Page 1

OU men’s basketball looks for back-to-back Big 12 wins (page 8) The University of Oklahoma’s independent student voice since 1916

T U E S D A Y , J A N U A R Y 17, 2 0 1 2

W W W.O U DA I LY.C O M

2 011 G OL D C ROW N F I N A L I S T

cRime

grandfather shoots, kills OU student Community, family mourn loss of race-car driver in shooting sean laWson

Campus Reporter

Incoming OU student Donald “Donnie Ray” Crawford III was killed at 9 a.m. Saturday in his parents’ home in Broken Arrow, just two days before starting his first semester at OU. Crawford was shot by his grandfather, 74-year-old Daniel Garcia,

said Gary Handley, spokesman for the Wagoner County Sher iff ’s Department. Crawford was set to start classes at OU today, accord- DONNie ing to a statement cRaWfORD from President David Boren. “Our sympathies are with the family of Donnie Crawford,” Boren said. Crawford’s parents, Donald

C raw f o rd a n d Jo d i e Ly n n Crawford, were present during the attack, Handley said. Both were injured by Garcia while attempting to protect their son. Garcia was killed in the altercation, but his cause of death has not been confirmed by the medical examiner, Handley said. Police are still investigating Garcia’s motive, Handley said. “It was totally out of the blue,” he said. Jodie Crawford was shot in the altercation with Garcia and taken

to a local hospital, where she appears to be in good condition, according to a story by The Tulsa World. Donald Crawford suffered injuries to his hand but refused treatment at the scene. Crawford was an avid racer who attended his first racing event when he was two days old, according to a biography on the Donnie Ray Crawford Racing website. Crawford won multiple races throughout his career and planned to attend the 26th Annual Chili Bowl Nationals before he

was shot and killed in his parents’ home as he was leaving for the race, according to a story published by the International Business Times. In recognition of Crawford, who drove the No. 55 car, officials extended the race’s length to 55 laps, according to the International Business Times. “The department would like to extend its deepest condolences to the family,” Handley said. “No family should have to go through this.”

WeatHeR

tecHNOlOgY cONfeReNce

OU looks to avoid school closings Classes may still be closed despite open campus PaigHTen HarKins Campus Reporter

auBrie HiLL/tHe daiLy

Ken Parker, upcoming TEDxOU speaker and CEO of Nextthought, displays a program on the iPad that allows students to read books but also look at comments and advice from other users. He will speak about using technology to make great education more accessible for people during his lecture.

Software CEO to introduce program Students to learn new technology skills set raCHael CervenKa Campus Reporter

Students can learn various ways technology can transform learning into a more social and community experience from the first speaker of the inaugural technology, entertainment and design (TEDxOU) event Jan. 27. Software developer Ken Parker is the

first of 10 speakers at TEDxOU, an independent event to encourage discussion and thought within the Norman community, according to the event website. At Parker’s TEDx talk he will focus mainly on community in education. Parker said that this aspect of education has the most transformative potential. “We want people to learn from one another and help one another develop,” he said.

OPiNiON VOL. 97, NO. 80 © 2011 OU Publications Board FREE — Additional copies 25 cents www.OUDaily.com www.facebook.com/OUDaily www.twitter.com/OUDaily

INSIDE News .......................... Classifieds .................. Life & Arts .................. Opinion ...................... Sports .........................

2 7 5 4 8

NOW ON

The Daily needs new staff members

This event will be Parker’s first TEDx event although he has been an avid fan of the website and its ideas for years, he said. He is honored to have been asked to speak and excited to spread his innovative ideas. Parker is the CEO of NextThought, a relatively new software company with the aim of creating an integrated program for online education. The mantra of NextThought is: Change the world, see PARKER paGe 2

Stars show fashion highs, lows at Golden Globes

Students can gain work experience by working in newsroom. (Page 4)

life & aRtS Students set New Year’s resolutions Sooners break mold with unconventional resolutions. (Page 6)

mUltimeDia

SPORtS

Stars dress for success for awards

OU hopes to break last year’s record

The Daily critiques best, worst dressed of Hollywood. (OUDaily.

Men’s basketball team faces off against Texas Tech tonight. (Page 8)

matt sayLes/tHe assoCiated press

Emma Stone poses for a picture as she arrives at the Golden Globes on Sunday in Los Angeles. The annual awards show wasn’t the most memorable, The Daily’s Mariah Webb writes. (Page 5)

TEDxOU ken Parker Ghislain d’Humieres Reed Timmer Kyle Harper Julia Ehrhardt Bobby Gruenewald Jeremy Short Clint and Buck Vrazel Christina Shay Austin Hartel

The university departments tasked with limiting weather-related campus closures are better prepared to keep students in class this winter after a series of new equipment purchases, administrators said. T h e O U Fa c i l i t i e s Management and Landscape and Grounds Departments sought the new equipment after a combination of sub-zero temperatures, ice accumulations and blizzard-like conditions resulted in six days of campus closures last spring semester. As a result, even during severe weather conditions both departments should be equipped to “tackle any chore within a day now,” Landscape and Grounds Director Allen King said. The OU Roads and Hauling department has tripled its capacity to clear ice and snow on campus roads and parking lots, Facilities Management Director Brian Ellis said. This increase is due to the purchase of additional heavy plows that will be attached to trucks already owned by the department and plans to equip all plowing vehicles with a sander, Ellis said. The additional sanders and plows will allow each vehicle to cover more territory in a shorter amount of time, Ellis said. The Landscape and Grounds Department has purchased five new pieces see SNOW paGe 2

The Daily’s open record requests Requested document and purpose

Date requested

Directory information of undergraduate students over the age of 60 — This was requested to gather some non-traditional student contact information.

Today

Results of the investigation of former OU professor chad kerksick — These documents were requested to further explore the investigation of the professor.

Today

campaign donations made by the university and university foundations — This was requested to gather data on what types of candidates receive money from the university and its foundations.

Today

UOSa’s Student fee expenditures during fall 2010, spring 2011 and fall 2011 — This was requested to compare student fee expenditures by Undergraduate Student Congress and Graduate Student Senate.

Today


2

CAMPUS

• Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Campus

Laney Ellisor, campus editor Kathleen Evans, assistant campus editor Chris Miller, assistant campus editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

SNOW: OU plans to avoid slippery sidewalks Continued from page 1 of equipment intended to help campus remain open even during the most severe of winter storms, King said. The problems his department experienced when trying to reopen campus last spring were compounded by consistent below-zero temperatures, King said. “Everything was freezing and refreezing as soon as we would get it deiced,� King said. “If we would have had temperatures like in the upper twenties, like on just an average snow storm, we would have had campus open the next day.� Any decisions about potential campus closures are made on a day-to-day basis with the consultation of OU President David Boren, university spokesman Michael Nash said in an email. The decision considers current and future forecasts and road conditions and is done so in the best interest of the students, faculty and staff, Nash said. While campus may stay open this semester during even severe snowfall, that doesn’t mean school will be in session, Ellis said. “If we do have a big blizzard situation, there may be city streets that are not passable, and if so I think that that would then become the bottleneck rather than we couldn’t get campus out [of the snow] in time,� Ellis said.

Today around campus Spring 2012 classes begin. Automatic grade of W for complete withdrawal of classes and no record on dropped courses. First day for late registration fee. Complete reduction of charges on dropped courses and complete withdrawals. An art exhibition by students of the School of Art and Art History will take place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art’s Sandy Bell Gallery. A free exhibit by invitational artist Clint Stone can be seen 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Lightwell Gallery of the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. OU men’s basketball will play Texas Tech at 7 p.m. in Lloyd Noble Center.

Wednesday, Jan. 18 Free donuts and hot chocolate will be served at 8 a.m. on the South Oval by the Campus Activities Council Winter Welcome Week while supplies last.

Continued from page 1

A free exhibit by invitational artist Clint Stone can be seen from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art’s Lightwell Gallery.

Have fun, Make money—in that order, according to its website. The greatest tragedy for humans is when someone has the ability and the desire but not the opportunity for education, Parker said. NextThought is working through technology to give a greater number of people the opportunity. “Education is such a powerful lever,� Parker said. “If you can give that to people and let them reach their maximum potential, it is a wonderful thing.� Parker never actually graduated from high school and does not possess a high school diploma, he said. His family moved during the summer before his senior year, and his credits did not carry over. “If I’d had access to the kinds of things that we’re building now, I would have completed my high school

A free lunch will be available at 11:30 a.m. on the South Oval by the Campus Activities Council Winter Welcome Week while supplies last. Free hot chocolate, apple cider and cookies will be served at “Warm Up Wednesday� from 2 to 4 p.m. in the Student Life Office. The office is in suite 370 of the Oklahoma Memorial Union. Bingo games can be played at 7 p.m. in the Jim Thorpe Multicultural Center, located south of Couch Restaurants.

Thursday, Jan. 19 Free donuts and hot chocolate will be served at 8 a.m. on the South Oval by the Campus Activities Council Winter Welcome Week while supplies last. An art exhibition by students of the School of Art and Art History will take place 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art’s Sandy Bell Gallery. A free exhibit by invitational artist Clint Stone can be seen from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art’s Lightwell Gallery. An opening recpetion will take place at 6 p.m.

20% discount with OU ID or this coupon!

NUMBER ONE is nothing to celebrate.

This year, more than 163,000 people will die from lung cancer—making it America’s

NUMBER ONE cancer killer.

But new treatments offer hope.

P NK & BLACK B

A

L

L

Wednesday Âť 8:00 a.m. — Hot chocolate and donuts on the South Oval. Âť 11:30 a.m. — Free food on the South Oval (while supplies last). Âť 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. — “Warm Up Wednesdayâ€?; come get free hot chocolate, apple cider and cookies (Student Life Office, Oklahoma Memorial Union, Suite 370). Âť 7:00 p.m. — Bingo (Jim Thorpe Multicultural Center located South of Couch Cafeteria).

Merrill Jones/The Daily

Bridgette Haxton, then-public relations senior, passes out a cup during last year’s Winter Welcome Week. The activities included passing out donuts and hot chocolate each morning and sports tournaments.

student groups as possible,� Bridegan said. “We are coprogramming and having participation from over 10 major student organizations and we are thrilled about that.� Representatives from campus chapters of the Women’s Outreach Center,

facilities management

Eventually, though, Ellis said he hopes Facilities Management will be equipped to help the large r No r ma n c o m mu n i t y combat large ice and snow accumulations.

Facilities Management impounds unattended bikes

Even if campus faces a similar series of events this semester, Ellis said the only closure on campus would result from a storm while it was happening. That sentiment was echoed

AT A GLANCE TED facts Âť Stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design Âť Non-profit organization created in California in 1984 Âť Bring in speakers to give presentations on new, unique projects Source: TED.com

education a lot faster and a lot higher quality,� Parker said. Parker did, however, graduate from Oklahoma Christian with degrees in math and computer science and went on to obtain his master’s in computer science from the University of Colorado. Parker has had many notable employers, including Martin Marietta, an aerospace company in Denver, and J.P. Morgan in New York, he said. He worked with Martin Marietta Aerospace for 10

years and JP Morgan for four years developing software. W hile w orki ng at J.P. Morgan on Wall Street, Parker began toying with the idea of forming a software company specializing in online education. He moved back to Oklahoma in 1996 and launched RiskMetrics Group, a financial risk management company, in 1998. Ethan Berman, a previous business partner at RiskMetrics, said Parker is one of his favorite people. Parker ran the technology group at RiskMetrics. However, Berman said he distinctly remembers a specific incidence when he was speaking with Parker in his office and he glanced up at Parker’s bookcase to find only books about people. There was not one book about technology. All the books were about leadership, motivation and career development. “It was always people first for Ken,� Berman said. RiskMetrics Group was

by King, who said he expected storms to impact campus life far less than they did last semester. “We’ll be fine this year,� King said.

Big Event, Black Student Association Stompdown, Black Student Association Big 1 2 C o n f e re n c e a n d Dance Marathon will all participate, Bridegan said. The festivities are intended not only to welcome students, but also to demonstrate CAC’s role in campus

life, Dance Marathon chairwoman Anissa Angier said. “CAC members want to let people know how they are involved on campus and we feel like this is a great way to do it,� said Angier, who functioned as vice president during fall’s Howdy Week. “I’m definitely excited.

Thursday  8:00 a.m. — Hot chocolate and donuts on the South Oval.  11:30 a.m. — Free food on the South Oval (while supplies

last). Âť 4:30 - 6:30 p.m. —Transfer Student Mixer and Involvement Fair; free food sponsored by Healthy Sooners (Jim Thorpe Multicultural Center located South of Couch Cafeteria). Sponsored by Student Alumni Association. Âť 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. — Night at the Huff; free food sponsored by Healthy Sooners (Huston Huffman Center). Âť 9:00 p.m. — “The Rock and Roll Dreams of Duncan Christopherâ€? premiere and Q&A at Meacham Auditorium. Friday Âť 8:00 a.m. — Hot chocolate and donuts on the South Oval. Âť 4, 7, 10 p.m. and 12:30 a.m. — “The Social Networkâ€? PJ Party at Meacham Auditorium (Oklahoma Memorial Union). Âť Midnight — Midnight Breakfast; free food sponsored by Healthy Sooners (Crossroads, Oklahoma Memorial Union). Sponsored by Union Programming Board.

sold in 2010, and Parker began thinking about what was next. “Life is too precious to spend it on retirement,� Parker said. He decided he wanted to utilize the immense amount of technology at hand during this day and age to transform education, he said. With the help of a small number of individuals Parker launched NextThought in April 2011. Parker is very proud of what has been built in Oklahoma. NextThought is now made up of 14 employees ready and willing to make this innovative product accessible to as many people as possible, he said. There is a perfect storm going on right now in education because there is a problem with quality of and access to education, Parker said. He and his colleagues are trying to battle this storm. “I’d like to see us change the world,� Parker said.

on Campus

The Works $16.99 Shampoo/ Cut/Blowdry $6 Bang Trim

Bible study Today, 1/17 @ 12:00pm Sooner Room, OU Union www.christiansoncampus.cc

SAVE THE DATE FEB R UARY

11 ,

OU removes bikes over winter break jalisa green

Campus Reporter

Christians

2 012

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If you think you might have ADD or ADHD call now for an appointment (405) 310-4477

Join Lung Cancer Alliance in the fight against this disease. lungcanceralliance.org

Tuesday  8:00 a.m. — Hot chocolate and donuts on the South Oval.  11:30 a.m. — Free food on the South Oval (while supplies last).  7:00 p.m. — Coffeehouse (Cate Main Social Lounge); free hot chocolate, coffee and cookies. Sponsored by OU Housing & Food Services.

Ice covers a fountain in front of Wagner Hall on Feb. 1, 2011. Last year’s storms shut down campus for six days with heavy snow fall and icing — a sitution Facilities Management is working to avoid this year through increased preparedness and new equipment purchases.

116 S. Main, Noble 127 N. Porter 1100 E. Constitution 129 N.W. Ave. 1215 W. Lindsey 872-1661 360-4247 579-1202 360-4422 364-1325

Being

AT A GLANCE Winter Welcome Week

Carmen Forman/The Daily

Non-Requested Stylist Only

Manicure $11.99

Welcome Week aims to include everyone at OU As new and returning students converge upon campus this week, free food, drinks and entertainment will be available each day as part of Campus Activities Council’s Winter Welcome Week. The week’s events are intended to help students return to campus life, Welcome Week chairman Tyler Bridegan said. “We view Winter Welcome Week’s purpose to be to welcome back returning students as well as welcome in international and transfer students,� he said. CAC made a concerted effort to include a diverse range of student groups and opportunities for involvement in welcome week, Bridegan said. “This year more than ever, Winter Welcome Week executives stressed the importance of including as many

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The Oklahoma Daily has a commitment to serve readers with accurate coverage and analysis. Readers should bring errors to The Daily’s attention by emailing dailynews@ou.edu.

CAC to welcome back students with food

Campus Reporter

HIGHLIGHTING OR COLOR 8*5))"*3$65t 8&"7&03'0*-"%%

Corrections

3

Back to School

Connor Sullivan

PARKER: Program seeks to pass on knowledge

An art exhibition by students of the School of Art and Art History will take place 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art’s Sandy Bell Gallery.

Tuesday, January 17, 2012 •

Bicycles left chained to campus racks during winter break may have been claimed by OU Facilities Management to conserve space for this semester, the department’s director said. Though his department may have removed the bikes from the racks, any bicycle removed from a rack can still be claimed, Facilities Management director Brian Ellis said. “We received a tip that highly popular areas — Sarkeys [Energy Center] and Bizzell

[Memorial] Library — have bikes that are left unattended and have been stripped of parts and have just been left,� Ellis said. “Those bikes that we see, we pick up and hold them until they are claimed by owners or we put them in a sale.� Before bicycles are moved by university employees, a notification is placed stating that if it isn’t claimed, it will be held by Facilities Management, Ellis said. The university undergoes this process to ensure space is available at campus bicycle racks. Bicycles can be claimed by contacting Facilities Management, but those that are not claimed are placed in a sale held in the last week of November.

AT A GLANCE How to claim your bike To claim a bicycle, contact Facilities Management Lost & Found at the Facilities Management Customer Service area at 160 Felgar St. or call 405-325-3060. Source: Facilities Management

Rick Patino/The Daily

A bike lies on the ground outside Kauffman Hall on Monday. Many students abandon bikes on campus and at local apartment complexes when they return home during breaks.

OU STUDENTS YOU ARE INVITED! President’s Associates Dinner

Mauro Vieira

Brazilian Ambassador to the U.S. His Excellency Mauro Vieira, Brazilian Ambassador to the United States, will speak about urban development in Brazil. His career includes diplomatic assignments and domestic roles in Brazil. Prior to being appointed Ambassador to the United States, Vieira was the Brazilian Ambassador to Argentina from 2004 to 2009.

6 p.m. - Reception 6:30 p.m. - Dinner and Keynote Address Monday, January 30 Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History

Because of the venue, space will be limited. Reservations will be accepted as they are received. ON CAMPUS CORNER 730 Asp Ave. Suite 210 Norman, OK 73069

Please respond by calling the Office of Special Events at 325-3784 or email specialevents@ou.edu. For accommodations on the basis of disability, call the Office of Special Events at (405) 325-3784. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution.


2

CAMPUS

• Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Campus

Laney Ellisor, campus editor Kathleen Evans, assistant campus editor Chris Miller, assistant campus editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

SNOW: OU plans to avoid slippery sidewalks Continued from page 1 of equipment intended to help campus remain open even during the most severe of winter storms, King said. The problems his department experienced when trying to reopen campus last spring were compounded by consistent below-zero temperatures, King said. “Everything was freezing and refreezing as soon as we would get it deiced,� King said. “If we would have had temperatures like in the upper twenties, like on just an average snow storm, we would have had campus open the next day.� Any decisions about potential campus closures are made on a day-to-day basis with the consultation of OU President David Boren, university spokesman Michael Nash said in an email. The decision considers current and future forecasts and road conditions and is done so in the best interest of the students, faculty and staff, Nash said. While campus may stay open this semester during even severe snowfall, that doesn’t mean school will be in session, Ellis said. “If we do have a big blizzard situation, there may be city streets that are not passable, and if so I think that that would then become the bottleneck rather than we couldn’t get campus out [of the snow] in time,� Ellis said.

Today around campus Spring 2012 classes begin. Automatic grade of W for complete withdrawal of classes and no record on dropped courses. First day for late registration fee. Complete reduction of charges on dropped courses and complete withdrawals. An art exhibition by students of the School of Art and Art History will take place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art’s Sandy Bell Gallery. A free exhibit by invitational artist Clint Stone can be seen 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Lightwell Gallery of the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. OU men’s basketball will play Texas Tech at 7 p.m. in Lloyd Noble Center.

Wednesday, Jan. 18 Free donuts and hot chocolate will be served at 8 a.m. on the South Oval by the Campus Activities Council Winter Welcome Week while supplies last.

Continued from page 1

A free exhibit by invitational artist Clint Stone can be seen from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art’s Lightwell Gallery.

mantra of NextThought is: Change the world, Have fun, Make money—in that order, according to its website. The greatest tragedy for humans is when someone has the ability and the desire but not the opportunity for education, Parker said. NextThought is working through technology to give a greater number of people the opportunity. “Education is such a powerful lever,� Parker said. “If you can give that to people and let them reach their maximum potential, it is a wonderful thing.� Parker never actually graduated from high school and does not possess a high school diploma, he said. His family moved during the summer before his senior year of high school, and his credits did not carry over. “If I’d had access to the kinds of things that we’re

A free lunch will be available at 11:30 a.m. on the South Oval by the Campus Activities Council Winter Welcome Week while supplies last. Free hot chocolate, apple cider and cookies will be served at “Warm Up Wednesday� from 2 to 4 p.m. in the Student Life Office. The office is in suite 370 of the Oklahoma Memorial Union. Bingo games can be played at 7 p.m. in the Jim Thorpe Multicultural Center, located south of Couch Restaurants.

Thursday, Jan. 19 Free donuts and hot chocolate will be served at 8 a.m. on the South Oval by the Campus Activities Council Winter Welcome Week while supplies last. An art exhibition by students of the School of Art and Art History will take place 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art’s Sandy Bell Gallery. A free exhibit by invitational artist Clint Stone can be seen from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art’s Lightwell Gallery. An opening recpetion will take place at 6 p.m.

20% discount with OU ID or this coupon!

NUMBER ONE is nothing to celebrate.

This year, more than 163,000 people will die from lung cancer—making it America’s

NUMBER ONE cancer killer.

But new treatments offer hope.

P NK & BLACK B

A

L

L

Wednesday Âť 8:00 a.m. — Hot chocolate and donuts on the South Oval. Âť 11:30 a.m. — Free food on the South Oval (while supplies last). Âť 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. — “Warm Up Wednesdayâ€?; come get free hot chocolate, apple cider and cookies (Student Life Office, Oklahoma Memorial Union, Suite 370). Âť 7:00 p.m. — Bingo (Jim Thorpe Multicultural Center located South of Couch Cafeteria).

Merrill Jones/The Daily

Bridgette Haxton, then-public relations senior, passes out a cup during last year’s Winter Welcome Week. The activities included passing out donuts and hot chocolate each morning and sports tournaments.

student groups as possible,� Bridegan said. “We are coprogramming and having participation from over 10 major student organizations and we are thrilled about that.� Representatives from campus chapters of the Women’s Outreach Center,

facilities management

Eventually, though, Ellis said he hopes Facilities Management will be equipped to help the large r No r ma n c o m mu n i t y combat large ice and snow accumulations.

Facilities Management impounds unattended bikes

Even if campus faces a similar series of events this semester, Ellis said the only closure on campus would result from a storm while it was happening. That sentiment was echoed

AT A GLANCE TED facts Âť Stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design Âť Non-profit organization created in California in 1984 Âť Bring in speakers to give presentations on new, unique projects Âť Inspired TEDx events, localized discussions about community projects Source: TED.com

building now, I would have completed my high school education a lot faster and a lot higher quality,� Parker said. Pa rk e r d i d , h o w e v e r, graduate from Oklahoma Christian University with degrees in math and computer science and went on to obtain his master’s in computer science from the University of Colorado. Parker has had many

notable employers, including Martin Marietta, an aerospace company in Denver, and J.P. Morgan in New York, he said. He worked with Martin Marietta Aerospace for 10 years and JP Morgan for four years developing software. W h i l e w o rk i ng at J. P. Morgan on Wall Street, Parker began toying with the idea of forming a software company specializing in online education. He moved back to Oklahoma in 1996 and launched RiskMetrics Group, a financial risk management company, in 1998. Ethan Berman, a previous business partner at RiskMetrics, said Parker is one of his favorite people. Parker ran the technology group at RiskMetrics. However, Berman said he distinctly remembers a specific incidence when he was speaking with Parker in his office and he glanced up at Parker’s bookcase to find only books about people.

by King, who said he expected storms to impact campus life far less than they did last semester. “We’ll be fine this year,� King said.

Big Event, Black Student Association Stompdown, Black Student Association Big 1 2 C o n f e re n c e a n d Dance Marathon will all participate, Bridegan said. The festivities are intended not only to welcome students, but also to demonstrate CAC’s role in campus

life, Dance Marathon chairwoman Anissa Angier said. “CAC members want to let people know how they are involved on campus and we feel like this is a great way to do it,� said Angier, who functioned as vice president during fall’s Howdy Week. “I’m definitely excited.

Thursday  8:00 a.m. — Hot chocolate and donuts on the South Oval.  11:30 a.m. — Free food on the South Oval (while supplies

last). Âť 4:30 - 6:30 p.m. —Transfer Student Mixer and Involvement Fair; free food sponsored by Healthy Sooners (Jim Thorpe Multicultural Center located South of Couch Cafeteria). Sponsored by Student Alumni Association. Âť 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. — Night at the Huff; free food sponsored by Healthy Sooners (Huston Huffman Center). Âť 9:00 p.m. — “The Rock and Roll Dreams of Duncan Christopherâ€? premiere and Q&A at Meacham Auditorium. Friday Âť 8:00 a.m. — Hot chocolate and donuts on the South Oval. Âť 4, 7, 10 p.m. and 12:30 a.m. — “The Social Networkâ€? PJ Party at Meacham Auditorium (Oklahoma Memorial Union). Âť Midnight — Midnight Breakfast; free food sponsored by Healthy Sooners (Crossroads, Oklahoma Memorial Union). Sponsored by Union Programming Board.

There was not one book about technology. All the books were about leadership, motivation and career development. “It was always people first for Ken,� Berman said. RiskMetrics Group was sold in 2010, and Parker began thinking about what was next. “Life is too precious to spend it on retirement,� Parker said. He decided he wanted to utilize the immense amount of technology at hand during this day and age to transform education, he said. With the help of a small number of individuals Parker launched NextThought in April 2011. Pa r k e r i s v e r y p ro u d of what has been built in Oklahoma. NextThought is now made up of 14 employees ready and willing to make this innovative product accessible to as many people as possible, he said. There is a perfect storm

on Campus

The Works $16.99 Shampoo/ Cut/Blowdry $6 Bang Trim

Bible study Today, 1/17 @ 12:00pm Sooner Room, OU Union www.christiansoncampus.cc

SAVE THE DATE FEB R UARY

11 ,

OU removes bikes over winter break jalisa green

Campus Reporter

Christians

2 012

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If you think you might have ADD or ADHD call now for an appointment (405) 310-4477

Join Lung Cancer Alliance in the fight against this disease. lungcanceralliance.org

Tuesday  8:00 a.m. — Hot chocolate and donuts on the South Oval.  11:30 a.m. — Free food on the South Oval (while supplies last).  7:00 p.m. — Coffeehouse (Cate Main Social Lounge); free hot chocolate, coffee and cookies. Sponsored by OU Housing & Food Services.

Ice covers a fountain in front of Wagner Hall on Feb. 1, 2011. Last year’s storms shut down campus for six days with heavy snow fall and icing — a sitution Facilities Management is working to avoid this year through increased preparedness and new equipment purchases.

116 S. Main, Noble 127 N. Porter 1100 E. Constitution 129 N.W. Ave. 1215 W. Lindsey 872-1661 360-4247 579-1202 360-4422 364-1325

Being

AT A GLANCE Winter Welcome Week

Carmen Forman/The Daily

Non-Requested Stylist Only

Manicure $11.99

Welcome Week aims to include everyone at OU As new and returning students converge upon campus this week, free food, drinks and entertainment will be available each day as part of Campus Activities Council’s Winter Welcome Week. The week’s events are intended to help students return to campus life, Welcome Week chairman Tyler Bridegan said. “We view Winter Welcome Week’s purpose to be to welcome back returning students as well as welcome in international and transfer students,� he said. CAC made a concerted effort to include a diverse range of student groups and opportunities for involvement in welcome week, Bridegan said. “This year more than ever, Winter Welcome Week executives stressed the importance of including as many

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The Oklahoma Daily has a commitment to serve readers with accurate coverage and analysis. Readers should bring errors to The Daily’s attention by emailing dailynews@ou.edu.

CAC to welcome back students with food

Campus Reporter

HIGHLIGHTING OR COLOR 8*5))"*3$65t 8&"7&03'0*-"%%

Corrections

3

Back to School

Connor Sullivan

PARKER: Program seeks to pass on knowledge

An art exhibition by students of the School of Art and Art History will take place 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art’s Sandy Bell Gallery.

Tuesday, January 17, 2012 •

Bicycles left chained to campus racks during winter break may have been claimed by OU Facilities Management to conserve space for this semester, the department’s director said. Though his department may have removed the bikes from the racks, any bicycle removed from a rack can still be claimed, Facilities Management director Brian Ellis said. “We received a tip that highly popular areas — Sarkeys [Energy Center] and Bizzell

[Memorial] Library — have bikes that are left unattended and have been stripped of parts and have just been left,� Ellis said. “Those bikes that we see, we pick up and hold them until they are claimed by owners or we put them in a sale.� Before bicycles are moved by university employees, a notification is placed stating that if it isn’t claimed, it will be held by Facilities Management, Ellis said. The university undergoes this process to ensure space is available at campus bicycle racks. Bicycles can be claimed by contacting Facilities Management, but those that are not claimed are placed in a sale held in the last week of November.

AT A GLANCE How to claim your bike To claim a bicycle, contact Facilities Management Lost & Found at the Facilities Management Customer Service area at 160 Felgar St. or call 405-325-3060. Source: Facilities Management

Rick Patino/The Daily

A bike lies on the ground outside Kauffman Hall on Monday. Many students abandon bikes on campus and at local apartment complexes when they return home during breaks.

OU STUDENTS YOU ARE INVITED! President’s Associates Dinner

Mauro Vieira

Brazilian Ambassador to the U.S. His Excellency Mauro Vieira, Brazilian Ambassador to the United States, will speak about urban development in Brazil. His career includes diplomatic assignments and domestic roles in Brazil. Prior to being appointed Ambassador to the United States, Vieira was the Brazilian Ambassador to Argentina from 2004 to 2009.

6 p.m. - Reception 6:30 p.m. - Dinner and Keynote Address Monday, January 30 Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History

Because of the venue, space will be limited. Reservations will be accepted as they are received. ON CAMPUS CORNER 730 Asp Ave. Suite 210 Norman, OK 73069

Please respond by calling the Office of Special Events at 325-3784 or email specialevents@ou.edu. For accommodations on the basis of disability, call the Office of Special Events at (405) 325-3784. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution.


4

• Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Each day in this space, The Daily features a comment of the day from OUDaily.com. Visit our website to create your account and join the conversation today.

OPINION EDITORIAL

Find your voice at The Daily Our View: Working for The Daily gives students a chance to gain hands-on experience and have an impact on campus.

college newspapers and professional, non-collegiate newspapers. And we were one of only four college papers in the country to be named Columbia Scholastic Press Association Crown It’s the start of a new semester, which means stu- Award finalists for both semesters of the last acadents are looking for more ways to be involved on demic year. campus. It also means many of the more than 400 But working at The Daily is more than just anothstudent organizations on campus will be er way to get involved and polish up that out in full force recruiting new members. resume — it is a chance to do those things The Our View So, here’s our pitch: is the majority in a meaningful way. It is a chance to affect Come work for The Daily. All of our secopinion of campus, to keep students informed about tions — campus news, sports, life & arts, The Daily’s news that matters and to tell the stories 10-member opinion, photography, copy editing, dethat might otherwise be ignored. editorial board sign, multimedia, and online — are looking It is important for students to know what for new interns. is being done with their tuition money and We need people interested in writing, what decisions are being made by the public offiphotography, design, illustration and editing. We cials who represent them or make decisions about need people from all majors and all backgrounds to them. Every Daily employee, from reporter to dehelp make a diverse staff with many different points signer, plays a role in making this possible. of view. So come take advantage of this exciting and chalAt The Daily, you will get hands-on experience lenging opportunity. Come work with a dedicated, and the opportunity to learn new skills. You’ll be talented and — if we do say so ourselves — fun staff working and learning alongside other students of fellow students. Come get involved in a way that with similar goals. The Daily is entirely student-led will affect campus and impact the lives of thouand student-operated, giving those who work here sands of Sooners. a unique level of freedom and accountability. And If you are interested in finding out more informaeventually, you could have the chance to get realtion or applying for a position, email the managing world managerial experience as a section editor. editor, Chase Cook, at chaseacook@gmail.com. No matter the position, working here is a real job Or, come visit us in person at our open house startthat teaches and utilizes real skills. Because The ing at 6 p.m. January 27 in The Daily newsroom in Daily is a real newspaper. Copeland Hall. And our success reflects that. The Daily consistently ranks well in national contests against Comment on this at OUDaily.com

COLUMN

Take food facts with grain of salt

S

OPINION COLUMNIST onic’s latest commercial advertising popcorn chicken speaks volumes about America’s general ignorance about the food they’re consuming. Remarks the candid and quite confused car passenger while at the drive-in, Kayley Gillespie “The kernels must be huge.” kayley.m.gillespie-1@ou.edu His friend in the driver’s seat asks, “What kernels?” The passenger replies, “The kernels they pop to get the popcorn chicken.” A “chicken-cob” is even referenced. True, it’s not popcorn, and the chicken isn’t “popped,” obviously, but this 30-second clip truly satirizes the American condition when it comes to food. We eat, then ask questions later, if we ask them at all. What is the popcorn chicken, apart from 65 milligrams of cholesterol, 1,890 milligrams of sodium and at least a half gram of trans fat? The inarticulate passenger may have assumed a character for comic effect in the commercial, but his confused brow and oblivious attitude is that of every American who is persuaded into consuming what is generally equated with “unhealthy” but fatefully unrelated with poison. This is in light of the New Year, when many Sooners will make resolutions to eat healthier and make smarter choices. Such decisions are hard to make when the cryptic food industry tells half-truths about a product and hides behind confusing ingredients like “maltodextrin” and “artificial flavors.” Politicians, lobbyists and corporate interests indirectly dictate the Food and Drug Administration’s guidelines so much that even if you viewed Sonic’s (or any other restaurant’s) nutrition guide, you wouldn’t get half the picture. For example, four ounces of Sonic’s popcorn chicken reportedly have zero grams of trans fats, while a six-ounce serving, according to the guide, has half of a gram of trans fats. Of course, this is mathematically impossible. According to the FDA’s website, it is reported this way because if a food contains less than one half a gram of trans fats, not only is it legal to refrain from reporting the actual amount of trans fats that the product contains, but the company actually can report the product has zero grams of trans fat. Trans fats, remember, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, are hydrogenated oils that result from processing liquid oils to semi-solid fats, improving the shelf life of food but also causing life-threatening illnesses such as heart disease. Sonic is by no means the only restaurant committing such health sins. Fast-food chains, restaurants and even grocery store aisles are suspects in the crimes committed against our health. Our very own Oklahoma Memorial Union houses many restaurants guilty of serving products that are less than natural and hardly healthy. Housing & Food’s nutrition calculator is a great tool to battle the nonhealthful ingredients and additives that are in the food you may order today — but only if you plan on Googling half the ingredients. Take a look at Crossroads’ honey BBQ wings, which contain sodium phosphates, propylene glycol alginate and natural flavors, to name just a few ingredients. It’s hardly a

Chris Lusk Chase Cook James Corley Laney Ellisor Greg Fewell Lindsey Ruta

contact us

Editor in Chief Managing Editor Night Editor Campus Editor Sports Editor Life & Arts Editor

PROVIDED

The nutritional facts for a chicken sandwich meal with waffle fries and a Coke students could order from Chick-fil-A in Oklahoma Memorial Union.

surprise the two former ingredients are engineered, but you may be surprised to learn that “natural flavors” are hardly natural, as they can be derived in a number of ways in a lab from a spice to a meat product. By the way, the wings also include just five grams shy of the recommended daily allowance for fat, half of your daily calories, more than two-thirds of your daily cholesterol and more than half of your sodium intake, assuming that you’re following the 2,000-calorie diet recommended to most Americans who read the side of their cereal box. The stupefied Sonic customer in the commercial may seem confused, but, even so, he is no less inclined to eat his chicken, relishing his brown-bagged meal down to, presumably, the smiley-faced sticker placed on the bag. Don’t be the Sonic guy — inquisitive yet careless. We all know that there’s only one Oklahoma, but remember, too, that you only have one body to nourish. Let’s all begin the new year with our health in mind. Kayley Gillespie is a literature and cultural studies junior.

Mary Stanfield Kingsley Burns Melodie Lettkeman Ana Lastra Katherine Borgerding Kyle Margerum

160 Copeland Hall, 860 Van Vleet Oval Norman, OK 73019-0270

phone:

405-325-3666

Opinion Editor Visual Editor Photo Chief Multimedia Chief Online Editor Copy Chief

email:

dailynews@ou.edu

?

Mary Stanfield, opinion editor dailyopinion@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

» Poll question of the day Do you read the nutritional information on the food you eat?

To cast your vote, visit COLUMN

Abstinence doesn’t have to tie into faith

I

wear a ring on my OPINION COLUMNIST right hand. It is not my class ring. It is not an engagement ring. It is not even a cute ring that just so happens to go with my outfit. I do not wear it to make me look cool or Kimm Johnson pretty. In fact, I wear this kimm.johnson@ou.edu ring on my right hand as an icon of my rebellion against doing what society wants because society wants it. I wear this ring on my right hand to represent the fact that I am not going to have sex until I am married. Whoa, I just admitted to about 20,000 people that I am a virgin. This is by choice and without an ounce of shame or pride. Trust me, it’s a scary thing to tell the whole world, but it shows how my view of my virginity has changed. When I decided to make this commitment, I thought about it. And I — yes me, not the church, not my family, but I — decided this was the right path after a couple of years of high school. For a while, I let this choice change me; I found my identity in it, but I’ve grown past that. I refuse to define myself by my sex life or lack thereof, and no one else should define me that way, either. Everyone is worth more than that. Abstinence is not for everyone, I know, I’m not “Is it hard? I would naïve. If people want to have definitely say sex, I have no problem with it. I will even go get them yes. I’m a little those free condoms from bit embarrassed the OU Women’s Outreach to talk about my Center. Yay for safe sex! I do not think I am any better sex life, or lack than anyone else just beof a sex life, with cause I refrain from having others, because I sex. I know some people worry that they will areYet, sitting around reading view it as strange this and thinking that staying or assume things a virgin until marriage is impossible or wondering why I about me based on would do this to myself. Well, this choice.” for me, I want to know that the person I’m going to have sex with is stuck with me for the rest of our lives. Call me crazy or a hopeless romantic, but that is why I do it. Is it hard? I would definitely say yes. I’m a little bit embarrassed to talk about my sex life, or lack of a sex life, with others, because I worry that they will view it as strange or assume things about me based on this choice. Still, I stick with it because I have met people who have persevered in this goal, and I find them inspiring. It goes to show, for me at least, that there are people out there who are living in these ways that are not considered “normal,” and they’re doing perfectly fine. Not everyone is doing the same thing. Not everyone is in the same boat whether it is about sexuality or just the way they live their lives . Through all of my experiences, I have learned to stay loyal to my convictions, no matter what the crowd may think. I know if I do that, I can do anything. Because when I am out in the big bad “real world,” trying to find life-long friends, a career or a husband, all the things that seem like the end of the world right now — like people judging my non-sex life — will be the least of my concerns. It’s your life; do or don’t do who you want. Kimm Johnson is an environmental design sophomore.

Do you have thoughts and views about issues affecting the university community? The Daily is searching for opinion columnists. Email dailyopinion@ou.edu to apply.

The Oklahoma Daily is a public forum, the University of Oklahoma’s independent student voice and an entirely student-run publication.

Columnists’ and cartoonists’ opinions are their own and not necessarily the views or opinions of The Oklahoma Daily Editorial Board.

Letters should concentrate on issues, not personalities, and must be fewer than 250 words, typed and signed by the author(s). Letters will be edited for accuracy, space and style. Students must list their major and classification. To submit letters, email dailyopinion@ou.edu. Letters also can be submitted in person Sunday through Thursday in 160 Copeland Hall.

Our View is the voice of The Oklahoma Daily Editorial Board, which consists of nine members of the editorial staff. The board meets at 5 p.m. Sunday through Thursday in 160 Copeland Hall. Board meetings are open to the public.

Guest columns are accepted and printed at the editor’s discretion.

One free copy of The Daily is available to members of the University of Oklahoma community. Because of production costs, additional copies may be purchased for 25 cents by contacting The Daily business office.


Tuesday, January 17, 2012 •

Life&arts

5

Lindsey Ruta, life & arts editor Mariah Webb, assistant life & arts editor dailyent@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

Review

2012 Golden Globes disappointingly average Life & Arts Columnist

Movie Preview

Upcoming flicks for 2012 hope to ‘wow’ audiences

W

ith the film industry awards season here, The Daily looks ahead to the most anticipated movies of 2012.

Life & Arts Columnist

‘Chronicle’ — Feb. 3 Besides a chilling trailer Steven Zoeller and some ominous poststevenvzoeller@gmail.com ers circulating online, there’s not much in the way of info about director Josh Trank’s first major film. But the premise is exciting by itself — three otherwise-unremarkable high school friends acquire telekinetic powers. They initially use the powers like any kids would — playing pranks and showing off to each other — until they begin take on darker projects. In a year of superhero sequels, this original tale is something to keep an eye on.

Mariah Webb mariahwebb@ou.edu

R

icky Gervais called it like it is on Sunday night: “Golden Globes are just like the Oscars without all that esteem.” In fact, one of the only reasons I tune in is to see which films may receive an Oscar nod. The other reason I tune in? Ricky Gervais. I must say I was very disappointed with the short leash the Hollywood Foreign Press had him on this year. After a large controversy with his hosting the event last year, many assumed he would never be asked back. He was; but I think perhaps the producers also may have forced him to wear a shock collar. (If the Hollywood Foreign Press Association is doing the shock collar thing, let’s try one for Madonna next year.) Apart from the beautiful crowd, highlights of the night were few and far between. This year’s Miss Golden Globe made me belly laugh as she waddled across the stage. She looked beautiful, but you’d think they might teach her how to walk in heels before putting her on national television. Other highlights included Antonio Banderas and Sofia Vergara yelling in Spanish and the cast of

‘The Hunger Games’ — March 23 Suzanne Collins’ books entranced young readers like no series has done since Harry Potter. Naturally, the release of the movie adaptation will be an event. We’re interested in how the casting will work in practice with Jennifer Lawrence and Josh Hutcherson in prominent roles. Hopefully it will live up to the books. Top: Golden Globe host Ricky Gervais speaks during the 69th annual awards Sunday in Los Angeles. This was Gervais’ third consecutive year to host.

The Associated Press

“The Artist” bringing Uggie the dog on stage after their win for best musical/ comedy. George Clooney spent more time talking about Michael Fassbender’s penis from “Shame” than he did thanking people in his acceptance speech for Best Actor in a motion picture drama for “The Descendants.” Overall, the Hollywood

Foreign Press Association produced an event that was exactly average. It was a safe, aesthetically pleasing award show. Had they been more daring in their approach to the host, perhaps it would have been one to remember.

9

OU Number Nyne Crisis Line

8 p.m.-4 a.m. every day

except OU holidays and breaks

325-5000 All calls are anonymous. The University of Oklahoma is an Equal Opportunity Institution.

Drama “The Descendants” Comedy/Musical “The Artist”

A CALL FOR PROPOSALS

325-6963 (NYNE)

Report Hazing.

AT A GLANCE Best Pictures

Mariah Webb is a University College freshman and the assistant life & arts editor.

crisis line

True Sooners Don’t Haze.

‘Twilight: Breaking Dawn, Part 2’ — Nov. 16 Plenty believe, not without reason, the Twilight Saga was the worst thing to ever befall mainstream entertainment. For those people, this final installment will be something like an exorcism — after this, the nightmare will finally be over. But for those of us who found the previous films ungodly funny — whether intentional or not — “Breaking Dawn” is our last chance to bask in the incredible cheesiness of this awkward love story. Steven Zoeller is a journalism sophomore.

help is just a phone call away

number

Left: Sofia Vergara (center left) and producer Steve Levitan accept the award Best Television Series-Comedy or Musical for “Modern Family” on Sunday night in Los Angeles.

‘The Dark Knight Rises’ — July 20 Christopher Nolan has yet to direct a bad movie, and from what we’ve seen of the sequel to 2008’s “The Dark Knight”, he isn’t about to break his tradition of quality. the prologue shown prior to More Online If“Mission Impossible: Ghost Visit OUDaily.com Protocol” is any indication, this for the full version film will up the ante where special effects are concerned and bring a new physicality to the franchise with the villain, Bane, played by Tom Hardy.

Ready for winter weather?

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e m o c l Back! We

The College of Art and Sciences welcomes back our students with free hot chocolate, cookies and a special gift!

Come by the Ellison Hall lobby from

9am until 4pm Tuesday through g Friday y

and enjoy a quick snack and drink, and pick up our exclusive Arts and Sciences lip balm!

Undergraduate Research Day 2012

Saturday, March 31, 2012 OCCE Thurman J. White Forum Building, 1704 Asp Avenue Deadline for submission is February 27, 2012 Apply online at h�p://www.ou.edu/honors/SRPD-applica�on.html Undergraduate Research Day is an annual event for undergraduate students to present their papers and crea�ve works. Topics include the natural sciences, performance art, life sciences, business, engineering, social sciences, cri�cal studies in ancient or modern literature, and the humani�es. Prose and poetry submissions and other forms of crea�ve ac�vity are also encouraged. Par�cipants will have a 10-15 minute period to give their presenta�ons. Prizes are awarded to the best presenta�ons in various categories. All undergraduate students at OU are eligible to apply and do not need to be a member of the Honors College to par�cipate. Students who have received undergraduate Research Opportunity Program grants are required to present before they graduate. Sponsored by The Joe C. and Carole Kerr McClendon Honors College


6

Life&Arts

• Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Student life

Students set unique resolutions I

t’s a new semester and a new year. With 2012 upon us, I’m sure many of you have set up your New Year’s resolutions. Typically, these goals involve health, money or stress-related “self-help” plans. The Huffington Post recently released its top five resolutions, and they follow this pattern . However, some students are branching out from the typical “new year, new me” norms. “One of my big New Year’s resolutions this year is to be more straightforward and to really go after what I want in life,” said Elyse Anderson, modern dance senior . She described her strategies for fulfilling her goals as small steps. “I’m going to audition for everything I can, take small risks every day in the studio, and if I don’t graduate with a job, move to a new city with enthusiasm, faith and courage,” she said. Civil engineering junior Dan Rhoades described a co-worker’s curious resolution to give no more courtesy laughs when someone tells a bad joke or story. Here’s to the awkward pauses sure to ensue this year. “One of my resolutions is to be happy, rather than focusing on things that might make me happy,” English junior Sarah Willis said. Photography junior Ryan Harris said his New Year’s resolution is to get his photography published in at least three publications. “I’m already confident in my art,” Harris said. “It’s really just a way for me to try and get my name in front of people and gain recognition.”

BY THE NUMBERS Resolution struggles

75%

of New Year’s resolutions are kept within the first week of the year.

71%

of New Year’s resolutions are kept within the two weeks of the year.

64%

of New Year’s resolutions are kept past the first month.

46%

of New Year’s resolutions are kept beyond six months.

8%

of people who successfully complete their resolutions.

31%

of all New Year’s resolutions are related to relationships. Source: University of Scranton Clinical Journal of Psychology

AT A GLANCE Top resolutions for 2012 Torin Halsey/Wichita Falls Times Record News

YMCA fitness instructor Crystal Amador leads an overall conditioning class using kettlebell weights that resemble a cannonball with a handle. Weight loss and fitness are consistently among the most popular resolutions made at the start of each year according to a study done by the University of Scranton.

“One of my big New Year’s resolutions this year is to be more straightforward and to really go after what I want in life. I’m going to audition for everything I can, take small risks every day in the studio, and if I don’t graduate with a job, move to a new city with enthusiasm, faith and courage.” Elyse Anderson, modern dance senior

These resolutions are definitely not the normal “lose 10 pounds” goals for the new year, but maybe

looking outside of the normal realm of resolutions can help the success rate of completing these goals.

“Psychology Today” reported that research shows that after six months, less than half of people who have set resolutions have kept up with their goals. The magazine also reported the self-help industry is worth about $2.5 billion, which means the tools are there, but there is something in the human brain that needs more than workout tapes, get out of debt books and miracle vitamins. The magazine

suggest that people need courage and determination in order to achieve their resolutions. As you kick off your new semester, perhaps creating new ways of thinking about goals or resolutions can help you stay on track with them beyond that fatal six months.

1. Lose weight 2. Get organized 3. Spend Less 4. Enjoy life to the fullest 5. Stay fit and healthy 6. Learn something exciting 7. Quit smoking 8. Help others 9. Fall in love 10. More family time

Westlee Parsons is an English literature senior.

Source: University of Scranton Clinical Journal of Psychology


Tuesday, January 17, 2012 •

CLASSIFIEDS

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POLICY The Oklahoma Daily is responsible for one day’s incorrect advertising. If your ad appears incorrectly, or if you wish to cancel your ad call 3252521, before the deadline for cancellation in the next issue. Errors not the fault of the advertiser will be adjusted. Refunds will not be issued for late cancellations. The Oklahoma Daily will not knowingly accept advertisements that discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, religious preference, national origin or sexual orientation. Violations of this policy should be reported to The Oklahoma Daily Business Office at 325-2521.

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Help Wanted ads in The Oklahoma Daily are not to separate as to gender. Advertisers may not discriminate in employment ads based on race, color, religion or gender unless such qualifying factors are essential to a given position. YOUR HOME CAN CAUSE TWICE AS MANY GREENHOUSE GASES AS A CAR.

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ENERGY STAR® is sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy.

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker January 17, 2012

4 5 7 9 6 3 4 8 2 1 7

5

7 2

2

3

9

5 7

3

1

3 8 4 5 8 6 1 2 9 4 6

Previous Solution 1 9 7 4 8 5 3 6 2

5 4 3 2 7 6 9 8 1

8 6 2 1 9 3 7 5 4

6 5 9 8 3 2 1 4 7

2 7 1 5 4 9 6 3 8

4 3 8 6 1 7 2 9 5

9 1 5 3 2 4 8 7 6

3 2 6 7 5 8 4 1 9

7 8 4 9 6 1 5 2 3

Monday- Very Easy Tuesday-Easy Wednesday- Easy Thursday- Medium Friday - Hard

Instructions: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. That means that no number is repeated in any row, column or box.

ACROSS 1 Half a 1960s foursome 6 Establish as the truth 11 Prohibition, for one 14 Rock concert venue 15 Fit for Muslim consumption 16 Woodpecker’s tool 17 Thrilled to no end 19 Like some martinis 20 Pageant bands 21 Thick and sticky 23 Puts on, as a show 26 Has control over 27 Golden Fleece carrier 31 Palindromic honorific 32 Fifth-century warrior 34 Futile 35 Trueheart of comics 37 Barrel slat 41 Blissful 44 Curriculum ___ (career summary) 45 Group of three singers 46 Firewood purchase 47 Worker among players 49 Quaint motel 50 “___ the

1/17

night before Christmas...” 51 Nutritional regimen 54 When kids get a break 57 Cattle contagion 59 Speaking with a grating voice 64 Vowelless degree 65 Thrilled to pieces 68 Poet Prior’s “prior” 69 Giant squid’s home 70 Blacksmith’s work site 71 Note after fa 72 “Vita” describer 73 Barely flows through the cracks DOWN 1 Butter servings 2 Opera feature 3 Lifter’s pride 4 Egyptian life symbol 5 Marketing data 6 Goal of some candidates 7 Spokenword genre 8 Martini must 9 Become invisible 10 Lodge fellows 11 Provide financial backing

12 TV staple 13 Immeasurable chasm 18 Country spread 22 Help for a spy 24 Performer’s promoter 25 Gut-related 27 Tel ___, Israel 28 Punjabi queen 29 Heart of the matter 30 Where many wish for peace 33 Employ 36 Rain alternative 38 Speak bluntly 39 Wang of wedding wear 40 Odds’ partners 42 Air show formation

43 Chief Japanese island 48 He reigned in Spain 51 Claire of “The Rainmaker” 52 Many a frosh course 53 Mertz or Kennedy 55 Do really well 56 Bottler’s offerings 58 Cathedral cross 60 “Rachel Getting Married” star Hathaway 61 Cut in half 62 Scissors’ sound 63 Aquatic shockers 66 “Fond du” finish 67 Next to nothing

PREVIOUS PUZZLEANSWER ANSWER PREVIOUS PUZZLE

HOROSCOPE By Bernice Bede Osol

Copyright 2012, Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 2012

It’s very likely that you will establish an extremely valuable ally in the year ahead who may be a bit older and more experienced than you, but with whom you will match up quite well. Together you’ll do some big things. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -Because you’ll innately understand certain things that aren’t necessarily obvious to others, trust your own instincts over the general consensus. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- For some strange reason, your sense of timing will be better than ever and could prove to be an enormous asset. When you feel the moment is right, play your trump cards.

1/16 12/12

2012Universal Universal Uclick ©©2011 Uclick www.upuzzles.com www.upuzzles.com

GLAD BAG By Alice Walker

PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Information you receive from a trusted ally could contain some hidden ramifications that require a great deal of thoughtful analysis. You should carefully evaluate everything. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- You may have to deal with some challenging developments, but you won’t have any trouble solving problems. You’ll perform best when working with your mind. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- It won’t bother you one bit if an idea or suggestion that’s offered by another is superior to anything you’ve thought of. In fact, you’ll welcome clever thinking of every stripe. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Being materially motivated will substantially enhance your

effectiveness and productivity. When you see a chance to make a dollar, you won’t hesitate to do what you must to earn it. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -Because you’re a good listener, you’re likely to pick up all kinds of bits of information that could collectively prove to be beneficial. Don’t ever stop learning. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- A situation that has been hanging fire for far too long can be successfully brought to a conclusion. If you see a sudden opening, act on it with boldness and alacrity. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -Upgrade that operation or endeavor in which you are presently involved the moment you get the chance to do so. Such an opportunity won’t come again soon. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- You could be exceptionally fortunate in your commercial affairs if you’re willing to act as soon as a likely opportunity manifests itself. Don’t sit around wondering if it’ll work -- just do it. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Good news that will substantially elevate your hopes and wishes is on its way, at long last. It will enable you do something you’ve thought about for a quite a while. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- You should closely listen to the advice of others about how to make or save money, but then follow whatever course makes the most sense to you. Pay the most heed to your own intuition.


8

• Tuesday, January 17, 2012

SPORTS

OUDaily.com ›› The No. 1-ranked Sooner men’s gymnastics team continues to roll with its most recent victory at the Rocky Mountain Open.

Greg Fewell, sports editor dailysports@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

basketball

Basketball

Sooners end threegame losing streak

BY THE NUMBERS Sooner hoops

Sooners hope for victory

18

OU prepares for tough conference

Oklahoma’s game back on track RJ Young

Sports Reporter

The buzzer sounded and the crowd applauded the Sooners for their effort and resolve, but mostly for the win — an 82-73 upset against then No. 18 Kansas State. OU players shook hands with the opposition as it made its way around the court, and smiles were in abundance. OU will need to carry that good feeling into its game against Texas Tech at 7 tonight at Lloyd Noble Center. Saturday’s win against the Wildcats ended a three-game losing streak for the muchimproved Sooner squad. Oklahoma coach L on Kruger said his team learned a lot about itself and what it takes to win in the Big 12 from previous losses. “As ugly as that was, as disappointing as that was, I think we have to learn from it,” Kruger said. “We came back and played a better half against Kansas, didn’t do what we wanted to at Stillwater. I think we learned from that.” Oklahoma (11-5, 1-3) already is three wins from matching its total for all of last season and is on pace to have its first winning season since 2008-09 — Blake Griffin’s last year in crimson and cream. Much of the change in the win-loss column and players’ attitudes can be attributed to Kruger and his staff. “This group right here, I love this group,” junior forward Andrew Fitzgerald said after his team defeated Kansas State. “I love this

K-State’s rank when OU defeated the Wildcats on Saturday in Norman. The win marked the first of the year for the team against a top 25-ranked opponent.

KEDRIC KITCHENS Sports Reporter

4

Number of victories OU needs to surpass last year’s win total. With just under half of the season remaining, the Sooners have 14 games to accomplish that goal.

group of guys and love the coaching staff. We have a lot of work to do, but I feel a lot of success is going to come our way because we put everything as a team out there and we play as hard as we can.” Oklahoma put on one of its best shooting displays of the season against K-State, shooting 54.9 percent from the floor. Kansas State coach Frank Martin acknowledged Oklahoma’s ability and effort after it dealt his men their fourth loss of the season. “You know, those kids are good,” Martin said. “They’re very well-coached, they have very good players and they came out today with a purpose.” Fitzgerald and junior forward Romero Osby combined for 39 points against Martin’s Wildcats, knocking down 15 of 18 shots. “It felt good to get that win,” Osby said. “That’s what we needed. We needed a boost in our confidence. We needed the taste of a win.”

Astrud reed/The Daily

Junior guard Sam Grooms drives past two Kansas State defenders en route to the basket during OU’s 82-73 victory over then No. 18 Kansas State Saturday, January 14, at the Lloyd Noble Center.

They’ll need to repeat their performance tonight against a Red Raiders team (7-9, 0-4) with the worst record in the Big 12. In his inaugural s eason, Texas Tech coach Billy Gillespie is being hit with

the whole of the kitchen — not just the sink. His last win came in 2011 against Southeastern Louisiana, and the Red Raiders are in the midst of a four-game losing streak. That being said, the

Sooners acknowledge they can’t take Tech lightly. “Even though they haven’t won a game (in Big 12 play), they’re still a good team,” Grooms said. “You can’t take things for granted in the Big 12.”

RENT

NOW SAVE

NOW

Who: All OU Students When: Thursday January 19, 1-5pm and Friday January 20, 7-11am Where: The Huston Huffman Fittness Center

University Bookstore Memorial Stadium

oklahoma.bkstr.com

/OUBookstore

*Savings based on total North American textbook rental savings vs new book price. Individual store savings vary by location. See store for details. 831/833JBTS12

What: A discount price for unlimted group fitness classes for the semester! How Much: $35/semester + tax (All other times $50/semester)

Fresh from a disappointing, last-minute loss in round one of Bedlam, the OU women’s basketball team heads to Manhattan, Kan., to take on the Kansas State Wildcats at 7 tonight. K-State is riding high after a victory against then-No. 10 Texas Tech, elevating the Wildcats to 4-0 in Big 12 play and No. 1 in the conference. Meanwhile, the Sooners are looking to improve their conference record to above .500. The team is currently even at 2-2 in conference play. The Wildcats, much like the Sooners, are led by strong guard play. Junior Brittany Chambers and senior Jalana Childs lead the way with 16.3 and 15.1 points per game, respectively. Both had big games against Texas Tech with Chambers turning in a double-double and Childs tying her career high with a 23-point performance. The Sooners will look for big per for mances from sophomore guard Aaryn Ellenberg and junior Whitney Hand. Both are climbing the ranks of all-time 3-pointers made at OU — Ellenberg at No. 7 with 137 and Hand at No. 10 with 128. The Sooners take on Kansas State at 7 tonight.


Campus

A

Tuesday, January 17, 2012 •

Meet the editors

ll right ... who is in charge of this publication, anyway? Well, there are nine student leaders at The Oklahoma Daily who are responsible for planning and producing the newspaper and OUDaily.com. If you have any questions about The Daily, these are the people you will want to speak with. Here is some brief information about each spring 2012 editor.

Name: Chris Lusk Title: Editor in Chief Class: journalism senior This is Lusk’s seventh semester at The Daily and second as editor in chief. He has previously worked as night editor, online editor and copy chief. Contact Chris Lusk at chris.m.lusk@ou.edu

Name: Chase Cook Title: Managing Editor Class: journalism junior

Name: James Corley Title: Night Editor Class: journalism senior

Name: Katherine Borgerding Title: Online Editor Class: journalism senior

This is Cook’s fifth semester at The Daily and third as managing editor. He was summer 2011 editor in chief.

This is Corley’s sixth semester at The Daily. He has previously worked as sports editor, assistant online editor and a sports reporter.

This is Borgerding’s third semester at The Daily. She has previously worked as life & arts editor and a news reporter.

Contact Chase Cook at chaseacook@gmail.com

Contact James Corley at jcorley@ou.edu

Contact Katherine Borgerding at k.borgerding@ou.edu

Name: Laney Ellisor Title: Campus Editor Class: professional writing junior

Name: Greg Fewell Title: Sports Editor Class: journalism senior

Name: Lindsey Ruta Title: Life & Arts Editor Class: journalism senior

This is Ellisor’s third semester at The Daily and first on the editorial board. She has previously worked as assistant managing editor.

This is Fewell’s fifth semester at The Daily and first on the editorial board. He has previously worked as assistant sports editor.

This is Ruta’s third semester at The Daily. She has previously worked as multimedia editor and summer 2011 photo editor.

Contact Laney Ellisor at laney@ou.edu

Contact Greg Fewell at greg_f@ou.edu

Contact Lindsey Ruta at lindsey.a.ruta-1@ou.edu

Name: Mary Stanfield Title: Opinion Editor Class: philosophy senior

Name: Kingsley Burns Title: Visual Editor Class: business senior

This is Stanfield’s fifth semester at The Daily and second as opinion editor. She has previously worked as an opinion columnist and a copy editor.

This is Burns’ second semester at The Daily. He has previously worked as photo editor for The Daily and for Sooner Yearbook.

Contact Mary Stanfield at stanfieldm@ou.edu

Contact Kingsley Burns at kburns@ou.edu

9


10

• Tuesday, January 17, 2012

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