Page 1

Wednesday, March 7, 2012

Special front-page editorial

A message to the university community

It’s more than a housing issue

T

his week, the university has a chance to join in this generation’s civil rights movement. Gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender Americans still are denied basic, fundamental rights because of an innate, uncontrollable, harmless facet of their identity. In what many call the greatest nation in the world, society is actively marginalizing your fellow citizens. We cannot allow this to continue any longer. GLBT citizens are told day in and day out that they are Gender-neutral housing means the choice to live with different, immoral and disgusting. That they are causing someone whom students know will be supportive of the downfall of this nation and the unraveling of families. their sexuality or gender identity. It means freedom from It still is socially acceptable in many circles to express discomfort, discrimination, harassment and fear. hateful, discriminatory, even violent sentiments about It means the choice to live with those who are most these people in polite conversation. In fact, we live in a comfortable with them, and, in turn, to live in the envistate where regular citizens feel comfortable spouting ronment they find most comfortable — a right taken for toxic hostility and contempt for them in the public forum granted by every other student at OU. It means one small step toward equal treatment for of a city council meeting. These individuals can be fired, denied housing, kept GLBT citizens. It means a step into the 21st century from adopting children, banned from teaching, barred for OU and for Oklahoma. It means the University of Oklahoma being a true leader. from basic tax and inheritance It means equality. rights, and denied validation of Why we’re sending this message This is something OU must do. their relationships from the state. While a newspaper must inform, there are times It is only a little step, but every little They still face daily discrimination, when a newspaper must speak up for what’s right. Gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender step is important. Sooners may not harassment, violence and murder. Americans have been denied justice and basic human dignity for far too long. The fight for their be able to change the world today, They are driven to suicide. rights is a fight for human rights. The gender-neutral housing debate brings the but we certainly can change OU. A congressional representative in struggle for equality to OU. It is a small change, but one we can accomplish. This is OU’s chance to We’ve heard it said that change Oklahoma said these citizens are stand up for what is right, and that is why we have like this can’t happen here because more dangerous than terrorists, chosen to devote our front page to this proposal. — Chris Lusk, editor in chief this is Oklahoma, as if Oklahomans and Rick Santorum, who Oklahoma can’t care about equal treatment has nominated for president of the United States, compared their love to pedophilia and and human rights. But this always will be Oklahoma — the same old Oklahoma — until we make it better. bestiality. These citizens are relegated to second-class status, So this is not just about providing a new housing opeasily denied acknowledgement and basic rights, on the tion for one group of students. This is about ensuring basis of who they have sex with and what gender traits every American has access to the American Dream, to the equality of rights guaranteed by our Constitution. they feel comfortable expressing. GLBT Americans face the very real, everyday threats of This policy is a message to every gay, lesbian, bisexual isolation, bigotry and hate. It is ridiculous that we are still and transgender member of the Sooner community that debating civil rights, that there still is so much stubborn they are worthy of acknowledgment, protection, support opposition to the proposition that all men — those you and safety. like and those you don’t — are created equal. It is back- This issue affects us all. Equality isn’t a special interest. Americans have a responsibility to demand the promises ward, unacceptable and, frankly, insane. It is time for change. OU now has one small, symbolic of our founding be fulfilled and to fight so their fellow citibut effective way to challenge that reality. Sooners can- zens may be recognized as human beings worthy of the same regard, the same respect, the same basic dignity. not afford to play it safe. The gender-neutral housing option students will pres- This country has struggled to answer that demand ent today to President David Boren would give students and win that fight for a long time. It’s still struggling. We the choice to live with students of any gender. This is an are calling on our fellow Sooners and the University of important right for all OU students, but it is particularly Oklahoma to join that struggle and take this simple, powimportant for GLBT students because it provides a safe erful step to reject repression and affirm freedom for all. And that’s why it’s more than a housing issue. home on campus — something many do not have.

Student reflects on life in the closet

An open letter to President Boren

Columnist pleas on students’ behalf

News, page 2

Editorial, page 4

opinion, page 4


2

CAMPUS

• Wednesday, March 7, 2012

CAMPUS

OUDaily.com ››

Laney Ellisor, campus editor Kathleen Evans, assistant campus editor Chris Miller, assistant campus editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

Norman City Council candidate Zac Abbott told student government representatives he wants to bridge gaps between city of Norman and campus.

ELECTIONS

Oklahomans nominate Santorum AT A GLANCE Unofficial Okla. primary results as of press time • Rick Santorum 34 percent • Mitt Romney 28 percent • Newt Gingrich 27 percent • Ron Paul 10 percent Source: Oklahoma Election Board

Former senator from Pennsylvania receives 34% of votes KATHLEEN EVANS

Assistant Campus Editor

Rick Santorum won Oklahoma’s primary and nomination for Republican p re s i d e nt i a l ca n d i d at e Tuesday, asserting his appeal with conservative voters. Ten states held primaries and caucuses during Super Tuesday. As of press time, results from eight states were sufficient to project winners. Santorum also won Tennessee and North Dakota,

with 37 and 40 percent votes, respectively, according to state election boards. “We went up against enormous odds … in every state,” Santorum s a i d d u r - MORE INSIDE ing an ad- Read more dress from about national h i s c a m - primary results. paign head- PAGE 5 quarters in Steubenville, Ohio. “There was not a single state where we spent more money than the people that we were able to defeat.” In addition to his Super Tuesday victories, Santorum earned primary wins in Iowa,

Minnesota, Missouri and Colorado. OU students watched the results live at a watch party in a Cate Center lounge, hosted by the Carl Albert Center, Cate Resident Student Association and OU Political Science Club. Residence hall leaders wanted to create a non-partisan atmosphere for students to learn about the elections, said Paige Abernathy, Cate Center Resident Student TY JOHNSON/THE DAILY Association president. During the event, three OU OU students watch and participate in political discussion during political science professors Tuesday night’s political watch party at Cate Center. The event featured several OU professors, who hosted a Q&A session during the SEE PRIMARY PAGE 3 televised coverage of Super Tuesday primaries.

GENDER-NEUTRAL HOUSING

CORRECTIONS The Oklahoma Daily has a commitment to serve readers with accurate coverage and analysis. Readers should bring errors to The Daily’s attention by emailing dailynews@ou.edu. In a page 2 story about a new education center at the OU Health Sciences Center, the cost of the center was misreported. The center was one of three buildings comprising a three-part construction project that cost $126 million.

Campus ......................... Classifieds ....................... Life & Arts ...................... Opinion ......................... Sports ............................

2 9 10 4 6

DISSECTION: Cadavers reveal unhealthy lives

Continued from page 2

Continued from page 2

answered student questions and discussed possible outcomes for the nomination and the presidency. Romney has won more than 50 percent of primary delegates thus far, so it would be hard for another candidate to beat him if he continued to win big in Super Tuesday as well, professor Keith Gaddie said. As of press time, Romney won Vermont, Virginia, Idaho and his home state Massachusetts with 41, 59, 77 and 72 percent of votes respectively, according to state election boards. Results from Ohio were too close to call as of press time, with Romney and Santorum each earning 38 percent. Romney and Gingrich finished second and third in Oklahoma, each with about 26 percent of votes at press time, according to the state election board. The loss for Gingrich disappointed political science sophomore Tyler Cope, who attended the watch party. “It’s all about momentum,” Cope said. “Santorum is just ahead because he is anti-Romney right now.” Gingrich won Georgia with 48 percent of votes. Though professors said Romney would be the most flexible and experienced candidate in a contest with President Barack Obama, Cope said he did not support Romney. “He’s wishy-washy,” Cope said. “He flip flops. There are some things he’s conservative on, but I don’t want someone who’s going to compromise.” Santorum echoed similar sentiments during his speech, saying his biggest reason for his candidacy was to repeal Obama’s health care policies. He has not required individual mandates in his home state, Santorum said, attacking a health-insurance program implemented in Massachusetts during Romney’s stint as governor. Obama won the Democratic ballot in Oklahoma with 56 percent of votes, according to the election board.

eat,” Leavey said. The degenerate condition of many of the organs reveal how unhealthily many people live, Gordon said. “You start to see all the stuff that goes wrong with our bodies, and many of these things, like bypasses, are what the cadavers died of,” Gordon said. “[Some students] may look at the fat on the heart and say, ‘Oh my gosh, a few less Girl Scout cookies’ … It’s at least a conversation in their heads.” The class took their test over extremities last Friday, and this 20-page exam is the hardest of the semester, Gordon said. “It’s 100-something muscles they need to know, and many of the muscles have three words in the name,” Gordon said. “It’s so much that they flounder.” Most people do not understand the massive amount of material covered in the four-month course, Gordon said. “After taking the course, many of my students say they now can do any class, any course, any time,” he said. Leavey perhaps has absorbed too much over the past two months, she said. “The other day, somebody was running past my car and I thought, ‘Wow, he has a really nice rectus femoris,’” Leavey said. “That was so embarrassing ... He was totally staring back at me.” Leavey said she has learned more than a list of muscles, nerves and organs, however. Lungs ravaged with cancer. Hearts smothered in layers of fat. Diabetic fingers riddled with pin pricks. They all tell stories that would be left untold if not for a decision to donate one’s body to science, Leavey said. “It makes you think about their lives,” Leavey said. “It makes you wonder what they did, what they left behind.”

HOUSING: Advocates hope to foster acceptance spaces for all student residents that allow them to study, learn, grow, and thrive, according to the proposal. OU ’s current housing policy both requires freshmen to live in on-campus housing and provides oncampus housing options for upperclassmen. The proposal references a 2005 National School Climate Survey, wherein 75.4 percent of GLBT youth reported hearing homophobic remarks in middle school or high school.

The survey — conducted by the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network — also reported that 40.7 percent of respondents felt unsafe at school due to their gender expression. A social stigma surrounding individuals who identify as GLBT is so powerful that “students’ comfort and safety is jeopardized, and their ability to perform academically is diminished,” according to the proposal. Gender-neutral housing at OU would promote an atmosphere of acceptance, as well as help to fulfill Housing & Food Services’

goals and obligations to the student body, according to the proposal. Very few universities offer gender-neutral housing for freshmen, Housing & Food Services Director David Annis said. “I don’t see this as being as overreaching as some of the proponents say,” Annis said. “I do think there are [currently] some viable options for students.” In response to verbal and physical abuse, Housing & Food Services works with students individually to ensure abuse won’t take place, Annis said.

Common objections to gender-neutral housing include opposition from parents and concerns regarding potential abuse from couples who want to use gender-neutral housing to live together, according to the proposal. “We have a lot of parental concern now with roommate issues,” Annis said. “This just adds another issue of concern for some parents.” While there certainly is the possibility of creative college students abusing genderneutral housing, Annis believes a majority of students respect the rules and follow them, he said.

AUBRIE HILL/THE DAILY

In this file photo, nutrition junior Kati Rose and pre-nursing sophomore RaeAnn Anderson get a closer look at what’s under the skin with a model in Collums Building.

Down to the bone Students explore human body firsthand JAKE MORGAN

Campus Reporter

Katherine Leavey, aspiring oncology nurse, surveyed her patient’s exposed chest cavity. The metastasized lung cancer had sent malignant tendrils into surrounding regions, fusing rib cage to lung tissue. Atrophied and rigid, the left lung resembled a piece of granite while the cancerous, plum-colored right lung lay in a disintegrated state. The heart, veiled in a thin layer of fat, lay in the middle of it all. All that was missing was a heartbeat. OU’s human anatomy course continues to challenge students as it delves into internal organs and an extensive amount of course material. Students exposed their cadavers’ internal organs in lab for the first time last week. Once rib cages are removed, a moment of fascination usually follows, human anatomy professor Cindy Gordon said.

“It’s always those few minutes of ‘Wow,’” Gordon said. “The first thing that everyone does is look at their [cadaver], and then they’ll go around to all the other bodies.” Transitioning from the study of musculature to internal organs, students in the course are starting to witness the incredible amount of variation among the bodies, Gordon said. “They’ve been doing muscles for five weeks; they’re about muscled out,” Gordon said. “[This unit] is when you start to see the things that students commonly hear about: cardiovascular disease, bypasses, lung cancer, emphysema and so on.” Leavey, a pre-nursing sophomore, said the lungs from her group’s cadaver shocked many of her classmates. “Other lungs felt like memory foam mattresses, but [our left lung] felt like it was filled with rock,” Leavey said. In another group, a heart nearly the size of a volleyball filled one chest, she said. The dissections involve more intricate, delicate structures as the course

SPORTS VOL. 97, NO. 116

The Irish Film Festival, part of the Puterbaugh Festival, will take place from 12:45 to 4 p.m. in the Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Meacham Auditorium.

Requested document and purpose

After suffering a few early season upsets on the road, Oklahoma is happy to be back at Marita Hynes Field. (Page 7)

SPORTS

OU HSC finds trigger for cardiovascular disease

Men’s gymnastics coach leaving lasting legacy

Research shows oxidative stress causes a dysfunction affecting how the body administers free radicals. (News)

Mark Williams has won five national championships in 12 years as OU’s head coach. Now, he is after a 6th. (Page 8)

SEE DISSECTION PAGE 3

The Daily’s open record requests

OU softball holds huge advantage on home field

NOW ONLINE AT

progresses, and it takes patience to avoid destroying them, Gordon said. “Within each table, they’ve figured out who the good dissector is, someone who’s not going to go in there like he’s got a chain saw,” Gordon said. “You really get into a bunch of structures that are right next to each other and you have to tease them apart.” Many students had difficulty reflecting the skin on the palms to view the delicate muscles in the hand, Leavey said. Earlier in the semester, her group’s cadaver began to bleed out after someone nicked an artery. “It took a lot of paper towels, and we had to soak it up,” Leavey said. “It kind of was a big mess.” Leavey also confirmed firsthand a myth that when bones are cut they smell similar to Cool Ranch Doritos, she said. “I could see them packaging that powder, bringing to the Dorito factory, putting them on the tortilla chips and packaging them for people to

KELSEY HIGLEY/THE DAILY

180 Meridian, a new restaurant on Main Street, offers sushi and an Asian-fusion twist on American classics. The Daily’s Westlee Parsons says the drinks are good, but the food and service could use a boost. (Page 10)

Date requested

Dorm costs for single and double rooms for the last ten years — To learn how the price of living at OU has changed during the span of a decade.

Friday

Reports filed by the OU Police Department for sexual assaults since 1980 — To learn more about the number of sex-related crimes reported in the past and how they were handled by OUPD.

Friday

Records of enrollment numbers for all foreign language courses offered during fall and spring semesters during the last fi ve years. — To look for trends in the number of students taking foreign language courses each semester.

Sunday

3

PRIMARY: Romney places second in Okla.

Continued from page 2

Campus Reporter

© 2012 OU Publications Board FREE — Additional copies 25 cents

THURSDAY, MARCH 8

FRIDAY, MARCH 9

EMMA HAMBLEN

SEE HOUSING PAGE 3

Student Success Series presents “Starting Research Writing From Scratch” from 3 to 4 p.m. in the Wagner Hall, Room 280.

Playwright Marina Carr will be giving a keynote address as part of the Puterbaugh Festival from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. in Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Meacham Auditorium.

Two student groups will rally today to deliver housing proposal to Boren Like all incoming freshmen, Caleb Cosper was required to live in on-campus housing his first year at OU. Unlike many of his classmates and fellow Couch Tower residents, Cosper was in the closet. Before coming to OU, Cosper hoped to live on an international floor with students from outside the U.S., he said. Cosper eventually was assigned a roommate with deeply held negative beliefs about the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community, he said. Cosper, now a zoology junior, said his roommate routinely made derogatory remarks about GLBT people, showed open disgust for them and said they were less than human and didn’t deserve any rights, Cosper said. His roommate never learned his sexual orientation, Cosper said. Other GLBT students may choose to live differently and suffer as a result, he said. Cosper’s freshman experience, coupled with his belief that steps should be taken to avoid similar situations, led him to become a proponent of a university gender-neutral housing proposal. He’ll voice that support today by participating in a GO AND DO student-led rally, which will Student rally culminate in the delivery of a gender-neutral housWHEN: Noon today ing proposal to the administration building housing WHERE: Gather at Unity OU President David Boren’s Garden before moving to Evans Hall office. Me m b e r s o f b o t h t h e Students for a Democratic Society and Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Trangender and Friends organizations will gather at noon in the South Oval’s Unity Garden before moving to Evans Hall to deliver the proposal. The proposal states that while OU has provided specialized environments such as National Merit floors to accommodate students, there are no specific housing options for student members of the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community who are uncomfortable with existing housing arrangements. Transgender students are those most in need of genderneutral housing, Cosper said. For these students in particular, the university’s current housing requirements has the potential to create uncomfortable living situations, Cosper said. “That’s not fair to either person in that situation unless you’re lucky enough to get paired with someone who’s supportive,” Cosper said. OU is obligated to provide safe and comfortable living

The baseball team will play Arkansas-Pine Bluff at noon at L. Dale Mitchell Park.

Free Lecture by Lilly Ledbetter entitled “Fighting for Fairness” will be presented from 7 to 8 p.m. in Gaylord Hall’s Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation Auditorium.

ANATOMY

Students aim to strengthen GLBT safety, comfort at OU

TODAY AROUND CAMPUS

Wednesday, March 7, 2012 •

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2

CAMPUS

• Wednesday, March 7, 2012

CAMPUS

OUDaily.com ››

Laney Ellisor, campus editor Kathleen Evans, assistant campus editor Chris Miller, assistant campus editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

Norman City Council candidate Zac Abbott told student government representatives he wants to bridge gaps between city of Norman and campus.

ELECTIONS

Oklahomans nominate Santorum AT A GLANCE Unofficial Okla. primary results as of press time • Rick Santorum 34 percent • Mitt Romney 28 percent • Newt Gingrich 27 percent • Ron Paul 10 percent Source: Oklahoma Election Board

Former senator from Pennsylvania receives 34% of votes KATHLEEN EVANS

Assistant Campus Editor

Rick Santorum won Oklahoma’s primary and nomination for Republican p re s i d e nt i a l ca n d i d at e Tuesday, asserting his appeal with conservative voters. Ten states held primaries and caucuses during Super Tuesday. As of press time, results from eight states were sufficient to project winners. Santorum also won Tennessee and North Dakota,

with 37 and 40 percent votes, respectively, according to state election boards. “We went up against enormous odds … in every state,” Santorum s a i d d u r - MORE INSIDE ing an ad- Read more dress from about national h i s c a m - primary results. paign head- PAGE 5 quarters in Steubenville, Ohio. “There was not a single state where we spent more money than the people that we were able to defeat.” In addition to his Super Tuesday victories, Santorum earned primary wins in Iowa,

Minnesota, Missouri and Colorado. OU students watched the results live at a watch party in a Cate Center lounge, hosted by the Carl Albert Center, Cate Resident Student Association and OU Political Science Club. Residence hall leaders wanted to create a non-partisan atmosphere for students to learn about the elections, said Paige Abernathy, Cate Center Resident Student TY JOHNSON/THE DAILY Association president. During the event, three OU OU students watch and participate in political discussion during political science professors Tuesday night’s political watch party at Cate Center. The event featured several OU professors, who hosted a Q&A session during the SEE PRIMARY PAGE 3 televised coverage of Super Tuesday primaries.

GENDER-NEUTRAL HOUSING

CORRECTIONS The Oklahoma Daily has a commitment to serve readers with accurate coverage and analysis. Readers should bring errors to The Daily’s attention by emailing dailynews@ou.edu. In a page 2 story about a new education center at the OU Health Sciences Center, the cost of the center was misreported. The center was one of three buildings comprising a three-part construction project that cost $126 million.

Campus ......................... Classifieds ....................... Life & Arts ...................... Opinion ......................... Sports ............................

2 9 10 4 6

DISSECTION: Cadavers reveal unhealthy lives

Continued from page 2

Continued from page 2

answered student questions and discussed possible outcomes for the nomination and the presidency. Romney has won more than 50 percent of primary delegates thus far, so it would be hard for another candidate to beat him if he continued to win big in Super Tuesday as well, professor Keith Gaddie said. As of press time, Romney won Vermont, Virginia, Idaho and his home state Massachusetts with 41, 59, 77 and 72 percent of votes respectively, according to state election boards. Results from Ohio were too close to call as of press time, with Romney and Santorum each earning 38 percent. Romney and Gingrich finished second and third in Oklahoma, each with about 26 percent of votes at press time, according to the state election board. The loss for Gingrich disappointed political science sophomore Tyler Cope, who attended the watch party. “It’s all about momentum,” Cope said. “Santorum is just ahead because he is anti-Romney right now.” Gingrich won Georgia with 48 percent of votes. Though professors said Romney would be the most flexible and experienced candidate in a contest with President Barack Obama, Cope said he did not support Romney. “He’s wishy-washy,” Cope said. “He flip flops. There are some things he’s conservative on, but I don’t want someone who’s going to compromise.” Santorum echoed similar sentiments during his speech, saying his biggest reason for his candidacy was to repeal Obama’s health care policies. He has not required individual mandates in his home state, Santorum said, attacking a health-insurance program implemented in Massachusetts during Romney’s stint as governor. Obama won the Democratic ballot in Oklahoma with 56 percent of votes, according to the election board.

eat,” Leavey said. The degenerate condition of many of the organs reveal how unhealthily many people live, Gordon said. “You start to see all the stuff that goes wrong with our bodies, and many of these things, like bypasses, are what the cadavers died of,” Gordon said. “[Some students] may look at the fat on the heart and say, ‘Oh my gosh, a few less Girl Scout cookies’ … It’s at least a conversation in their heads.” The class took their test over extremities last Friday, and this 20-page exam is the hardest of the semester, Gordon said. “It’s 100-something muscles they need to know, and many of the muscles have three words in the name,” Gordon said. “It’s so much that they flounder.” Most people do not understand the massive amount of material covered in the four-month course, Gordon said. “After taking the course, many of my students say they now can do any class, any course, any time,” he said. Leavey perhaps has absorbed too much over the past two months, she said. “The other day, somebody was running past my car and I thought, ‘Wow, he has a really nice rectus femoris,’” Leavey said. “That was so embarrassing ... He was totally staring back at me.” Leavey said she has learned more than a list of muscles, nerves and organs, however. Lungs ravaged with cancer. Hearts smothered in layers of fat. Diabetic fingers riddled with pin pricks. They all tell stories that would be left untold if not for a decision to donate one’s body to science, Leavey said. “It makes you think about their lives,” Leavey said. “It makes you wonder what they did, what they left behind.”

HOUSING: Advocates hope to foster acceptance spaces for all student residents that allow them to study, learn, grow, and thrive, according to the proposal. OU ’s current housing policy both requires freshmen to live in on-campus housing and provides oncampus housing options for upperclassmen. The proposal references a 2005 National School Climate Survey, wherein 75.4 percent of GLBT youth reported hearing homophobic remarks in middle school or high school.

The survey — conducted by the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network — also reported that 40.7 percent of respondents felt unsafe at school due to their gender expression. A social stigma surrounding individuals who identify as GLBT is so powerful that “students’ comfort and safety is jeopardized, and their ability to perform academically is diminished,” according to the proposal. Gender-neutral housing at OU would promote an atmosphere of acceptance, as well as help to fulfill Housing & Food Services’

goals and obligations to the student body, according to the proposal. Very few universities offer gender-neutral housing for freshmen, Housing & Food Services Director David Annis said. “I don’t see this as being as overreaching as some of the proponents say,” Annis said. “I do think there are [currently] some viable options for students.” In response to verbal and physical abuse, Housing & Food Services works with students individually to ensure abuse won’t take place, Annis said.

Common objections to gender-neutral housing include opposition from parents and concerns regarding potential abuse from couples who want to use gender-neutral housing to live together, according to the proposal. “We have a lot of parental concern now with roommate issues,” Annis said. “This just adds another issue of concern for some parents.” While there certainly is the possibility of creative college students abusing genderneutral housing, Annis believes a majority of students respect the rules and follow them, he said.

AUBRIE HILL/THE DAILY

In this file photo, nutrition junior Kati Rose and pre-nursing sophomore RaeAnn Anderson get a closer look at what’s under the skin with a model in Collums Building.

Down to the bone Students explore human body firsthand JAKE MORGAN

Campus Reporter

Katherine Leavey, aspiring oncology nurse, surveyed her patient’s exposed chest cavity. The metastasized lung cancer had sent malignant tendrils into surrounding regions, fusing rib cage to lung tissue. Atrophied and rigid, the left lung resembled a piece of granite while the cancerous, plum-colored right lung lay in a disintegrated state. The heart, veiled in a thin layer of fat, lay in the middle of it all. All that was missing was a heartbeat. OU’s human anatomy course continues to challenge students as it delves into internal organs and an extensive amount of course material. Students exposed their cadavers’ internal organs in lab for the first time last week. Once rib cages are removed, a moment of fascination usually follows, human anatomy professor Cindy Gordon said.

“It’s always those few minutes of ‘Wow,’” Gordon said. “The first thing that everyone does is look at their [cadaver], and then they’ll go around to all the other bodies.” Transitioning from the study of musculature to internal organs, students in the course are starting to witness the incredible amount of variation among the bodies, Gordon said. “They’ve been doing muscles for five weeks; they’re about muscled out,” Gordon said. “[This unit] is when you start to see the things that students commonly hear about: cardiovascular disease, bypasses, lung cancer, emphysema and so on.” Leavey, a pre-nursing sophomore, said the lungs from her group’s cadaver shocked many of her classmates. “Other lungs felt like memory foam mattresses, but [our left lung] felt like it was filled with rock,” Leavey said. In another group, a heart nearly the size of a volleyball filled one chest, she said. The dissections involve more intricate, delicate structures as the course

SPORTS VOL. 97, NO. 116

The Irish Film Festival, part of the Puterbaugh Festival, will take place from 12:45 to 4 p.m. in the Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Meacham Auditorium.

Requested document and purpose

After suffering a few early season upsets on the road, Oklahoma is happy to be back at Marita Hynes Field. (Page 7)

SPORTS

OU HSC finds trigger for cardiovascular disease

Men’s gymnastics coach leaving lasting legacy

Research shows oxidative stress causes a dysfunction affecting how the body administers free radicals. (News)

Mark Williams has won five national championships in 12 years as OU’s head coach. Now, he is after a 6th. (Page 8)

SEE DISSECTION PAGE 3

The Daily’s open record requests

OU softball holds huge advantage on home field

NOW ONLINE AT

progresses, and it takes patience to avoid destroying them, Gordon said. “Within each table, they’ve figured out who the good dissector is, someone who’s not going to go in there like he’s got a chain saw,” Gordon said. “You really get into a bunch of structures that are right next to each other and you have to tease them apart.” Many students had difficulty reflecting the skin on the palms to view the delicate muscles in the hand, Leavey said. Earlier in the semester, her group’s cadaver began to bleed out after someone nicked an artery. “It took a lot of paper towels, and we had to soak it up,” Leavey said. “It kind of was a big mess.” Leavey also confirmed firsthand a myth that when bones are cut they smell similar to Cool Ranch Doritos, she said. “I could see them packaging that powder, bringing to the Dorito factory, putting them on the tortilla chips and packaging them for people to

KELSEY HIGLEY/THE DAILY

180 Meridian, a new restaurant on Main Street, offers sushi and an Asian-fusion twist on American classics. The Daily’s Westlee Parsons says the drinks are good, but the food and service could use a boost. (Page 10)

Date requested

Dorm costs for single and double rooms for the last ten years — To learn how the price of living at OU has changed during the span of a decade.

Friday

Reports filed by the OU Police Department for sexual assaults since 1980 — To learn more about the number of sex-related crimes reported in the past and how they were handled by OUPD.

Friday

Records of enrollment numbers for all foreign language courses offered during fall and spring semesters during the last fi ve years. — To look for trends in the number of students taking foreign language courses each semester.

Sunday

3

PRIMARY: Romney places second in Okla.

Continued from page 2

Campus Reporter

© 2012 OU Publications Board FREE — Additional copies 25 cents

THURSDAY, MARCH 8

FRIDAY, MARCH 9

EMMA HAMBLEN

SEE HOUSING PAGE 3

Student Success Series presents “Starting Research Writing From Scratch” from 3 to 4 p.m. in the Wagner Hall, Room 280.

Playwright Marina Carr will be giving a keynote address as part of the Puterbaugh Festival from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. in Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Meacham Auditorium.

Two student groups will rally today to deliver housing proposal to Boren Like all incoming freshmen, Caleb Cosper was required to live in on-campus housing his first year at OU. Unlike many of his classmates and fellow Couch Tower residents, Cosper was in the closet. Before coming to OU, Cosper hoped to live on an international floor with students from outside the U.S., he said. Cosper eventually was assigned a roommate with deeply held negative beliefs about the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community, he said. Cosper, now a zoology junior, said his roommate routinely made derogatory remarks about GLBT people, showed open disgust for them and said they were less than human and didn’t deserve any rights, Cosper said. His roommate never learned his sexual orientation, Cosper said. Other GLBT students may choose to live differently and suffer as a result, he said. Cosper’s freshman experience, coupled with his belief that steps should be taken to avoid similar situations, led him to become a proponent of a university gender-neutral housing proposal. He’ll voice that support today by participating in a GO AND DO student-led rally, which will Student rally culminate in the delivery of a gender-neutral housWHEN: Noon today ing proposal to the administration building housing WHERE: Gather at Unity OU President David Boren’s Garden before moving to Evans Hall office. Me m b e r s o f b o t h t h e Students for a Democratic Society and Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Trangender and Friends organizations will gather at noon in the South Oval’s Unity Garden before moving to Evans Hall to deliver the proposal. The proposal states that while OU has provided specialized environments such as National Merit floors to accommodate students, there are no specific housing options for student members of the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community who are uncomfortable with existing housing arrangements. Transgender students are those most in need of genderneutral housing, Cosper said. For these students in particular, the university’s current housing requirements has the potential to create uncomfortable living situations, Cosper said. “That’s not fair to either person in that situation unless you’re lucky enough to get paired with someone who’s supportive,” Cosper said. OU is obligated to provide safe and comfortable living

The baseball team will play Arkansas-Pine Bluff at noon at L. Dale Mitchell Park.

Free Lecture by Lilly Ledbetter entitled “Fighting for Fairness” will be presented from 7 to 8 p.m. in Gaylord Hall’s Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation Auditorium.

ANATOMY

Students aim to strengthen GLBT safety, comfort at OU

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Reader comment on OUDaily.com ››

• Wednesday, March 7, 2012

“It is pretty standard for newspapers to endorse candidates. In the 2008 election, 88 college newspapers across the nation endorsed candidates. I applaud the Daily for taking the time to give such an opinion and for giving endorsements on both sides during this primary process..” (pike1892, RE: ‘EDITORIAL: Everyone — Republican, Democrat — should go vote today’)

OPINION

AN OPEN LETTER TO PRESIDENT BOREN

Time is now to approve gender-neutral housing DEAR PRESIDENT BOREN:

to send to your student body? To alumni? To the public? Regardless of your personal feelings or the prejuToday, you have a chance to make this university dices of Oklahoma lawmakers, there are GLBT safer for hundreds of students. You have a chance Sooners. They are just as worthy of acknowledgto support some of your most vulnerable students, ment, support and protection as any other stuto provide them with a comfortable and encouraging home environment so they may excel. You have dent. They are Oklahoma, too. And they need you, a chance to give students a reasonable, responsible President Boren, to fight for them. Who else will? When we pointed out the condition of speed choice in their housing arrangements. bumps and sidewalks near the dorms was putting Today, you will be presented with a proposal to adopt a gender-neutral housing option. And for the students at risk, you leapt quickly at the chance sake of all your students, and the essential mission of to improve student safety. In that case, it was an easy fix with no risk of negative consequences. this institution, you must support it. Unfortunately, that is not the case this time — but Gender-neutral housing would give the students this is a much more vital issue. at OU — adults who are legally and “But you are primarily Here is your opportunity to do logically capable of responsible decimuch more to improve the safety of sions — the option to live with those responsible for the they are most comfortable with. That safety, education and OU students in the places they call is all it will do. But that is a lot. success of the students home — the places they should be the most safe. Some students at OU would prefer you represent. That We understand you will face some to live with members of the oppointerest must always criticism due to this policy. And some site sex for a variety of reasons. But come before politics, of that criticism will come from peofor gay, lesbian, bisexual and transple who directly or indirectly control before money.” gender students, this is more than a OU’s monetary future. Since you have question of preference — it is a quesbeen friendly to logical and necessary student-led tion of safety. These students consistently face disinitiatives in the past, we assume your reluctance to comfort, discrimination and harassment. And it is act on this issue stems from fear of those criticisms happening here, at OU. and the negative effect they could have on OU’s fiEvery other student on this campus has access to nancial future. safe housing. In fact, that’s the primary responsiWe understand you’re responsible for ensuring bility of Housing & Food Services. This new option the health of this organization. But you are primarwould not be special treatment, but simply equal ily responsible for the safety, education and success treatment. of the students you represent. That interest must You will face those who argue that this option always come before politics, before money. And we would be immoral — that it would lead to rampant sexual activity, maybe even increased pregnancies. hope you see as clearly as we do that the opinions of those who oppose this policy are blatantly ignorant, Even ignoring the fact that the 54 other universities dangerous and wrong. (including Yale, your alma mater) that have such a There comes a time in any movement when somepolicy have seen no such increase, the sexual activity one has to stand up and make an unpopular deciof students is no business of the universities. That choice, like the choice of whom to room with, sion in order to do what is right. You and the Board of is best left up to students and their parents. And it is Regents are leaders in Oklahoma, and it is a leader’s responsibility to do the right thing, even when it unfair of anyone to expect the university to involve is not a popular choice. It is time for you to lead by itself in that. You also will face those who argue there is no place example. So, President Boren, if you care about the safety for such a thing in conservative Oklahoma. You’ve expressed similar sentiments yourself. But when you and prosperity of all your students, if you are willing to put those concerns over political concerns, and if say there is no place for gender-neutral housing at OU, gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender students you are ready to make OU a true leader in this region — this nation — in ways that matter, you must suphear that there is no place for them either. port this gender-neutral housing proposal and urge And with that argument, you are saying the conservative social values of your state have left you with the Board of Regents to adopt it. It is time. Your students are ready. Are you ready to your hands tied, powerless to act to change your unisupport them? versity for the better. Is that the message you want

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Lack of Teach-In coverage disappointing On Feb. 26, I hugged Diane Rehm, the great National Public Radio talk show host and Peabody-award winner. I own a copy of her biography. I know of her struggles with spasmodic dysphonia. I listen to her show every morning. So naturally, that embrace will go down as a defining moment in my life, thankfully captured by photograph. But that Monday was magical for more reasons than just that hug and for more people than just me. Earlier in the day, thousands flocked to Catlett Music Center’s Sharp Concert Hall for the Teach-In on the American Founding. Filled capacity mandated that a simulcast of the production be broadcast to other parts of campus. Granted, amazing speakers have come to campus before — Paul Krugman, Fareed Zakaria, Colin Powell to name just a few — but these past lecturers and dinners, taken in isolation, pale in comparison to Monday’s collection of the best scholars and teachers on the American Founding on one stage, on one day, for one purpose. The next day, I excitedly grabbed a copy of the The Daily — my excitement was fueled by my desire to read about the Teach-In and keep the front page, which I imagined would invariably have

pictures capturing the groundbreaking events of the day prior. I was disturbed to see that the Teach-In on the American Founding — which brought together such inspiring figures as Gordon Wood and David McCullough, which had four Pulitzer prizes represented, and which taught the lessons on our founding that must be taught for our democracy to survive — was side-barred on the front page to a story about rock climbing. A small segment on the side of the front page made only brief mention of what some called, “the greatest collection of scholars on the founding in the history of our university and state.” Now, giving credit where credit is due, the stud that graced the front page, Kevin Marlow, was my resident when I was a resident adviser in Couch Center. The guy is a really wonderful person, and his likeness deserves to be on the front page of any newspaper on any other day. And rock climbing is awesome, and the article was written wonderfully. But the day after the Teach-In? Really? Where was the coverage of the TeachIn? Why was the front page story about rock climbing instead of the mountainous task that our founders faced in

drafting the Constitution? That is a story that needs to be told, and it was told in many of the presentations that day. But these are ideas that must be spread, and we should be proud that our university champions such education. My disappointment really lies here: The Daily writes progressive ideas in the editorial and in other sections. It often pens about the furthering of individual rights, the changing of Oklahoma policies in the pursuit of equality or the calling for protections of minorities and disadvantaged citizens. And yet, when a syndicate of scholars comes to campus to teach about the history of these very principles, how they developed and why they are so important, there is hardly an article written. I think The Daily missed an opportunity at a defining moment for our university. For our generation to “fight for a future worthy of our past,” we must tell the stories of our constitutional heritage at every juncture, but especially after such a special event as the Teach-In. The sadness of opportunity lost is one that only an embrace from Diane Rehm can pacify. Clayton Dodds, political science and entrepreneurship senior.

?

» Poll question of the day Should the university implement a gender-neutral housing policy? To cast your vote, log on to COLUMN

Too much at stake not to adopt housing proposal Editor’s note: Elizabeth Rucker is a member of Students for a Democratic Society, the group that wrote the gender-neutral proposal.

I

have dedicated a OPINION COLUMNIST newspaper’s worth of editorial space to describing the rationale for implementing gender-neutral housing. I also have worked on presentations and public fora to explain this idea Elizabeth Rucker to OU’s student body, wordful@ou.edu faculty and staff. Nearly a year ago, I helped organize and participated in a “sleep-in” for genderneutral housing, where more than 40 students occupied Crossroads over night. Today, the Gender-Neutral Housing Coalition, made up of Students for a Democratic Society, Student Organizer’s Collective, Friends and Friends, and Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Friends, will rally outside the South Oval’s Unity Garden at noon and then marching to Evans Hall to present our proposal. I want to speak not as an activist or academic. Today I am writing to you — the student body — and to President David Boren as a friend and ally of my fellow students. Gender-neutral housing is not just a bullet point in a mythical gay agenda; it is a vital need for many Sooners. And I am writing for them, because not all of my friends feel safe enough to speak. The truth is there are dire consequences to, intentionally or not, maintaining an atmosphere of exclusion and “We know our discrimination, manifest in university does mandatory sex-segregated housing. not hate us, but than 50 universities we are frustrated of More every stripe — large, prithat too many vate, small, public, liberally administrators we or conservatively situated — have recognized this truth. have spoken with GLBTQI — or Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, will not do their duty and advocate Questioning and Intersexed — students deserve to have for us.” their needs met by housing — just as honors, National Merit and international students have different needs than other students. And like GLBTQI students, all students at this university are capable of choosing the living situation best suited to their needs. Because, when those needs are not met, tragedies occur. They may be everyday tragedies of uncomfortable silences, veiled innuendos and worry about putting your significant other’s picture on your desk. These may escalate to bullying and harassment, and I pray every day that OU does not have to learn the same lesson Rutgers University did when Tyler Clementi took his own life after enduring his roommate’s shocking homophobia. I do not want Norman to lose another young queer person like we did in 2010 when Zachary Harrington killed himself after that atrocious city council meeting. I do not want the world to lose another Jeanine Blanchette or Chantal Dubé. These names often are forgotten within the news cycle, but queer activists know the systems that compel young queer people to take their lives are deeply embedded. My friends all still are living, but many of them live with scars of bullying and failed plans. We know our university does not hate us, but we are frustrated that too many administrators we have spoken with will not do their duty and advocate for us. My fellow students and I are asking for something small but critical: a home. We ask simply that we not be forced to organize our lives around gender, when present definitions and policies do not fit us. Many of the straight students I have talked to over the years have also expressed that desire. We have asked quietly and behind closed doors for three years. Today, we approach our administration — you, President Boren — to request your support for our initiative to the Board of Regents. There is a lot at stake, but it is not just a question of funding, donors and politicking; for us, our emotional, mental and physical lives hang in the balance. Elizabeth Rucker is an international studies and interdisciplinary perspectives on the environment senior, and is a member of Students for a Democratic Society.

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NEWS

Wednesday, March 7, 2012 •

2012 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION

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WORLD NEWS BRIEFS 1. BEIJING

US meets with North Korea to arrange food aid shipments

GERALD HERBERT/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. envoys met with North Korean counterparts Wednesday to finalize arrangements for the first U.S. government food aid shipment to the impoverished North in three years, part of an agreement aimed at ending Pyongyang’s nuclear programs. Special envoy Robert King and senior aid official Jon Brause said the talks are intended to ensure proper procedures and safeguards are in place to make sure nutritional aid for about 1 million North Koreans gets to those who need it most. The program is focusing on vulnerable groups, such as children, pregnant women, nursing mothers and the elderly. The Associated Press

Supporters cheer as election results come in at the Super Tuesday primary watch party for Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney on Tuesday in Boston.

2. TEGUCIGALPA, HONDURAS

Santorum, Romney duel in Ohio, split other states WASHINGTON — Rick Santorum and Mitt Romney split six states and dueled in an almost impossibly close race in Ohio on a Super Tuesday that stretched from one end of the country to the other in the most turbulent Republican presidential race in a generation. A resurgent Santorum broke through in primaries in Oklahoma and Tennessee and in the North Dakota caucuses, raising fresh doubts about Romney’s ability to corral the votes of conservatives in some of the most Republican states in the country. Romney had a home-state win in Massachusetts to go with victories in Vermont and in Virginia, where neither Santorum nor Newt Gingrich qualified for the ballot. He also led in early Idaho caucus returns and — most important — padded his lead for delegates to the Republican National Convention. On the busiest night of the campaign season, Ohio was the marquee matchup, a second industrial state showdown in as many weeks between Romney and Santorum. It drew the most campaigning and television advertisements of all 10 Super Tuesday contests and for good reason— no Republican has ever won the White House without carrying the state in the fall. After trailing for much of the night, Romney forged ahead in a count that stretched toward midnight. With votes tallied in 91 percent of the state’s precincts, he led by about 5,000 votes out of 1.1 million cast. Gingrich had a victory in his column — his first win in more than six weeks. The former House speaker triumphed at home in Georgia, but a barrage of attack ads by a super PAC supporting Romney helped hold him

Central American leaders meet with Biden on drug violence Central American leaders gathered Tuesday to meet with U.S. Vice President Joe Biden, saying they would focus on drug trafficking and the violent crime that plagues their region. Guatemalan President Otto Perez has said he favors legalizing drugs as a way to decrease drug cartel violence. On Monday, during a visit to Mexico, Biden said the U.S. government doesn’t think that is the answer. After arriving in Honduras’ capital for Tuesday’s meeting, Perez didn’t say whether he would bring up drug legalization at the session. But speaking at the Tegucigalpa airport, Perez said it was an opportune time to discuss “organized crime, drug trafficking and the problems the region faces.� The Associated Press

3. TEHRAN, IRAN

World powers agree to new round of Iran nuclear talks

EVAN VUCCI/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich and his wife Callista wave as they arrive for a Super Tuesday rally Tuesday in Atlanta.

MITT ROMNEY

NEWT GINGRICH

RON PAUL

RICK SANTORUM

below 50 percent and forced him to share the delegates. Te x a s R e p. R o n Pa u l pinned his hopes on Idaho and Alaska as he scratched for his first victory of the campaign season. Whatever the outcome in Ohio, Romney was on track to pad his lead in the hunt for delegates to the Republican National Convention. Not surprisingly, given his mixed

night, he focused on the delegate chase. “This is a process of gathering enough delegates to become the nominee, and I think we’re on track to have that happen,� he told reporters as he arrived home in Massachusetts to vote in the primary. Later, he told supporters, “I’m going to get this nomination.� Yet Santorum’s multiple victories, coupled with Gingrich’s win, provided fresh evidence that Romney’s conservative rivals retain the ability to outpoll him in certain parts of the country despite his huge organizational and financial advantages. Santorum waited until Oklahoma and Tennessee fell into his column before speaking to cheering supporters in Ohio. “This was a big night tonight,� he said. “We have won in the West, the Midwest and the South, and we’re ready to win across this country.� In all, there were primaries in Virginia, Vermont, Ohio,

Massachusetts, Georgia, Tennessee and Oklahoma. Caucuses in North Dakota, Idaho and Alaska rounded out the calendar. Some 419 delegates were at stake in the 10 states. Romney picked up at least 129 delegates during the evening, Santorum 47, Gingrich 42 and Paul at least 10. That gave the for mer Massachusetts governor 332, more than all his rivals combined, a total that included endorsements from members of the Republican National Committee who automatically attend the convention and can support any candidate they choose. Santorum had 139 delegates, Gingrich 75 and Paul 35. It takes 1,144 delegates to win the nomination at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla., this summer. Ohio Republicans were a party divided, based not only on the popular vote but also interviews with voters as they left their polling places. The Associated Press

Efforts to find a diplomatic solution to Iran’s disputed nuclear program appeared to get a boost Tuesday when world powers agreed to a new round of talks with Tehran, and Iran gave permission for inspectors to visit a site suspected of secret atomic work. The two developments countered somewhat the crisis atmosphere over Iran’s nuclear program, the focus of talks in Washington between President Barack Obama and Israel’s visiting prime minister. Speaking at a news conference, Obama said he saw a “window of opportunity� to use diplomacy instead of military force to resolve the dispute over Iran’s nuclear program. The Associated Press

4. BEIRUT

Syrian president determined to continue fighting uprising Syria’s president defied mounting international pressure to end the year-old crackdown on an uprising against him and said Tuesday he was determined to go on fighting what he called “foreign-backed terrorism.� After a powerful American senator called for airstrikes on Syria, President Barack Obama said unilateral U.S. military action against President Bashar Assad’s regime would be a mistake. The U.S. said it is proposing a new United Nations Security Council resolution demanding an end to violence in Syria, first by government forces and then by opposition fighters. Russia and China, powerful allies that have blocked a Security Council resolution against Syria, made clear they were still standing by the regime in Damascus. The Associated Press

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• Wednesday, March 7, 2012

SPORTS

OUDaily.com ››

Greg Fewell, sports editor Kedric Kitchens, assistant sports editor dailysports@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

OU junior gymnast Jake Dalton earned his third conference honor of the season this week.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

OU prepares for tough Aggie battle Sooners seek Big 12 tournament win to extend season

Left: OU defenders, led by senior forward C.J. Washington (5), converge on Oklahoma State’s Keiton Page during the team’s 77-64 Bedlam victory over Oklahoma State on Feb. 22 in Norman. OU held the Cowboys’ leading scorer to a mere five firsthalf points in the contest on the way to the victory. The team will be looking for more solid defense to move past Texas A&M tonight in the Big 12 tournament.

GREG FEWELL Sports Editor

The OU men’s basketball team will open up play at the Big 12 tournament when it meets Texas A&M at 6 tonight in Kansas City, Mo. The game will serve as a rubber match between the two teams as OU scraped by with a 65-62 victory over the Aggies Saturday in Norman to even things up after losing in College Station early in the year. A s mu c h a s t hat may mean to the two squads w ith A&M prepar ing to leave for the Southeastern Conference, it also means a lot more than that. For two teams that have struggled to find wins this season, especially in conference play, it is a chance to extend their seasons for at least one more game. The Sooners finished their first season under coach Lon Kruger at .500 with an even 15 wins and 15 losses. With that record, OU players know they will not be invited to the big dance at the conclusion of this season. For them, the Big 12 tournament is it. It is the ultimate win or go home situation for OU right now. Kruger said he hopes his team will be able to play not just one, but four, games with that very thing in mind en route to a Big 12 championship to make the season a slightly more successful one. To have a chance to do that, though, OU will first have to get by the team it defeated just four days ago. Kruger said that while playing the Aggies again immediately does not give the Sooners an advantage, it does make scouting very easy. “It’s an easy scout for both teams,” Kruger said. “Both teams are very familiar (with each other), and probably not a lot of difference in this game and the one on Wednesday in terms of preparation. We know they have a lot of good weapons and we have to do a good job guarding them. We need to execute things a little bit better.” One of the main A&M weapons OU will need to do a better job of shutting down is senior for ward David Loubeau.

Below: Oklahoma junior guard Steven Pledger skies over an Oklahoma State player for a layup during Oklahoma’s Bedlam victory at home. The two teams split the series this season, with each team winning on its home court. The Sooners will need to up their level of competition for the Big 12 tournament, where they will be playing on a neutral court.

AT A GLANCE Previous meetings OU and Texas A&M met for the first time this season on Jan. 21 in College Station. A&M was able to pull out an 81-75 overtime victory on its home court. The two teams were sloppy with a combined 19 turnovers.

Loubeau, who led A&M with 15 points in Saturday’s l o ss, l e d a s e c o n d - ha l f comeback for the Aggies with seven points during a 16-6 run. OU was able to stifle the A&M run and hold on for a victory on its home court Saturday. However, with increased pressure on a neutral court, the team will need to do a better job if it hopes to go more than one round into the Big 12 tournament. Fortunately for Oklahoma, though, the team has had players step up on the offensive side of the ball as of late. Primarily, junior forward Romero Osby has had a couple of big games for the Sooners lately, leading the team in the past two games w i t h 1 4 a n d 2 4 p o i n t s, respectively. Osby credits his teammates and the coaching philosophy in place for his recent successes. “My teammates are doing a good job of encouraging me to score and stuff like

Most recently, the two teams faced off Saturday in Norman. While the second game did not require overtime like the first contest, it did come down to the wire. OU pulled out the nail-biter, winning 65-62 to set up the rubber match.

that,” Osby said. “When you have support and stuff like that, sometimes it just takes over to where you can just play at any type of level. I am just blessed to have people around me to encourage me to do better offensively.” Normally it might be hard for OU and A&M not to look ahead to a matchup with No. 1 seeded Kansas in the second round. However, with the oneand-done format of the Big 12 tournament, teams are not afforded the luxury of looking ahead. For two teams that have already had disappointing seasons, a loss in the first game of the tournament would only add insult to injury, A&M coach Billy Kennedy said. “Everything is about the first game,” Kennedy said. “If you don’t win the first game of the tournament, you feel like you’ve never been there. All the tournaments I’ve been at, we put all the emphasis on the first game, and from there you build off the momentum of

PHOTOS BY ASTRUD REED/THE DAILY

winning the first game.” Momentum is key in basketball, and it is also something the Sooners have struggled to hold on to this season. Any time the team found the win column, it would fall to an opponent on the road or suffer a heart-breaking loss at Lloyd Noble Center. However, if ever there was a time for the team to finally gather some momentum, this would be it. O k l a h o ma e n d e d t h e regular season with a victory. Now, it needs to carry

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that momentum for four more games to have a chance to shock the entire conference. It is a tall order for OU, but the Sooners have traditionally fared very well in Big 12 tournaments. OU has an all-time Big 12 championship record of 20-12, second in the conference only to Kansas. More importantly, though, Oklahoma has won its first game in the tournament in 11 of the event’s 15 years. Of course, the most

important stat for the Sooners may simply be the fact that they just faced the team they will be facing in the first round and held on for a clutch, three-point victory. It is a small thing, but it is something that could give OU the little boost of confidence it needs to come out and put together a solid first-round showing. If the Sooners do get past A&M, the road ahead will only get more difficult. No. 1 seed Kansas will be waiting for OU at 2 p.m. Thursday.


SPORTS

Wednesday, March 7, 2012 •

7

There’s no place like home Oklahoma

Austin Peay

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0

OU surges to run-rule shutout

Oklahoma hits it out of the park at Norman complex

Senior’s 1-hitter powers Sooners past Austin Peay

Marita Hynes Field proves to be successful playing ground for OU

TOBI NEIDY

Sports Reporter

TOBI NEIDY

Sports Reporter

Sophomore Javen Henson and freshman Lauren Chamberlain each blasted home runs in the 8-0 runrule Sooner victory over Austin Peay Tuesday night in Norman. While the southern wind looked like it could play a role in the game, both homers were shots to left-center, indicating that these hits would have sailed out of the park regardless of the wind factor. The Sooners (15-3) were coming off a short oneday break after sweeping the weekend action, and head coach Patty Gasso was pleased to see her youthful team getting back to the grind. “We came here ready to play tonight,” Gasso said. “I trusted them to prepare on Monday’s off-day and to understand the importance of what was coming up.” After loading the bases in the first inning, the Sooner offense erupted with runs in each of the following three innings. Henson’s two-run homer allowed the Sooners to draw first blood in the second inning. It was her first career home run after playing as a flex player last season. “It definitely felt good,” Henson said. “My approach at the plate was to stay back and not get ahead of myself in

REBEKAH CORNWELL/THE DAILY

Junior Brianna Turang attemps to steal third base during the Sooners’ 8-0 run-rule victory over Austin Peay Tuesday night in Norman. Senior Kirsten Allen pitched a complete-game one-hitter to lead the Sooners to the run-rule victory in the fifth inning. OU remains undefeated in the state of Oklahoma this year.

the count like I usually do.” Chamberlain’s solo shot in the third only padded the lead as the Sooner offense revved up in the fourth inning to force the 8-after-5 inning run rule. “I just wanted to be a good lead off for my team that inning,” Chamberlain said. “I was anxious during my first at bat, so I wanted to make an adjustment and wait for my pitch.” Junior Keilani Ricketts, who spent the evening as the designated hitter, blasted two shots that bounced off

Oklahoma

9

the outfield fences to help get the Sooner base runners into home plate two separate innings. Normally the starting pitcher for the Sooners, Ricketts spent the game working on her techniques at the other side of the plate, going 2-for-3 in her plate appearances. And the Sooners wouldn’t need their ace pitcher during the game. Instead, senior Kirsten Allen dominated in her first start on the mound this season for OU. The Union, Ky.

UP NEXT OU Spring Festival vs. Indiana: 6 p.m. Friday, 4 p.m. Saturday vs. Wichita State: 1:30 p.m. Saturday, 1 p.m. Sunday

native threw a one-hitter with seven strikeouts and did not allow a walk through the five innings of work. “I fed off the girls around me,” Allen said . “We came off ready and I got to feed off their success and stayed focused during the game.”

Familiar lines that separate dirt from grass and recognizable chants from seasoned fans come with the territory when playing softball games at home. But familiarity also brings another factor to the home field advantage: the requirement of defending the territory. During last year’s regular season, the Sooners lost only three home games. As a program overall, the Sooners are 288-47-1 when playing at Marita Hynes Field. But for this year’s Oklahoma softball team, which regularly starts freshmen and sophomores, the necessity of a home win is added incentive. “Playing at home brings a different energy to our team,” freshman infielder Lauren Chamberlain said. “You see everyone supporting you, and you want to win for your fans, not just for your team.” Chamberlain said she was pleased with Friday’s 7-0 win against LSU to begin the PATTY 2012 home slate. “It was a great start, being on our home GASSO field and establishing the fact we need to defend our home turf and protect this house,” Chamberlain said. Freshman Georgia Casey also was pleased with the home-opening weekend. But the infielder from Australia was quick to acknowledge the revealed weaknesses. “We were happy with how we started on our home field,” Casey said. “But we know we have some things to work on, and we will when we get a chance to get back out in practice.” But with six members on the team already nabbing home runs, there is plenty of strength behind the Sooner bats. “We made some big strides on offense this weekend,” Gasso said. “We just have to learn to settle down and make better swing decisions.” The road to redemption has not been easy for the Sooners, who played four games last weekend, but the team is on its longest winning streak since opening the season. Whether coming back to Oklahoma has helped this team settle into a new winning groove, the two home wins from the weekend add proof that Marita Hynes Field continues to be the place where the Sooners traditionally tally win after win in front of the Sooner faithful.

Arkansas-Pine Bluff

4

Sooners continue winning streak against Golden Lions

Agnes M. and Herbert True Family Lecture

Team wins first of two games against Arkansas-Pine Bluff DILLON PHILLIPS Sports Reporter

Building on the momentum of a three-game road series sweep of New Mexico last weekend, Oklahoma’s baseball team returned home Tuesday and won the first of a pair of games against Arkansas-Pine Bluff, 9-4. Entering Tuesday’s game, OU owned an 8-0 record alltime against Pine Bluff. In two games against Pine Bluff last season, the Sooners outscored the Golden Lions, 39-8, including a 27-7 shellacking when senior Evan Mistich scored an OU-record six runs. Mistich did not appear in the lineup Tuesday, but the No. 16 Sooners (8-3) kept their unblemished record against Pine Bluff intact, extending their winning streak to a season-high four games in the process. The Sooners got the sticks going early and often, scoring six runs in the second through fourth innings and finishing the game with nine runs on 12 hits. Bu t t h e S o o n e r s a l s o struck out nine times, something coach Sonny Golloway noted as an area in need of improvement. “We need to cut down on the strikeouts,” Golloway said. “(There were) too many situations where we’re not swinging the bat, or we’re swinging at bad pitches.” Oklahoma’s freshman phenom Hunter Lockwood continued his scorching start to the season with a leadoff homer in the bottom of the third, his fifth of the year.

The Recovered Image: The Faith and Reason of C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien and the Inklings

REBEKAH CORNWELL/THE DAILY

Junior Drew Harrison throws a pitch during OU’s 9-4 victory over Arkansas-Pine Bluff on Tuesday in Norman. The Sooners went through four pitchers, with no pitcher going more than three innings.

OU’s bullpen threw four pitchers — including two hitless innings from Friday night starter Dillon Overton — with no one pitcher seeing more than three innings of work. “[Overton] pitched outstanding in the fifth and sixth, and I thought Kindle (Ladd) threw the ball well on the backside,” Golloway said. “They’re the two guys that threw the ball well. We didn’t throw the ball extremely well in between there with some other people.” Junior Drew Harrison — who also plays first base — picked up the win while giving up one run on three hits through three innings, and

PLAYER PROFILE Hunter Lockwood Year: Freshman Position: Catcher Hometown: Bedford, Texas Season stats: The freshman already has five home runs in just 11 games for OU this season.

sophomore Kindle Ladd got the save, striking out the side to end the game. The Sooners will conclude their midweek series with Pine Bluff at noon today.

Dr. Zaleski, with her husband Philip Zaleski, has just completed an intellectual biography of the Inklings, a literary group at Oxford University in the 1930s to the 1950s. C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien were members of the Inklings. She will talk about the influence of faith and reason upon their literary work and their world view.

Presented by Dr. Carol Zaleski Dr. Zaleski has been a professor of World Religions at Smith College since 1989. She has a Ph.D in the Study of Religion from Harvard University and has published several books on the topic of religion.

March 7 7:30pm Bell Courtroom at the OU School of Law There will be free parking directly south of the main (fountain) entrance to the OU Law School


306-28 8

SPORTS

• Wednesday, March 7, 2012

Five national titles 22 individual national championship winners

Mark Williams took over the OU head coaching job after 12 years as an assistant. He has been leaving his legacy ever since. BY G REG FE W E LL • S P O R T S E D I TO R RICARDO PATINO/THE DAILY

T

he OU men’s gymnastics team is ranked No. 1 and will aim for the program’s ninth national title when it holds the NCAA championships at Lloyd Noble Center in just over a month. Five of those national titles have come in the past 10 years under coach Mark Williams. Since Williams took over the program in 2000, OU has finished no lower than fourth nationally. Under Williams, Oklahoma has established itself as one of, if not the, premier NCAA men’s gymnastics program in America. This year’s team, even with an inexperienced lineup of 10 freshmen and only three seniors, is continuing the tradition. A big reason for that is Williams’ knack for knows what he’s doing.” pushing athletes, whether freshman or senior, Williams says it took time to figure out how to be better than they thought they could be. to deal with Dalton in practice. Then again, it “With the coaching staff here, I’ve im- takes time to figure out how to deal with every proved probably more than I ever thought I athlete. Every athlete who steps in the gym is would,” junior Troy Nitzky said. “Getting All- different and will have a distinct personality. American on rings last year was a huge feat For Williams, and every coach for that matfor me. So, I’m excited to see what’s going to ter, a big part of the coaching process involves happen over the next two years as far as I’ve earning his athletes’ trust. already come.” “I think I’ve learned how to deal with Jake Taking some of the nation’s best gym- through the years,” Williams said. “Right from nasts and making them betthe beginning, there were ter is nothing new for Mark things that I had to change in “I’ve done this for Williams. Currently, four forwhat he was doing, and I was mer Sooners and one current thirty years almost, maybe a little heavier-handSooner are on the U.S. Senior ed than I am now because at and it’s become Men’s National Team. this point, he’s trusting what I second nature to me have to offer.” OU junior Jake Dalton, a member of the national what has to get done.” As a coach, there is probteam, will finish up the NCAA ably no better way to earn MARK WILLIAMS, season in April only to immethe trust of a player than OU GYMNASTICS COACH diately begin training for the truly having that player’s best 2012 Olympic games. interests in mind. Maybe Dalton said his coach’s ability to give him that is part of the reason Williams has been just a little extra push when he needs it is a big successful. reason he is where he is today. Oklahoma athletes buy into his system be“He’s seen guys be pushed to where they’re cause they see where it can get them. They tired and keep going, and that’s when you re- can trust that their coach’s advice is going to ally achieve success,” Dalton said. “He’s just get them where they want to be. really good at pushing you when you’re tired “Mark is an amazing coach and has a plan and making you do things when you’re tired. set for everything the whole year,” Nitzky said. He’s been there, he’s got experience and he “I mean, he’s dealt with Olympians and world

SPORTS BRIEFS WOMEN’S GYMNASTICS

VOLLEYBALL

OU gymnasts continue to rake in weekly awards

Sooner awarded NCAA postgraduate scholarship

Junior Kayla Nowak and senior Megan Ferguson won two of the Big 12’s three weekly awards, with Nowak earning Gymnast of the Week and Ferguson winning her fifth straight Event Specialist of the Week award. Ferguson earned the award with her 9.95 on floor to lift OU over No. 5 Alabama, while Nowak shined in her first all-around. Daily staff reports

Senior volleyball player Suzy Boulavsky was one of 58 student-athletes to receive an NCAA postgraduate scholarship Tuesday for the fall 2011 sports period. Boulavsky earned honorable mention AllAmerican honors for the fall 2011 season while becoming the first Sooner to earn first team Academic All-American honors. Daily staff reports

RICARDO PATINO/THE DAILY

Coach Mark Williams (left) talks to an Oklahoma gymnast in practice Tuesday about minor adjustments that need to made to a routine. The No. 1 Sooners are preparing to host No. 8 Michigan on Saturday.

champions so he knows what he’s doing.” Williams’ planning is something all the OU gymnasts have become accustomed to. Actually, their coach doesn’t have just the week planned out. Williams said he has the entire year planned out. “I could probably tell you what we did this week ten years ago,” Williams said. “I already have a good idea probably what we’re going to do through NCAA’s and then I have a plan for Jake and Steve (Legendre) as they train for the Olympic games. I’ve done this for thirty years almost and it’s become second nature to me what has to get done.” Mark Williams has been involved with gymnastics his whole life. From competing at a young age to becoming the head coach for a high school team to the 11 years he spent as an assistant at Oklahoma, he was refining his coaching style along the way. He has spent years being involved with

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coaches at the highest level and going to clinics to be exposed to information to make him better at his job. Twelve years after finally taking over as OU’s head coach, Williams is one of the biggest names in collegiate gymnastics, has trained multiple Olympians and has been part of several national teams. He is always looking for more, though. For example, he wouldn’t mind grabbing a sixth national title. “I told our guys after our competition on Saturday when we beat Stanford, ‘This is how you win championships,’” Williams said. “And if we can continue to compete like that and stay healthy, we’re going to be in the mix.” Of course, if the team doesn’t grab OU’s ninth national title this year, there’s always next year. The team has never finished outside the top five under Williams, and as long as he is here, there is no reason to think it will.

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Make extra summer $$! SOONER BLOOMERS, seasonal retail garden center, now hiring for spring season, April, May & June. Full & Part time positions, call Debbie at 405-476-2977 for interview. PT Leasing Agent needed. Flexible schedule, 20-25 hours per week. Must be able to work Saturdays. Experience in customer service preferred, $7.50-$8.00 hourly. Call 360-7744. PT Temporary landscape help, $10/hr. Call 321-3727.

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SUMMER EMPLOYMENT! Fun Valley Family Resort, South Fork, Colorado needs students for all type jobs: kitchen, dining room, housekeeping, stores, maintenance, office, horse wrangler. Room/board, salary, bonus. For information and application write to Student Personnel Director, 6315 Westover Drive, Granbury, TX 76049 Eurosport, the southwest’s premier service center is currently accepting applications for: Reception, Lot Porter. Please apply in person at 3050 Northwest Blvd. in Norman. www.eurosportok.com Grounds & Pool Person needed mornings 8 am -12 pm M-F. 333 E. Brooks, call 364-3603. DEL RANCHO IN NORMAN is hiring additional dependable, smiling faces! We need cooks and carhops! Apply in person at 2300 W Lindsey!

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PT Delivery & Whse. Prefer 1-5:30 M-F, some flexibility. Apply in person, Blair Furniture, 226 E Main, 321-4949 Research volunteers needed! Researchers at OU Health Sciences Center need healthy volunteers ages 18 to 30 who have a parent with or without a history of an alcohol or drug problem. Qualified participants will be compensated for their time. Call (405) 456-4303 to learn more about the study and to see if you qualify. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. STUDENTPAYOUTS.COM Paid survey takers needed in Norman 100% FREE to join. Click on Surveys. WESTWOOD POOL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Asst. Aquatic Mgr. AM - $9.75 - $10.75/hr Asst. Aquatic Mgr. PM - $9.75 - $10.75/hr Office Mgr./Cashier AM - $8.50 - $9.50/hr Cashier PM - $7.25 - $8.25/hr Instructor/Lifeguard - $8.50 - $9.50/hr Maintenance Worker - $7.25 - $8.25/hr Lifeguard/Water Slide - $7.25 - $8.25/hr

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Spring Specials

HOROSCOPE By Bernice Bede Osol

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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012 $445 $515 $440 $510 $700

There is a chance that several people from your past will re-enter your life once again. Those who made you happy and brought you luck before will do so again. However, avoid anybody from yesteryear who made your life miserable. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --It’s to your benefit to be decisive and assertive pertaining to a critical matter. Don’t be afraid to make a bold judgment call if you believe it would work. ARIES (March 21-April 19) --Some kind of opportunity of considerable dimensions could develop for you. It has something to do with your finances and might be able to enhance your security.

         

   

   

  

         

Previous Solution                                                                                  Monday- Very Easy Tuesday-Easy Wednesday- Easy Thursday- Medium Friday - Hard

Instructions: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. That means that no number is repeated in any row, column or box.

9

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- If there are many players involved but they lack your managerial skills, assume a leadership role and take the reins whether or not you’re asked to do so. The others will appreciate it. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- If you’re in need of some assistance concerning a confidential matter, go to someone close whom you respect, such as a good friend or a family member. They’ll do the most to help. CANCER (June 21-July 22) --As conditions start to change for the better, fresh hope will instill itself in your heart. A beloved friend might be instrumental in bringing this about. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --Due to the fact that Lady Luck wants to divert

your attention onto something that would be beneficial, it isn’t likely that you’ll be able to dismiss commercial matters from your agenda. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- In order to have your say or your way, you must first allow others to have theirs. If you fail to let them express themselves, they in turn will block your means to do so. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -If you have something of importance to do, you’ll find that you will work far better if you don’t have anyone peering over your shoulders. Seek solitude, not a cheering section. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) --Dame Fortune is likely to look favorably on partnership arrangements, so don’t impatiently go off on your own simply because you are tired of waiting for others. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) --Coworkers might lack your industriousness, so don’t allow them to distract you from gratifying your ambitions and fulfilling what you want to accomplish. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Just because they like you, certain people are apt to treat you in a far more generous fashion than they do others. Show your gratitude openly. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- This might be an especially good time to devote both your mental and physical energies to a huge critical matter that you’ve been afraid to tackle. Desirable results are indicated.

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker March 7, 2012 ACROSS 1 Arrogant person 5 Best suited 11 Cries of excitement 14 ___ and terminer 15 In an ear-piercing way 16 Almond or pecan 17 Emulating a surgeon, pre-operation 19 “To ___ is human ...� 20 Words rarely uttered by toadies 21 Religious hermit 23 Comparatively coy 26 Checkup sounds 28 Woes, as of the world 29 Show watchers 31 Butcher-shop machines 33 Number before “Liftoff!� 34 Printed mistake 36 Be verbally incoherent 41 Sail support part 42 Note traded for bills 44 Dry creek 47 Accelerator 50 Bridle attachment 51 ___ and haw 52 Hard to get a reaction out of 53 Rub the right

3/7

way? 56 Chinese river or dynasty 57 Make an inquiry 58 Astound 64 Warren female 65 Television antenna 66 Voice amplifier 67 “... ___ a bottle of rum� 68 Snappy answer to a stupid question 69 During the course of DOWN 1 Coast Guard alert 2 The Big Apple, briefly 3 “ ___ the ramparts ...� 4 Sultanate on Borneo’s coast 5 Clerical robes 6 Maui finger food 7 252 wine gallons 8 Neatens, as a lawn 9 Say “Offisher, I am shober,� e.g. 10 Begin on the home keys 11 Ed of “Married ... With Children� 12 Fling with great force 13 Cause of worry lines 18 Yawninducing

speaker 22 South Beach locale 23 “Paulo� lead-in 24 Seek prey 25 It’s symbolized by a light bulb 26 Bitter-tasting 27 Succulent vegetation 30 Black, in Barcelona 31 Botanical supporters 32 Dirty dog 35 Sarai’s husband 37 City on the Saone and Rhone 38 Mary ___ of cosmetics 39 Up-down connector 40 Frost coating 43 Utmost (Abbr.) 44 Assemblage of warships

45 Logician’s need 46 Took chances 48 Boardwalk structure 49 Challenging riddle 51 Valentine’s Day symbol 54 A good way off 55 “... as they shouted out with ___� (“Rudolph� lyric) 56 Flogging memento 59 Who’s who piece, for short 60 Place to get smashed 61 “Fire!� preceder 62 Aspen runner 63 Williams the baseball legend

PREVIOUS PUZZLE ANSWER

3/6

Š 2012 Universal Uclick www.upuzzles.com

LOADING AN AIR RIFLE By Mark Hooper


10

• Wednesday, March 7, 2012

Tomorrow ››

Life&arts

Miss the magic of Disney? Relive your childhood at the new student-curated art exhibit at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art.

Lindsey Ruta, life & arts editor Mariah Webb, assistant life & arts editor dailyent@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

REstaurant Review

New fusion eatery an average blend American-Asian grill offers good drinks but food, service need upgrade Life & Arts COlumnist

Left: Mason King, economics junior, and Anna Schubert, speech pathology senior, enjoy two sushi rolls Monday at 180 Meridian Grill. The theme of this restaurant is an American-Asian fusion, giving classic American dishes such as pizza or french fries a bit of Asian flair. The grill also offers an extensive sushi selection.

AT A GLANCE Rating Experience: ««« Service: ««

Westlee Parsons

Food: «« 1/2

westlee.a.parsons-1@ou.edu

Drinks: ««««

A

Atmosphere: ««««

s I walked into 180 Meridian Grill, the American-Asian fusion restaurant, on Saturday night, I was hopeful. There was a beautiful bar, a tucked away sushi bar and a huge, open seating area that was a little more than half empty. This is where my pessimism set in. I was seated immediately, and then my waiter took my drink order while telling me how busy it was. As someone who has worked in restaurants since she was 16, I was unimpressed with my waiter’s definition of busy. Three waiters, a food runner, a host, two managers, a bartender, a bar back and, I assume, a full kitchen staff with 10 to 12 small tables in such an expansive restaurant on a Saturday night is what I know as slow. I suppose they were pretty busy at the bar since it took almost as long to get a Bloody Mary as it did to get food. But, the wasabi Bloody Mary was worth it — and I am a Bloody Mary snob. It was spicy with the addition of the wasabi and tangy, but it wasn’t too strong. It was perfection. However, waiting 10 to 12 minutes for a drink and getting food a few minutes after shows timing is something they need to work on. Speaking of timing, I ordered the southwest Potstickers to start off my

Bottom: Joshua Strother, 180 Meridian Grill manager, pours a Lemon Drop for a customer Monday. The restaurant’s American-Asian inspiration is found even in its cocktails with drinks such as the wasabi Bloody Mary. The restaurant, which opened in early February, has a happy hour and half-price sushi hour daily from 2 to 5 p.m. and 8 to 10 p.m.

Compiled by Westlee Parsons

meal, and they came after my entrées. The waiter explained that he forgot to put them in and that it was his fault, which I understand. I think the managers need to have a conversation with their wait staff, though, and express that there is a specific time frame in which everything in a restaurant must come out. But, back to the food, the Potstickers were great. They had pork, corn and black beans in them and came with the traditional Potsticker sauce. My only complaint is that the dough was a little thick, but it did not detract from the Potsticker too much. Now for the entrées, I got the Ahi Tuna club sandwich and the garlic shrimp flatbread pizza. Ahi Tuna is a tricky fish to cook and must be cooked in a specific amount of time — too long and it is bland. 180 Meridian Grill did not follow the rules of Ahi Tuna. The fish had not been seasoned, whatsoever, and had been devastatingly overcooked to where it looked ashy-gray and tasted like nothing. The entire Ahi club was a swing and miss for me. There were no condiments, the bread was too thick and hard from being toasted.

house. For a restaurant that has had time to stretch its GO AND DO legs, the evening was disap180 Meridian Grill pointing. I will, however, be back to try the sushi. It looked WHERE: 2541 W. Main Street so delicious as it traveled past my table, but my pocket book PRICE: $16-$18 dinner couldn’t handle $13 specialty rolls. INFO: 405-310-6110 The restaurant has a happy hour from 2 to 5 p.m. and 8 to The vegetables were far from 10 p.m. with half-off drinks, fresh, and the only things I appetizers and sushi. So could taste were avocado and believe me when I say I will bacon. The supposed Asian- be back for the Potstickers, American Ahi Tuna club is Blood Marys and half-price not worth the $9. sushi. Now, the garlic shrimp But until then, I won’t be flatbread pizza was a whole returning. different story. The crust was perfectly cooked with a light lemongrass basil sauce, goat Westlee Parsons is an English cheese and perfectly cooked literature senior. garlic shrimp on top. This pizza, I would come back for. All in all, the theme of the restaurant was missed in some dishes, and the execution of the service and food seemed like a restaurant on opening night with a full

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Life&Arts

Wednesday, March 7, 2012 •

Fashion

Spring into new styles Life&Arts columnist

11

Literature

Expo shares Irish culture Featured playwright Marina Carr to discuss plays, Irish culture, theater TIM FRENCH

Staff Reporter

Jalisa Green sooners24@yahoo.com

T

rendy fashion isn’t only found in the Big Apple. This spring, Norman shops will bring the latest and greatest spring items to OU students. Local boutiques are beginning to stock their stores and dress their mannequins in the cutest and freshest pieces for spring. Blush, located on Campus Corner, has brought out its stock of the latest season’s trends. Students can expect to see lots of bright colors this spring, Blush owner Amanda Clark said. “You have your corals, teals, turquoises, and light blues that are going to be big,” Clark said. “Colored skinny jeans, pleated dresses and skirts and denim are expected to be big, too.” Bright colors are the biggest trend for the spring, especially flashy combinations, she said. Spice up your wardrobe with these four simple items that are at the forefront of fashion this season.

Denim shirts Whether faded or dark denim, these shirts can work well with sleeves rolled to your elbow and paired with your favorite colored skinny jeans or white pants. Wear a T-shirt or V-neck underneath and leave a few buttons undone. Denim shirts look great when worn with your favorite fashion sneakers or flats to finish. “This spring it’s all about keeping it simple, while doing it big,” Clark said. “You can always play up an outfit with a necklace, bracelet, scarf or fedora. You’re still cute and doing it on a budget.”

chelsea lott/the daily

Amanda Clark, owner of Campus Corner’s Blush boutique, dresses a mannequin in the latest stock of spring-wear Tuesday. Clark said she hopes to attract more customers with the colorful pieces and warm weather around the corner. Season trends include colored pants, denim shirts, and prints, Clark said.

these with a simple T-shirt or V-neck and heels. If you don’t like heels, you also can do the same combo with flats. To add a little bit of bling, add a big necklace or bracelets. For a little bit of flair, Lucca employee Chelsea Smith recommends adding a fedora. “Bright colors are what I always look for to add to my closet, especially minty green colors,” Smith said. “And my fedora is one thing I can wear with any outfit.”

Pleated skirt dress Bright colored dresses are definitely in style this season. These cute dresses can

be worn in any style. Casual with flats, or a little dressier with accessories. If you want to keep it classy but simple, a polka dotted pleated dress can work with wedge heels, adding a simple bracelet and necklace, and curling the hair to accent the combination. As the weather continues to warm up, so will these trends. So celebrate the return of spring by treating yourself to a few new additions to your wardrobe. Jalisa Green is a University College freshman.

Blush, 566 Buchanan Ave. Lucca, 319 West Boyd Street Rhinestones & Rubies, 582 Buchanan Ave. Savvy, 763 Asp Ave.

Mariah Webb contributed to this story.

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Colored skinny jeans You never can go wrong with skinny jeans, especially colorful pairs. You can work

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Whether colorful, patterned, printed or side shoulder, a tunic works well when belted around the middle, and accompanied with simple hoop earrings, flats or wedged heels and straight hair.

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A festival celebrating Irish literature kicked off Tuesday and continues this week with musical performances, roundtable discussions, plays and more. The Puterbaugh Festival of International Literature and Culture, hosted by World Literature Today, is an annual event that highlights literature from countries across the world, according to World Literature Today’s website. This year’s festival features Marina Carr, an Irish playwright who will discuss Irish culture, contemporary theater and some of the 15 plays she has written, World Literature Today Director Robert Con Davis said. University Theatre actors will perform one of Carr’s plays — “By the Bog of Cats” — Saturday at the festival’s closing. The Marina play, which is set in Ireland, is a loose adCarr aptation of Euripedes’ “Medea.” Drama performance senior Anna Fearheiley plays the lead in Carr’s play. Fearheiley said the cast has not met the playwright yet, but Carr will attend the performance. “It’s interesting to know that the playwright will be in the audience,” Fearheiley said. “It certainly makes you pay more attention to the language of the play.” Fearheiley said she’s slightly nervous for Carr to see their staging, but more so excited. “As an actor you want to make sure you do justice to her words,” she said. “We love the script and we know she loves it, so we want it to live up to her expectations.” See the full schedule The show opens at 8 p.m. of events for the 2012 Saturday and continues Puterbaugh Festival. through Wednesday. All Puterbaugh Festival oudaily.com/life&arts events are free to the public, except for the full performance of the play, which costs $5, according to a press release. Actors will perform selected scenes for free 11 a.m. Thursday and 10 a.m. Friday in the Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Meacham Auditorium. “I hope that [attendees] leave with a greater appreciation of Marina Carr’s work and more understanding of what’s happening in Irish culture,” Davis said. “Carr is an important contemporary playwright, and so we would like lots of people to get to meet and talk with her.” The keynote talk by Carr is 10:30 a.m. Friday in Meacham Auditorium.

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• Wednesday, March 7, 2012

CONGRATULATIONS ON A CLEAN SWEEP! OU Construction Science teams placed first in all categories at the 17th Region V Associated Schools of Construction/TEXO Student Competition and the sweep was a first for any university in the region and a first in the competition’s history.

Design Build Team Greg O’Bryan, Construction Science Lynnsee Turner, Construction Science Colton Roberts, Construction Science Holly North, Construction Science Beth Pearcy, Architecture Anna Price, Architecture Cole Hixon, Construction Science, Alternate Davis Lasiter, Construction Science, Alternate Tammy McCuen, Construction Science, Coach Anthony Cricchio, Architecture, Coach

International Design Build Team Jonathan Radebaugh, Construction Science Kevin Leach, Construction Science Bryce McCarthy, Architecture Adam LeCours, Construction Science, Alternate Joe Cullinan, Construction Science, Alternate Greg Davis, Construction Science, Alternate Paul Murphy, Construction Science, DIT Conor Shaw, Architecture Technology, DIT Orla Hayes, Architecture, DIT Ken Robson, Construction Science, Coach Lloyd Scott, Dublin Institute of Technology, Coach

Heavy Civil Team Rande Patterson, Construction Science Mike Senn, Construction Science Zach Henderson, Construction Science Adam Hinkle, Construction Science Dominique Harris, Construction Science Cody Wheeler, Construction Science Christina Backus, Construction Science, Alternate Adrian Sopher, Construction Science, Alternate Dominique Pittenger, Construction Science, Coach

Commercial Building Team Jared Bills, Construction Science Carlie Carpio, Construction Science Ryan Puckett, Construction Science Jeremy Nichols, Construction Science David Goldstein, Construction Science John Bledsoe, Construction Science Richard Ryan, Construction Science, Coach

Best Presenters Orla Hayes, First, Design Build Lynnsee Turner, Second, Design Build Rande Patterson, First, Heavy Civil Carlie Carpio, Second, Commercial Building

For more information about the Haskell & Irene Lemon Construction Science Division in the College of Architecture, go to cns.ou.edu

Wednesday, March 7, 2012  

Wednesday, March 7, 2012

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