophy professor

Astrud Reed/The Daily

Philosophy professor Wayne Riggs discusses man’s justification of existentialism during his epistemology class Thursday in George Lynn Cross Hall. Riggs is studying the role emotion plays in human decision-making and says emotion is a central and necessary part of making decisions.

about the nature of the mind, what kinds of creatures we are and how we operate, he said. It’s a deeply important practice because we evaluate things and judge others and ourselves on these evaluations, he said.

“I’m fascinated in trying to make sense of our practices — what we mean when we say things like ‘that’s irrational,’” Riggs said. Joseph McKinney, a first-year philosophy graduate student, studied the role of emotions in

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decision-making in Riggs’ semester-long seminar about epistemology and emotion in fall 2011. “I learned that there is a lot of work to be done in dispelling the notion that emotions and rationality ought to be divorced,” McKinney said in an email. “Such a view has been held (in subtle and not-so-subtle ways) for so long that it nearly escapes scrutiny.” In the seminar, students examined the assumption that emotions and reasoning should be separated and learned that emotions motivate decisions and make certain information prominent, he said. “Emotions seem to play a valuable role in how we interact with and come to know about the world around us,” he said. “I take it to be important that we respect the role of emotions in these processes, rather than disavowing or actively fighting against their contributions.” Benjamin Polansky, a philosophy graduate student who also attended Riggs’ seminar, said Riggs was one of the main reasons he came to OU. “He is a fine philosopher, ... an innovative, flexible master of criticism,” Polansky said in an email. “His criticism is illuminating. As your teacher, he will turn his light upon you every so often. When he does, it is absolutely to your benefit as a student [as a burgeoning writer and thinker].”

Sooners to remember March earthquake COCO COURTOIS Campus Reporter

The Japanese Student Association will host a Japanese culture night at 6:30 tonight in Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Meacham Auditorium. Japan Night will feature modern and traditional dances, as well as a special tribute to remember the March 2011 earthquakes, tsunamis and nuclear accidents. “This will be my last Japanese cultural night, so I want to try to do something unique,” coordinator Benson Wong said. The electrical engineering senior said he came up with a movie-theme night, a film-poster flier and a trailer to publicize the event. Wong learned a lot from working alongside Japanese people to help create these culture nights the last few years, he said. “Being around them changed me a little,” Wong said. “It brought me some self-discipline. I guess it’s also a personal giving back to the people of Japan.” Because OU only has six Japanese exchange students, the event coordinators got in touch with associations at Oklahoma State University and the University of Central Oklahoma to invite 40 Japanese exchange students to the event, Wong said. Also in attendance will be 23 Japanese students from Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto, Japan, who have been visiting OU for four weeks. “We became so close while preparing the Japan night, and they are already leaving Saturday,” Wong said. “I really want everyone to have a great memory they can take home with them.”


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2 col (3.25 in) x 2 inches Sudoku ..............$760/month Boggle ...............$760/month Horoscope ........$760/month

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POLICY The Oklahoma Daily is responsible for one day’s incorrect advertising. If your ad appears incorrectly, or if you wish to cancel your ad call 3252521, before the deadline for cancellation in the next issue. Errors not the fault of the advertiser will be adjusted. Refunds will not be issued for late cancellations. The Oklahoma Daily will not knowingly accept advertisements that discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, religious preference, national origin or sexual orientation. Violations of this policy should be reported to The Oklahoma Daily Business Office at 325-2521. Help Wanted ads in The Oklahoma Daily are not to separate as to gender. Advertisers may not discriminate in employment ads based on race, color, religion or gender unless such qualifying factors are essential to a given position. All ads are subject to acceptance by The Oklahoma Daily. Ad acceptance may be re-evaluated at any time.

Can you believe what some children have to face as they grow up? In the past year alone, we’ve helped almost one million children stay in school and choose success. But there are millions more who need your help. We’re Communities In Schools and we were named one of the “100 non-profits most likely to save the world� by Worth Magazine. Now that you know who we are, just think what we can accomplish with your help.

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Spring Specials

HOROSCOPE By Bernice Bede Osol

Copyright 2012, Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 2012 $445 $515 $440 $510 $700

If need be, don’t hesitate in the next year to dissolve a partnership that is going nowhere in lieu of a new endeavor that allows you to act independently. If it comes down to it, it’ll be the smart thing to do. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --When you’re permitted to establish your own agenda, you’ll function at your best. It behooves you to steer clear of anyone who always makes demands on your time. ARIES (March 21-April 19) --Adopting a negative attitude will only make disruptive matters worse than they already are. If you think everything is going against you, solutions won’t be possible.









                     







Previous Solution                                                                                  Monday- Very Easy Tuesday-Easy Wednesday- Easy Thursday- Medium Friday - Hard

Instructions: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. That means that no number is repeated in any row, column or box.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Getting involved in petty politics with someone who is adroit in that kind of game- playing is not a wise thing to do. He or she will do his or her best to make you look bad, and is likely to succeed. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Whatever you do, don’t let your ego or temper cause you to challenge someone who could have an influence over your work or career. It might be one match you can’t win. CANCER (June 21-July 22) --Getting in the last word shouldn’t be important to you if it results in the possibility of jeopardizing a valued friendship. It would turn out to be a win that would mean a big loss. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --Be on guard so that someone in trouble doesn’t maneuver you into a position where

you would be held accountable for his or her mistake or debt. Know when to be quiet and walk away. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- If you ignore your own counsel and do something that goes against your better judgment, you could end up paying dearly for the consequences of this folly. Stay sharp and be cool. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -It’s not that you won’t have adequate drive and ambition to handle everyday matters, it’s more likely that you will be tempted to take on something that exceeds your limitations. Be honest about your abilities. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) --It won’t add any luster to your image if you deliberately do things that buck the will of the majority, just to prove your independence. All it will do is make you look like a selfish jackanapes. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) --Limit the discussion of family problems to the participants only. If you talk to others about private matters, you’ll be inviting them to butt in and introduce added dissension. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Gauge your audience well so that you don’t inadvertently introduce a topic about which you feel strongly to someone who holds an equally strong opposing opinion. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- If you leave something you value lying about in plain sight, it’s likely to tempt someone with sticky fingers. Be more careful with your prize possessions.

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker March 8, 2012 ACROSS 1 Give shelter or refuge to 7 Uppercut target 11 Bottom-row PC key 14 Elaborately embellished 15 Boxcar Willie dressed as one 16 Astor’s line 17 Summer treat for a goddess? 19 Dangerous to drive on 20 Showed off, as clothes 21 Pupil’s flower? 22 Kangaroo babies 25 Assistance provider 26 Airplane assignment 27 Aussie avian 28 “Guinness World Records� suffix 30 Post-wedding title 32 Lee of baking fame 34 Area away from the battle 37 To best 41 Patronizing a well-known retailer? 44 Decreases, as pain 45 Ballesteros of golf 46 Punjabi queen 47 Basketball backboard attachment 49 “Am ___

3/8

risk?� 51 Bad thing to invoke 52 Match audio and video 55 Caribbean taro 58 Many a Wayne flick 60 Beach ball? 61 Very last segment 63 Mo. of Canada’s Thanksgiving 64 Hands-on god in a children’s farm activity? 68 A fifth of “Hamlet� 69 Hype up 70 They make a party a party 71 Adverse vote 72 Ant formation 73 Has a second meeting with DOWN 1 ___ polloi 2 “The ___ of the Deal� 3 “Messenger� molecule 4 Pleasant, weather-wise 5 Serving no purpose 6 Audition for a part 7 Five-alarm dish 8 Flimflammed 9 Footnote notation 10 “Terrible twos� cries 11 Blazing 12 Windward Island St. ___ 13 Clandestine meeting 18 Tidies up

21 Magazine publisher, e.g.? 22 Eisenberg of “The Social Network� 23 Missouri River city 24 Cash from the Continent 29 ___ Lanka 31 “Arabian Nights� menace 33 Quick impression 35 Woman’s secret 36 Filled pasta 38 Brown eyes or curly hair, e.g. 39 Category 40 Basketry twig 42 Last Greek consonant 43 “Coffee or ___?� 48 Planetary threat in some sci-fi films

50 Taste bud locale 52 Ashcan School member 53 New Mexico state flower 54 Dressed like King Cole? 56 It’s a fact 57 Simple tune 59 Ax relatives 62 Bridge builder, for one (Abbr.) 64 Kind of meeting at a school 65 Compass pt. opposite WNW 66 All-purpose truck, for short 67 Bacon frying sound

PREVIOUS PUZZLE ANSWER

3/7

Š 2012 Universal Uclick www.upuzzles.com

MESSING AROUND WITH THE GODS By Rob Lee


8

SPORTS

• Thursday, March 8, 2012

OUDaily.com ››

SPORTS

OU’s baseball team completed the series sweep with a 5-4 victory over Arkansas-Pine Bluff Wednesday afternoon at L. Dale Mitchell Park.

Greg Fewell, sports editor Kedric Kitchens, assistant sports editor dailysports@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Sooners to square off with Missouri Team looks to play strong in tourney after Kansas loss

AT A GLANCE Previous meetings of OU, Mizzou

KEDRIC KITCHENS

Assistant Sports Editor

The buses rolled out for Kansas City, Mo., as the OU women’s basketball team headed to the Big 12 tournament, where it will play Missouri. The Sooners finished the regular season on a low note Sunday, dropping their final matchup to the Kansas Jayhawks. After the game, coach Sherri Coale wasn’t quite sure what to think. “We were as flat as can be,” Coale said. “We knew what was on the line — we knew what was at stake — and I can’t explain it. I wish I could.” What was at stake was a second-place finish behind Baylor in the Big 12 and a No. 2 seed in the conference tournament. Instead, the loss left the Sooners tied with Texas A&M for the position. The two squads were so evenly matched that the decision came down to the fifth tiebreaker, a draw, which the Sooners won. Sunday’s loss and the final standings will be major motivators for the Sooners sophomore point guard Morgan Hook said. “The motivation is pretty high right now,” Hook said. “We were down after the Kansas game, but we ended up getting second in the league anyway. It’s all the motivation for everyone, second place in the Big 12. I think we got what we need.” Immediately following the tough loss to Kansas, Coale

CHELSEA LOTT/THE DAILY

Junior guard Whitney Hand calls out defensive assignments to her teammates during Oklahoma’s Feb. 11 victory over the Missouri Tigers. The two teams will match up again tonight in the Big 12 tournament.

The Sooners and Tigers met twice this season, and OU swept the series. In the first matchup Jan. 28 in Columbus, Mo., the Sooners squeaked out a 62-59 victory. Mizzou senior forward Christine Flores had a game-high 24 points while pulling down 16 rebounds — also a game-high. On Feb. 11 in Norman, the contest again was a hard-fought battle and again was won by the Sooners, 64-60. The high-scorer again was a Tiger — that time senior forward BreAnna Brock with 20. OU junior guard Whitney Hand had 17 of her own to lead the Sooners to victory. Compiled by Kedric Kitchens

Oklahoma State 68

10

Game 2 — 7:30 p.m. Wednesday

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP March 7-10 Municipal Auditorium Kansas City, Mo. wasn’t sure what to do, but heading to the tournament, she believed that she and her team put in the work they needed to do and are ready. “It’s about focusing what we are and who we are,” Coale said. “We had a really good workout [Tuesday], just finetuning little things. You get to conference tournament

Missouri

72

Visit OUDaily.com to see the complete tournament bracket play, and you gotta defend and you gotta rebound. You can’t have any slips, so we went back and polished a lot of little things defensively. And offensively, just talked about our purpose and what we’re trying to accomplish on every possession. I feel really good.” The big problem with the

Missouri

Game 5 — 5 p.m. today

2

Oklahoma

Sooners’ play against Kansas was a lack of intensity, the first thing that they went to work on before the team left for Kansas City, Coale said. “Effort is always a personal decision — it’s always a decision that a competitive athlete makes,” Coale said. “It was important for our guys to watch that Kansas game on

film because, for whatever reason, on Sunday afternoon, I was not able to convince them that we weren’t playing with great effort or intensity.” “They didn’t have to watch very much to figure out that it was exactly right.” When the team felt like they had seen enough, Coale made them watch more to

drive the point home. “They were embarrassed, they were humiliated and they want to change it,” Coale said. “That’s all you can do, and that’s all you should have to do.” Missouri beat Oklahoma State, 72-68, Wednesday night to earn the right to face the Sooners in the second round at 5 p.m. today. Not knowing the opponent until the night before the game could bring a certain amount of concern, but Hook said the unknown isn’t a worry. “We’ve played both of the teams before, and either way, it doesn’t really matter,” Hook said. “We know what to do in scout; just gotta play hard. That’s what it comes down to: giving all of our effort.” Coale had similar sentiments, noting that what’s important is what her squad is doing, not the opponent. “When you play every team in the league twice, you are so familiar with everyone,” Coale said. “We know tendencies, we know individual players — it doesn’t really matter. And in a way, I kinda like it because it helps us focus more on us. And when you get to this point in the season, you better be able to do what you do really well, regardless of what the other team does.” OU is led by sophomore guard Aaryn Ellenberg and junior guard Whitney Hand. Ellenberg leads the team in scoring with 15.6 points per game. Hand comes in at second with 13 points per game and leads the team with seven rebounds per game. SEE TOURNEY PAGE 9

OU STUDENTS YOU ARE INVITED! Informal Discussion

Fouad Ajami

5 p.m. Tuesday, March 13

Sandy Bell Gallery Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art Please respond by calling the Office of Special Events at 325-3784 or email specialevents@ou.edu. For accommodations on the basis of disability, call the Office of Special Events at (405) 325-3784. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution.

9

HOOPS: Aggies maintain control late to beat OU TOURNEY: Team will Continued from page 1 be ready, Coale says Continued from page 8

open jumper. A defensive rebound by Osby set up a fastbreak layup by Grooms to knot things up at 39 a piece. That was as close as OU came to a victory, though. Texas A&M promptly went on a 6-0 run to regain control, and the Sooners were unable to respond. OU had its chances and came within two points of the Aggies several times late in the game. However, the team simply gave up too many secondchance points to A&M. The game came down to the wire, just like the teams’ previous two games this season. However, someone had to take control, OU coach Lon Kruger said. “They’re good games, they just always seem to come down to that critical couple of possessions right there,” Kruger said. “It might be at the two-minute mark or at the four-minute mark; someone’s going to get a little bit of a cushion and play the rest of the game from there.” Going into Wednesday’s game, the teams had almost identical stat lines against each other. Both had won one contest a piece and were averaging 33 rebounds per game, but A&M had a slight edge of 1.5 points per game more than the Sooners. The teams stayed on par with each other in almost every category Wednesday, as well. However, A&M held a clear advantage in the hustle categories, and that is why the Aggies ultimately won. Oklahoma actually had a better field-goal percentage and one more assist. However, A&M had 10 more rebounds (36-26) and six more points in the paint (24-18) than OU. More telling, though, were the second-chance opportunities. A&M grabbed 13 offensive boards to OU’s five, translating to 17 second-

ORLIN WAGNER/ASSOCIATED PRESS

OU junior forward Andrew Fitzgerald (4) battles for a rebound with Texas A&M forward David Loubeau and forward Daniel Alexander (right) during the first half of the Sooners’ first-round loss in the Big 12 tournament Wednesday in Kansas City, Mo.

chance points for the Aggies compared to OU’s eight. The major gut check for Oklahoma came with less than three minutes left in the game. However, down by only five, 52-47, Oklahoma went ice cold for two minutes. During that span, OU missed all three of its shots and a pair of free throws while putting A&M at the

line for an easy two and allowing them a wide open 3-ball. That was, essentially, the game. A&M had suddenly jumped out to a 10-point lead with under a minute remaining in the game. The Aggies made their free throws down the stretch and sent the Sooners home with a record one game under the .500 mark.

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Scholar and Author on the Middle East Fouad Ajami, one of the most outstanding scholars on the Middle East, is the author of The Arab Predicament, The Vanished Inam, Beirut: City of Regrets, The Dream Palace of the Arabs and The Foreigner’s Gift: The Americans, The Arabs and the Iraqis in Iraq. He is a frequent guest expert on the Middle East and the Anderson Cooper CNN news program. He is a widely published essayist whose writings – comprising some 400 essays, reviews and columns of opinion – have appeared in such publications as Foreign Affairs magazine, for which he serves on the editorial board, and New York Times Magazine, as well as other forums in the United States and abroad. He has headed Middle Eastern studies programs at Johns Hopkins, Princeton University and at the Hoover Institute at Stanford.

Thursday, March 8, 2012 •

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��������������������������������� facebook.com/sunandski.Norman

NORMAN: 3447 W. Main St. (Sooner Mall) OKLAHOMA CITY: 10109 N. May (Between Hefner & Britton Rd) TULSA: 6808 S. Memorial Drive

With the season now over, OU now has nothing to look forward to but an offseason of preparation to get ready for next year. “Everyone would like to win more games,” Kruger said. “Everyone would like to win right away. Our coaches and players are no different, but they will keep working at it. I know they will keep making progress.”

Hook is the Sooners’ third-leading scorer, producing 11.1 points per game. The Lowell, Ark., native has struggled as of late, but Coale said the team plays better when Hook plays well and believes Hook will be able to bounce back and perform in postseason play. “I think, for Morgan, it’s focused aggression,” Coale said. “When she has an intentional push with the ball in her hand in transition, she is better, we are better. When she has her jaw set defensively, she is better, we are better. I just think it’s an aggression; it’s a confidence; it’s a decision; and I think she’ll be ready for it.” KEY OPPONENT Hook had no assists and six turnovers on Sunday, Christine Flores and Coale believes Hook Year: will be challenged by that Senior and rise above it. Position: When it comes to Forward Mizzou, the offense is Hometown: all about senior center San Antonio, Christine Flores. She avTexas erages 16.7 points and Season stats: 7.8 rebounds per game. Fourth in the conference with Senior forward BreAnna 16.7 points per game and Brock also averages 13.9 seventh with 7.8 boards. points and eight rebounds a game. By getting the No. 2 seed, the Sooners are lined up for a potential championship game with No. 1 Baylor. The Bears are the last undefeated team in the nation and have beat teams by an average of 27.7 points per game. The Sooners are no stranger to Baylor’s dominance, losing to the Bears twice this season by 31 and 27, respectively. Although they seem to be unstoppable, Coale said it can be done. “You have to shoot well — I don’t think there is any doubt about it,” Coale said. “Teams that have hung close to Baylor in a half have shot extremely well from the field. You talk about the (Brittney) Griner factor and all that; you can’t get to the rim. I don’t care what you do — she’s big enough to guard from the elbow extended and still take away layups. So, you have to shoot well from the perimeter. When you get [good looks], you have to make them.” Coale said the defense can’t stop every shot, but the key is to limit opponents’ second-chance opportunities. If the Sooners beat Missouri, they will play the winner of Texas A&M and Kansas at 2:30 p.m. Friday.

Are you on Twitter? Stay connected with the sports desk for news and updates about Sooner sports

@OUDailySports


8

SPORTS

• Thursday, March 8, 2012

OUDaily.com ››

SPORTS

OU’s baseball team completed the series sweep with a 5-4 victory over Arkansas-Pine Bluff Wednesday afternoon at L. Dale Mitchell Park.

Greg Fewell, sports editor Kedric Kitchens, assistant sports editor dailysports@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Sooners to square off with Missouri Team looks to play strong in tourney after Kansas loss

AT A GLANCE Previous meetings of OU, Mizzou

KEDRIC KITCHENS

Assistant Sports Editor

The buses rolled out for Kansas City, Mo., as the OU women’s basketball team headed to the Big 12 tournament, where it will play Missouri. The Sooners finished the regular season on a low note Sunday, dropping their final matchup to the Kansas Jayhawks. After the game, coach Sherri Coale wasn’t quite sure what to think. “We were as flat as can be,” Coale said. “We knew what was on the line — we knew what was at stake — and I can’t explain it. I wish I could.” What was at stake was a second-place finish behind Baylor in the Big 12 and a No. 2 seed in the conference tournament. Instead, the loss left the Sooners tied with Texas A&M for the position. The two squads were so evenly matched that the decision came down to the fifth tiebreaker, a draw, which the Sooners won. Sunday’s loss and the final standings will be major motivators for the Sooners sophomore point guard Morgan Hook said. “The motivation is pretty high right now,” Hook said. “We were down after the Kansas game, but we ended up getting second in the league anyway. It’s all the motivation for everyone, second place in the Big 12. I think we got what we need.” Immediately following the tough loss to Kansas, Coale

CHELSEA LOTT/THE DAILY

Junior guard Whitney Hand calls out defensive assignments to her teammates during Oklahoma’s Feb. 11 victory over the Missouri Tigers. The two teams will match up again tonight in the Big 12 tournament.

The Sooners and Tigers met twice this season, and OU swept the series. In the first matchup Jan. 28 in Columbus, Mo., the Sooners squeaked out a 62-59 victory. Mizzou senior forward Christine Flores had a game-high 24 points while pulling down 16 rebounds — also a game-high. On Feb. 11 in Norman, the contest again was a hard-fought battle and again was won by the Sooners, 64-60. The high-scorer again was a Tiger — that time senior forward BreAnna Brock with 20. OU junior guard Whitney Hand had 17 of her own to lead the Sooners to victory. Compiled by Kedric Kitchens

Oklahoma State 68

10

Game 2 — 7:30 p.m. Wednesday

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP March 7-10 Municipal Auditorium Kansas City, Mo. wasn’t sure what to do, but heading to the tournament, she believed that she and her team put in the work they needed to do and are ready. “It’s about focusing what we are and who we are,” Coale said. “We had a really good workout [Tuesday], just finetuning little things. You get to conference tournament

Missouri

72

Visit OUDaily.com to see the complete tournament bracket play, and you gotta defend and you gotta rebound. You can’t have any slips, so we went back and polished a lot of little things defensively. And offensively, just talked about our purpose and what we’re trying to accomplish on every possession. I feel really good.” The big problem with the

Missouri

Game 5 — 5 p.m. today

2

Oklahoma

Sooners’ play against Kansas was a lack of intensity, the first thing that they went to work on before the team left for Kansas City, Coale said. “Effort is always a personal decision — it’s always a decision that a competitive athlete makes,” Coale said. “It was important for our guys to watch that Kansas game on

film because, for whatever reason, on Sunday afternoon, I was not able to convince them that we weren’t playing with great effort or intensity.” “They didn’t have to watch very much to figure out that it was exactly right.” When the team felt like they had seen enough, Coale made them watch more to

drive the point home. “They were embarrassed, they were humiliated and they want to change it,” Coale said. “That’s all you can do, and that’s all you should have to do.” Missouri beat Oklahoma State, 72-68, Wednesday night to earn the right to face the Sooners in the second round at 5 p.m. today. Not knowing the opponent until the night before the game could bring a certain amount of concern, but Hook said the unknown isn’t a worry. “We’ve played both of the teams before, and either way, it doesn’t really matter,” Hook said. “We know what to do in scout; just gotta play hard. That’s what it comes down to: giving all of our effort.” Coale had similar sentiments, noting that what’s important is what her squad is doing, not the opponent. “When you play every team in the league twice, you are so familiar with everyone,” Coale said. “We know tendencies, we know individual players — it doesn’t really matter. And in a way, I kinda like it because it helps us focus more on us. And when you get to this point in the season, you better be able to do what you do really well, regardless of what the other team does.” OU is led by sophomore guard Aaryn Ellenberg and junior guard Whitney Hand. Ellenberg leads the team in scoring with 15.6 points per game. Hand comes in at second with 13 points per game and leads the team with seven rebounds per game. SEE TOURNEY PAGE 9

OU STUDENTS YOU ARE INVITED! Informal Discussion

Fouad Ajami

5 p.m. Tuesday, March 13

Sandy Bell Gallery Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art Please respond by calling the Office of Special Events at 325-3784 or email specialevents@ou.edu. For accommodations on the basis of disability, call the Office of Special Events at (405) 325-3784. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution.

9

HOOPS: Aggies maintain control late to beat OU TOURNEY: Team will Continued from page 1 be ready, Coale says Continued from page 8

open jumper. A defensive rebound by Osby set up a fastbreak layup by Grooms to knot things up at 39 a piece. That was as close as OU came to a victory, though. Texas A&M promptly went on a 6-0 run to regain control, and the Sooners were unable to respond. OU had its chances and came within two points of the Aggies several times late in the game. However, the team simply gave up too many secondchance points to A&M. The game came down to the wire, just like the teams’ previous two games this season. However, someone had to take control, OU coach Lon Kruger said. “They’re good games, they just always seem to come down to that critical couple of possessions right there,” Kruger said. “It might be at the two-minute mark or at the four-minute mark; someone’s going to get a little bit of a cushion and play the rest of the game from there.” Going into Wednesday’s game, the teams had almost identical stat lines against each other. Both had won one contest a piece and were averaging 33 rebounds per game, but A&M had a slight edge of 1.5 points per game more than the Sooners. The teams stayed on par with each other in almost every category Wednesday, as well. However, A&M held a clear advantage in the hustle categories, and that is why the Aggies ultimately won. Oklahoma actually had a better field-goal percentage and one more assist. However, A&M had 10 more rebounds (36-26) and six more points in the paint (24-18) than OU. More telling, though, were the second-chance opportunities. A&M grabbed 13 offensive boards to OU’s five, translating to 17 second-

ORLIN WAGNER/ASSOCIATED PRESS

OU junior forward Andrew Fitzgerald (4) battles for a rebound with Texas A&M forward David Loubeau and forward Daniel Alexander (right) during the first half of the Sooners’ first-round loss in the Big 12 tournament Wednesday in Kansas City, Mo.

chance points for the Aggies compared to OU’s eight. The major gut check for Oklahoma came with less than three minutes left in the game. However, down by only five, 52-47, Oklahoma went ice cold for two minutes. During that span, OU missed all three of its shots and a pair of free throws while putting A&M at the

line for an easy two and allowing them a wide open 3-ball. That was, essentially, the game. A&M had suddenly jumped out to a 10-point lead with under a minute remaining in the game. The Aggies made their free throws down the stretch and sent the Sooners home with a record one game under the .500 mark.

WINTER

B OWOUT SAVE UP TO

2012 Supersmooth Skis w/ Bindings

339

$

93

40

% OFF

SNOWBOARDS, BOOTS & BINDINGS

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2012 Cruise 65 Boots

Scholar and Author on the Middle East Fouad Ajami, one of the most outstanding scholars on the Middle East, is the author of The Arab Predicament, The Vanished Inam, Beirut: City of Regrets, The Dream Palace of the Arabs and The Foreigner’s Gift: The Americans, The Arabs and the Iraqis in Iraq. He is a frequent guest expert on the Middle East and the Anderson Cooper CNN news program. He is a widely published essayist whose writings – comprising some 400 essays, reviews and columns of opinion – have appeared in such publications as Foreign Affairs magazine, for which he serves on the editorial board, and New York Times Magazine, as well as other forums in the United States and abroad. He has headed Middle Eastern studies programs at Johns Hopkins, Princeton University and at the Hoover Institute at Stanford.

Thursday, March 8, 2012 •

19993

$

SAVE $115

ENTIRE STOCK CK

Adult & Kids Apparel

40 %

OFF F

ENTIRE EN STOCK

Adult & Kids Apparel

50%

OFF

Smith Venue Helmet

7993

$

Reg. $100

Performance Baselayer Buy 1, Get 2nd

50%

Gordini Adult RM-1 Gloves & Mittens

OFF

1993

$

SAVE $25 Prices valid thru 3/11/12

��������������������������������� facebook.com/sunandski.Norman

NORMAN: 3447 W. Main St. (Sooner Mall) OKLAHOMA CITY: 10109 N. May (Between Hefner & Britton Rd) TULSA: 6808 S. Memorial Drive

With the season now over, OU now has nothing to look forward to but an offseason of preparation to get ready for next year. “Everyone would like to win more games,” Kruger said. “Everyone would like to win right away. Our coaches and players are no different, but they will keep working at it. I know they will keep making progress.”

Hook is the Sooners’ third-leading scorer, producing 11.1 points per game. The Lowell, Ark., native has struggled as of late, but Coale said the team plays better when Hook plays well and believes Hook will be able to bounce back and perform in postseason play. “I think, for Morgan, it’s focused aggression,” Coale said. “When she has an intentional push with the ball in her hand in transition, she is better, we are better. When she has her jaw set defensively, she is better, we are better. I just think it’s an aggression; it’s a confidence; it’s a decision; and I think she’ll be ready for it.” KEY OPPONENT Hook had no assists and six turnovers on Sunday, Christine Flores and Coale believes Hook Year: will be challenged by that Senior and rise above it. Position: When it comes to Forward Mizzou, the offense is Hometown: all about senior center San Antonio, Christine Flores. She avTexas erages 16.7 points and Season stats: 7.8 rebounds per game. Fourth in the conference with Senior forward BreAnna 16.7 points per game and Brock also averages 13.9 seventh with 7.8 boards. points and eight rebounds a game. By getting the No. 2 seed, the Sooners are lined up for a potential championship game with No. 1 Baylor. The Bears are the last undefeated team in the nation and have beat teams by an average of 27.7 points per game. The Sooners are no stranger to Baylor’s dominance, losing to the Bears twice this season by 31 and 27, respectively. Although they seem to be unstoppable, Coale said it can be done. “You have to shoot well — I don’t think there is any doubt about it,” Coale said. “Teams that have hung close to Baylor in a half have shot extremely well from the field. You talk about the (Brittney) Griner factor and all that; you can’t get to the rim. I don’t care what you do — she’s big enough to guard from the elbow extended and still take away layups. So, you have to shoot well from the perimeter. When you get [good looks], you have to make them.” Coale said the defense can’t stop every shot, but the key is to limit opponents’ second-chance opportunities. If the Sooners beat Missouri, they will play the winner of Texas A&M and Kansas at 2:30 p.m. Friday.

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10

• Thursday, March 8, 2012

Life&arts

OUDaily.com ›› Relive that magic carpet ride from your childhood at Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art’s newest exhibit showcasing classic Disney animation.

Lindsey Ruta, life & arts editor Mariah Webb, assistant life & arts editor dailyent@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

theater preview

Students stage work of featured playwright Performance of Irish play — ‘By the Bog of Cats’ — to close literature festival Westlee Parsons Life & Arts Reporter

Irish fire, mystique and passion is set to light up the stage this weekend with the OU School of Drama’s production of “By the Bog of Cats.” This play will take the audience through an adaptation of the burning tragedy of “Medea” placed in contemporary Ireland. World Literature Today is showcasing “By the Bog of Cats” and its playwright, Marina Carr, at this year’s Puterbaugh Festival. The play, written in 1998, follows a day in the life of a traveler, the Irish term for gypsy, named Hester Swane. Do not be fooled — this is not a typical day-in-the-life story. It is the happiest, saddest and most tragic day in the characters’ lives neatly bottled in a flask of Irish comedic relief. Acting senior Anna Fearheiley, who plays Swane, said the audience sees her character as someone who is abandoned by everyone in her life in a single day. Drama senior Sam Boeck — who plays Swane’s love, Carthage Kilibride — described the play as a downhill slide into a dark set of circumstances. “The first act is all right, the second is somewhat depressing and then the third act is a boulder rolling down a hill,” Boeck said. This is a mild understatement because, metaphorically, the boulder crashes into a small town and bursts into flames. In other words, the play is not for the faint of heart, but it really ignites emotion in the audience. Fearheiley said one of the biggest challenges with the story line is how to get the audience to the end of the play. Like its Greek inspiration — Euripides’ “Medea” — the

GO AND DO By the Bog of Cats WHEN: 8 p.m. Saturday, Monday through Wednesday; 3 p.m. Sunday WHERE: Beatrice Carr Wallace Old Science Hall’s Lab Theatre, 640 Parrington Oval PRICE: $5 at the door INFO: 405-325-0317

adaptation’s end is inevitable from the beginning. Fearheiley has never done an Irish play before, so the text was a new challenge, she said. “There was a lot of analysis of the language and symbolism that had to be done,” she said. Fearheiley described the language as beautiful and colorful but with difficult Irish terms that are important to convey correctly in the performance of the play. The set is simple, forcing the play to be driven by the actors, she said. The designers were particular in their use of color to help emphasize the language and symbolism of the play, Fearheiley said. She said that, while the adaptation is placed in contemporary times, the Irish setting has an older feel to it. Drama professor Susan Shaughnessy, who directs the production, said the set is supposed to be an abstract interpretation of the landscape, or, in this case, the bog mentioned in the play’s title. The stage and background are black, with a frosted white willow tree and blood spilled on the stage for certain events, Shaughnessy said. Given the Irish setting, a culture most in the cast are not intimately familiar with,

Above: Drama performance senior Anna Fearheiley (left) and drama performance senior Sam Boeck play estranged couple Hester Swane (Fearheiley) and Carthage Kilibride (Boeck) in “By the Bog of Cats” by Marina Carr, this year’s featured playwright at the Puterbaugh Festival. The play is a loose adaptation of Euripides’ Greek tragedy, “Medea,” set in contemporary Ireland. The show opens Saturday and runs through Wednesday in the Beatrice Carr Wallace Old Science Hall’s Lab Theatre.

a lot of research was done in order to successfully produce this play, she said. The dramaturg and assistant director, Kasey Sams, also researched the history of the play to make sure nothing was missed, Shaughnessy said. The actors began preparing for their roles in November, she said. They were provided with research packets that included the play’s historical information, translations of Irish words, bogs in Ireland and information on the original “Medea.” Playwright Marina Carr will be attending Saturday night’s performance, which concludes the Puterbaugh Festival. Shaughnessy said that, while the cast always strives to bring their best work to the stage, having Carr in the audience makes opening night more exciting.

photos by ty johnson/the daily

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Left: Hester Swane, played by drama performance senior Anna Fearheiley, (right) and her daughter, Josie Kilbride, played by drama performance sophomore Jennifer Pearson, share an intimate moment during Monday’s rehearsal. “By the Bog of Cats” opens at 8 p.m. Saturday as the conclusion to the 2012 Puterbaugh Festival, hosted by OU’s World Literature Today.


Life&Arts

Thursday, March 8, 2012 •

11

Performance Review

‘Dance Oklahoma’ show misses mark Left: Students perform “On the Rim,” a modern dance piece choreographed by OU dance professor Austin Hartel. “On the Rim” was the third piece of five performed in “Contemporary Dance Oklahoma,” the OU School of Dance’s second show of the semester.

Life & Arts Columnist

Mariah Webb mariahwebb@ou.edu

Below: Students perform “Indelible Grace: A Tribute to 9/11,” choreographed by OU dance professor Derrick Minter, during “Contemporary Dance Oklahoma” at the Fine Arts Center’s Rupel J. Jones Theatre. It was the second piece performed in the show and was a memorial to the attacks on America on Sept. 11. “Contemporary Dance Oklahoma” opened Wednesday and runs through Sunday. A selected piece from the show also will perform at 3 p.m. Saturday at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art in a partnership with the museum’s new Disney-themed exhibit.

T

he OU School of Dance opens its second show of the semester Wednesday with “Contemporary Dance Oklahoma,” a performance of five original pieces choreographed by dance professors Austin Hartel and Derrick Minter. As a whole, the recital was beautifully danced. The students of the modern dance department clearly are talented and hardworking. They executed the choreography with precision and attention to detail. This level of talent — a truly beautiful blank canvas — made the tired choreography placed upon them disappointing. There certainly were high points in the show, but they were few and far between. The biggest factor hindering the show was an overuse of props and set. The pieces were too high-concept, which was distracting and got in the way of the dancing itself. The first piece, “Forever In a Day” by Derrick Minter, was enjoyable. Choreographing to Bobby McFerrin is not an easy task, and Minter was generally successful. The dancers in the piece were precise and energetic. The set was simple and served the purpose of enhancing the choreography. It was generally very visually pleasing.

GO AND DO WHEN: 8 p.m. today to Saturday, 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday WHERE: Rupel J. Jones Theatre in the Fine Arts Center, 563 Elm Ave. PRICE: $14 for students, $18 for seniors, $22 for adults. INFO: 405-325-4101

Minter’s other piece, “Indelible Grace: A Tribute to 9/11,” was not the same. The high-concept scenery and all-too-familiar setting resulted in a melodramatic piece of performance art. But, as with most of the pieces, there was an exception — toward the end, an incredible number provided

a beautiful visual experience. Donned in white chiffon, the company executed an angelic and beautiful scene, which almost made up for the silliness of the rest of the piece. The third piece, “On the Rim” by Austin Hartel, was the most disappointing. The concept was tired and, frankly, boring. This was tragic since the moves were obviously physically tolling on the dancers, who were working hard to do their best with what they were given. The fourth piece, also choreographed by Hartel, was chilling and absolutely enchanting. “Bicuspid” features two dancers performing perfectly in-sync on a naked stage under a simple red-light queue. The music, the choreography, and two

female dancers were outstanding. I was at the edge of my seat begging for more. The fifth and final piece also was refreshing and enjoyable to watch. Hartel collaborated with the dancers to create a piece inspired by Disney Animation’s “Fantasia.” They innovatively used a backlight to create a light-hearted and magical dance experience. “Contemporary Dance Oklahoma” has its high points, as well as several low points. If you love dance and can persevere through the silly, this show will entertain you. If you don’t, however, I don’t suggest you attend this show. Mariah Webb is a University College freshman.

photos by Ricardo Pantio/the daily


12

Life&Arts

• Thursday, March 8, 2012

CONGRATULATIONS ON A CLEAN SWEEP! OU Construction Science teams placed first in all categories at the 17th Region V Associated Schools of Construction/TEXO Student Competition and the sweep was a first for any university in the region and a first in the competition’s history.

Design Build Team Greg O’Bryan, Construction Science Lynnsee Turner, Construction Science Colton Roberts, Construction Science Holly North, Construction Science Beth Pearcy, Architecture Anna Price, Architecture Cole Hixon, Construction Science, Alternate Davis Lasiter, Construction Science, Alternate Tammy McCuen, Construction Science, Coach Anthony Cricchio, Architecture, Coach

International Design Build Team Jonathan Radebaugh, Construction Science Kevin Leach, Construction Science Bryce McCarthy, Architecture Adam LeCours, Construction Science, Alternate Joe Cullinan, Construction Science, Alternate Greg Davis, Construction Science, Alternate Paul Murphy, Construction Science, DIT Conor Shaw, Architecture Technology, DIT Orla Hayes, Architecture, DIT Ken Robson, Construction Science, Coach Lloyd Scott, Dublin Institute of Technology, Coach

Heavy Civil Team Rande Patterson, Construction Science Mike Senn, Construction Science Zach Henderson, Construction Science Adam Hinkle, Construction Science Dominique Harris, Construction Science Cody Wheeler, Construction Science Christina Backus, Construction Science, Alternate Adrian Sopher, Construction Science, Alternate Dominique Pittenger, Construction Science, Coach

Commercial Building Team Jared Bills, Construction Science Carlie Carpio, Construction Science Ryan Puckett, Construction Science Jeremy Nichols, Construction Science David Goldstein, Construction Science John Bledsoe, Construction Science Richard Ryan, Construction Science, Coach

Best Presenters Orla Hayes, First, Design Build Lynnsee Turner, Second, Design Build Rande Patterson, First, Heavy Civil Carlie Carpio, Second, Commercial Building

For more information about the Haskell & Irene Lemon Construction Science Division in the College of Architecture, go to cns.ou.edu

Thursday, March 08, 2012  

Thursday, March 08, 2012

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