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Student-produced dance show to open this weekend (Page 7) The University of Oklahoma’s independent student voice since 1916

W E D N E s DaY, J a N ua R Y 2 5 , 2 012

W W W.O U DA I LY.C O M

2 011 G OL D C ROW N F I N A L I S T

Smoke-Free CampUS

regents snuff out tobacco use at oU All forms of tobacco will be banned on Norman campus starting July 1 CHRIS MILLER

Assistant Campus Editor

The days of unrestricted tobacco use on OU’s Norman campus are officially numbered after the OU Board of Regents voted unanimously Tuesday to implement a ban this summer. The campuswide Tobacco-Free Policy was approved as an addition to the Regents’ Policy Manual and designated two areas on campus as acceptable smoking areas while enacting fines for repeat offenders. The policy is set to take effect July 1. OU President David Boren proposed the ban to the regents in the Robert M. Bird Library Auditorium on the OU Health Sciences Center campus in Oklahoma City, and during an address before the vote, he said university administrators felt morally obligated to enact it. “We want to join the leadership of other universities who

Gender gap evident in OU dean positions SEAN LAWSON

Campus Reporter

T

he position of collegiate dean is becoming less glamorous, which may be contributed to a gender disparity in the positions at OU, university administrators said. Across the three campuses in the OU system, 45 men and 21 women occupy

66 dean and associate dean positions, according to OU department websites. On the Norman campus alone, 31 men and 13 women occupy 44 dean and associate dean positions, according to department websites. Fixing this discrepancy can be difficult because see ROLE PaGe 3

see BAN PaGe 3

ConSTrUCTion

ConFerenCe

reSearCH

Groups moved during remodel

Comedy twins to emcee forum

Course to teach water hygienics

Union upgrades displace student organizations SYDNEY HOBBS Campus Reporter

Construction on the Oklahoma Memorial Union is displacing OU student groups that previously held meetings there. The renovations began Dec. 19, after an anonymous donor gave the university $1 million for that project and to renovate the University Club, university spokesman Michael Nash said. The work on the Union is set to conclude March 18. Areas affecte d i n c l u d e t h e Mo l l y Shi Boren Ballroom and the Frontier, Governors, see UNION PaGe 2

Brothers follow passion for improv, present at TEDxOU JAKE MORGAN

Campus Reporter

When a local performer received his first $7 for working a three-hour improvisation show, he proudly called his father to tell him that he was “now a paid actor.” His father’s response: “Don’t quit your day job.” “‘Learn a skill,’” Buck Vrazel and his twin brother Clint simultaneously said as they parroted their father’s advice. The twins, two halves of an improvisational duo christened Twinprov, will lead the first of 11 presentations at Friday’s sold-out TEDxOU event, co-organizer Adam Croom said. They will also act as emcees to facilitate the transitions between discussions. The brothers’ expertise at improv and their unique compatibility made them naturally attuned to speaking at the innovation conference, Croom said. “We needed a host ... who

ediTorial VOL. 97, NO. 86 © 2011 OU Publications Board FREE — Additional copies 25 cents www.OUDaily.com www.facebook.com/OUDaily www.twitter.com/OUDaily

INsIDE Campus .......................... 2 Classifieds .................. 6 Life & Arts .................. 7 Opinion ...................... 4 Sports ......................... 5

NOW ON

oU’s gender gap must be addressed

Class to be held during summer PAIGHTEN HARKINS Campus Reporter

KinGsLey Burns/tHe DaiLy

Buck vrazel (left) and Clint vrazel laugh while performing an impromptu freestyle rap Tuesday night in their living room. The brothers, founders of the improv comedy group Twinprov, will speak about creativity, inspiration and freestyle rapping as the opening presentation at Friday’s TEdx conference.

could be the anchor for the entire event,” Croom said. “Naturally, people who are humorous fit that bill.” The profound nature of the TED events often leaves audience members either

emotionally drained or emotionally pumped up, Croom said. “When you’re watching deep talks throughout an entire day, it tends to be emotionally draining, and

Students hold watch party for State of the Union

dearth of female leaders involves the entire system. (page 4)

liFe & arTS oscar nods snub noteworthy films daily staffers weigh in on Tuesday’s movie award nominations. (page 8)

neWS

SporTS

researchers assist oil, gas production

Sooner hoops gets bitten by the Bears

Project intended to lower costs at the pump (oUdaily.com)

The OU men’s basketball team lost to Baylor, 77-65, Tuesday. (page 5)

ParKe MetZer/tHe DaiLy

University students wait for President Barack Obama’s 2012 State of the Union address in david l. Boren Hall on Tuesday. The event was hosted by the young democrats.

you need that comedic relief,” Croom said. “You need that anchor throughout that keeps it fun, brings the culture of what TED is ... and see SPEAKERS PaGe 2

A course intended to help students prepare for work in developing nations will be offered for the first time during the upcoming summer intersession. The Sustainable Development in Emerging Regions: Field Methods course will teach students basic water sanitation and construction skills, said David Sabatini, civil engineering and environmental sciences professor. “If they learn water and sanitations things in U.S., it will allow them to transition more effectively and be productive more quickly,” Sabatini said. Students will spend 80 to see FIELD PaGe 3

The Daily’s open record requests Requested document and purpose

date requested

Complete contract for dr. Chad kerksick — This document was requested to further explore the investigation of the professor.

Monday

The percentage of letter grades earned by oU-norman students overall each semester since Fall 2000 — This was requested to see how student grades have risen or fallen during the past decade.

Monday

The percentage of letter grades earned by oU-norman students broken down by college for each semester since Fall 2000 — This was requested to see how student grades have risen or fallen during the past decade and to compare trends between colleges.

Monday


2

Campus

• Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Campus

Today around campus Student Success Series will have its first seminar of the semester, Finding a Student Job, at noon in Wagner Hall 245.

Thursday, Jan. 26 Rising from Fall Semester Mistakes, a Student Success Series seminar, will be led by graduation coach Casey Partridge at 2 p.m. in Wagner Hall 245. The women’s basketball team will play Baylor at 7 p.m. in Lloyd Noble Center. Young Choreographers’ Showcase, put on by ballet and modern dance majors, will be performed at 8 p.m. Jan. 26, 27 and 28 and at 3 p.m. Jan. 29.

Friday, Jan. 27 “The Empire of Trebizond: The Last Gasp of Byzantium,” a free lecture, will be given at 6:30 p.m. in the A/B room of the Norman Public Library. The fifth annual Beauty and the Beast event, featuring the OU wrestling and women’s gymnastics teams, will take place at 7 p.m. at Lloyd Noble Center. Final day to change from credit to audit for undergraduate students. For more information, contact Enrollment Services. A special TEDx event will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Meacham Auditorium.

Saturday, Jan. 28 A track & field competition with Oklahoma Christian University will be going on all day in Norman.

Sunday, Jan. 29 A wrestling dual against Lehigh will take place at noon at McCasland Field House. Divas!, a performance by Professor Bradley Williams’ voice students, will take place at 8 p.m. in Catlett Music Center’s Pitman Recital Hall.

Tuesday, Jan. 31 A forum on how you can study abroad will be led by Education Abroad staff and study abroad alumni at 7 p.m. in Cate Main Social Lounge. Free pizza will be provided.

Thursday, Feb. 2 An information session for students interested in the Journey to Latin America program will be held at 4:30 p.m. in 221 Old Science Hall.

Friday, Feb. 3 The women’s gymnastics team will host a quad meet against Nebraska, Minnesota and Centenary at 7 p.m. in Lloyd Noble Center.

Saturday, Feb. 4 The women’s basketball team will play Oklahoma State at noon in Lloyd Noble Center.

Corrections The Oklahoma Daily has a commitment to serve readers with accurate coverage and analysis. Readers should bring errors to The Daily’s attention by emailing dailynews@ou.edu. In a Page 1 story in Monday’s edition, the Oklahoma City-based newspaper, The Oklahoman, was misidentified. In a Page 1 photo headline in Monday’s edition, the nature of The Earth Cafe and Deli’s move was misreported. The restaurant moved locations within Campus Corner. In a Page 4 column in Monday’s edition, the number of judges appointed by former President George W. Bush was misreported. Only six of the 19 judges were appointed by Bush.

Laney Ellisor, campus editor Kathleen Evans, assistant campus editor Chris Miller, assistant campus editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

Campus Briefs International Students

Union: University Club closed for renovations

Two dozen families needed to host Japanese students for month-long stay

Continued from page 1

Host families are needed for approximately two dozen Japanese students who are visiting campus in February as part of a month-long English language and intercultural program. The Ritsumeikan Intercultural Program, now in its 26th year, will embrace students from Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto, Japan during their temporary stay from Feb. 11 to March 10, according to a press release. The Japanese students will take an intensive English course and participate in multiple activities, including museum trips and tomahawk throwing, program organizer

Heritage, Pioneer, Regents and Scholars rooms, where heating and air conditioning units are being upgraded, according to the Union website. Student groups that use those rooms have been displaced due to the ongoing work. OU Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Friends previously met in various rooms in the Union but has been relocated to Room 280 Wagner Hall for the remainder of the semester, GLBTF president Devin Luxner said. A week before the semester began, Luxner discovered that his organization’s room request had not gone though because the rooms in the Union would not be available until April, he said. That change was unexpected and last minute, Luxner said. “ We a r e t h a n k f u l t o Wagner Hall for reaching out and giving us a meeting place for the rest of the year,” Luxner said. The University Club, a private faculty meeting place and coffee lounge,

creates a really engaged environment.” The TEDxOU event is an independent event to encourage innovative thought within the community, according to its website. It is based on national TED discussions, which stands for Technology, Entertainment and Design. The Vrazel brothers were completely “ecstatic” upon being chosen as speakers. “The fact that it’s come to Oklahoma at last is extremely exciting,” Buck said. “I’m looking forward to being in the audience just as much as I am to the presentations.” A l t h ou g h Tw i np rov ’s website states that the two have been performing for 11 years, Clint said he and his brother were doing improv before they knew what the word meant. “Our parents were storytellers, and [improv] was just a natural part of our life,” Buck said. Over the past decade, the group has come from performing games based on the TV show “Whose Line Is It Anyway” in a friend’s living room to co-founding OKC Improv, a non-profit theater arts organization. OKC Improv has contributed to the growth of improvisation in Oklahoma with the number of improv crews increasing from five to 35 over the past 22 months, according to the organization’s website. “It’s a nice, messy, comedic ecosystem from which things emerge,” Buck said. “We thought it would take a decade. It’s happened so quickly that it’s really indescribable.” Through OKC Improv, they hope to create the first improvisation theater in Oklahoma, but they’re a long way from achieving that goal, Clint said. They have, however, obtained a love for their craft, they said. “Improv is risky; it’s a roller coaster,” Buck said. “When we pull something off as a team ... [and] get that standing ovation from a packed crowd, it’s glorious.” While reminiscing over an 8th-grade memory of formulating hilarious characters, Clint said he fell in love with the act of creating what comes next. “I’ve been chasing that moment again and again to make it happen,” Clint said. “It’s not just a fun way to show off — it’s transformative.”

Bobby Wiggins said. “The students get a chance to sample American culture, as well as Oklahoman culture,” she said. During the first two weeks of the program, the students will stay with a host family. The families must provide beds, meals and local transportation for each student. A small stipend will be given to families to cover expenses. After staying with the host family, the Japanese students will finish their stay in OU’s dormitories. Those interested in hosting a student for this year’s program should visit the Center for English as a Second Language at 1660 Cross Center Drive, Vance House or call (405) 325-6602. Jake Morgan, Campus Reporter

role: Applicants are decreasing, provost says Continued from page 1

Photo Provided

Construction equipment litters the gutted University Club in Oklahoma Memorial Union. The restaurant and bar’s year-long renovation includes an enlarged kitchen, wood-planked floors, booth seating and a private dining room.

will be closed for approximately one full year due to the renovations; however, all club reservations have been accommodated for the tenure of its closure, Union director Laura Tontz said in

an email. I mp rove m e nt s to t h e club include wooden floors, booth seats, a private dining room and an expanded kitchen, according to the Union website.

Membership is expected to increase upon opening in December due to the cutting-edge design, amenities and new menu, club manager Alison Thomas said.

Speakers: Pair hopes to open improv theater Continued from page 1

Wednesday, January 25, 2012 •

Improv acts as an essential mirror for the character of society, Clint said. “One of the founders of improv, Del Close, once said, ‘The job of the improviser is to enchant and to horrify,’” Buck said. “We like to think that you can learn more about people by watching them play.” Drawing on their passion for improv, the brothers have

aptly titled their TEDxOU presentation “Making a Date With Inspiration.” The discussion will center around the improviser’s mindset and what creativity means for the audience in general, Clint said. “We’re going to give them a taste,” Clint said. “And there will be a singalong element,” Buck said with a laugh.

TEDxOU Ken Parker Ghislain d’Humieres Reed Timmer Kyle Harper Julia Ehrhardt Bobby Gruenewald Jeremy Short Clint and Buck Vrazel Courtney Griffin Austin Hartel

VO TE

Nash agrees with Mergler that the pool can be limited by the administrative tasks expected of deans, he said. “The role of dean can be stressful,” Nash said. the role of dean is becoming less desirable, Provost Nancy “Remaining a scholar or teacher may be more appealing to faculty members in higher education.” Mergler said. One of the few female deans at OU, former Jeannine “I do think in the last five years, with legal, financial and Rainbolt College of Education dean Joan Smith, retired administration issues, the appeal of being a dean has diminfrom her position in order to resume ished,” Mergler said. “Applicant pools are teaching, Nash said. The regents officially “In times of tighter smaller, and the jobs are more stressful.” The position is becoming harder with budrestraint on financial replaced Smith at their Tuesday meeting by appointing Gregg Garn, who has spent get constraints placed on OU colleges, she resources, less and 13 years on the faculty at OU, as dean. said. However, progress has been made to fix less applicants are “The role of dean is constantly swirling and changing,” Mergler said. “In times of tighter applying [to be deans].” the gap in male-to-female leadership at OU in other places, Nash said. restraint on financial resources, less and less On Tuesday, the regents appointed Nancy Mergler, applicants are applying.” filled the role of Dennis Aebersold , outgoOU Provost The OU Board of Regents are responsible ing vice president for information technolfor and have final say in hiring deans, accordogy and chief information officer, by appointing Loretta ing to the OU Faculty Handbook. OU attempts to attract a wide range of applicants during Early . “OU is gaining a female in the role of chief informaall stages of the hiring process, OU spokesman Michael Nash tion officer, a position vacated by a male who retired,” said. “The university believes it is important to use that process Nash said. “In addition, the deans of pharmacy (JoLaine and to conduct a nationally advertised search that casts a Draugalis) and nursing (Lazelle Benefield) at the OU Health Sciences Center are both women.” wide net to get a diverse applicant pool,” Nash said.

BAN: New policy aims to better campus health Continued from page 1 have chosen to enact these policies,” Boren said. During his remarks, Boren invited Gary Raskob, College of Public Health Dean and chairman of an advisory tobacco committee who helped Boren formulate the policy, to address the regents as well. Raskob believed the final recommendations took into effect student, faculty and staff feedback while positively impacting campuswide health, he said. “The proposal strikes a balance between protecting people from second-hand smoke, while acknowledging the difficulty of quitting,” Raskob said. Boren is optimistic the policy will overcome difficulties encountered when enforcing a statewide ban already in place, restricting smoking within 25 feet of building entrances, he said. “I think [we encountered difficulties] because we had no set policy and never publicized a program to help people quit smoking,” Boren said. “We’ve had a program, but it hasn’t been highly advertised.” OU Police Department officers will be tasked with enforcing the new policy, Boren said. OUPD officials have been in contact with university administrators regarding enforcement, but the department declined to comment as of press time, OUPD Lt. Bruce Chan said. “The Chief of the OUPD does communicate with the senior administration of the University; however, it is not appropriate for us to comment on the content of that communication,” Chan said. After the regents’ meeting adjourned, Boren said it is not OU administrators’ place to tell people they cannot smoke at all, but they are authorized to restrict smoking on campus. “We’re not saying people can’t smoke,” Boren said. “They can go home and smoke, they can smoke in their cars, so I don’t think we’re stopping the liberty of people to smoke.”

More Online Visit OUDaily.com to read about the other agenda items approved by the OU Board of Regents on Tuesday.

Field: OU first in nation to offer course with hands-on experience, skills Continued from page 1 90 percent of the course outside learning to dig wells and construct eco-latrines while using local materials, course professor Jim Chamberlain said. The course’s hands-on approach is designed to teach students that in the developing world learning what to do

with the materials at hand is crucial, Chamberlain said. Both Sabatini and Chamberlain have spent time in developing nations and know first-hand how difficult it is to transition from the U.S., they said. “You have to adjust to the culture, the language, the food and the living situation,” Sabatini said. If students will be

conducting water sanitation work, they generally have to do so on site, because they often don’t learn it in the U.S., Sabatini said. The opportunity to plan for the class has been exciting thus far, Chamberlain said. “I have taken college students to El Salvador and every time there was something we were asked to do that we

could have better prepared ourselves to do back in the states,” Chamberlain said. “I knew there was a real need [for the class].” Despite the need for the class, OU is the first in the nation to offer it, Chamberlain said. Other universities have taken a more lecture-based approach to the subject matter, Chamberlain’s version

will be the first to take a fieldbased approach, he said. With students from Oklahoma State University, the University of Kansas and the University of Arkansas already showing interest in the course, OU is working to become a regional resource for all students in this area, Sabatini said. The class will be offered by the OU College of

Engineering and is open to all majors, according to a class flier. The information offered could be useful for students planning to do work with the Peace Corps, U.S. Agency for International Development and faith-based organizations focusing on working abroad, according to the flier.

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2

Campus

• Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Campus

Today around campus Student Success Series will have its first seminar of the semester, Finding a Student Job, at noon in Wagner Hall 245.

Thursday, Jan. 26 Rising from Fall Semester Mistakes, a Student Success Series seminar, will be led by graduation coach Casey Partridge at 2 p.m. in Wagner Hall 245. The women’s basketball team will play Baylor at 7 p.m. in Lloyd Noble Center. Young Choreographers’ Showcase, put on by ballet and modern dance majors, will be performed at 8 p.m. Jan. 26, 27 and 28 and at 3 p.m. Jan. 29.

Friday, Jan. 27 “The Empire of Trebizond: The Last Gasp of Byzantium,” a free lecture, will be given at 6:30 p.m. in the A/B room of the Norman Public Library. The fifth annual Beauty and the Beast event, featuring the OU wrestling and women’s gymnastics teams, will take place at 7 p.m. at Lloyd Noble Center. Final day to change from credit to audit for undergraduate students. For more information, contact Enrollment Services. A special TEDx event will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Meacham Auditorium.

Saturday, Jan. 28 A track & field competition with Oklahoma Christian University will be going on all day in Norman.

Sunday, Jan. 29 A wrestling dual against Lehigh will take place at noon at McCasland Field House. Divas!, a performance by Professor Bradley Williams’ voice students, will take place at 8 p.m. in Catlett Music Center’s Pitman Recital Hall.

Tuesday, Jan. 31 A forum on how you can study abroad will be led by Education Abroad staff and study abroad alumni at 7 p.m. in Cate Main Social Lounge. Free pizza will be provided.

Thursday, Feb. 2 An information session for students interested in the Journey to Latin America program will be held at 4:30 p.m. in 221 Old Science Hall.

Friday, Feb. 3 The women’s gymnastics team will host a quad meet against Nebraska, Minnesota and Centenary at 7 p.m. in Lloyd Noble Center.

Saturday, Feb. 4 The women’s basketball team will play Oklahoma State at noon in Lloyd Noble Center.

Corrections The Oklahoma Daily has a commitment to serve readers with accurate coverage and analysis. Readers should bring errors to The Daily’s attention by emailing dailynews@ou.edu. In a Page 1 story in Monday’s edition, the Oklahoma City-based newspaper, The Oklahoman, was misidentified. In a Page 1 photo headline in Monday’s edition, the nature of The Earth Cafe and Deli’s move was misreported. The restaurant moved locations within Campus Corner. In a Page 4 column in Monday’s edition, the number of judges appointed by former President George W. Bush was misreported. Only six of the 19 judges were appointed by Bush.

Laney Ellisor, campus editor Kathleen Evans, assistant campus editor Chris Miller, assistant campus editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

Campus Briefs International Students

Union: University Club closed for renovations

Two dozen families needed to host Japanese students for month-long stay

Continued from page 1

Host families are needed for approximately two dozen Japanese students who are visiting campus in February as part of a month-long English language and intercultural program. The Ritsumeikan Intercultural Program, now in its 26th year, will embrace students from Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto, Japan during their temporary stay from Feb. 11 to March 10, according to a press release. The Japanese students will take an intensive English course and participate in multiple activities, including museum trips and tomahawk throwing, program organizer

Heritage, Pioneer, Regents and Scholars rooms, where heating and air conditioning units are being upgraded, according to the Union website. Student groups that use those rooms have been displaced due to the ongoing work. OU Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Friends previously met in various rooms in the Union but has been relocated to Room 280 Wagner Hall for the remainder of the semester, GLBTF president Devin Luxner said. A week before the semester began, Luxner discovered that his organization’s room request had not gone though because the rooms in the Union would not be available until April, he said. That change was unexpected and last minute, Luxner said. “ We a r e t h a n k f u l t o Wagner Hall for reaching out and giving us a meeting place for the rest of the year,” Luxner said. The University Club, a private faculty meeting place and coffee lounge,

creates a really engaged environment.” The TEDxOU event is an independent event to encourage innovative thought within the community, according to its website. It is based on national TED discussions, which stands for Technology, Entertainment and Design. The Vrazel brothers were completely “ecstatic” upon being chosen as speakers. “The fact that it’s come to Oklahoma at last is extremely exciting,” Buck said. “I’m looking forward to being in the audience just as much as I am to the presentations.” A l t h ou g h Tw i np rov ’s website states that the two have been performing for 11 years, Clint said he and his brother were doing improv before they knew what the word meant. “Our parents were storytellers, and [improv] was just a natural part of our life,” Buck said. Over the past decade, the group has come from performing games based on the TV show “Whose Line Is It Anyway” in a friend’s living room to co-founding OKC Improv, a non-profit theater arts organization. OKC Improv has contributed to the growth of improvisation in Oklahoma with the number of improv crews increasing from five to 35 over the past 22 months, according to the organization’s website. “It’s a nice, messy, comedic ecosystem from which things emerge,” Buck said. “We thought it would take a decade. It’s happened so quickly that it’s really indescribable.” Through OKC Improv, they hope to create the first improvisation theater in Oklahoma, but they’re a long way from achieving that goal, Clint said. They have, however, obtained a love for their craft, they said. “Improv is risky; it’s a roller coaster,” Buck said. “When we pull something off as a team ... [and] get that standing ovation from a packed crowd, it’s glorious.” While reminiscing over an 8th-grade memory of formulating hilarious characters, Clint said he fell in love with the act of creating what comes next. “I’ve been chasing that moment again and again to make it happen,” Clint said. “It’s not just a fun way to show off — it’s transformative.”

Bobby Wiggins said. “The students get a chance to sample American culture, as well as Oklahoman culture,” she said. During the first two weeks of the program, the students will stay with a host family. The families must provide beds, meals and local transportation for each student. A small stipend will be given to families to cover expenses. After staying with the host family, the Japanese students will finish their stay in OU’s dormitories. Those interested in hosting a student for this year’s program should visit the Center for English as a Second Language at 1660 Cross Center Drive, Vance House or call (405) 325-6602. Jake Morgan, Campus Reporter

role: Applicants are decreasing, provost says Continued from page 1

Photo Provided

Construction equipment litters the gutted University Club in Oklahoma Memorial Union. The restaurant and bar’s year-long renovation includes an enlarged kitchen, wood-planked floors, booth seating and a private dining room.

will be closed for approximately one full year due to the renovations; however, all club reservations have been accommodated for the tenure of its closure, Union director Laura Tontz said in

an email. I mp rove m e nt s to t h e club include wooden floors, booth seats, a private dining room and an expanded kitchen, according to the Union website.

Membership is expected to increase upon opening in December due to the cutting-edge design, amenities and new menu, club manager Alison Thomas said.

Speakers: Pair hopes to open improv theater Continued from page 1

Wednesday, January 25, 2012 •

Improv acts as an essential mirror for the character of society, Clint said. “One of the founders of improv, Del Close, once said, ‘The job of the improviser is to enchant and to horrify,’” Buck said. “We like to think that you can learn more about people by watching them play.” Drawing on their passion for improv, the brothers have

aptly titled their TEDxOU presentation “Making a Date With Inspiration.” The discussion will center around the improviser’s mindset and what creativity means for the audience in general, Clint said. “We’re going to give them a taste,” Clint said. “And there will be a singalong element,” Buck said with a laugh.

TEDxOU Ken Parker Ghislain d’Humieres Reed Timmer Kyle Harper Julia Ehrhardt Bobby Gruenewald Jeremy Short Clint and Buck Vrazel Courtney Griffin Austin Hartel

VO TE

Nash agrees with Mergler that the pool can be limited by the administrative tasks expected of deans, he said. “The role of dean can be stressful,” Nash said. the role of dean is becoming less desirable, Provost Nancy “Remaining a scholar or teacher may be more appealing to faculty members in higher education.” Mergler said. One of the few female deans at OU, former Jeannine “I do think in the last five years, with legal, financial and Rainbolt College of Education dean Joan Smith, retired administration issues, the appeal of being a dean has diminfrom her position in order to resume ished,” Mergler said. “Applicant pools are teaching, Nash said. The regents officially “In times of tighter smaller, and the jobs are more stressful.” The position is becoming harder with budrestraint on financial replaced Smith at their Tuesday meeting by appointing Gregg Garn, who has spent get constraints placed on OU colleges, she resources, less and 13 years on the faculty at OU, as dean. said. However, progress has been made to fix less applicants are “The role of dean is constantly swirling and changing,” Mergler said. “In times of tighter applying [to be deans].” the gap in male-to-female leadership at OU in other places, Nash said. restraint on financial resources, less and less On Tuesday, the regents appointed Nancy Mergler, applicants are applying.” filled the role of Dennis Aebersold , outgoOU Provost The OU Board of Regents are responsible ing vice president for information technolfor and have final say in hiring deans, accordogy and chief information officer, by appointing Loretta ing to the OU Faculty Handbook. OU attempts to attract a wide range of applicants during Early . “OU is gaining a female in the role of chief informaall stages of the hiring process, OU spokesman Michael Nash tion officer, a position vacated by a male who retired,” said. “The university believes it is important to use that process Nash said. “In addition, the deans of pharmacy (JoLaine and to conduct a nationally advertised search that casts a Draugalis) and nursing (Lazelle Benefield) at the OU Health Sciences Center are both women.” wide net to get a diverse applicant pool,” Nash said.

BAN: New policy aims to better campus health Continued from page 1 have chosen to enact these policies,” Boren said. During his remarks, Boren invited Gary Raskob, College of Public Health Dean and chairman of an advisory tobacco committee who helped Boren formulate the policy, to address the regents as well. Raskob believed the final recommendations took into effect student, faculty and staff feedback while positively impacting campuswide health, he said. “The proposal strikes a balance between protecting people from second-hand smoke, while acknowledging the difficulty of quitting,” Raskob said. Boren is optimistic the policy will overcome difficulties encountered when enforcing a statewide ban already in place, restricting smoking within 25 feet of building entrances, he said. “I think [we encountered difficulties] because we had no set policy and never publicized a program to help people quit smoking,” Boren said. “We’ve had a program, but it hasn’t been highly advertised.” OU Police Department officers will be tasked with enforcing the new policy, Boren said. OUPD officials have been in contact with university administrators regarding enforcement, but the department declined to comment as of press time, OUPD Lt. Bruce Chan said. “The Chief of the OUPD does communicate with the senior administration of the University; however, it is not appropriate for us to comment on the content of that communication,” Chan said. After the regents’ meeting adjourned, Boren said it is not OU administrators’ place to tell people they cannot smoke at all, but they are authorized to restrict smoking on campus. “We’re not saying people can’t smoke,” Boren said. “They can go home and smoke, they can smoke in their cars, so I don’t think we’re stopping the liberty of people to smoke.”

More Online Visit OUDaily.com to read about the other agenda items approved by the OU Board of Regents on Tuesday.

Field: OU first in nation to offer course with hands-on experience, skills Continued from page 1 90 percent of the course outside learning to dig wells and construct eco-latrines while using local materials, course professor Jim Chamberlain said. The course’s hands-on approach is designed to teach students that in the developing world learning what to do

with the materials at hand is crucial, Chamberlain said. Both Sabatini and Chamberlain have spent time in developing nations and know first-hand how difficult it is to transition from the U.S., they said. “You have to adjust to the culture, the language, the food and the living situation,” Sabatini said. If students will be

conducting water sanitation work, they generally have to do so on site, because they often don’t learn it in the U.S., Sabatini said. The opportunity to plan for the class has been exciting thus far, Chamberlain said. “I have taken college students to El Salvador and every time there was something we were asked to do that we

could have better prepared ourselves to do back in the states,” Chamberlain said. “I knew there was a real need [for the class].” Despite the need for the class, OU is the first in the nation to offer it, Chamberlain said. Other universities have taken a more lecture-based approach to the subject matter, Chamberlain’s version

will be the first to take a fieldbased approach, he said. With students from Oklahoma State University, the University of Kansas and the University of Arkansas already showing interest in the course, OU is working to become a regional resource for all students in this area, Sabatini said. The class will be offered by the OU College of

Engineering and is open to all majors, according to a class flier. The information offered could be useful for students planning to do work with the Peace Corps, U.S. Agency for International Development and faith-based organizations focusing on working abroad, according to the flier.

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Comment of the day on OUDaily.com ››

• Wednesday, January 25, 2012

OPINION

“Ten years from now college graduates will look back on these days and wonder in amazement why students protested against a smokefree policy.” (smokefree, RE: Editorial: Regents, Vote No On Smoking Ban)

EDITORIAL

OU lacking female equality Our View: The low number of female professors, deans and other leaders at OU only can be addressed by the individuals in the system.

The same study suggests the disparity in full professors and academic leaders comes from the gendered workplace environment found in institutions of higher education, where the “policies, interperOU recently appointed a new dean for the College sonal networks and embedded attitudes” were deof Education. Like 22 of the 24 other deans on the veloped by, and for, men. Norman campus, this one was male. It identifies a range of behaviors identified by variTo put that in perspective, OU had 11,533 ous studies over the last two decades that female students and 11,725 male students pervade institutions of higher education The Our View in 2009-10, according to the OU Factbook. is the majority and disadvantage women, including asIn order for the pool of deans and associate opinion of signment to less powerful committees, asThe Daily’s deans on all three campuses to match the signment to support roles rather than lead10-member student population it represents, OU should ership roles, resource imbalances, stereoeditorial board have 32 female deans and associate deans to typing and “unclear professional etiquette 34 men. There are currently 21 women to 45 creating male discomfort, which exacermen. bates social isolation.” And this problem is not unique to OU. Women So, to truly address this issue, all members of the made up about 45 percent of tenure-track faculty, 31 OU faculty and staff must guard themselves against percent of tenured faculty and just 24 percent of full such behavior. We call on each of you to do the difprofessorships in 2005-06, according to a study by ficult work of examining the way your perceptions the American Association of University Professors. may twist your professional conduct. What’s to blame for this discrepancy? We have no But you can start with the easy, practical solutions. reason to believe it comes from discriminatory hirThe 2010-2011 OU budget shows the three highest ing practices or any conscious effort on the adminis- female administrators at the time each were paid 15 tration’s part. So we have to look at the entire system, to 25 percent less than men in comparable positions, starting with graduate students. according to Daily archives. More women attain graduate degrees than men, This is a clear, unacceptable form of discrimiaccording to a 2010 report from the Department nation that no doubt discourages women from of Education. But women achieve associate and pursuing academic careers. It must be addressed full professor rank at a much lower rate, according immediately. to a 2006 report from the American Association of And don’t forget: This issue starts with students. University Professors. At OU in 2010, there were only Female students, hearing about wage discrepancies 152 female associate and full professors compared and other discrimination — and not seeing many to 400 men, according to the OU Factbook. examples of women in positions of power — may reAcademic leadership positions, such as deans and ject the idea of an academic career outright. provosts, are generally filled from these ranks. So, Professors, you are the first line of defense against by nature of the system, there are fewer qualified fe- this. Ensure that you treat your female students male candidates for these positions. equally, offering them the same amount of help and Assuming OU follows fair hiring practices, if the guidance, particularly in male-dominated classes number of female professors matched the popuor majors. Make sure you never assume a female lation, the number of female leaders would, too. student isn’t interested in research opportunities or A 2008 study from North Dakota State University other career-advancing encouragement. shows that where there are more women in leaderIt’s easy to assume you are free from such biases, ship positions, there are more female professors but the numbers don’t lie. It is happening, in subtle — and “few women want to go to places where few and unacknowledged ways. And it is happening here. women are.” Don’t wait for a policy handed down from above; Once one of these issues is addressed, a cycle of it’s up to each of you to be the solution. progress will start. So, how can OU get this cycle started? Comment on this at OUDaily.com

COLUMN

OU should lead in more than football

T

here are things I do OPINION COLUMNIST not understand. And a lot of them have to do with American football. This is probably largely due to my early socialization: My dad and brother are both musician-painter-actors, Elizabeth Rucker and my mom is a detective wordful@ou.edu novel woman through and through. Growing up in Oklahoma gave me a certain level of preparation for football-mania, but I still was taken aback when I came to OU. I don’t mean just the pregame fireworks that initiate a jump out of my skin or the game day traffic that compels my friends and me to batten down the hatches and wait out the storm. Football seems to be the defining feature of our institution. For example, the Big 12 conference. We compete against these 11 other universities on the gridiron, of course. But our academics, cost and policies also are constantly compared with these schools. Some of it makes sense — there’s a Southwest by Midwest regional logic at play. Yet, there are some real outliers included: not the least West Virginia, the most recent addition to the conference, and Baylor and Texas Christian University, which are both private, Christian universities with student populations between one-third and one-half the size of ours. But all that would be immaterial if OU’s administration would show as much dedication to leading the Big 12 off the field as on it. Unforunately, in my three years as a student organizer for change on this campus, I have been repeatedly told by OU administrators of various levels that we must limit ourselves to what the rest of the Big 12 is doing. For example, the last time Students for a Democratic Society and our coalition in support of gender-neutral housing tried to secure a meeting with President David Boren to discuss the proposal we have been writing and promoting for more than two years, we were sent on the wild-goose chase of producing the gender-neutral housing policies of Big 12 peer group. Gender-neutral housing (also known as gender-blind or gender-inclusive housing) is a policy that would allow students of different assigned sexes to live in the same rooms and suites in the residence halls. Gender-neutral housing

creates a safe and comfortable environment for gendernonconforming, transgender, lesbian, bisexual, gay and queer students by recognizing that sex-segregated housing poses emotional, mental and physical danger for this group of people. However, it is not limited to LGBTQ students — straight allies who just want to room with someone regardless of gender identity, expression or sexual orientation also are welcome. You don’t have to be a women’s and gender studies major to realize this policy is unpopular in the Bible Belt for a variety of irrelevant reasons (even though many Christian students on this campus have expressed their support for this policy to me). Thus, using the other Big 12 schools as benchmarks for such critical policy changes is a fait accomplishment for those who resist students’ demands in this area. As I noted above, Baylor and TCU are both small, private, religious universities that do not offer any kind of accommodation to LGBTQI students (Baylor even refused to allow students to form a group dedicated to the discussion of homosexuality in 2010). Most of the remaining schools offer spotty options, more or less comparable to ours, that range from single rooms to special exceptions for living off-campus. This is not good enough. It is not good enough for students at those universities, nor is it good enough for Sooners. But even using the Big 12 benchmark may not allow administrators to stall on this issue much longer: When my fellow organizers contacted the University of the Missouri, we were told that plans for a gender-neutral housing policy will be released this semester. These changes follow the university’s Residence Halls Association (the equivalent of our Housing Center Student Association) vote last semester to support the implementation of a gender-neutral housing policy in 2012, according to an April article in the Columbia Missourian. If Mizzou comes through on this, it will join over 50 universities of every size, shape and location in ensuring all students have access to safe, comfortable housing. I don’t have much of a competitive streak, but I would love to see OU beat Mizzou to it. Elizabeth Rucker is an international studies and interdisciplinary studies on the environment senior.

?

Mary Stanfield, opinion editor dailyopinion@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

» Poll question of the day Do you think OU should hire more female deans and associate deans?

To cast your vote, visit LETTER TO THE EDITOR

OU is too good for designated smoking areas I’m not a fan of the color orange. I’m a proud OU graduate, and I don’t like seeing my team get beat by any team in orange. But sadly, that is exactly what is happening. When it comes to tobacco, OSU has been smoking OU for years with their campuswide policy banning the cancer-causing product. And when OU finally gets the chance to step up and take a stance against the No. 1 preventable cause of death in this country — tobacco — they still might come in second place to the Pokes. Opportunities for leadership only come so often, and the fact that the OU Tobacco Advisory Committee might recommend something less than a complete tobacco ban is nothing more than a failure to see the future and lead. A recommendation that allows for designated smoking areas is not a significant contribution to a State whose overall health ranking dropped from 46th in the nation to 48th, nor is it in line with the long tradition of excellence that typifies OU. In short, OU is too good for anything less than a complete tobacco ban. ReRe Lunsford, OU’s Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Research Program

EDITORIAL

Protestors of SOPA, PIPA act victorious for now

O

n Jan. 18, Wikipedia’s English pages, Reddit, Google and an estimated 7,000 other websites coordinated a service blackout in protest of the Stop Online Piracy Act and the Protect IP Act. In excess of 160 million people saw Wikipedia’s banner, according to the site. Other protest actions included petition drives, boycotts of supporting companies and a rally in New York City. We urged you to take part in this protest by staying informed and sending letters to your congressmen. We’re happy to tell you that, for now, it looks like we’ve won. On Jan. 20, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Lamar Smith announced that the bill has been tabled. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid announced that the vote on PIPA would be postponed until complaints about the bill could be addressed. This victory illustrates the power of online organizing and grassroots protest movements. It would be easy to lean back and celebrate. But the fight isn’t over. This gathering of effort wasn’t just about these two bills. It’s about the continued struggle to protect individual rights from corporate interests, to keep the government from dangerously expanding its power and to maintain the Internet as a powerful tool for free expression. They’re gone for now, but they will be back. The entertainment industry won’t back off from this defeat. The actions of our Congress are not the only threats — some come from outside our borders. In 2006, Canada, the European Union, Switzerland and the United States began preliminary talks on a secretive treaty called the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement , which would establish international standards on intellectual property rights enforcement, according to documents leaked to Wikileaks. In 2008, other nations joined official discussions. This treaty would create a governing body outside the existing international framework for intellectual property issues, going above the already agreed-upon authorities. It was developed largely in secret, giving developing countries and citizens of involved countries no input. Similar concerns arise with SOPA and PIPA, but the international scope raises the threat level. Opponents worry it will distort trade, penalize Internet Service Providers, force companies to comply with privacy invasions, limit legal exchange of free software, and give corporations too much input on future amendments. Visit OUDaily.com to find a link to the Free Software Foundation’s declaration against the treaty and sign it to support the fight. But this is just one further example. We all must remain vigilant against further threats to our technological freedoms and not lose this powerful energy.

The Oklahoma Daily is a public forum, the University of Oklahoma’s independent student voice and an entirely student-run publication.

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Guest columns are accepted and printed at the editor’s discretion. Columnists’ and cartoonists’ opinions are their own and not necessarily the views or opinions of The Oklahoma Daily Editorial Board. To advertise in The Oklahoma Daily, contact advertising manager Kristen Milburn by calling 405-325-8964 or emailing dailyads@ou.edu. One free copy of The Daily is available to members of the OU community. Additional copies may be purchased for 25 cents by contacting The Daily business office at 405-325-2522.


Wednesday, January 25, 2012 •

OUDaily.com ››

SPORTS AT A GLANCE Sooners in the rankings The Sooner men’s gymnastics team is now the highest-ranked OU squad after reclaiming the No. 1 spot this week. The move came after the previously third-ranked Sooners defeated No. 2 Ohio State on Saturday in Columbus, Ohio. OU has not been ranked No. 1 since the first week of competition. The women’s gymnastics team leaped from No. 10 to No. 5 in Monday’s rankings after posting an NCAAleading 197.450 team score Saturday in Denton, Texas. The Sooners also fared well in preseason rankings for softball and baseball. The USA Today/ NFCA poll ranks the OU softball team No. 5 in the country. The OU baseball team clocks in at No. 19 in Baseball America’s top-25 preseason poll, released Tuesday, marking four straight years the Sooners have started the season in the top 25. The men’s track and field team jumped 10 spots this week to No. 13, and the women’s track and field team jumped two spots to No. 19.

Men’s gymnastics 1. Oklahoma 2. Illinois 3. Ohio State 4. Penn State 5. California 6. Stanford 7. Michigan 8. Minnesota 9. Nebraska 10. Air Force

WOMen’s gymnastics 1. Arkansas -- UCLA 3. Utah 4. Nebraska 5. Oklahoma 6. Alabama 7. Georgia 8. Florida 9. Penn State 10. Oregon State

Men’s tennis opened up its season with a dominant win, and women’s tennis moved to 3-0 on Tuesday in Norman.

Greg Fewell, sports editor dailysports@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

Men’s Basketball

OU hoops’ upset bid falls short Sooners fall to No. 3 Baylor Bears by score of 77-65

Key performer Andrew Fitzgerald Year: Junior Position: Forward Hometown: Baltimore Game stats: Fitzgerald finished Tuesday’s game with 13 points, 2 steals, 3 rebounds, and no turnovers.

RJ Young

Sports Reporter

Romero Osby ripped the rock from the hands of a Baylor defender and then rose toward the ceiling in Lloyd Noble Center. He threw down a twohanded jam that pulled the Sooners to within one point of the sixth-ranked Baylor Bears with 17:19 left to play in the game. Junior forward Andrew Fitzgerald scored 10 crucial first half points to leave Oklahoma (12-7, 2-5) trailing Baylor, 35-30, when each team entered its locker room, and Osby had taken only three shots and scored four points. The second half was the time for the junior from Meridian, Miss., to assert himself. But Osby’s slam would bring the Sooners as close to Baylor (18-2, 5-2) on the scoreboard as they would be all night. His 16 points, 11 rebounds and two blocks were not enough to overcome Baylor forward Perry Jones III and the Bears. Baylor beat the Sooners, 77-65, on Tuesday night. Oklahoma’s hope of winning its first contest versus a top-10 opponent was thwarted. Jones III scored a gamehigh 21 points and pulled down 12 boards on an efficient 9-of-15 night of shooting. But if that wasn’t enough, Baylor’s shooting was. The Bears were pyrotechnic from 3-point range, knocking down 9-of-18 3-pointers and shooting 54 percent from the hardwood for the game. “With our inside getting a lot of recognition and notoriety, a lot of people choose to kind of focus on that and that gives us some pretty good looks from the outside, and we have some players that are capable of making open shots from the

Astrud Reed/the daily

Junior forward Romero Osby (right) drives to the basket during the first half of the Sooners’ 77-65 loss to the sixth-ranked Baylor Bears on Tuesday night at Lloyd Noble Center.

outside and they did that tonight,” Baylor coach Scott Drew said. Five different Bears made at least one 3-pointer, while junior guard Steven Pledger sunk Oklahoma’s only three 3-pointers. Pledger ended the game with 17 points and made 7-of-15 shots from the floor. He thought just one more opportunity to make a play might have given the Sooners the victory. “ We ’ r e a s t e p a w a y ,” Pledger said. “I feel like we’re just one more. We’ve just got to make that one more extra step, get that one more extra rebound, box out one more time. We’re just

one more step away from everything.” He might be right. Nearly 12 minutes after Osby’s energizing dunk, Oklahoma had counterpunched its way to a twopoint deficit with 4:42 left

to play on a jumper from sophomore guard Cameron Clark. Drew attributed Oklahoma’s fight to coach Lon Kruger and his ability to instill a competitiveness in the Sooners that has

SOFTBALL

1. Arizona State 2. Florida 3. Alabama 4. California 5. Oklahoma 6. Missouri 7. Baylor 8. Arizona 9. Stanford 10. Georgia

BASEBALL

1. Florida 2. Stanford 3. South Carolina 4. Arkansas 5. Arizona 6. Rice 7. Texas A&M 8. Louisiana State 9. North Carolina 10. Vanderbilt ... 19. Oklahoma

Men’s Track & Field 1. Arkansas 2. Florida 3. Louisiana State 4. Florida State 5. Texas 6. Indiana 7. Stanford 8. Nebraska 9. Texas A&M 10. Arizona ... 13. Oklahoma

WoMen’s Track & Field 1. Oregon 2. Louisiana State 3. Arkansas 4. Clemson 5. Texas 6. Central Florida 7. Brigham Young 8. Texas Tech 9. Florida State 10. Southern Miss ... 19. Oklahoma

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become a trademark of his coaching style. “Coach Kruger is starting to put his stamp on the team,” he said. “They really get after you defensively. I think this is a team that competes every play.” Baylor answered with a 9-2 run that would put the game out of reach for the Sooners. It’s a moral victory, but Osby made it clear in the post game press conference Oklahoma isn’t a place where a moral victory is seen as anything other than what it is on the stat sheet — a loss. “I feel like we’re making progress but moral victories are something we really just don’t want to accept,” Osby said. He’s not thinking about next season or the increasing possibility of a career in the NBA . He’s thinking about winning — right now. “We want to try and start making this progress now, go out and get some wins under our belts and get some confidence. See where we can go from here the rest of this year.”


6

• Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Classifieds C Transportation

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HOROSCOPE By Bernice Bede Osol

Copyright 2012, Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

WEDNESDAY JANUAR JANUARY 25, 2012

Through working together on a mutual job or goal, there is an excellent chance that a bond between you and an attractive individual will be significantly strengthened in the year ahead. Both of you will be drawn to one another. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- If you study your financial affairs down to the last detail, you should be able to discover some new ways to generate the gains you desire. Don’t take your past situations for granted. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Refrain from judging someone you don’t really know based on dubious information supplied by others. Even if this person is difficult for some to get along with, this may not hold true for you.



              



Previous Solution



     

       

                                                                                 Monday- Very Easy Tuesday-Easy Wednesday- Easy Thursday- Medium Friday - Hard

Instructions: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. That means that no number is repeated in any row, column or box.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Playing a supportive role generally isn’t your bag; you’re usually the person leading the pack. However, if you handle your unaccustomed position well, both the accolades and rewards will be shared. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -Observe and study persons you admire who do things right, and you can learn more from them than you do from books. Pay heed not only to what they say, but what they do. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- If you think those who are handling something of significance aren’t doing a good enough job, assume a more active role in their efforts. Set an example they’ll want to follow.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- When you allow yourself to have as much time as needed to analyze an important decision, you’ll be able to reach a solid conclusion. Don’t cut yourself off at the knees. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Any task that requires considerable concentration as well as a certain amount of boldness is what you’ll excel at, so don’t shy away from these kinds of jobs. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Because your powers of persuasion are exceptionally strong, you’ll be remarkably good at turning people to your way of thinking. Now is the time to make your pitch. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- The timing is perfect for attending to a serious matter that you’ve been sidestepping. Take a deep breath and get down to business the moment you see an opening -- it may not last long. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -Numbered among your many virtues is an excellent organizational ability that you’ll have a chance to use today. Just be careful not to employ a heavy hand when giving orders. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Provided profit is a motivation, this can be quite a rewarding day for you. If your desire to accumulate that paper is strong enough, you might be able to make some serious gains. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- The possibilities for advancing your selfinterests are exceptional. Don’t be unduly self-serving -- just push for what is personally important.

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker January 25, 2012

ACROSS 1 At a remote point 5 Swiss mountains 9 Stalk of asparagus 14 Name on many jeans’ labels 15 Waikiki party 16 Make happy 17 Object of blind devotion 18 Gave energy to 20 Colorful location in Kentucky 22 Tax shelter, for short 23 Formerly, on the wedding page 24 Bring into existence 28 Tossed serving 30 Rug feature 32 None whatsoever 33 Small explosive 36 Agenda entry 37 Colorful location in New York 39 “Aren’t we the comedian?� 41 Disburses 42 ___ Wan Kenobi 43 Bohemian 44 Book of maps 48 Go downhill 1/25

50 “Yay, home team!� 52 In-flight guesstimate, for short 53 Colorful location in California 57 Accommodate 60 Low part of a high top 61 Soft palate attachment 62 Monetary unit of Ethiopia 63 Half brother of Athena 64 Miss America judges, e.g. 65 Stuck-up person 66 Yard segments DOWN 1 Courtroom defenses 2 Indiana Jones topper 3 Affirmation 4 Small brook 5 Dress with some flare 6 Fencing maneuver 7 Feeling of hunger 8 Litigant 9 Harshly extreme 10 Leveling tool 11 Snack or nosh 12 Past tense of 11-Down 13 Unpopular ink color

19 Wash again 21 Large lemur 25 Echidna’s edibles 26 No-win situation 27 Popular tree type 29 Turkish chief 30 Father, to Li’l Abner 31 Word with “gossip� or “chatter� 34 Without beginning or end 35 At the front of the line 36 “Meet Me ___ Louis� 37 Blender noise 38 Kind of potato 39 Questioning word 40 Blood classification syst.

43 Kind of photography 45 “Doubly dead� Poe title girl 46 British Prime Minister Clement 47 Utter, Biblically 49 Architectural column support 50 Fashionably nostalgic 51 Acidtongued 54 Bird beaks 55 “No pain, no ___� 56 Amer. military fliers 57 Eight fluid ounces 58 Anatomical eggs 59 Sister wearing a habit

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HUE-ITFUL PLACES By Joel Portman


Life&arts

Wednesday, January 25, 2012 •

OUDaily.com ›› Do you dare to walk under the clock tower? Read why some students believe in the myths associated with the campus icon.

7

Lindsey Ruta, life & arts editor Mariah Webb, assistant life & arts editor dailyent@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

School of dance

Students to stage original numbers

Ricardo Patino/The Daily

A dancer waits for her cue in Charlotte Hart’s “Up, up, down, down, left, right, left, right, B, A,” one of the shows presented in the Young Choreographers’ Showcase. Hart’s number is inspired by classic Nintendo video games such as “Super Mario Bros.” and “Duck Hunter.” This is the 25th year the University Theatre has produced the Young Choreographers’ Showcase.

Choreographers’ showcase to include eight dances Westlee Parsons Life & Arts Reporter

What do ballet shoes, live drummers and “Duck Hunt” have in common? Nothing, until they meet on stage Thursday for the Young Choreographers’ Showcase. The showcase started 25 years ago in order to applaud the dance students for their hard work over their undergraduate or graduate years. The show is cast and choreographed completely by students. The choreographers were selected through two judging processes last semester after an initial September audition. The chosen students then choreographed their pieces last semester and have been rehearsing and fine tuning ever since. “Some students applied for [the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program] or grants to fund production costs such as costumes,” Clare Springer said. Springer is a modern dance senior and dancer in one of the pieces. She said choreography wasn’t the only element of the show students were responsible for. The entire production

GO AND DO Showcase WHEN: 8 p.m. Thursday to Sunday; 3 p.m. Sunday WHERE: Rupel J. Jones Theatre

has been arranged completely by the students with guidance from select faculty advisers. The choreographers were responsible for the performance elements of the show, as well as the technical elements. “Choreographers worked with student lighting designers on their pieces,” Springer said. Ballet performance senior Jammie Walker was one of the students selected to choreograph a piece for the showcase. In his piece, titled “6 Out of 5”, Walker said he originally started out with five women, but after the determination of another dancer, the piece quickly changed. “When I originally envisioned this piece, I had five specific women that I wanted to work with,” Walker

Stay connected with the life & arts desk for entertainment news and features

@OUDailyArts UNIVERSITY THEATRE SCHOOL OF DANCE PRESENTS

YOUNG CHOREOGRAPHERS’ SHOWCASE

8 P.M. JAN. 26-28 3 P.M. JAN. 29 RUPEL J. JONES THEATRE OU FINE ARTS BOX OFFICE

(405) 325-4101 IN YOUR OU ARTS DISTRICT ou.edu/finearts/events

The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. For accommodations on the basis of disability call (405) 325-4101.

said. “After a few rehearsals, however, a sixth woman requested to be an understudy. I was flattered, impressed and excited to work with this dancer.” Walker said the sixth dancer not only changed the piece but also inspired the title. He said the process has been a challenging one, but he thinks it brings something different to this area. “I think that the fusion of more contemporary/modern movement with ballet technique is something that audiences in this region of the country do not see as much as story ballets or classical modern works,” Walker said. This idea encompasses The Young Choreographers’ Showcase he said, because these types of performances might be unfamiliar to the majority of students or to people of the community and this performance is a great way to become exposed to many forms of dance. Modern dance senior Terra Easter choreographed a piece titled “Weightless: An Ode to Cello”. “My piece attempts to

at a glance Student choreographers Terra Easter Modern dance performance senior Piece: “Weightless: And Ode to Cello” Christopher Frazier Ballet performance senior Piece: “The Hocket” Charlotte Hart Graduate student Piece:ÇÇ “ÇÇ ÅÆÅÆBA ”

Ricardo Patino/The Daily

Claire Belden dances in during a dress rehearsal Tuesday in the Rupel J. Jones Theatre. Belden is one of the student dancers in choreographer Nathan Young’s piece, “Ineffable Soulstice.” Young and seven choreographers were accepted into the Young Choreographers’ Showcase opening Thursday in the Rupel J. Jones Theatre.

show the beauty and softness amongst hardness and even ugliness,” Easter said. She said she was so moved by the cello music she originally selected for her piece that it found its way into the title and theme of the piece. She said the process has been a new and rewarding task. “The experience is an

Austin Litnter Ballet performance junior Piece: “Vitality” Diana Robertson Modern dance performance senior Piece: “D.S.”

oudaily.coM

Jammie Walker Ballet performance senior Piece: “6 out of 5”

Q&A: Five of the student choreographers discuss the inspiration for their pieces.

Brett Young Ballet performance senior Piece: “Sammen Som Én”

amazing one for aspiring choreographers and gives you a new platform to work on,” Easter said.

Nathan Young Ballet performance junior Piece: “Ineffable Soulstice”


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LIFE&ARTS

• Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Dissecting the Oscar nominees The Academy Award nominations were announced on Tuesday, and many of them were almost surprisingly predictable this year. We were sad to see a few films not make the cut — “The Ides of March,� “Crazy, Stupid, Love,� “Melancholia� — but considering the volume of high-budget dramas (is anybody else tired of Brad Pitt?), we’re not really surprised by most of the nominations, or the snubs for that matter. Here we break down the nominations for three of the most popular categories and give our views on what the Academy has selected. The Life & Arts Staff

Best Picture “Hugo� “War Horse� “Moneyball� “The Descendants� “The Help� “The Artist� “The Tree of Life� “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close� “Midnight in Paris� The Academy only nominated nine films this year, a decision we find interesting given the snub of excellent films such as “Carnage,� “Shame� and “Melancholia.� It’s disappointing to see “Moneyball� take up a nod. The slow-paced, lackluster sports film cannot keep stride with most of its competitors.

Actor in a Leading Role George Clooney- “The Descendents� Demian Bichir- “A Better Life� Jean Dujardin- “The Artist� Gary Oldman- “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy� Brad Pitt- “Moneyball� Again, the “Moneyball� nomination is a waste. Brad Pitt’s character was mediocre, especially in comparison to Michael Fassenberger’s riveting performance in “Shame� (which has been all together snubbed). We can’t complain with the other four. While we’re happy to see Gary Oldman nab a nod, we’re inclined to think the Academy will follow suit to the Golden Globes in this category.

Actress in a Leading Role Glen Close- “Albert Nobbs� Viola Davis- “The Help� Rooney Mara- “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo� Meryl Streep- “The Iron Lady� Michelle Williams- “My Week With Marilyn�

AT A GLANCE Nominations To see a full list of nominations, go to: Oscars.go.com

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This may be our favorite category. The Academy was spot on in recognizing some of the year’s most outstanding female performances. The queen of Oscar nods, Meryl Streep’s performance is just as deserving as ever. Michelle Williams is a favorite of ours, but who can argue with any of these?


Wednesday, January 25, 2012